Resume Format for Politician by yft85255

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									          ACT Grammar Review
One of the best things about the ACT English section is that the grammar topics are
limited. Below is a quick review of the different topics covered. This is not in test format.

Fragments and Run-On Sentences
Notes:

A comma is not enough to separate two complete thoughts.
What is enough? A dash, semicolon, make into two sentences, another word like and,
but, so, because…..

FANBOYS: For, And, neither, but, or, yet, so  all can be preceded by a comma




Directions: Mark the following sentences with a C for a correct sentence, F for a
sentence fragment, and R for a run-on sentence. For any run-on sentence, change the
sentence to make it correct.
    1. Although he had been an often decorated soldier during World War II and had
        fought many battles for the losing cause of liberalism in Congress. F
    2. This is going to be the most difficult exam of your college career; you had better
        start studying for it immediately. R
    3. Coach Espinoza really wants this job with Notre Dame University—she is very
        excited about returning to the college she graduated from. R
    4. Right after the Christmas holidays and during those three weeks before class
        begins in January. F
    5. She ran. C
    6. Perplexed by the rising rates of inflation and alarmed by the decline in major
        construction projects. F
    7. Anabel realizes what she is doing, I think, but she is doing it anyway. C
    8. Professor Pepin spends a lot of time translating medieval texts on ancient
        medicine. He also stays informed about the latest developments in modern
        asthma treatments. R
    9. He went to the conference. C
    10. As mentioned in the preceding letter. F
    11. Although we do not agree with your methods, we agree with your goals. C
    12. I am going to the office; you should call me if you have any problems. R
    13. Walk in a single- file line, please. C
    14. Running the car non-stop, she ran in and out of buildings on her way home. C
    15. Having prepared a speech and practiced it many times. F


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            ACT Grammar Review
Consistency
Notes:

Either use “one” or “you”
Tense has to be the same



Directions: Write corrections for the underlined phrases and words in the following
paragraphs.

Travel
When you get ready to travel, there are many things one has to[1] take care of in advance.
If you’re going outside the country, one[2] must plan ahead to ensure that you’ll get your
passport on time. Of course, there was[3] the packing to be done, though this can wait
until closer to your departure day. If you have pets, however, you should have thought[4]
ahead about a pet-sitter. There is, though, one thing you must do at the last minute:
Don’t’ forget to lock you door!

Preparing for a Test
When you prepare for a test one[5] should really think about what needs to be done ahead
of time. Make sure you allow yourself enough time to study all the subjects that might be
covered by the test. If one’s[6] teacher has given you a study guide, divide it into
sections; study each section separately, at first, each on a different day. Then, in the last
two days before the test, studied[7] all of the sections together. The night before the test,
sleep was[8] really important. By studying over time, you won’t need to stay up all night
cramming information; instead, you had[9] the time to get a good night’s rest and a fresh
start the next morning. Part of that fresh start should be a good and healthy breakfast. If
one follows[10] these rules, taking a test will become simple for you.

1.     you have to
2.     you
3.     is
4.     think
5.     you
6.     your
7.     study
8.     is
9.     will have
10.    you follow


                                              2
         ACT Grammar Review
Punctuation—Commas
Notes:


Commas come after a name when you are talking to the person named
Commas come before a quote and at the end of a quote if it does not end the sentence and
is not a question or exclamation.
Separate items in a list
Separate cities from states from countries from continents fro m worlds, etc.
Separates introductory phrase
Separates unnecessary phrases (I am in Tulsa, one of the greatest cities known to
mankind, eating a churro.)




Directions: Insert commas, where needed, in the following sentences.

   1. Beth Fine, the District-wide Coordinator of Special Education, is one of the most
       talented and dynamic administrators the school district has ever had.
   2. Luke, please put your dirty socks in the hamper and do not leave them on the
       couch any more.
   3. The delicious and refreshing fruit salad contained four types of berries: clam shell
       blackberries, blueberries, strawberries, and raspberries.
   4. Before walking out the door, Lana turned to Jack and said, “Drive safely and take
       good care of yourself.”
   5. On the ACT, unlike on the SAT, there are no sentence completion questions or
       long double-passage reading selections.
   6. Luca, did you leave your pool towel at your friend’s house earlier today?
   7. Growing up, I frequently would be reminded of my well- intentioned mother’s
       favorite words of wisdom, “Waste not, want not” and “The early bird gets the
       worm.”
   8. Before leaving for the four-hour car ride, the family worked together to prepare
       and pack sandwiches, snacks, and a cooler filled with fruit and cold drinks.
   9. Now married for fifteen marvelous years, the couple met on September 9, 1989, at
       Bar Beach-Hempstead Harbor Park in Port Washington, New York.
   10. Situated at the end of the road, the white brick colonial, which is the largest house
       in Forest Court, has over 5,500 square feet of interior living space.


                                            3
         ACT Grammar Review
Colons and Semicolons
Notes:



Colons (:) are used:
  To start a list
  To introduce a quote

Semicolons (;) are used:
       To separate two independent clauses
       To separate items in a list that already have a comma in them (I have visited:
Denver, Colorado; Paris, France; and Sea of Tranquility, The Moon.)




Directions: Insert colons or semicolons, where needed, in the following sentences.

   1. Hilary loves field hockey; Corey is more into lacrosse.
   2. The play show times are: Thursday, 7:30 P.M.; Friday, 8:00 P.M.; and Saturday,
       8:30 P.M.
   3. The Quaker family owns five varieties of pets: dogs, turtles, cats, birds, and
       chinchillas.
   4. Ms. Jones went to the potluck dinner and brought the following: green bean
       casserole, a loaf of raisin bread, and a pumpkin pie.
   5. Miranda puts four types of berries in her fruit salad : strawberries, raspberries,
       blueberries, and blackberries.
   6. Perplexingly, the treasure hunt map indicated three destination points : Laurel
       Lane, 3 miles east of Hillside; Maple Court, 2 miles north of Marcus; and Nassau
       Road, 7 miles west of Serpentine.
   7. “The early bird gets the worm” works nicely along with one of my other favorite
       sayings: “no use being a day late and a dollar short.”
   8. Video games often get a bad rap, but some can argue that they have three
       redeeming benefits: providing an outlet for downtime, encouraging game dialogue
       when not “in play,” and exercising eye- hand coordination.
   9. Only buy beverages that contain natural flavorings; avoid beverages that contain
       artificial sugars, color enhancers, and chemical additives that are hard to
       pronounce.
   10. Her words rang true to me: it is a gift for one to know what he is and is not good
       at doing.


                                            4
         ACT Grammar Review
Apostrophes, Dashes, and Hyphens
Notes:

Dashes are long lines (—)
Like the comma, it separates unnecessary or extra information from the rest of the
sentence
Also connects separate but emphatic information

Hyphens are short lines (-)
Connect the words “- in- law” “step- “
Connects numbered things to their numbers “fourth-grade” “five-year-old”
Connects a noun and verb to make a complete meaning “chocolate-flavored” “cake- like”
“smurf-oppressing”




Directions: Insert apostrophes, dashes, and hyphen marks where required.

   1. Diana’s father- in- law prepared a delicious Mediterranean egg salad that everyone
       enjoyed at the anniversary brunch, which was celebrated in honor of Diana and
       David’s five-year wedding anniversary.
   2. Foolishly, freshman Gus signed up for whichever classes met late in the day so he
       could sleep in—clearly, his priority was partying and not studying.
   3. Tango Mango and Green Worm are the fourth-grade boys’ favorite crayon colors.
   4. Cotton candy-flavored lollipops and chocolate- flavored licorice sticks were Grant
       and Zach’s favorite snacks while watching action-adventure movies.
   5. Melissa Blanca—one of the most amiable girls at the middle school—always
       offered a smile and friendly word to her friends.
   6. It has been said that one man’s trash is another man’s treasure—recycling
       belongings among friends testifies to the truth behind this saying.
   7. The chorus’ body movements, hand motions, and facial expressions made us feel
       like we were watching an off-Broadway show—not just listening to a bunch of
       youngsters singing!
   8. Getting ready for next weekend’s ski trip, Justina first borrowed Mia’s gloves,
       then she borrowed Paula’s scarf—one can’t help but wonder what Justina will
       borrow next?
   9. Hannah’s recipe for thick, cake- like brownies is much better than Lina’s recipe—
       Lina’s always turn out rather flat, gooey, and sticky to the touch.
   10. A traditional summer—sleeping late, taking a ride to the beach, hanging with
       neighborhood friends—is what most appeals to the family this year.



                                            5
         ACT Grammar Review
Pronouns
Notes:
Which is only used for non-human or inanimate objects
Use Who if the right pronoun would be he or she
Use Whom if the right pronoun would be him or her

If you would not say “me am going” then do not say “me and Jennifer are going”
If you would not say “he gave it to she” then do not say “he gave it to both katheryn and
she
Number is important: he/she/it are singular, they is plural only.

Directions: Find the pronoun in the sentence and underline it. Mark the sentence with a
C if it is correct. If it is incorrect, correct the pronoun usage.

   1. My mother and her work friends, nurses in a large emergency room, have many
       interesting stories about their experiences. C
   2. Some of these stories are about the challenges patients face, but some of the
       funniest stories are about interactions she and the other nurses have with various
       staff members.
   3. Whenever Mom and I have friends over at the same time, my friends and I always
       wind up laughing at the things we hear.
   4. The story about the doctor who thought his cell phone had been “borrowed” by a
       nurse was hilarious.
   5. Mom and her friends have given us teenagers some good advice: One should not
       go into the medical field if one doesn’t have a good sense of humor.
   6. We must be respectful in this class, or the teacher will give us detention. C
   7. Kevin and I are going skating tonight. C
   8. The guests said they were thankful for the help that we volunteers provided. C
   9. Ginny told me there was no need to return the book to her. C
   10. Can you believe my parents said they will give us the car for the weekend? C

Directions: Circle the correct word in the following sentences.

   1.  My brother, who/whom attends the state university, is majoring in history.
   2.  The singers, who have trained in opera, have taken its/their place on the stage.
   3.  The baby, who/which is only nine months old, has already started walking.
   4.  A public speaker should keep in mind the audience who/whom she is addressing.
   5.  At the break of dawn the newscasters review her/their script for the morning
       broadcast.
   6. The company president is the person which/whom you need to contact.
   7. The principal said that all students who/whom skip the rally will get a detention.
   8. The boys ate sandwiches for not one of them would put salad in his/their mouth.
   9. The head librarian is the one to which/whom you must send your resume.
   10. The painting of which/whom I write is the work of an unknown genius.


                                            6
         ACT Grammar Review
Verbs
Notes:




Directions: Check the following sentences for subject-verb agreement. If they disagree,
correct the sentence.

   1. The potted red geraniums that line the driveway bloom all summer long.
   2. The basket of dried fruits, nuts, and carob chips was passed around the patio table
       several times.
   3. Around the bases of the baseball diamond run the soccer players, conditioned
       athletes whose speed and agility attest to their training.
   4. My aunt or my uncle is arriving by train today.
   5. Neither she nor I am going to the festival.
   6. Either Kiana or Casey is helping get everything decorated.
   7. A car and a bike are my means of transportation.
   8. The politician, along with the newsmen, is expected shortly.
   9. Neither Jenny nor the others are expected soon.
   10. Each of the girls is finished with her exams.

Directions: Write an F next to any sentence that is a fragment. Write a C beside any
sentence that is correct.

   1. The cat sleeping in the hottest part of the day. F
   2. I am getting so excited about this weekend! C
   3. The dog was twitching her nose toward the savory smells emanating from the
      kitchen. C
   4. My mother swinging on the porch swing while the children played in the front
      lawn. F
   5. Singing a lullaby, the mother put her child in his bed. C


                                           7
         ACT Grammar Review
Modifiers
Notes:




Directions: Select the correctly written sentence in each sentence pair.

1. a. Spending way too much money on his old car, Fred’s salary just wasn’t enough.
    b. Spending way too much money on his old car, Fred found he’d used up his salary.
2. a. To become a respected politician, one must administer campaign funds carefully.
    b. To become a respected politician, campaign funds must be administered carefully.
3. a. I like to listen to rock music doing my homework.
    b. I like to listen to rock music while I do my homework.
4. a. The soccer team only won four games in the last three years.
    b. The soccer team won only four games in the last three years.
5. a. Without a plan for the weekend, we decided to go to the movie.
    b. Without a plan for the weekend, a movie sounded like a good idea.
6. a. The children were delighted by the monkeys swinging wildly through the trees.
    b. Swinging wildly through the trees, the children were delighted by the monkeys.
7. a. Of all my friends, I think Joe is the most likely to become a doctor.
    b. Of all my friends, I think Joe is more likely to become a doctor.
8. a. Caitlyn drove careful on the highway.
    b. Caitlyn drove carefully on the highway.
9. a. I am certainly that the show starts at 8:00.
    b. I am certain that the show starts at 8:00.
10. a. Sonnesh is extremely happy.
    b. Sonnesh is extreme happy.


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