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									                     Presidential Greeting
As a former resident of the Lone Star State, it is my pleasure to welcome y’all to
Texas and to the 31st Annual Conference of the American Society for Laser
Medicine and Surgery. The ASLMS Program Committee led by Dr. Serge Mordon has
assembled an excellent program of educational sessions to stimulate thought and
to generate idea sharing.

The ASLMS organization and therefore its Annual Conference are unique in their
multi-disciplinary nature. The fundamental purpose of the ASLMS and its Annual
Conference is to provide a forum at which a multi-disciplinary array of scientists,
clinicians, students, health care professionals and industry representatives can
learn, share, investigate and create ideas, the outcomes of which are clinical
applications that can and have changed the world of patient care.                        E. Duco Jansen, Ph.D.


Whether this is your first or thirty-first Annual Conference, you have the opportunity to participate in the
exciting exchanges of information and ideas which will challenge you to grow professionally. I encourage
you to both gather and share information, as the success of the Annual Conference can only be fully
realized through the sharing of ideas and expertise by all conference attendees.

Take advantage of all the activities described in this program. It’s a short 3-day conference; you can catch
up on your sleep on the flight home. ASLMS conducts ongoing participant evaluation surveys during and
after the conference to gather feedback. We encourage your completion of these surveys and look forward
to your feedback as that is how we will improve future conferences.

Saddle up and get ready to participate in three days of exciting professional growth.



E. Duco Jansen, Ph.D.
President


                            Important Dates & Deadlines
2011 Member-Get-A-Member Program Deadline                        2012 ASLMS Annual Conference
              July 31, 2011                                           April 18 – April 22, 2012
                                                            Gaylord PalmsTM Resort & Convention Center
    2012 Abstract and Travel Grant Deadline                                Kissimmee, FL
               October 17, 2011
                                                                 2013 ASLMS Annual Conference
  ASLMS Research Grant Application Deadline                               April 3-7, 2013
               January 9, 2012                            Sheraton Boston Hotel/Hynes Convention Center
                                                                           Boston, MA
 Dr. Horace Furumoto Innovations Professional
         Development Award Deadline
                January 31, 2012
                                                                          2011 Annual Conference
                                                                          Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                          Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                          Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                          Grapevine, TX




                          Program Chair Greeting
 Welcome to the ASLMS 31th Annual Conference. Each Annual Conference provides
 an opportunity for sharing the new scientific developments and clinical
 applications in light based and related technologies.

 This year’s conference has labored to keep the best of past conferences while
 incorporating new courses, new sessions and new expert panels.

 The 2011 Annual Conference, with more than 250 scientific presentations,
 addresses experimental and translational research, cutaneous laser surgery,             Serge R. Mordon, Ph.D.
 photobiomodulation, surgical applications and interstitial laser therapy. Further,
 course content reflects multiple specialty areas, including oncology, dermatology,
 plastic surgery, otolaryngology, urology, nursing and allied health, among others. Lastly, a session is
 dedicated to international experiences in order to open the ASLMS to medical laser societies outside the
 United States.

 We are also excited to announce that our Keynote Speaker is Neil R. Ogden, Chief, General Surgery Devices
 Branch, Division of Surgery, Orthopedic, and Restorative Devices at the Office of Device Evaluation, Food
 and Drug Administration. His expertise encompasses light based devices, and particularly surgical laser
 systems. Mr. Ogden’s lecture will discuss how FDA relates to practicing physicians, researchers and
 industry in terms of current light device issues.

 The variety of learning opportunities we’ve put together for you this year are intended to foster a spirit of
 collaboration while demonstrating the ASLMS’s extraordinary commitment to excellence.

 Another goal of this Annual Conference is to bring to clinicians, scientists, health care professionals, laser
 technicians, students and industry representatives a unique occasion to grow professionally and connect
 with colleagues from around the world.

 We do hope that you will enjoy your time at this Annual Conference and we strongly encourage you to
 contribute your expertise and perspective to the sharing.




                                        Thank You
The ASLMS would like to thank Dr. Howard Schlossberg, Program Manager at the Air
Force Office for Scientific Research for the grant to the Society which allows the ASLMS to
support graduate student and postdoctoral fellow attendance at our Annual Conference.




 2
                                                                        2011 Annual Conference
                                                                        Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                        Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                        Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                        Grapevine, TX




                        What’s New for 2011!
ASLMS is the leading medical Society in the field of laser and energy-based treatment, and the only one
that is truly multidisciplinary. We are a diverse organization, with much to teach and learn from each
other.

Keynote Speaker. Neil R. Ogden, Chief, General Surgery Devices Branch, Division of Surgery, Orthopedic
and Restorative Devices, Office of Device Evaluation, Food and Drug Administration. Plan to attend the
Plenary Session on Friday, April 1, 2011 to hear Mr. Ogden's lecture on "Light, Science, Medicine, and the
FDA”.
Complimentary lunch Friday and Saturday with ticket in the Exhibit Hall with Paid Conference
Registration.
Course On-Site Registration yields an e-link to electronic course materials. IKON Office Solutions (Business
Center at the Gaylord TexanTM) has computers and printing available at the attendees’ expense.
Optional Knowledge Based Exam following the Fundamentals of Lasers in Health Care Course will be
offered FREE to individuals attending the full two-day Fundamentals Course.
Scar Revision luncheon will provide an understanding of the options for the management of scars utilizing
lasers and related energy devices.
Acne Treatment luncheon experts will discuss the different light therapies used for acne treatment.
Interstitial Laser Therapy Session combined with the Surgical Applications session will be focused on ILT
which is becoming a very attractive procedure with lower rates of infection than open surgery and more
acceptable aesthetic results have been reported.
PDT: Principle and Clinical Role Course will address therapy fundamentals/basic science, rationale,
clinical outcomes, morbidities, treatment procedure and clinical data collected from peer-reviewed
publications.
ILT: Principle and Clinical Role Course will address ILT and laser ablation or tissue destruction methods,
best use and application practices and reviews existing and recent evidence regarding clinical practice.
International Experience in Lasers in Dermatology sessions will promote clinical and fundamental studies
on laser applications and related technologies.
Endovenous Laser Ablation Expert Panel will focus on ELA which is now the most widely accepted and
used treatment option for insufficient great and short saphenous veins.
PDT in Dermatology Expert Panel clinicians will share their extensive experience in photodynamic therapy
treatments for actinic keratoses, non-melanoma skin cancer, acne and other disorders.
Burns and Trauma Expert Panel clinicians will discuss how we can leverage multispecialty expertise to
provide trauma and burn survivor’s optimal functional and cosmetic care.
Cutting Edge “Translational Medicine” Session will continue the tradition of presenting high quality,
unbiased academic investigations into the development and application of lasers and related technology.
Cutting Edge “Laser and Skin” Session will stimulate the course attendees to question dogma and to
challenge our laser engineers to shatter conventional approaches. Although it might be difficult to predict
what changes will occur within the next several years, it is absolutely true that future directions and
discoveries will derive from our efforts to improve patient outcomes.




                                                                                                              3
                                                                           2011 Annual Conference
                                                                           Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                           Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                           Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                           Grapevine, TX



                           Dr. Horace Furumoto
                         Innovations Professional
                            Development Award
ASLMS is very pleased to administer the Dr. Horace Furumoto
Innovations Professional Development Award which memorializes
and honors Dr Furumoto’s genius and leadership in the development of
laser technology.

Through his excellent leadership and creativity, Dr. Furumoto
endeavored to develop laser technology for use in health care. This
award is designed to inspire others to enter the field, and continue the
development of laser technologies which promote excellence in                 Horace Furumoto, Ph.D. was born in
patient care by advancing biomedical applications of lasers worldwide.        Hawaii in 1933. Dr. Furumoto began his
                                                                              career in the sixties at AVCO in the laser
Throughout Dr. Furumoto’s outstanding career, he was highly regarded          weapons division, and then moved to
                                                                              NASA. He is credited with developing
for his dedication to and innovation in the development of laser
                                                                              the worlds first practical dye laser.
technologies. The criteria used to select the annual Innovations
Professional Development Award in Dr. Furumoto’s honor are based              In 1971, he founded Candela Laser
upon those personal characteristics which he exhibited.                       Corporation    and     developed    the
                                                                              extremely versatile flashlamp – excited
The annual Dr. Horace Furumoto Innovations Professional Development           dye laser (FEDL).
Award recognizes individuals who demonstrate a potential for                  In 1992 in collaboration with Wellman
contributing to and the dedication and creativity required to expand          Laboratories at Massachusetts General
the development of lasers in the health care enterprise.                      Hospital, Dr. Furumoto developed
                                                                              selective photothermolysis. Using this
In 2011, up to $5,000 may be awarded to an individual who is                  technology, he created devices that
identified as having the potential to substantially contribute to the         were used to treat birthmarks, kidney
                                                                              stones and glaucoma.
development and application of laser and related technologies in
health care. The award is provided to assist the recipient with               In 1991, Dr. Furumoto founded
continuing their professional development.                                    Cynosure, Inc.    He introduced what
                                                                              became the Photo-Genica series of
The ASLMS Awards Committee is charged with selecting an individual            lasers, and spearheaded the use of the
to receive the Dr. Horace Furumoto Innovations Award. The award will          long pulse alexandrite lasers for hair
                                                                              removal. Dr. Furumoto retired in 2003.
be made available each year; however, the Awards Committee has the
discretion to determine if an appropriate recipient has been identified.      Physics was Dr. Furumoto’s passion. He
The Awards Committee will make its selection using criteria which has         loved    the   process   of    thinking,
been developed by ASLMS in consultation with the award sponsors. The          calculating,    designing,     drawing,
Dr. Horace Furumoto Innovations Award recipient will be announced at          building, and testing ideas. During his
the ASLMS Annual Conference.                                                  career, Dr. Furumoto was awarded
                                                                              twenty-six U.S. patents and twenty-one
                                                                              international patents. He is considered
Nominations and applications for the Dr. Horace Furumoto Innovations          a pioneer in medical laser technology
Professional Development Award will be solicited from the membership          innovation.
of ASLMS and other individuals and organizations which are involved in
and/or support the continued development of laser and related                 In multi million dollar contracts and
technology in healthcare. The nomination/application deadline is              individual promises, Dr. Furumoto
                                                                              always delivered, contributing to his
January 31, 2012. The nomination/application form and supporting
                                                                              lasting reputation as a faithful, sincere,
instructions are available on the ASLMS Web site, www.aslms.org.              and trustworthy colleague, mentor and
                                                                              partner.

                                                                              Biographical information provided by Cynosure.
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                                                                         2011 Annual Conference
                                                                         Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                         Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                         Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                         Grapevine, TX



AWARD CRITERIA

The purpose of this award is to recognize individuals early in their career and to provide the recipient with
resources to continue their professional development. The award selection criterion focuses on the
individual’s demonstrated potential for leadership, innovation and desire for continued professional
growth. Evidence of the individual’s commitment and ability to participate in the continued development
of innovations in the areas of laser and related technologies are also important.

Consistent with the characteristics exhibited by Dr. Horace Furumoto throughout his career, candidates for
the Dr. Horace Furumoto Innovations Professional Development Award will exhibit one or more of the
following:
    •   Clearly defined professional development goals.
    •   Demonstrated interest, ability and/or evidence of having participated in the development of laser
        and related technologies for health care applications.
    •   Demonstrated commitment to the discipline of lasers and related technologies.
    •   Obtained appropriate professional education upon which to build additional professional
        development.
    •   Demonstrated ability to be an innovative leader.
    •   Demonstrated innovative approaches to clinical practice.

Candidates will be regarded by supervisors and/or colleagues as having the potential to be a “leader of
innovation” in the development of laser and related technology. Examples of evidence of high regard by
supervisors or colleagues include but are not limited to:
    •   Selection to be a presenter at national or international conferences.
    •   A history of having been awarded research grants to conduct laser and related technology
        development research, etc.
    •   Letters of recommendation supporting the individual’s potential for continued development.
    •   Acceptance into an organized continuing education program.

Recipients will be selected based upon evidence of one or more of these criterions.



The ASLMS would like to acknowledge and thank the following
companies who have provided financial support for this award.




           The recipient of the Fourth Annual Dr. Horace Furumoto
             Innovations Professional Development Award will be
                  announced during the Plenary Session on
                           Saturday, April 2, 2011.
                                                                                                               5
                                                                        2011 Annual Conference
                                                                        Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                        Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                        Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                        Grapevine, TX




ASLMS Keynote Speaker
Neil R. Ogden, Chief
General Surgery Devices Branch, Division of
Surgery, Orthopedic and Restorative Devices,
Office of Device Evaluation, Food and Drug
Administration                                                                                  Neil R. Ogden




“Light, Science, Medicine, and the FDA”
The ASLMS is pleased to announce that Neil R. Ogden, Chief of the General Surgery Devices, from the FDA
Office of Device Evaluation has agreed to serve as the keynote speaker at our 31st ASLMS Annual
Conference. Mr. Ogden’s lecture entitled “Light, Science, Medicine, and the FDA” is scheduled during the
Plenary Session in Longhorn F on Friday, April 1, 2011 at 11:00 am – 11:59 am. Mr. Ogden’s keynote
lecture will discuss how FDA relates to practicing physicians, researchers, and industry in terms of current
light device issues.

Mr. Ogden completed his undergraduate studies in biomedical engineering at Tulane University in New
Orleans in 1980. While working at Tulane University Medical School, he earned his Master’s degree in
biomedical engineering at Tulane University in 1985.

He became Peace Corps Volunteer with his wife Ellyn in Papua, New Guinea, New Ireland Province, 1987-
1989. Mr. Ogden enjoys international travel with his family having visited Australia, Belgium, Canada,
Germany, France, Greece, Guatemala, Italy, India, Mexico, South Africa, Switzerland, and Zimbabwe.

He worked briefly at the National Institutes of Health before joining the Food and Drug Administration in
1990 as a new scientific reviewer in the General Surgery Devices Branch, in the Office of Device Evaluation
in the Center for Devices and Radiologic Health. As a scientific reviewer, one of his areas of expertise was
light based device reviews with emphasis on surgical laser systems.

Mr. Ogden was selected as the Branch Chief for the General Surgery Devices Branch in December, 1998. As
Branch Chief, he has supervised hundreds of light based device reviews and final recommendations for
marketing which includes reviews of surgical lasers, IPLs, visible spectrum diagnostic devices (Melafind),
biostimulation lights, OCT systems, surgical lights, and other optical devices. During this period he has
received numerous awards for excellent job performance including the 2010 FDA Human Capital Investment
Award. He has written articles about device regulation which has been published in FDA Consumer, FDA
Today, and Seminars in Laparoscopic Surgery. He has also co-authored a chapter on FDA regulation in the
book, Cancer Principles and Practices of Oncology, 7th Edition.

He has broadened his professional experience over the past six years by working as Acting Deputy Division
Director in the Division of Cardiovascular Devices, the Division of Anesthesiology, General Hospital,
Infection Control, and Dental Devices, the Division of Surgery and Orthopedic Devices each in the Office of
Device Evaluation, and most recently the Division of Biology in the Office of Science and Engineering
Laboratories.


6
                                                                                      2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                      Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                      Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                      Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                      Grapevine, TX




                      Wednesday, March 30, 2011
                    A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses


6:30 am – 5:00 pm           Registration – Texas Ballroom Prefunction

6:30 am – 8:00 am           Continental Breakfast – Texas A

                       FUNDAMENTALS OF LASERS IN HEALTH CARE COURSE – Texas A
                                        Two Day Fundamentals Course #001
                                                    Day One Only #002
                                                    (Fee required to attend)

This course is intended for physicians and other clinicians, scientists, researchers, and laser and related technology industry
personnel who are considering entering or who have minimal background and experience in the field of laser and other light-
based technology and their application in health care.

8:00 am – 8:29 am           Introduction/Pre-Test

8:30 am – 9:29 am           Biophysics Principles

9:30 am – 9:44 am           Break

9:45 am – 10:44 am          Interaction of Tissue With Light Energy

10:45 am – 11:44 am         Laser and Light Energy Device Applications

11:45 am – 12:29 pm         CASH LUNCH - On Your Own

12:30 pm – 1:44 pm          Basic Laser Safety

1:45 pm – 2:29 pm           Treating Vascular Lesions and Port Wine Stains

2:30 pm – 2:44 pm           Break

2:45 pm – 3:44 pm           Hair Removal

3:45 pm – 4:44 pm           Fractional Ablative Skin Rejuvenation

4:45 pm – 5:00 pm           Q&A/Post-Test/Adjourn




                                                                                                                             7
                                                                                                 2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                                 Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                                 Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                                 Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                                 Grapevine, TX



                                Thursday, March 31, 2011
              A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses and luncheons

6:00 am – 6:00 pm            Registration – Texas Ballroom Prefunction

6:30 am – 8:00 am            Continental Breakfast – Texas Ballroom Prefunction


                                              FUNDAMENTALS OF LASERS IN HEALTH                          CLINICAL           NURSING/ALLIED
                                                   CARE COURSE – Texas A                              APPLICATION          HEALTH COURSE
                                                     (Day Two Only #003)                                COURSE              (All-Day Program)
                                                                                                      (Intermediate/         (Fee required to
                                                          (Fee required to attend)                                                attend)
                                                                                                         Advanced)
                                                                                                     (Fee required to
                                                                                                         attend)

7:30 am – 7:44 am                          Introduction/Pre-Test

7:45 am – 8:44 am                          Fractional Non-Ablative Rejuvenation                                           Nursing/Allied Health
                                                                                                     Resurfacing and
                                                                                                                          #004
                                           Tattoos, Pigmented Lesions, Melasma                       Contouring #005
8:45 am – 9:29 am                                                                                                         Texas 1&2
                                                                                                     Texas C
                                                                                                                          7:30 am – 4:30 pm
                                           Break                                                     8:00 am–12:00 pm
9 : 3 0 am – 9 : 4 4 a m                                                                                                  Business Meeting
                                                                                                                          4:30 pm – 5:00 pm
9:45 am – 10:29 am                         Treatment Complications Including Darker Skin

10:30 am – 11:29 am                        Body Sculpting Fundamentals

11:30 am – 11:44 am                        Q&A (Morning Session)

11:45 am – 12:30 pm                        CASH LUNCH – On Your Own

12:00 pm – 1:15 pm                         CASH LUNCH – On Your Own

12:15 pm – 1:15 pm                         • My Approach to Fractional Resurfacing #018 – Dallas 5-6
                           Luncheon With




(Fee required to attend)                   • My Approach to Skin Tightening Technologies #019 – San Antonio 5-6
                            the Experts




                                           • Practical Pearls to Optimize Clinical Outcomes – Laser/Light-Based Procedures #020 – Texas 6
                                           • Non-Invasive and Invasive Fat Removal #021 – Texas 5
                                           • Difficult Cases and Complications #022 – Grapevine 3
                                           • NEW – Scar Revision #023 – Texas 4
                                           • NEW – Acne Treatment #024 – Texas 3

                                                                                                       CLINICAL APPLICATION COURSES
                                              FUNDAMENTALS OF LASERS IN HEALTH                                 (Intermediate/Advanced)
                                                       CARE COURSE
                                                                                                              (Fee required to attend)

12:30 – 1:44 pm                            Lasers With Non-Device Skin Treatment Interventions       Laser Treatment of Vascular Lesions #006
                                                                                                     Texas C
1:45 pm – 2:44 pm                          Patient Selection/Relationship Building                   1:30 pm – 5:30 pm

2:45 pm – 2:59 pm                          Post-Test/Adjourn                                         Hair and Pigment Removal #007
                                                                                                     Texas D
3:00 pm – 5:00 pm                          Knowledge-Based Exam                                      1:30 pm – 5:30 pm




       8
                                                                                                                   2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                                                   Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                                                   Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                                                   Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                                                   Grapevine, TX



                                                                 Friday, April 1, 2011
                      A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses.


6:00 am – 6:00 pm      Registration – Texas Ballroom Prefunction

6:30 am – 8:00 am      Continental Breakfast – Texas Ballroom Prefunction

                                                                                          CLINICAL APPLICATION COURSES
                                                                                                   (Intermediate/Advanced)
                                                                                                   (Fee required to attend)

7:00 am - 10:00 am                                          Laser Treatment of Patients     Complications, Controversies, and        NEW: PDT: Principle and
                                                            of Color #008                   Legal Issues #009                        Clinical Role #011
                                                            Longhorn F                      Texas C                                  Texas 2-3


10:00 am – 10:30 am                                         BREAK/View ePosters – Longhorn D&E

10:30 am – 12:00 pm                                                         Plenary Session – Longhorn F (3-day conference begins)
                                                            Welcome & Introduction – Serge R. Mordon, Ph.D.
                                                            Presidential Address & Citations – E. Duco Jansen, Ph.D.
                        Exhibits Open – 9:00 am – 7:00 pm




                                                            Keynote Speaker
                                                            Neil R. Ogden, Chief of the General Surgery Devices, Food and Drug Administration



12:00 pm – 1:30 pm                                          Complimentary Lunch with Ticket in Exhibit Hall/View ePosters – Longhorn D&E

                                                                                                    BREAKOUT SESSIONS

1:00 pm – 2:45 pm                                           Experimental and     Cutaneous        Photobiomodulation      Surgical Applications    NEW-
                                                            Translational        Laser Surgery    Session                 and Interstitial Laser   Photodynamic
                                                            Research Session     Session          Texas 4-6               Therapy Session          Therapy
                                                            Texas C              Longhorn F                               Texas 2-3                Session
                                                                                                                                                   Texas D

2:45 pm – 3:45 pm                                           BREAK/View ePosters – Longhorn D&E

3:00 pm – 3:15 pm                                           EXPERT IN THE EXHIBIT HALL – Laser Safety – Merete Haedersdal, M.D. – Longhorn D&E
3:15 pm – 3:30 pm                                           EXPERT IN THE EXHIBIT HALL – The Cosmetic Consultation – Elizabeth L. Tanzi, M.D. – Longhorn D&E

                                                                                                    BREAKOUT SESSIONS

3:45 pm – 6:00 pm                                                                Cutaneous        Photobiomodulation      Surgical Applications    NEW-
                                                            Experimental and
                                                                                 Laser Surgery    Session                 and Interstitial Laser   Photodynamic
                                                            Translational
                                                                                 Session          Texas 4-6               Therapy Session          Therapy
                                                            Research Session
                                                                                 Longhorn F                               Texas 2-3                Session
                                                            Texas C
                                                                                                                                                   Texas D




                                                                                                                                                         9
                                                                                                                2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                                                Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                                                Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                                                Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                                                Grapevine, TX



                                                          Saturday, April 2, 2011
                  A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses.


6:00 am – 7:30 pm     Registration – Texas Ballroom Prefunction

6:30 am – 8:00 am     Continental Breakfast – Texas Ballroom Prefunction

                                                                                     CLINICAL APPLICATION COURSES
                                                                                                (Intermediate/Advanced)
                                                                                                (Fee required to attend)

7:00 am - 9:00 am                                         Student/Post-      Technologies for    Periorbital      Photography,       How to Use Optical
                                                          Doc/Resident       Fat Related         Therapies        Treatment          Diagnostics in Clinical
                                                          Opportunities      Disorders #013      #014             Documentation      Laser Medicine #016
                                                          #012               Longhorn F          Texas C          and Oversight      Texas 1
                                                          Texas 2-3                                               #015
                                                                                                                  Texas D

9:15 am - 10:10 am                                         NEW - Cutting Edge “Translational Medicine” Session – Longhorn F (2nd day of conference begins)

10:05 am – 10:30 am                                       BREAK/View ePosters – Longhorn D&E

10:30 am – 11:30 am                                                                      Plenary Session – Longhorn F
                                                          Presentation of Horace Furumoto Innovations Professional Development Award - TBA
                      Exhibits Open – 9:00 am – 7:30 pm




                                                          Caroline and William Mark Memorial Award – Franz Hillenkamp, Ph.D.
                                                          Ellet H. Drake Memorial Award – Dieter Manstein, M.D.
                                                          Leon Goldman Memorial Award – Stephen G. Bown, M.D., F.R.C.P.
                                                          Nursing/Allied Health Excellence Award – Faye M. Jenkins, R.N., B.S.N.

11:30 am – 12:00 pm                                       ASLMS Business Meeting (Members Only) – Longhorn F

12:00 pm – 1:30 pm                                        Complimentary Lunch with Ticket in Exhibit Hall/View ePosters – Longhorn D&E

1:00 pm – 2:45 pm                                         NEW – Cutting Edge “Laser and Skin” Session – Longhorn F

2:45 pm – 3:45 pm                                         BREAK/View ePosters – Longhorn D&E

3:00 pm – 3:15 pm                                         EXPERT IN THE EXHIBIT HALL – How to Thrive in a Difficult Economy – Paul M. Friedman, M.D. –
                                                          Longhorn D&E
3:15 pm – 3:30 pm                                         EXPERT IN THE EXHIBIT HALL – Laser and the Law – Mathew M. Avram, M.D., J.D. – Longhorn D&E

                                                                                                BREAKOUT SESSIONS

3:45 pm – 6:00 pm                                         Experimental and         Cutaneous Laser Surgery     Photobiomodulation      NEW - International
                                                          Translational Research   Session                     Session                 Experience in Lasers
                                                          Session                  Longhorn F                  Texas 4-6               in Dermatology
                                                          Texas C                                                                      Session
                                                                                                                                       Texas D




6:00 pm – 7:30 pm                                         Exhibitor Reception / Silent Auction


    10
                                                                                             2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                             Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                             Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                             Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                             Grapevine, TX



                                        Sunday, April 3, 2011
                 A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses.



6:30 am – 12:30 pm    Registration – Texas Ballroom Prefunction

6:30 am – 8:00 am     Continental Breakfast – Texas Ballroom Prefunction

                                                                                                                     CLINICAL
                                                                                                                   APPLICATION
                                                            EXPERT PANELS
                                                    (No additional fee required to attend)                           COURSE
                                                                                                                 (Intermediate/Advanced)
                                                                                                                 (Additional fee required)

7:00 am - 7:45 am     NEW - Endovenous Laser                     NEW - PDT in           NEW – Burns and          NEW - ILT: Principle
                      Ablation                                   Dermatology            Trauma                   and Clinical Role
                      Longhorn F                                 Texas D                Texas 4-6                Course #017
                                                                                                                 7:00 am – 10:00 am
                                                                 BREAKOUT SESSIONS                               Texas 2-3

8:00 am – 10:00 am                      Experimental    Cutaneous      NEW -            Photobiomodulation
                                        and             Laser          International    Session
                                        Translational   Surgery        Experience in    Texas 4-6
                                        Research        Session        Lasers in
                      Exhibits Closed




                                        Session         Longhorn F     Dermatology
                                        Texas C                        Session
                                                                       Texas D




10:00 am – 10:30 am                     BREAK – Texas Ballroom Prefunction

                                                                 BREAKOUT SESSIONS

10:30 am – 12:00 pm                     Experimental and               Cutaneous Laser Surgery Session
                      Exhibits Closed




                                        Translational Research         Longhorn F
                                        Session
                                        Texas C




                                                                                                                                   11
                                                                                  2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                  Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                  Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                  Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                  Grapevine, TX



                                  ePosters/Exhibits
Exhibit Hall/ePoster Viewing Hours:                                                                          Longhorn D&E

Friday, April 1, 2011 ........................................................................................ 9:00 am – 7:00 pm
Saturday, April 2, 2011 ..................................................................................... 9:00 am – 7:30 pm
Sunday, April 3, 2011 ............................................................................................ Exhibits Closed

Directors: Gregory T. Absten, B.Sc., M.B.A., C.L.R.T. (Exhibit Chair); Emil A. Tanghetti, M.D. (ePoster Chair)

Disclosures
Gregory T. Absten – No disclosure
Emil A. Tanghetti received equipment and a discount from Cynosure and Palomar


ePosters
Twenty viewing stations will be located in the Exhibit Hall. We have extended the lunch hour and breaks to
allow additional time for viewing ePosters and visiting with the exhibitors. No hard copy posters will be on
display. A maximum of 4 CME credits will be offered for viewing the ePosters.
ePoster Q&A
Each ePoster will include a tab labeled “Questions and Answers”. When the conference attendee clicks on
the Q&A tab, they will view a running list of questions along with each question’s corresponding answer
from the author. Additionally, there will be a button labeled “Submit a Question”. When the conference
attendee clicks this button, they will be provided with a form which has a blank area for them to type and
submit their question to the author. The system will update every morning at 6:00 am local time. All
questions and answers from the previous day will be posted to each ePoster. Also, the Q&A log will be
viewable in the post-conference online version, but the ability to ask questions will not be available in the
post-conference online version.
A REMINDER FOR CONFERENCE ATTENDEES TO PLEASE VIEW THE ePOSTERS AND PARTICIPATE IN THE
ASK eQUESTIONS AND RECEIVE eANSWERS PROGRAM.


                                     Experts in the Hall
Experts in the Exhibit Hall will give a five minute presentation followed by 10 minutes of questions and
answers. Following is a schedule of speakers, topics, and dates/times of presentations.


 Date                            Time                     Speaker                           Topic

 Friday, April 1, 2011           3:00 pm – 3:15 pm        Merete Haedersdal, M.D.           Laser Safety

 Friday, April 1, 2011           3:15 pm – 3:30 pm        Elizabeth L. Tanzi, M.D.          The Cosmetic Consultation

 Saturday, April 2, 2011         3:00 pm – 3:15 pm        Paul M. Friedman, M.D.            How to Thrive in a
                                                                                            Difficult Economy

 Saturday, April 2, 2011         3:15 pm – 3:30 pm        Mathew M. Avram, M.D.,            Laser and the Law
                                                          J.D.




12
                                                                       2011 Annual Conference
                                                                       Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                       Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                       Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                       Grapevine, TX




                       Silent Auction for Research
Annual Conference attendees can receive great deals on new medical laser equipment and supplies at the
31st Annual Conference. All net proceeds from the Silent Auction will be designated to fund research
projects designed to foster the development and use of lasers and other related technologies in medical
and surgical applications. Minimum bids start at 50% of total value.
Jason N. Pozner, M.D. Chair, ASLMS Silent Auction Task Force

6th Annual Silent Auction Schedule
March 31, 2011
Online bidding closes at 11:59 pm.
April 1, 2011
Annual Conference bidding opens in exhibition hall at 9:00 am to all conference attendees.
April 2, 2011
Annual Conference bidding closes at 7:00 pm. The names of winners will be announced at 7:15 pm. Items
that do not receive minimum bids will be available online for members on April 6, 2011.

Company                               Item Donated to Date                                            Estimated
                                                                                                        Value
Allergan                              Juvederm XC Ulta and XC Ultra Plus                              $ 3,350.00
R. Rox Anderson, M.D.                 Four hours of Stimulating Discussion with Dr. R. Rox               7,500.00
                                      Anderson
Mathew Avram, M.D.                    Engage in a One-day Observational Preceptorship with               2,500.00
                                      Dr. Mathew Avram
Buffalo Filter                        Surgical Smoke Evacuation System                                   1,500.00
Canfield Imaging Systems              PhotoFile Software                                                   825.00
CoolTouch, Inc.                       Two-Year Warranty for any CoolTouch Laser System                  10,000.00
Cynosure, Inc.                        Affirm Tips                                                        9,000.00
DEKA Medical, Inc.                    Bottles of Wine                                                      795.00
DermaNetwork.org                      DermaNetwork.org – Connecting Patients with Physicians             3,600.00
Ellman International                  $1,500 of Ellman International Products                            1,500.00
FotoFinder Systems, Inc.              FotoFinder Handyscope                                              1,490.00
David J. Goldberg, M.D., J.D.         One Day On-Site Observational Preceptorship                        2,500.00
Green Bay Packers/Milwaukee           Packer Autographed Football/Milwaukee Brewers – Two                  750.00
Brewers                               Club Level Seat Tickets
HOYA ConBio                           RevLite Q-Switched Nd:YAG One Year Laser Lease                    48,000.00
Incredible Marketing                  One Custom Complete Web site                                       8,995.00
Int’l Aes. and Laser Association      IALA Membership and Aesthetic Laser Procedures                     1,745.00
                                      Training




                                                                                                            13
                                                                      2011 Annual Conference
                                                                      Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                      Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                      Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                      Grapevine, TX




Company                              Item Donated to Date                                            Estimated
                                                                                                       Value
Lumenis, Inc.                        Dinner for Six at Quince www.quincerestaurant.com                  2,000.00
                                     Including Tip Tier Wine
                                     Private dinner at Dough Room of Flour and Water                    2,000.00
                                     Hotel Voucher                                                      1,000.00
                                                                                                        5,000.00
MedCo Data, LLC                      Charty Ready Scanning Solution                                     5,200.00
MedCo Data, LLC                      Workflow Centric Analysis                                          6,000.00
MJD Patient Communications           MJD Gift Certificate                                               1,000.00
NexTech Systems, Inc.                iPad 64GB with wi-fi                                                 750.00
Oculo-Plastik, Inc.                  One pr Durette® II External Laser Shield with OPSoft
                                     Laser Mouthguard (bag of 10)                                         339.00
                                     One pair Durette® III External Laser Shields with mobile
                                     plastic attachments, with OPSoft Laser Mouthguard (bag
                                                                                                          339.00
                                     of 10)
                                     One pair Durette® IV External Laser Shields with Mobile
                                     Metal Attachments, with OPSoft Laser Mouthguard (bag                 339.00
                                     of 10)                                                             1,017.00
Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc.   Palomar® Artisan™ Pulsed-light and Laser System                   90,000.00
                                     Including Pulsed Light MaxG™ Handpiece
PCA Skin                             PCA Skin In-Office Training Seminar                                1,500.00
PhotoMedex                           Neova Skincare Basket                                              1,000.00
Quality Medical Publishing (QMP)     Four Book Collection                                                 900.00
Quantum BioMedical, Inc.             Quantum WARP 10                                                      750.00
Rockwell Laser Industries            Medical Laser Safety Officer Course                                  895.00
Sciton, Inc.                         iPad wi-fi 32 GB from Apple with iTunes Gift Certificate           1,000.00
Ava Shamban, M.D.                    One-day On-Site Observational Preceptorship                        2,500.00
Solta Medical                        VIP Visit to Solta Medical                                         3,500.00
Surgeon’s Advisor                    In-depth Web Site, Social Media, Reputation, and                   1,500.00
                                     Internet Strategy Analysis
Syneron/Candela                      eMatrix Sublative Rejuvenation System and a Paul Reed             53,900.00
                                     Smith 513 Guitar
Syris Scientific                     Syris v600 Vision Enhancement System                               2,035.00
THE Aesthetic Guide                  Certified Aesthetic Consultant (CAC) Program (Practice)            3,500.00
The Patient’s Guide                  Patient’s Guide Calls                                              5,000.00
Ulthera, Inc.                        Ulthera DeepSEE Transducers                                       10,000.00
Zeltiq Aesthetics, Inc.              CoolSculpting eZ App 8 and 8 Cycle eZ Card                        16,500.00
Zimmer MedizinSystems                Zimmer Cryo 6                                                      8,995.00
Total Estimated Value of 2011 Silent Auction Donations To Date                                      $326,492.00
14
                                                                        2011 Annual Conference
                                                                        Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                        Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                        Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                        Grapevine, TX




Fundamentals of Lasers in Health Care Course
              Wednesday, March 30 – Thursday, March 31, 2011
A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses. CME credits and CE contact hours
available.

Fundamentals of Lasers in Health Care – Texas A                               March 30 - 8:00 am – 5:00 pm
                                                                              March 31 – 7:30 am – 3:00 pm
                                                                         Optional Knowledge Based Exam*
                                                                                      3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Directors: J. Stuart Nelson, M.D., Ph.D., David M. Verebelyi, M.D.

Faculty: Gregory T. Absten, B.Sc., M.B.A., C.L.R.T., R. Rox Anderson, M.D., A. Jay Burns, M.D., Jason N.
Pozner, M.D., E. Victor Ross, M.D., Emil A. Tanghetti, M.D., Elizabeth L. Tanzi, M.D.

ACCME Accreditation Statement
The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. is accredited by the Accreditation Council for
Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
Continuing Medical Education Credit
The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. designates this live activity for a maximum of 18.25
AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their
participation in the activity.
You will receive a statement of CME credit hours after the Annual Conference.
Continuing Education Credit
This offering by the ASLMS, in conjunction with Professional Medical Education Association is accredited for a
maximum of 19.5 contact hours. Professional Medical Education Association is approved by the California
Board of Registered Nursing, Provider # CEP 12386. Note: Most State Boards of Nursing accept another State
Board’s approval for granting credits. Check with the Board of Nursing in your state for clarification.
Certificates of Attendance will be provided. You will receive a statement of CE contact hours after the
Annual Conference.

Optional Knowledge Based Exam
Individuals who score a minimum of 80% will receive a statement from ASLMS acknowledging their
comprehension of the information provided in the course. All examination participants will receive their score.
This exam is offered at no additional cost to course participants*.
*Exam available only for those who register and attend both days. Previous Fundamentals or Irvine Aesthetics
course attendees have the exam only option available for a fee of $250.00.
   •   Prerequisite - Individuals who wish to take the exam only must have taken ANY previous 2-Day
       Fundamentals Course offering or attended the Aesthetics Laser Course held November 6-7, 2010 at the
       Beckman Laser Institute in Irvine, California.
   •   Pre-Registration Only. No walk-in's will be accepted for the exam only option.




                                                                                                             15
                                                                           2011 Annual Conference
                                                                           Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                           Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                           Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                           Grapevine, TX




Fundamentals of Lasers in Health Care continued – Texas A

Objectives: This course is intended for physicians and other clinicians, scientists, researchers, and laser and
related technology industry personnel who are considering entering or who have minimal background and
experience in the field of laser and other light-based technology and their application in health care. At the
conclusion of the course, participants will:
1.    Understand the biophysics pertinent to the application of lasers and other light-based energy devices and
      related technology, and will be prepared to apply this same understanding related to the provision of
      patient care.
2.    Understand the working parts of a laser and other light-based devices.
3.    Understand the interaction and implications of using lasers and other light-based devices and related
      technologies on human tissues and be capable of using this knowledge in the provision of patient care.
4.    Be familiar with a broad array of lasers and light-based devices used in the provision of health care
      procedures and be capable of determining which laser and/or light-based technology is most appropriately
      used for particular clinical procedures.
5.    Be introduced to the interactions of lasers and other light emitting devices and popular non device skin
      interventions (i.e., muscle relaxers and fillers, etc).
6.    Understand the legal issues associated with the use of lasers and related technology in patient care, and
      will be capable of using this knowledge to avoid any legal ramifications for themselves, their organization,
      and the patients for which they care.
7.    Understand the safety risks to providers and patients associated with the use of lasers and related
      technology, and understand and be capable of using this knowledge to practice the safety necessary to
      provide a safe environment for all providers and patients.
 8. Be capable of practicing good patient selection and properly preparing patients for treatment with light-
      based devices.
9.    Have sufficient exposure to a cross-section of clinical applications such that they are capable of using this
      knowledge to discern the clinical applications for which they may or may not choose to develop specific
      laser application skills.
WEDNESDAY MARCH 30, 2011 – Session Moderator: J. Stuart Nelson

8:00 am - 8:29 am         Introduction/Orientation/Pre-Test
8:30 am - 9:29 am         UNIT I - Biophysics Principles Pertinent to the Use of Lasers and Other Light Energy
                          Devices - J. Stuart Nelson
9:30 am - 9:44 am         Refreshment Break
9:45 am - 10:44 am        UNIT II - The Interaction of Tissue with Light Energy - J. Stuart Nelson
10:45 am - 11:44 am       UNIT III - Lasers and Other Light Energy Devices and Their Preferred Applications -
                          R. Rox Anderson
11:45 am - 12:29 pm       Cash Lunch – On Your Own
12:30 pm - 1:44 pm        UNIT IV – Basic Laser Safety Principles and Practices - Gregory T. Absten
1:45 pm - 2:29 pm         UNIT V – Treating Vascular Lesions and Port Wine Stains Using Laser and Other Light
                          Energy Technology - J. Stuart Nelson

2:30 pm - 2:44 pm         Refreshment Break
2:45 pm - 3:44 pm         UNIT VI – Application of Lasers and Other Devices for Hair Removal - David M.
                          Verebelyi
3:45 pm - 4:44 pm         UNIT VII – Fractional Ablative Skin Rejuvenation – A. Jay Burns
4:45 pm – 5:00 pm         Q&A/Post-Test/Adjourn


 16
                                                                                          2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                          Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                          Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                          Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                          Grapevine, TX




Fundamentals of Lasers in Health Care continued – Texas A

THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2011 - Session Moderator: David M. Verebelyi

7:30 am - 7:44 am              Introduction/Orientation/Pre-Test
7:45 am - 8:44 am              UNIT VIII – Fractional Non-Ablative Skin Rejuvenation - E. Victor Ross
8:45 am - 9:29 am              UNIT IX – Laser Treatment of Tattoos, Pigmented Lesions, Melasma - E. Victor Ross
9:30 am - 9:44 am              Refreshment Break
9:45 am - 10:29 am             UNIT X – Light Energy Based Treatment Complications Including Those for Patients With
                               Darker Skin Photo Types - E. Victor Ross
10:30 am - 11:29 am            UNIT XI – Non-Invasive and Invasive Body Sculpting Fundamentals - Jason N. Pozner
11:30 am - 11:44 am            Q&A – (Morning Session)
11:45 am - 12:29 pm            Cash Lunch – On Your Own
12:30 pm - 1:44 pm             Unit XII – Implications and Opportunities of Using Light Based Energy Technologies in
                               Combination With Non-Device Skin Treatment Interventions - Emil A. Tanghetti
1:45 pm - 2:44 pm              UNIT XIII – Patient Selection and Relationship Building Opportunities to Avert Legal
                               Issues –Elizabeth L. Tanzi
2:45 pm - 2:59 pm              Post-Test/Adjourn
3:00 pm - 5:00 pm              Administration of Knowledge Based Exam
Disclosures
Gregory T. Absten – No disclosure
R. Rox Anderson received royalties from Massachusetts General Hospital which owns and licenses patents on laser hair removal, fractional A.
Jay Burns received discount from Cutera, Cynosure, Palomar, Sciton, Zeltiq, and Zimmer; stockholder with Skin Medica and Zeltiq; research
grant from Solta, Uthera, and Zeltiq; honoraria from Sciton, Solta, Ulthera, and Zeltiq; medical advisory board for Ulthera and Zeltiq
laser treatments, and cryolipolysis; serves on scientific advisory boards for PhotoMedex and Ulthera
J. Stuart Nelson received equipment from Cynosure, Fotona, and Genentech; research grant from Syneron/Candela, New Star, Wyeth-Pfizer;
royalties from Syneron/Candela and New Star; honoraria/speaker from Syneron/Candela
Jason N. Pozner received equipment from DEKA, Elemé, Sciton, Syneron; consulting fees from Sciton, Syneron, and Ulthera; discount from
Alma and Zeltiq; stockholder with Sciton; research grant from Aesthera, Continuum Biomedical, Sciton, and Syneron; honoraria from Sciton,
Syneron, Ulthera, and Zeltiq
E. Victor Ross received financial grant and consulting fees from Palomar and Syneron; equipment from Cutera, Lumenis, Palomar, and Sciton;
research grant from Cutera, Palomar, and Syneron; honoraria from Cutera, Lumenis, Palomar, and Syneron
Emil A. Tanghetti received equipment and a discount from Cynosure and Palomar
Elizabeth L. Tanzi received equipment from Cynosure, Lumenis, Palomar, Solta, and Syneron; consulting fees from Medicis, Myoscience, and
Zeltiq
David M. Verebelyi – No disclosure




                                                                                                                                   17
                                           Nursing/Allied                              2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                       Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                       Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                           Health Course                               Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                       Grapevine, TX
                                    Thursday, March 31, 2011

A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses. CE contact hours available.

Nursing/Allied Health – Merging Lasers and Technology Design in 2011–                                        7:30 am – 4:30 pm
Texas 1&2

Directors: Faye M. Jenkins, R.N., B.S.N. (Section Chair), Krystie P. Lennox, PA-C (Education Chair)

Faculty: Eric F. Bernstein, M.D., Donna C. Gabriel, L.P.N., David J. Goldberg, M.D., J.D., Penny J. Smalley,
R.N., C.M.L.S.O., Jill Waibel, M.D., Andrea Willey, M.D.

Continuing Education Credit
This offering by the ASLMS, in conjunction with Professional Medical Education Association is accredited for 8.4
contact hours. Professional Medical Education Association is approved by the California Board of Registered
Nursing, Provider # CEP 12386. Note: Most State Boards of Nursing accept another State Board’s approval for
granting credits. Check with the Board of Nursing in your state for clarification. Certificates of Attendance will
be provided. You will receive a statement of CE contact hours after the Annual Conference.

Educational Needs
The 2011 Nursing/Allied Health course is designed to develop awareness of available education for the variety
of providers using lasers. The program will also offer a forum for discussion to explore the educational needs of
the attendees during roundtable discussions with experienced providers and educators.
Participants
The participants are nurses and allied health professionals seeking information and education necessary to be
safe and effective in the roles they play in the delivery of laser treatment.
Background Requirements
The nursing and allied professionals attending the course should have a basic knowledge of laser function,
science, applications, and safety.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
The goal of this year’s Nursing/Allied Health course is to create an awareness of the broad scope of life
changing applications that laser treatments have. Attendees will have educational options addressed for
further understanding of the use of lasers in their field. We will provide an all encompassing review of laser
safety, addressing any new changes in the Standards of Laser Safety, if any. Attendees will be introduced to
laser applications and the importance of patient preparation and follow-up. Attendees will meet colleagues
and share valuable experiences that can impact your practice today, tomorrow, and into the future.

7:30 am – 8:45 am                     Laser Safety – Penny J. Smalley

8:46 am – 9:00 am                     Break

9:01 am – 9:16 am            283      Evaluation of the Thulium Fiber 1927nm Wavelength for Off-Face Treatment of
                                      Photodamaged Skin with Actinic Lesions
                                      Rebecca Sprague
, Suzanne Kilmer1, Laser & Skin Surgery Center of Northern
                                      California, Sacramento, CA
                                      1
                                        Research grant from Candela, CoolTouch, Cutera, Cynosure, Ellipse, HOYA ConBio, Iriderm,
                                      Lumenis, Palomar, Primaeva, Reliant, Sciton, Thermage, Ulthera, and Zeltiq; serves on medical
                                      advisory boards for Candela, Cutera, Ellipse, HOYA ConBio, Lumenis, Primaeva, Ulthera, and Zeltiq
                                      •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

Peggy Nowell RN Travel Grant Recipient.




18
                                           Nursing/Allied                               2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                        Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                        Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                           Health Course                                Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                        Grapevine, TX

                                     Thursday, March 31, 2011


Nursing/Allied Health – Merging Lasers and Technology Design in 2011 Cont. – Texas 1&2

9:17 am – 9:37 am                      Lasers in the Treatment of Tubular Sclerosis – Donna C. Gabriel

9:38 am – 9:59 am                      Laser/Light Treatment of Photoaging – Eric F. Bernstein

10:00 am – 10:14 am                    Break

10:15 am – 10:44 am                    Before the “Laser Incident”, Be Prepared – David J. Goldberg

10:45 am – 10:59 am            281     Sun + Laser = Disaster!
                                       Trudy Fleming1, Fleming Institute, Melbourne, Australia
                                       1
                                         Stockholder in Fleming Institute
                                       •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

11:00 am – 11:29 am                    Laser Correction, Post Burn Injuries – Jill S. Waibel

11:30 am – 11:44 am            282     Development of Combination Therapy Strategies
                                       Patricia A. Owens1, James Brazil2, Sharon Olson, Olympic Dermatology and
                                       Laser Clinic, Olympia, WA
                                       1
                                        Consulting fees from Lumenis and Rockwell Laser Industries
                                       2
                                        Consulting fees from Lumenis
                                       •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

11:45 am – 11:59 am                    Q&A

12:00 pm – 1:29 pm                     Cash Lunch – On Your Own

1:30 pm – 1:44 pm              280     Treatment of Subcutaneous Fat Using a Novel Non-Invasive Cooling Device –
                                       CoolSculpting™ by ZELTIQ™
                                       Holly Bryan, Tina Alster, Elizabeth Tanzi, Washington Institute of Dermatologic
                                       Laser Surgery, Washington, DC
1:45 pm – 2:14 pm                      CoolSculpting™ by ZELTIQ™ - Andrea Willey

2:15 pm – 4:29 pm                      Round Table Breakout Discussions
                                            1)   Education: What Do We Need, How Do We Get It? – Holly Bryan
                                            2)   The Role of ANSI and OSHA in a Laser Setting – Penny J. Smalley
                                            3)   Treating Skin of Color – Debi Cordi
                                            4)   Documentation – Donna C. Gabriel
                                            5)   Treating Photodamage/Prevention – Rebecca Sprague
                                            6)   Multiple Approaches to Skin Tightening – Patricia A. Owens

4:30 pm – 5:00 pm                      Nursing/Allied Health Business Meeting
Disclosures
Eric F. Bernstein received equipment from Candela, Cynosure, DEKA, Lumenis, and Reliant; consulting fees from TRIA Beauty; discount from
Zeltiq
Donna C. Gabriel – No disclosure
David J. Goldberg received consulting fees from Ultrashape; research grant from Alma and Viora
Faye M. Jenkins – No disclosure
Krystie P. Lennox – No disclosure
Penny J. Smalley – received consulting fees from Rockwell Laser Industries and Buffalo Filter
Jill S. Waibel received consulting fees from Allergan and Medicis; research grant from Sciton; honoraria from Candela and Syneron
Andrea Willey – No disclosure


                                                                                                                                19
                                      Clinical                           2011 Annual Conference
                                                                         Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                    Application                          Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                         Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                         Grapevine, TX
                                     Courses
                                (Intermediate/Advanced)
                             Thursday, March 31, 2011
A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses. CME credits and CE contact hours
available.

 Resurfacing and Contouring – Texas C                                                    8:00 am – 12:00 pm

 Directors: Richard E. Fitzpatrick, M.D., Paul M. Friedman, M.D.

 Faculty: Tina S. Alster, M.D., A. Jay Burns, M.D., Jeffrey S. Dover, M.D., Roy G. Geronemus, M.D.,
 Suzanne L. Kilmer, M.D., Robert A. Weiss, M.D., Christopher B. Zachary, M.B.B.S., F.R.C.P.

 ACCME Accreditation Statement
 The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. is accredited by the Accreditation Council for
 Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
 Continuing Medical Education Credit
 The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. designates this live activity for a maximum of
 3.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the
 extent of their participation in the activity.
 Continuing Education Credit
 This offering by the ASLMS, in conjunction with Professional Medical Education Association is accredited for
 4.5 contact hours. Professional Medical Education Association is approved by the California Board of
 Registered Nursing, Provider # CEP 12386. Note: Most State Boards of Nursing accept another State Board’s
 approval for granting credits. Check with the Board of Nursing in your state for clarification. Certificates
 of Attendance will be provided. You will receive a statement of CE contact hours after the Annual
 Conference.

 Educational Needs
 This course will present improved and new techniques, treatments, and technologies in order to promote
 optimal patient outcomes. Lectures will focus on the most recent advances for photo-damaged, scarred
 and in lax skin utilizing a broad spectrum of state-of-the-art devices. It is anticipated that the attendees
 will familiarize themselves with the various technologies prior to attending this course as the speakers will
 focus on advanced applications rather than introductory concepts.
 Participants
 This course is designed for dermatologists, plastic surgeons, and physicians that have an interest in skin
 rejuvenation and body contouring through the use of lasers, light sources, and radio-frequency devices.
 Background Requirements
 This course is NOT intended as an introductory course.         Physics of the various technologies will be
 presented at an advanced level.
 Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
 This course will provide an opportunity to gain perspective on the role of ablative, non-ablative resurfacing,
 rejuvenation techniques, and effective therapy alternatives for their patients. Newer therapeutic options
 in ablative and non-ablative fractional resurfacing, radio-frequency and ultrasound, as well as facial/body
 recontouring techniques will also be reviewed.
 8:00 am – 8:10 am      Discussion and Pre-Test – Richard E. Fitzpatrick, Paul M. Friedman
 8:11 am – 8:27 am      Non-Ablative Fractional Photothermolysis – Paul M. Friedman
 8:28 am – 8:44 am      Ablative Fractional Resurfacing – Richard E. Fitzpatrick



20
                                                 Clinical                                  2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                           Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                           Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011

                                               Application                                 Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                           Grapevine, TX


                                                Courses
                                          (Intermediate/Advanced)
                                       Thursday, March 31, 2011
  A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses. CME credits and CE contact hours
  available.

Resurfacing and Contouring Continued – Texas C                                                                  8:00 am – 12:00 pm

8:45 am – 9:01 am           Facial Rejuvenation “My Approach” – Tina S. Alster
9:02 am – 9:18 am           Facial Rejuvenation “My Approach” – Christopher B. Zachary
9:19 am – 9:35 am           Ancillary Laser Treatments to Enhance Facial Rejuvenation - Roy G. Geronemus
9:36 am - 9:59 am           Questions and Answers
10:00 am – 10:15 am         Break
10:16 am – 10:32 am         Update Non-invasive Facial and Body Shaping – Robert A. Weiss
10:33 am – 10:49 am         Update on New Emerging Body Shaping Technology – Jeffrey S. Dover
10:50 am – 11:06 am         Resurfacing and Contouring: Combining the Concepts – A. Jay Burns
11:07 am – 11:23 am         Combining Technology for Facial Rejuvenation – Suzanne L. Kilmer
11:24 am – 11:49 am         Question and Answers
11:50 am – 12:00 pm         Post Test - Richard E. Fitzpatrick, Paul M. Friedman

Disclosures
Tina S. Alster – No disclosure
A. Jay Burns received discount from Cutera, Cynosure, Palomar, Sciton, Zeltiq, and Zimmer; stockholder with Skin Medica and Zeltiq;
research grant from Solta, Uthera, and Zeltiq; honoraria from Sciton, Solta, Ulthera, and Zeltiq; medical advisory board for Ulthera and
Zeltiq
Jeffrey S. Dover received consulting fees from Lumenis, and Solta; research grant from Cutera, Lumenis, and Solta
Richard E. Fitzpatrick received financial grant and honoraria from Solta; consulting fees from Candela, SkinMedica, and Solta; discount from
Candela; stockholder with SkinMedica and Solta; equity position with SkinMedica; serves on scientific advisory board for Zeltiq
Paul M. Friedman received honoraria from Candela, DUSA, and Solta
Roy G. Geronemus is an investigator for Cynosure, DUSA, Invasix, Palomar, Solta, and Syneron; stockholder with Solta; serves on Medical
Advisory Board for Candela, Lumenis, PhotoMedex, Syneron, and Zeltiq
Suzanne L. Kilmer serves on medical advisory boards for Candela, Cutera, Ellipse, HOYA ConBio, Lumenis, Primaeva, Ulthera, and Zeltiq;
research grant from Candela, CoolTouch, Cutera, Cynosure, Ellipse, HOYA ConBio, Iriderm, Lumenis, Palomar, Primaeva, Reliant, Sciton,
Thermage, Ulthera, and Zeltiq
Robert A. Weiss received financial grant, equipment, and honoraria from Lumenis, Palomar, and Solta; research grant from Lumenis and
Palomar
Christopher B. Zachary received discounted equipment from Cutera and Solta (UCI); honoraria from Sciton and Solta




                                                                                                                                    21
                                        Clinical                         2011 Annual Conference
                                                                         Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                      Application                        Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                         Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                         Grapevine, TX

                                       Courses
                                 (Intermediate/Advanced)
                               Thursday, March 31, 2011
A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses. CME credits and CE contact hours
available.


Laser Treatment of Vascular Lesions – Texas C                                              1:30 pm – 5:30 pm

Directors: Kristen M. Kelly, M.D., Thomas E. Rohrer, M.D.

Faculty: R. Rox Anderson, M.D., Kenneth A. Arndt, M.D., Melissa A. Bogle, M.D., Bernard Choi, Ph.D.,
Christine C. Dierickx, M.D., Roy G. Geronemus, M.D., Arielle N.B. Kauvar, M.D., Suzanne L. Kilmer, M.D., J.
Stuart Nelson, M.D., Ph.D., Elizabeth L. Tanzi, M.D., Robert A. Weiss, M.D.

ACCME Accreditation Statement
The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. is accredited by the Accreditation Council for
Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
Continuing Medical Education Credit
The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. designates this live activity for a maximum of 3.5
AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of
their participation in the activity.
Continuing Education Credit
This offering by the ASLMS, in conjunction with Professional Medical Education Association is accredited for
4.2 contact hours. Professional Medical Education Association is approved by the California Board of
Registered Nursing, Provider # CEP 12386. Note: Most State Boards of Nursing accept another State Board’s
approval for granting credits. Check with the Board of Nursing in your state for clarification. Certificates of
Attendance will be provided. You will receive a statement of CE contact hours after the Annual
Conference.

Educational Needs
The course is designed to enhance the participant’s understanding of lasers and light sources in the
treatment of vascular lesions.
Participants
The course is designed for dermatologists, plastic surgeons, vascular surgeons, and all physicians performing
cutaneous laser surgery or treating vascular abnormalities.
Background Requirements
Attendees should have some knowledge of laser physics, tissue interaction and the practical use of vascular
devices.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
This course will enhance the participants understanding of lasers and non-coherent light sources in the
treatment of vascular abnormalities and telangiectasias and will increase knowledge about light based
treatment approaches to unwanted vascular lesions. Attendees will be informed about current research
related to development and enhancement of light based treatment of vascular lesions.
1:30   pm – 1:34 pm     Discussion and Pre-Test – Kristen M. Kelly, Thomas E. Rohrer
1:35   pm – 1:49 pm     Understanding Laser and Light Treatments of Vascular Lesions – Thomas E. Rohrer
1:50   pm – 1:59 pm     The Importance of Cooling – Melissa A. Bogle
2:00   pm – 2:14 pm     Use of Alexandrite Lasers for Treatment of Vascular Lesions - Suzanne L. Kilmer



22
                                               Clinical                                2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                       Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                             Application                               Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                       Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                       Grapevine, TX
                                              Courses
                                        (Intermediate/Advanced)
                                     Thursday, March 31, 2011
A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses. CME credits and CE contact hours
available.

Laser Treatment of Vascular Lesions Continued – Texas C                                                    1:30 pm – 5:30 pm

2:15   pm – 2:29 pm          Treatment of Facial Telangiectases - Kenneth A. Arndt
2:30   pm – 2:44 pm          Complications - Roy G. Geronemus
2:45   pm – 2:59 pm          Questions for First Half Faculty
3:00   pm – 3:29 pm          Break
3:30   pm – 3:44 pm          Treatment of Leg Telangiectases - Robert A. Weiss
3:45   pm – 3:59 pm          Treatment of Port Wine Stains and Hemangiomas – Kristen M. Kelly
4:00   pm – 4:09 pm          How I Approach my Vascular Lesion Patient – Christine C. Dierickx
4:10   pm – 4:19 pm          How I Approach my Vascular Lesion Patient – Arielle N.B. Kauvar
4:20   pm – 4:29 pm          Update of Vascular Lesion Treatment Research – Bernard Choi
4:30   pm – 5:14 pm          Panel Discussion of Case Presentations: R. Rox Anderson, J. Stuart Nelson, Elizabeth
                               Tanzi
5:15 pm – 5:30 pm            Conclusion and Post-Test – Kristen M. Kelly, Thomas E. Rohrer

Disclosures
R. Rox Anderson received royalties from Massachusetts General Hospital which owns and licenses patents on laser hair removal,
fractional laser treatments, and cryolipolysis; serves on scientific advisory boards for PhotoMedex and Ulthera
Kenneth A. Arndt – No disclosure
Melissa A. Bogle – No disclosure
Bernard Choi – No disclosure
Christine C. Dierickx received equipment from Candela, Cutera, Lumenis, Palomar, and Ulthera; research grant from Palomar
Roy G. Geronemus is an investigator for Cynosure, DUSA, Invasix, Palomar, Solta, and Syneron; stockholder with Solta; serves on
Medical Advisory Board for Candela, Lumenis, Photomedex, Syneron, and Zeltiq
Arielle N.B. Kauvar – No disclosure
Kristen M. Kelly received equipment from Candela, DUSA, and Solta; consulting fees from Lumenis and Ulthera; research grant from
Candela, DUSA, Graceway
Suzanne L. Kilmer serves on medical advisory boards for Candela, Cutera, Ellipse, HOYA ConBio, Lumenis, Primaeva, Ulthera, and
Zeltiq; research grant from Candela, CoolTouch, Cutera, Cynosure, Ellipse, HOYA ConBio, Iriderm, Lumenis, Palomar, Primaeva, Reliant,
Sciton, Thermage, Ulthera, and Zeltiq
J. Stuart Nelson received equipment from Cynosure, Fotona, and Genentech; research grant from Syneron/Candela, New Star, Wyeth-
Pfizer; royalties from Syneron/Candela and New Star; honoraria/speaker from Syneron/Candela
Thomas E. Rohrer received research grant from Syneron/Candela, Julia Therapeutics, and Radiancy; honoraria from Syneron/Candela
and Radiancy; serves on medical advisory board for Syneron/Candela and Julia Therapeutics
Elizabeth L. Tanzi received equipment from Cynosure, Lumenis, Palomar, Solta, and Syneron; consulting fees from Medicis, Myoscience,
and Zeltiq
Robert A. Weiss received financial grant, equipment, honoraria from Cynosure, Lumenis, and Palomar; consulting fees from Cynosure




                                                                                                                                23
                                       Clinical                          2011 Annual Conference
                                                                         Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                     Application                         Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                         Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                         Grapevine, TX

                                      Courses
                                 (Intermediate/Advanced)
                              Thursday, March 31, 2011
A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses. CME credits and CE contact hours
available.

Hair and Pigment Removal – Texas D                                                         1:30 pm – 5:30 pm

Directors: Eric F. Bernstein, M.D., Henry H.L. Chan, M.D., Ph.D., F.R.C.P.

Faculty: Mathew M. Avram, M.D., J.D., Suzanne L. Kilmer, M.D., Dieter Manstein, M.D., E. Victor Ross,
M.D., Brian D. Zelickson, M.D.

ACCME Accreditation Statement
The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. is accredited by the Accreditation Council for
Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
Continuing Medical Education Credit
The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. designates this live activity for a maximum of 3.75
AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of
their participation in the activity.
Continuing Education Credit
This offering by the ASLMS, in conjunction with Professional Medical Education Association is accredited for
4.5 contact hours. Professional Medical Education Association is approved by the California Board of
Registered Nursing, Provider # CEP 12386. Note: Most State Boards of Nursing accept another State Board’s
approval for granting credits. Check with the Board of Nursing in your state for clarification. Certificates of
Attendance will be provided. You will receive a statement of CE contact hours after the Annual
Conference.

Educational Needs
This course will teach basic laser physics and biology of tissue interaction, basic safety tips, and optimal
laser usage for pigmented lesions and hair removal.
Participants
This course is geared toward all physicians performing laser surgery.
Background Requirements
Participants should have a basic understanding of the fundamentals of skin biology, laser physics, and laser
tissue interaction.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of the course, the participant will advance their knowledge base and acquire an up-to-date
understanding of complications and how to avoid them with laser hair removal, basic physics biology for
laser hair removal, and selecting the correct device.

1:30 pm - 1:39 pm      Discussion and Pre-Test - Eric F. Bernstein, Henry H.L. Chan
1:40 pm - 1:59 pm      Laser Physics, Hair and Pigmented Lesions - Henry H.L. Chan
2:00 pm - 2:19 pm      Laser Treatment of Pigmented Lesions - E. Victor Ross
2:20 pm - 2:39 pm      Hair and Tattoo Removal in Skin of Color - Henry H.L. Chan
2:40 pm - 2:49 pm      Q&A




24
                                              Clinical                                  2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                        Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                            Application                                 Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                        Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                        Grapevine, TX
                                             Courses
                                       (Intermediate/Advanced)
                                    Thursday, March 31, 2011

A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses. CME credits and CE contact hours
available.

Hair and Pigment Removal Continued – Texas D                                                               1:30 pm – 5:30 pm

2:50 pm - 3:09 pm           Avoiding Complications in Tattoo Removal - Eric F. Bernstein
3:10 pm - 3:24 pm           Break
3:25 pm - 3:44 pm           Laser Hair Removal - Eric F. Bernstein
3:45 pm - 4:04 pm           Avoiding Complications in Hair Removal - Suzanne Kilmer
4:05 pm - 4:24 pm           Laser Treatment of Tattoos - Brian D. Zelickson
4:25 pm - 4:34 pm           Q&A
4:35 pm - 4:54 pm           Medical Legal Aspects of Hair/Pigmented Lesion/Tattoo Removal - Mathew M. Avram
4:55 pm - 5:14 pm           Future of Hair, Pigment, Tattoo Lasers - Dieter Manstein
5:15 pm - 5:30 pm           Q&A and Post-Test - All Faculty

Disclosures
Mathew M. Avram is a stockholder with Zeltiq
Eric F. Bernstein received equipment from Candela, Cynosure, DEKA, Lumenis, and Reliant; consulting fees from TRIA Beauty; discount
from Zeltiq
Henry H.L. Chan received financial grant from Lumenis; equipment from Candela, Elemé, Lumenis, Palomar, Solta, Syneron, Zeltiq;
discount from Candela; stockholder with Lumenis, Solta
Suzanne L. Kilmer serves on medical advisory boards for Candela, Cutera, Ellipse, HOYA ConBio, Lumenis, Primaeva, Ulthera, and
Zeltiq; research grant from Candela, CoolTouch, Cutera, Cynosure, Ellipse, HOYA ConBio, Iriderm, Lumenis, Palomar, Primaeva, Reliant,
Sciton, Thermage, Ulthera, and Zeltiq
Dieter Manstein, received equipment from Quantel Derma and Solta; consulting fees from Elemé, Quantel Derma and Zeltiq; research
grant from Candela and Lumenis; stockholder with Zeltiq, royalties from Massachusetts General Hospital due to licensing contracts with
Candela, Elemé, Palomar, Solta, Zeltiq and Zimmer
E. Victor Ross received financial grant and consulting fees from Palomar and Syneron; equipment from Cutera, Lumenis, Palomar, and
Sciton; research grant from Cutera, Palomar, and Syneron; honoraria from Cutera, Lumenis, Palomar, and Syneron
Brian D. Zelickson received equipment from Candela, Lumenis, and Syneron; consulting fees from Medicis; discount from Lumenis and
Syneron; research grant from Cutera, Lumenis, Palomar, Solta, Syneron, Ulthera, and Zeltiq; honoraria from Zeltiq; intellectual
property rights with Candela




                                                                                                                                 25
     2011 Annual Conference
     Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
     Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
     Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
     Grapevine, TX




26
                                                Clinical                                2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                        Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                              Application                               Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                        Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                        Grapevine, TX
                                                Course
                                         (Intermediate/Advanced)
                                          Friday, April 1, 2011
A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses. CME credits and CE contact hours
available.

Laser Treatment of Patients of Color – Longhorn F                                                           7:00 am – 10:00 am

Directors: Paul J. Carniol, M.D., Jennifer Kim, M.D., Ph.D.

Faculty: Andrew F. Alexis, M.D., Kei Negishi, M.D., Mario A. Trelles, M.D., Ph.D.

ACCME Accreditation Statement
The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. is accredited by the Accreditation Council for
Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
Continuing Medical Education Credit
The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. designates this live activity for a maximum of 3 AMA
PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their
participation in the activity.
Continuing Education Credit
This offering by the ASLMS, in conjunction with Professional Medical Education Association is accredited for 3.6
contact hours. Professional Medical Education Association is approved by the California Board of Registered
Nursing, Provider # CEP 12386. Note: Most State Boards of Nursing accept another State Board’s approval for
granting credits. Check with the Board of Nursing in your state for clarification. Certificates of Attendance will
be provided. You will receive a statement of CE contact hours after the Annual Conference.

Educational Needs
This course will address avoiding adverse events and improving efficacy of laser treatment of patients with skin
of color.
Participants
This course is geared toward clinical laser practitioners.
Background Requirements
Participants should have basic clinical laser skills and training.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
This course will address discussion of appropriate treatment parameters, pre- and post-operative care, patient
selection, and management of adverse events.
7:00 am – 7:29 am           Discussion, History, Physics, Concept of Ethnicity, Pre-Test – Paul J. Carniol
7:30 am – 7:59 am           Laser Treatments of Pigmentary Concerns – Mario A. Trelles
8:00 am – 8:29 am           Laser and Light Based Skin Rejuvenation and Toning Techniques for Asian Patients – Kei
                             Negishi
8:30 am – 8:59 am           Managing Acne and Acne Scars – Jennifer Kim
9:00 am – 9:29 am           Lasers for Hair Removal and Hair Disorders – Andrew F. Alexis
9:30 am – 10:00 am          Discussion and Post-Test - Paul J. Carniol, Jennifer Kim

Disclosures
Andrew F. Alexis – No disclosure
Paul Carniol – No disclosure
Jennifer Kim received consulting fees from Allergan, Galderma, and Steifel/GSK; stockholder with Allergan; research grant from Dong Sung
Pharmaceuticals
Kei Negishi received equipment from Cutera, Sciton, and Lumenis
Mario A. Trelles – No disclosure


                                                                                                                                27
                                           Clinical                           2011 Annual Conference
                                                                              Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                         Application                          Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                              Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                              Grapevine, TX
                                          Courses
                                     (Intermediate/Advanced)
                                      Friday, April 1, 2011
A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses.          CME credits and CE contact hours
available.


 Complications, Controversies, and Legal Issues – Texas C                                       7:00 am – 10:00 am

 Directors: Mathew A. Avram, M.D., J.D., Suzanne L. Kilmer, M.D.

 Faculty: Eric F. Bernstein, M.D., Henry H.L. Chan, M.D., Ph.D., F.R.C.P., Christine C. Dierickx, M.D., Jeffrey S.
 Dover, M.D., Roy G. Geronemus, M.D., David J. Goldberg, M.D., J.D., Merete Haedersdal, M.D., Ph.D., Zeina
 Tannous, M.D., Robert A. Weiss, M.D., Christopher B. Zachary, M.B.B.S., F.R.C.P., Brian D. Zelickson, M.D.

 ACCME Accreditation Statement
 The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. is accredited by the Accreditation Council for
 Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
 Continuing Medical Education Credit
 The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. designates this live activity for a maximum of 2.75 AMA
 PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their
 participation in the activity.
 Continuing Education Credit
 This offering by the ASLMS, in conjunction with Professional Medical Education Association is accredited for 3.4
 contact hours. Professional Medical Education Association is approved by the California Board of Registered
 Nursing, Provider # CEP 12386. Note: Most State Boards of Nursing accept another State Board’s approval for
 granting credits. Check with the Board of Nursing in your state for clarification. Certificates of Attendance will
 be provided. You will receive a statement of CE contact hours after the Annual Conference.

 Educational Needs
 This course is designed to address all common complications of a host of laser and light source treatments.
 Participants
 Participants include any physicians or allied health professionals involved in the operation of lasers in surgery.
 Background Requirements
 Participants should have experience with the basics of laser.
 Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
 It is expected that at the conclusion of this course, participants will be able to identify gaps in their knowledge
 which will aid in their safe treatment of patients in order to limit potential side effects.
 7:00   am – 7:05 am     Discussion and Pre-Test – Mathew M. Avram, Suzanne L. Kilmer
 7:06   am - 7:14 am     Vascular Lasers/IPL - Brian D. Zelickson
 7:15   am - 7:19 am     Laser Complications in Pediatric Patients – Zeina Tannous
 7:20   am – 7:28 am     Pigment Lasers/Tattoo Lasers - Eric F. Bernstein
 7:29   am - 7:37 am     Hair Removal Lasers - David J. Goldberg
 7:38   am - 7:46 am     Photodynamic Therapy - Merete Haedersdal
 7:47   am - 7:55 am     Non-Invasive Fat Removal, Tissue Tightening - Christine C. Dierickx
 7:56   am - 8:04 am     Laser Lipolysis - Robert A. Weiss
 8:05   am - 8:28 am     Questions and Answers
 8:29   am - 8:39 am     Break
 8:40   am - 8:48 am     Laser Treatment of Darker Skin Types - Henry H.L. Chan
 8:49   am - 8:57 am     Non-Ablative Fractional - Jeffrey S. Dover
 8:58   am - 9:06 am     Ablative Fractional - Christopher B. Zachary
 9:07   am - 9:15 am     Ablative Laser - Suzanne L. Kilmer

   28
                                                 Clinical                                 2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                          Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                               Application                                Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                          Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                          Grapevine, TX
                                                Courses
                                          (Intermediate/Advanced)
                                            Friday, April 1, 2011
A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses.                      CME credits and CE contact hours
available.


 Complications, Controversies, and Legal Issues Continued – Texas C                                            7:00 am – 10:00 am

 9:16 am - 9:24 am           Complications of Unskilled Laser Operators - Roy G. Geronemus
 9:25 am - 9:33 am           Legal Issues - Mathew M. Avram
 9:34 am - 10:00 am          Questions and Answers and Post Test – Mathew M. Avram, Suzanne L. Kilmer

 Disclosures
 Mathew M. Avram is a stockholder with Zeltiq
 Eric F. Bernstein received equipment from Cynosure, DEKA, HOYA ConBio, and Syneron; consulting fees from TRIA Beauty; discount from
 Candela, Cynosure, HOYA ConBio, Solta, and Zeltiq; research grant from Candela, Cynosure, and Solta
 Henry H.L. Chan received financial grant from Lumenis; equipment from Candela, Elemé, Lumenis, Palomar, Solta, Syneron, Zeltiq; discount
 from Candela; stockholder with Lumenis, Solta
 Christine C. Dierickx received equipment from Candela, Cutera, Lumenis, Palomar, Ulthera; research grant from Palomar and Medicis
 Jeffrey S. Dover received consulting fees from Lumenis, and Solta; research grant from Cutera, Lumenis, and Solta
 Roy G. Geronemus received consulting fees from Cynosure, DUSA, Invasix, Palomar, Solta, and Syneron; stockholder with Solta; serves on
 Medical Advisory Board for Candela, Lumenis, Photomedex, Syneron, and Zeltiq
 David J. Goldberg received consulting fees from Ultrashape; research grant from Alma and Viora
 Merete Haedersdal – No disclosure
 Suzanne L. Kilmer serves on medical advisory boards for Candela, Cutera, Ellipse, HOYA ConBio, Lumenis, Primaeva, Ulthera, and Zeltiq;
 research grant from Candela, CoolTouch, Cutera, Cynosure, Ellipse, HOYA ConBio, Iriderm, Lumenis, Palomar, Primaeva, Reliant, Sciton,
 Thermage, Ulthera, and Zeltiq
 Zeina Tannous – No disclosure
 Robert A. Weiss received financial grant, equipment, and honoraria from Cynosure, Lumenis, and Palomar; consulting fees from Cynosure
 Christopher B. Zachary received discounted equipment from Cutera and Solta (UCI); honoraria and educational support from Sciton and Solta
 Brian D. Zelickson received equipment from Candela, Lumenis, and Syneron; consulting fees from Medicis; discount from Lumenis and
 Syneron; research grant from Cutera, Lumenis, Palomar, Solta, Syneron, Ulthera, and Zeltiq; honoraria from Zeltiq; intellectual property
 rights with Candela




                                                                                                                                  29
                                             Clinical                         2011 Annual Conference
                                                                              Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                           Application                        Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                              Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                              Grapevine, TX

                                            Courses
                                       (Intermediate/Advanced)
                                        Friday, April 1, 2011
  A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses. CME credits and CE contact hours
  available.
PDT: Principle and Clinical Role – Texas 2-3                                                      7:00 am – 10:00 am
Director: Ron R. Allison, M.D.
Faculty: Keith A. Cengel, M.D., Ph.D., Gordon H. Downie, M.D., Ph.D., M. Sam Eljamel, M.D., Colin Hopper,
B.D.S., M.B.B.S., M.D., F.D.S., F.R.C.S., Herbert C. Wolfsen, M.D.

ACCME Accreditation Statement
The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. is accredited by the Accreditation Council for
Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
Continuing Medical Education Credit
The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. designates this live activity for a maximum of 3 AMA
PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their
participation in the activity.
Continuing Education Credit
This offering by the ASLMS, in conjunction with Professional Medical Education Association is accredited for 3.6
contact hours. Professional Medical Education Association is approved by the California Board of Registered
Nursing, Provider # CEP 12386. Note: Most State Boards of Nursing accept another State Board’s approval for
granting credits. Check with the Board of Nursing in your state for clarification. Certificates of Attendance will
be provided. You will receive a statement of CE contact hours after the Annual Conference.

Educational Needs
This course will address the fundamentals of PDT in terms of the basic science behind this therapy, the rationale
for this treatment, the clinical outcomes and morbidities expected, the actual treatment procedure, and the data
collected clinically from peer-reviewed publications.
Participants
This course is designed for oncologists, dermatologists, surgeons, pulmonologists, and gastroenterologists involved
with photodynamic therapy.
Background Requirements
Although it is not a prerequisite, attendees would ideally have some basic understanding of laser tissue
interactions. Individual attendees do not need to have significant experience or expertise in laser medicine or
surgery.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
At the conclusion of the course, attendees will have a clinical history and overview of photodynamic therapy.
They will understand the basic science of PDT (photosensitizers, light source, photodynamic reaction), understand
clinical treatment calculations, and treatment outcomes and morbidity of clinical PDT.
7:00 am – 7:29 am            Introduction, Fundamentals of PDT, and Pre-Test – Ron R. Allison
7:30 am – 7:59 am            Clinical PDT – Cutaneous and Head and Neck – Colin Hopper
8:00 am – 8:29 am            Clinical PDT – Neurooncology – M. Sam Eljamel
8:30 am – 8:59 am            Clinical PDT - Pulmonary Indications – Gordon H. Downie
9:00 am – 9:29 am            Clinical PDT – Gastrointestinal – Herbert C. Wolfsen
9:30 am – 9:54 am            Clinical PDT – Genitourinary – Keith A. Cengel
9:55 am – 10:00 am           Conclusion and Post Test – Ron R. Allison
Disclosures
Ron R. Allison – No disclosure
Keith A. Cengel – No disclosure
Gordon H. Downie – No disclosure
M. Sam Eljamel – No disclosure
Colin Hopper – No disclosure
Herbert C. Wolfsen – No disclosure
  30
                               Conference                                      2011 Annual Conference
                                                                               Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                               Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                             Plenary Session                                   Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                               Grapevine, TX
                               Friday, April 1, 2011

Conference Plenary Session – Longhorn F                                                          10:30 am – 12:00 pm
10:30 am – 10:39 am   WELCOME & INTRODUCTION
                      Serge R. Mordon, Ph.D.*, Program Chair
                      INSERM U703, Lille, France
                      *Stockholder with Ekkyo

                      E. Duco Jansen, Ph.D.*, President
                      Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
                      *Received a salary, research grant, and intellectual property rights from Vanderbilt University; research
                      grant from NIH, DOD, HFSP, and Lockheed-Martin \

10:40 am – 10:59 am   PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS AND ANNOUNCEMENT OF AWARDS/CITATIONS
                      E. Duco Jansen, Ph.D., President

                      Presidential Citations
                      Ken Day, Ph.D.
                      Raymond J. Lanzafame, M.D., M.B.A.
                      J. Stuart Nelson, M.D., Ph.D.
                      Jason N. Pozner, M.D.


                      Best Overall Awards
                      Robert Anolik                                    Dr. Richard E. Fitzpatrick Clinical Research
                                                                       and Innovations Award
                      Xingjia Wu                                       Best Overall Experimental and Translational
                                                                       Research


                      Best Student/Resident Awards
                      Vivian Laquer                                    Best Student/Resident Cutaneous
                                                                       Laser Surgery
                      Mehmet Kosoglu                                   Best Student/Resident Experimental and
                                                                       Translational Research
                      Tianyi Wang                                      Best Student/Resident Photobiomodulation
                      Liyi Huang                                       Best Student/Resident Photodynamic
                                                                       Therapy
                      Edward C. Wu                                     Best Student/Resident Surgical
                                                                       Applications/Interstitial Laser Therapy

                      Recipients of the best ePoster awards will be announced at the Annual Conference.


                      2011 Research Grant Recipients To Be Announced




                                                                                                                        31
                              Conference                              2011 Annual Conference
                                                                      Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                      Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                            Plenary Session                           Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                      Grapevine, TX
                              Friday, April 1, 2011


11:00 am – 11:59 am   KEYNOTE SPEAKER

                      LIGHT, SCIENCE, MEDICINE, AND THE FDA

                      Neil R. Ogden, Chief, General Surgery Devices Branch,
                      Division of Surgery, Orthopedic, and Restorative
                      Devices, Office of Device Evaluation, Food and Drug
                      Administration, Silver Spring, MD



                      Mr. Ogden completed his undergraduate studies in biomedical engineering at Tulane
                      University in New Orleans in 1980. While working at Tulane University Medical
                      School, he earned his Master’s degree in biomedical engineering at Tulane University
                      in 1985.

                      He became Peace Corps Volunteer with his wife Ellyn in Papua, New Guinea, New
                      Ireland Province, 1987-1989. Mr. Ogden enjoys international travel with his family
                      having visited Australia, Belgium, Canada, Germany, France, Greece, Guatemala,
                      Italy, India, Mexico, South Africa, Switzerland, and Zimbabwe.

                      He worked briefly at the National Institutes of Health before joining the Food and
                      Drug Administration in 1990 as a new scientific reviewer in the General Surgery
                      Devices Branch, in the Office of Device Evaluation in the Center for Devices and
                      Radiologic Health. As a scientific reviewer, one of his areas of expertise was light
                      based device reviews with emphasis on surgical laser systems.

                      Mr. Ogden was selected as the Branch Chief for the General Surgery Devices Branch
                      in December, 1998. As Branch Chief, he has supervised hundreds of light based
                      device reviews and final recommendations for marketing which includes reviews of
                      surgical lasers, IPLs, visible spectrum diagnostic devices (Melafind), biostimulation
                      lights, OCT systems, surgical lights, and other optical devices. During this period he
                      has received numerous awards for excellent job performance including the 2010 FDA
                      Human Capital Investment Award. He has written articles about device regulation
                      which has been published in FDA Consumer, FDA Today, and Seminars in
                      Laparoscopic Surgery. He has also co-authored a chapter on FDA regulation in the
                      book, Cancer Principles and Practices of Oncology, 7th Edition.

                      He has broadened his professional experience over the past six years by working as
                      Acting Deputy Division Director in the Division of Cardiovascular Devices, the Division
                      of Anesthesiology, General Hospital, Infection Control, and Dental Devices, the
                      Division of Surgery and Orthopedic Devices each in the Office of Device Evaluation,
                      and most recently the Division of Biology in the Office of Science and Engineering
                      Laboratories.



12:00 pm – 1:30 pm    COMPLIMENTARY LUNCH WITH TICKET IN EXHIBIT HALL (View ePosters)




32
                                     Experimental and                                2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                     Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                     Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011

                                       Translational                                 Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                     Grapevine, TX


                                     Research Session
                                      Friday, April 1, 2011

Experimental and Translational Research – Texas C                                                       1:00 pm – 5:45 pm
Directors: Jennifer K. Barton, Ph.D., Bernard Choi, Ph.D.
Disclosures
Bernard Choi – No disclosure
Jennifer K. Barton – No disclosure
Educational Needs
These sessions promote understanding of basic processes of light interaction with tissues and cells, design of
light-based diagnostic and therapeutic devices and techniques, and early translation of this knowledge to
clinical application.
Participants
Scientists, engineers, medical practitioners as well as other health care professionals involved in biomedical
applications of lasers are invited to attend.
Background Requirements
Participants should have a basic understanding or experience of how light interacts with tissues.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
These sessions will provide attendees knowledge of cutting-edge advances in optical diagnostics and
therapeutics, and their early translation to the clinical management of patients. Novel results are presented
that will impact the development of new and more efficacious, light-based therapeutic and diagnostic devices
and applications. Characterization of light sources and safety issues are also considered.
Hot Topics
• Lasers plus drugs: Towards more effective blood vessel treatments
• Safety and efficacy of laser nerve stimulation in humans
• Novel microneedles for interstitial light and fluid delivery
• Photoacoustic detection of melanoma

                                                  PHOTOBIOMODULATION

                                                      INVITED SPEAKER

1:00 pm – 1:11 pm              1      SAFETY AND EFFICACY OF INFRARED NEURAL STIMULATION IN HUMANS
                                      Jonathan Cayce1, Jonathan Wells2, Jonathan Malphrus, Chris Kao, Sharon
(ePoster available)
                                      Thomsen, Noel Tulipan, Peter Konrad3, E. Duco Jansen4, Anita Mahadevan-
                                      Jansen4, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, Lockheed Martin Aculight,
                                      Bothel, WA, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX
                                      1
                                        Research grant from NIH/HFSP
                                      2
                                        Stockholder with Lockheed Martin Aculight, intellectual property rights with Vanderbilt
                                      University and Lockheed Martin Aculight
                                      3
                                        Intellectual property rights with Vanderbilt University
                                      4
                                        Research grant from NIH/HFSP; royalties from Lockheed Martin Aculight; intellectual property
                                      rights with Vanderbilt University

1:12 pm – 1:23 pm              2      TREATING TRACHEAL STENOSIS USING LOW LEVEL LASER THERAPY: AS A
                                      POTENTIAL TOOL IN AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY IN RAT MODEL
                                      Claudia Silva, Nathali Pinto, Raduan Hage, Neila Garcia, Emilia Arisawa, M.
                                      Cristina Chavantes, UNIVAP, USP, São José dos Campos, São Paulo, Brazil
                                      •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use


                                                                                                                              33
                                    Experimental and                                     2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                         Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                      Translational                                      Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                         Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                         Grapevine, TX

                                    Research Session
                                          Friday, April 1, 2011
1:24 pm – 1:35 pm              3          NOVEL APPROACH FOR HEALING LEG ULCERS: CASE STUDY INVOLVING
                                          COMBINED EFFECT OF LOW LEVEL LASER THERAPY AND BIOCERAMICS
                                          Supriya Babu, Bheemsain Rao, Veena P. Waiker, Jaisri Goturu, Vasanthi
                                          Ananthakrishnan, G. Dayananda, Arun Kumar, M.S. Ramaiah Institute of
                                          Technology, Medical College and Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

                                                           NANOPARTICLES

1:36 pm – 1:47 pm              4          EFFECT OF POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL COATING ON BIODISTRIBUTION OF
                                          ICG-LOADED POLYMERIC NANOCAPSULES IN MICE
                                          Baharak Bahmanii, Sharad Gupta, Bahman Anvari, University of California,
                                          Riverside, CA
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

                                    2009 ASLMS STUDENT RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENT

1:48 pm – 1:59 pm              5          NARROWBAND IMAGING OF TARGETED GOLD NANORODS IN TUMORS
                                          Priyaveena Puvanakrishnan1, Parameswaran Diagaradjane, Glenn Goodrich,
                                          Jon Schwartz, Sunil Krishnan, James Tunnell1, University of Texas at Austin,
                                          Austin, TX, University of Texas/MD Anderson Cancer Center, Nanospectra
                                          Biosciences, Inc., Houston, TX
                                          1
                                           Royalties from the University of Texas through Nanospectra Biosciences
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

                                                  PRECLINICAL THERAPEUTICS I

2:00 pm – 2:11 pm              6          INDUCTION OF LIPOLYSIS IN HUMAN ADIPOCYTES BY HYPERTHERMIA
                                          ALONE AND IN COMBINATION WITH PHOTODYNAMIC TREATMENT
                                          Valery Tuchin1, Irina Yanina, Georgy Simonenko, Andrey Belikov, David
                                          Tabatadze, Ilya Yaroslavsky, Gregory Altshuler, Institute of Optics and
                                          Biophotonics, Saratov State University, Saratov, Russian Federation, Laser
                                          Center, SPITMO, St. Petersburg, Russia, Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc.,
                                          Burlington, MA
                                          1
                                           Equipment, consulting fees, and travel expenses from Palomar
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

2:12 pm – 2:23 pm              7          HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN EXPRESSION IN TISSUES AFTER SHORT PULSE LASER-
                                          INDUCED DAMAGE
                                          Amir Sajjadii, Kunal Mitra, Michael Grace, Melbourne, FL
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

                                                          INVITED SPEAKER

2:24 pm – 2:44 pm              8          MOBILIZATION OF ENDOTHELIAL PROGENITOR CELLS FOLLOWING
                                          PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY
                                          Charles Gomer, Angela Ferrario, Marian Luna, University of Southern
                                          California, Children’s Hospital, Los Angeles, CA
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

2:45 pm – 3:44 pm                         Break – Visit the Exhibits and ePosters
iRecipient of U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research travel grant.
34
                           Experimental and                                2011 Annual Conference
                                                                           Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                             Translational                                 Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                           Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                           Grapevine, TX
                           Research Session
                            Friday, April 1, 2011

3:45 pm – 3:56 pm     9     COMPARISON OF ANTIANGIOGENIC AGENTS FOR INHIBITING REPERFUSION
                            OF PHOTOCOAGULATED BLOOD VESSELS IN AN ANIMAL MODEL
                            Wangcun Jia, Victor Sun, Tom Liu1, Bernard Choi, J. Stuart Nelson2,
                            Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine,
                            CA, Conrex Pharmaceuticals, Newtown Square, PA
                            1
                             Salary from Conrex Pharmaceuticals
                            2
                             Research grant from Wyeth Pharmaceuticals
                            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

3:57 pm – 4:08 pm           VIRUS-BASED OPTICAL NANO-CONSTRUCTS FOR POTENTIAL OPTICAL
                            IMAGING AND LASER THERAPY APPLICATIONS
                            Bongsu Jung, Yadir Guerrero, Rao Ayala, Bahman Anvari, UC Riverside,
                            Riverside, CA
                            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

4:09 pm – 4:20 pm     12    OPTIMAL WAVELENGTH SELECTION FOR LASH TREATMENT OF SKIN
                            PHOTOTYPES I TO VI
(ePoster available)
                            Sylvain Giraud1, Sonia Saai2, Cecile Philandrianos, Alain Cornil3, Guy
                            Magalon, Ekkyo, Aix-en-Provence, Paca, France, APHM Hospital La
                            Conception, Marseille, Paca, France
                            1
                                Travel expenses from Ekkyo
                            2
                                Salary expenses from Ekkyo
                            3
                                Equity position with Ekkyo
                            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

4:21 pm – 4:32 pm     13    TISSUE EFFECTS INDUCED BY Er,Cr:YSGG LASER PULSES DELIVERED
                            THROUGH A RADIAL EMITTING FIBER STUDIED WITH HIGH SPEED OPTICAL
                            THERMOGRAPHY
                            Rudolf Verdaasdonk1, Vladimir Lemberg2, Albert Veen van der1, Stefan
                            Been3, Dmitri Boutoussov4, Werner Landgraf4, VU University Medical Center,
                            Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Optomix, Santa Clara, CA, Biolase, Irvine, CA,
                            Biolase, Floss, Germany
                            1
                              Research grant from Biolase
                            2
                              Consulting fees from Biolase
                            3
                              Research grant from FP7 MIRSURG
                            4
                              Salary from Biolase
                            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

4:33 pm – 4:44 pm     14    IS IT POSSIBLE TO PERFORM LASER RESHAPING WITHOUT DRAMATIC
                            EFFECT ON CHONDROCYTES?
                            Emil Sobol1, Natalia Vorobieva2, Olga Baum3, Anatoly Shekhter4, Anna
                            Guller4, Institute on Laser and Information Technologies, Medical Academy of
                            Moscow, Troitsk, Moscow Region, Russia
                            1
                              Equipment and stockholder with Arcuo Medical
                            2
                              Equipment from Arcuo Medical
                            3
                              Stockholder with Arcuo Medical
                            4
                              Salary from Arcuo Medical
                            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use




                                                                                                                35
                                    Experimental and                                     2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                         Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                      Translational                                      Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                         Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                         Grapevine, TX

                                    Research Session
                                         Friday, April 1, 2011


4:45 pm – 4:56 pm              15         FLUID CHARACTERIZATION OF A NOVEL HOLLOW-CORE MICRONEEDLE
                                          DESIGN
(ePoster available)
                                          Robert Hoodi, Mehmet Kosoglu, Matthew Parker, Christopher Rylander,
                                          Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

4:57 pm – 5:08 pm              16         USING TRIPHASIC THEORY TO EVALUATE CARTILAGE MECHANICAL
                                          RESPONSE TO LASER RESHAPING
                                          Dmitry Protsenko, Brian Wong, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic,
                                          University of California, Irvine, CA
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

5:09 pm – 5:20 pm              17         COMPARISON OF THERMAL AND MECHANICAL CHARACTERISTICS DURING
                                          TISSUE ABLATION OF Er:YAG, Er,Cr:YSGG AND CO2 IN THE MICROSECOND
                                          TO MILLISECONDS PULSE RANGE IN VIEW OF SOFT TISSUE APPLICATIONS IN
                                          SURGERY
                                          Rudolf Verdaasdonk1, Vladimir Lemberg2, Albert Veen van der1, Stefan
                                          Been3, Dmitri Boutoussov4, Werner Landgraf4, VU University Medical Center,
                                          Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Optomix, Santa Clara, CA, Biolase, Irvine, CA,
                                          Biolase, Floss, Germany, University Medical Center, Utrecht, The
                                          Netherlands
                                          1
                                            Research grant from Biolase
                                          2
                                            Consulting fees from Biolase
                                          3
                                            Research grant from FP7 MIRSURG
                                          4
                                            Salary from Biolase
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

                                          LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT / 2008 AND 2009 ASLMS RESEARCH GRANT
                                          RECIPIENT

5:21 pm – 5:32 pm                         IN VIVO TUMOR-TARGETING OF GOLD NANOPARTICLES: EFFECT OF
                                          PARTICLE TYPE AND DOSING STRATEGY
                                          Jaesook Park, Parameshwaran Diagaradjane, Glenn Goodrich, Jon Schwartz,
                                          Sunil Krishnan, James Tunnell, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, MD
                                          Anderson Cancer Center, Nanospectra Biosciences, Houston, TX
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

                                          LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT

5:33pm – 5:45 pm                          INTRAVITAL IMAGING OF ABNORMAL VASCULATURE IN PRENEOPLASTIC
                                          ORAL MUCOSA BY TWO-PHOTON LUMINESCENCE OF GOLD NANORODS
                                          Saam Motamedi, Tuya Shilagard, Kert Edward, Luke Koong, Suimin Qui,
                                          Gracie Vargas, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
iRecipient of U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research travel grant.




36
                                    Cutaneous Laser                            2011 Annual Conference
                                                                               Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                    Surgery Session                            Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                               Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                               Grapevine, TX
                                       Friday, April 1, 2011

Cutaneous Laser Surgery – Longhorn F                                                          1:00 pm – 6:10 pm

Directors: Mathew M. Avram, M.D., J.D., Paul M. Friedman, M.D.
Disclosures
Mathew M. Avram is a stockholder with Zeltiq
Paul M. Friedman received honoraria from Candela, DUSA and Solta

              LASER AND LIGHT THERAPY FOR THE TREATMENT OF VASCULAR LESIONS AND SCARS

Educational Needs
This session focuses on the use of lasers and light sources for the treatment of cutaneous vascular lesions and
scars. The topics of new therapeutic techniques and optimized treatment approaches for targeting vascular
lesions and scars will be addressed in this session. Participants will develop an understanding of the present
treatment indications, therapeutic techniques, and new and innovative technologies.
Participants
This session will benefit physicians and health care personnel who treat vascular cutaneous disorders in the
disciplines of dermatology, plastic surgery, otolaryngology, facial plastic surgery, and vascular surgery. It will
also benefit those engineers and medical device personnel who actively work to develop devices for the
treatment of cutaneous disorders.
Background Requirements
Participants should have a basic understanding of the fundamentals of skin biology, laser physics, and laser
tissue interaction.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
Attendees will gain knowledge of cutting edge laser and light sources and their clinical applications in the
area of cutaneous vascular lesions and scars.
Hot Topics
 Laser speckle imaging during treatment
x
 Histologic change of burn scars after fractional ablative treatment
x

1:00 pm – 1:01 pm                      Introduction – Mathew M. Avram, Paul M. Friedman

1:02 pm – 1:07 pm             46       INVESTIGATION INTO SAFE AND EFFECTIVE TREATMENT INTERVALS OF
                                       PORT WINE STAINS USING THE PULSED DYE LASER
(ePoster available)
                                       Robert Anolik, Tracey Newlove, Elliot T. Weiss, Anne Chapas, Lori
                                       Brightman, Elizabeth K. Hale, Julie K. Karen, Leonard Bernstein, Roy G.
                                       Geronemus1, Laser and Skin Surgery Center of New York, New York University
                                       School of Medicine, New York, NY
                                       1
                                           Equity position with Solta

1:08 pm – 1:13 pm            47        REAL-TIME LASER SPECKLE IMAGING AS AN INTRAOPERATIVE DIAGNOSTIC
                                       TOOL DURING TREATMENT OF PORT WINE STAIN BIRTHMARKS
                                       Bruce Yang, Owen Yang, Kristen Kelly, J. Stuart Nelson, Bernard Choi,
                                       Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine,
                                       CA

1:14 pm – 1:19 pm             48       THE USE OF LONG PULSED Nd:YAG LASER IN THE TREATMENT OF
                                       PEDIATRIC VENOUS MALFORMATION
(ePoster available)
                                       Stratos Sofos4, Se Hwang Liew, Liverpool, United Kingdom
                                               Sofos,

4
Recipient of ASLMS travel grant.

                                                                                                                    37
                                      Cutaneous Laser                                    2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                         Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                         Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011

                                      Surgery Session                                    Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                         Grapevine, TX

                                          Friday, April 1, 2011


                                          LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT

1:20 pm – 1:25 pm                         TREATMENT OF PORT WINE STAIN USING AN INTENSE PULSE LIGHT DEVICE
                                          WITH A NEW OPTIMIZED LIGHT HANDPIECE
                                          E. Victor Ross, Emily Yu, Chad Tingey, Scripps Clinic, San Diego, CA

1:26 pm – 1:31 pm              50         OPTIMIZED SPECTRAL OUTPUT AND PULSE SHAPES FOR VASCULAR
                                          TREATMENTS
(ePoster available)
                                          Robert Weiss1, E. Victor Ross2, Emil Tanghetti3, David B. Vasily3, James
                                          Childs4, Mikhail Smirnov4, Gregory Altshuler4, Maryland Laser, Skin and Vein
                                          Institute, Baltimore, MD, Scripps Clinic, San Diego, CA, Center for
                                          Dermatology and Laser Surgery, Sacramento, CA, Aesthetica Cosmetic &
                                          Laser Surgery Center, Bethlehem, PA, Palomar Medical Technologies,
                                          Burlington, MA
                                          1
                                            Equipment and research grant from Palomar
                                          2
                                            Equipment, consulting fees, research grant from Palomar
                                          3
                                            Equipment from Palomar
                                          4
                                            Salary from Palomar

1:32 pm – 1:37 pm              51         SPLIT-FACE RANDOMIZED TREATMENT OF FACIAL TELANGIECTASIA
                                          COMPARING PULSED DYE LASER AND A NEW OPTIMIZED LIGHT HANDPIECE
                                          Emil Tanghetti1, Center for Dermatology and Laser Surgery, Sacramento, CA
                                          1
                                              Equipment from Palomar

1:38 pm – 1:43 pm              52         ANGIOGENESIS MEDIATOR ALTERATIONS IN ANGIOMAS AFTER PULSED DYE
                                          LASER TREATMENT
(ePoster available)
                                          Kristen Kelly, Belinda Dao, Janelle Marshall, Amy Nguyen, Vivian Laquerih,
                                          Elizabeth Rugg, Ronald Harris, Tina Chen, Beckman Laser Institute and
                                          Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, CA
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

1:44 pm – 2:02 pm                         Q&A

2:03 pm – 2:08 pm              53         NON-ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL LASER RESURFACING FOR THE TREATMENT OF
                                          SCARS AND GRAFTS AFTER MOHS MICROGRAPHIC SURGERY: A RANDOMIZED
(ePoster available)                       CONTROLLED TRIAL
                                          Evelien Verhaeghe, Katia Ongenae, Jessica Bostoen, Jo Lambert, University
                                          Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium

2:09 pm – 2:14 pm              54         HISTOLOGIC CHARACTERISTICS OF MATURE BURN SCARS BEFORE AND
                                          AFTER THREE TREATMENTS WITH FRACTIONAL CO2 LASER
                                          David Ozog1, Marsha Chaffins1, Ronald Moy1, Elizabeth Farhat1, Henry Ford
                                          Hospital, Detroit, MI, University of California, Los Angeles, CA
                                          1
                                            Study funded by Lumenis
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

2:15 pm – 2:20 pm              55         SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT OF POST BURN SCARS WITH FRACTIONAL CO2
                                          LASER IN INDIAN SKIN
(ePoster available)
                                          Ashok Naik, Sahil Dhavan, Shilpa Shah, Niteen Dhepe, Pune, India

iRecipient of U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research travel grant.
hBest Student/Resident Cutaneous Laser Surgery Award Recipient.
38
                               Cutaneous Laser                            2011 Annual Conference
                                                                          Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                          Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                               Surgery Session                            Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                          Grapevine, TX
                                  Friday, April 1, 2011

                                  LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT

2:21 pm – 2:26 pm                 GENE EXPRESSION ANALYSIS OF IN VIVO WOUND HEALING POST NON
                                  INVASIVE MONOPOLAR RADIOFREQUENCY TREATMENT: EVIDENCE OF
                                  NEOCOLLAGENESIS
                                  Erica Lee Elford, Rachana Soni, Kerrie Jiang, Sherry Alandt, Steven K.
                                  Struck, Vikramaditya P. Bedi, Christopher B. Zachary, Solta Medical Inc.,
                                  Hayward, CA, Struck Plastic Surgery, Atherton, CA, University of California,
                                  Irvine, CA

2:27 pm – 2:32 pm        57       TREATMENT OF SCARS USING LASER AND LASER ASSISTED
                                  CORTICOSTEROID DELIVERY
                                  Jill Waibel, Stephen Davis, Emmy Graber, Nathan Uebelhoer, Miami
                                  Dermatology and Laser Institute, University of Miami Miller School of
                                  Medicine Miami, FL, Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical
                                  Center, Boston, MA, Naval Medical Center, San Diego, CA

2:33 pm – 2:44 pm                 Q&A

2:45 pm – 3:44 pm                 Break – Visit the Exhibits and ePosters

                 RADIOFREQUENCY, NON-ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL, AND BODY CONTOURING

Educational Needs
This session focuses on the use of radiofrequency and non-ablative fractional lasers for the treatment of a
variety of conditions. Additionally, each of the topics of laser-assisted liposuction, techniques for non-invasive
fat removal, assessment of techniques to evaluate treatment outcomes, and potential complications will be
addressed. Participants will develop an understanding of the present treatment indications, therapeutic
techniques, and new and innovative technologies.
Participants
This session will benefit physicians and health care personnel who treat cutaneous disorders in the disciplines
of dermatology, plastic surgery, and facial plastic surgery. It will also benefit those engineers and medical
device personnel who actively work to develop devices for the treatment of cutaneous disorders.
Background Requirements
Participants should have a basic understanding of the fundamentals of skin biology, laser physics, and laser
tissue interaction.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
Attendees will gain knowledge of cutting edge laser treatments and their clinical applications in the
treatment of cutaneous conditions.
Hot Topics
x   Radiofrequency laser treatments for a variety of conditions
x   Side effects and risks from cryolipolysis

3:45 pm – 3:50 pm        58       FRACTIONAL ABLATIVE RADIOFREQUENCY TREATMENT FOR SKIN TYPES V-
                                  VI: RISK-BENEFIT ANALYSIS
(ePoster available)
                                  Jennifer Chwalek, Mussarrat Hussain, David Goldberg, Skin Laser & Surgery
                                  Specialists of NY and NJ, New York, NY



                                                                                                               39
                           Cutaneous Laser                                      2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                           Surgery Session                                      Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                Grapevine, TX
                            Friday, April 1, 2011

3:51 pm – 3:56 pm     59    THE EFFECTS OF FRACTIONAL RADIOFREQUENCY MICRONEEDLE ON
                            PERIORBITAL WRINKLES OF KOREAN PATIENTS
(ePoster available)
                            Won-Serk Kim1, Ga-young Lee1, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan
                            University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
                            1
                              Equipment from Jeisys
                            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

3:57 pm – 4:02 pm     60    BIPOLAR PARALLEL RADIOFREQUENCY FOR REDUCTION DEPTH OF
                            WRINKLES: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY VISUALIZED BY COLORED 3D IMAGING
(ePoster available)         SYSTEM
                            Katharina Russe-Wilflingseder1, Elisabeth Russe1, Plastische Chirurgie und
                            Laserzentrum, Innsbruck, Austria
                            1
                              Equipment from Asclepion Laser Technologies
                            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

4:03 pm – 4:08 pm     61    A NOVEL ENERGY ASSISTED LIPOLYSIS APPROACH USING COMBINED RF AND
                            LASER TECHNOLOGY
(ePoster available)
                            Jason Pozner1, Haim Epstein2, Boris Vaynberg2, Ruthie Amir2, Cleveland
                            Clinic, Weston, FL, Syneron, Yokneam Illit, Israel
                            1
                             Equipment and research grant from Syneron
                            2
                             Salary from Syneron
                            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

4:09 pm – 4:14 pm     62    FRACTIONAL BIPOLAR RADIOFREQUENCY DELIVERED THROUGH A VACUUM-
                            ASSISTED, MICRONEEDLE ARRAY FOR THE TREATMENT OF ACNE SCARRING:
                            A PILOT STUDY
                            Girish Munavalli1, Robert Anderson2, Dermatology Laser and Vein Specialists,
                            Charlotte, NC, Theravant Corporation, Pleasanton, CA
                            1
                                Equipment and equity position with Theravant
                            2
                                Salary, equity position, intellectual property rights with Theravant

                            LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT

4:15 pm – 4:20 pm           TREATMENT OF BURN SCAR DEFORMITIES IN FITZPATRICK SKIN TYPES IV-V
                            WITH NON-ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL PHOTOTHERMOLYSIS: A REPORT OF 7
                            CASES
                            Sean Boutros, Houston Plastic & Craniofacial Surgery, Houston, TX

4:21 pm – 4:36 pm           Q&A

4:37 pm – 4:42 pm     64    1550nm and 1927 FRACTIONAL LASER RESURFACING FOR THE TREATMENT
                            OF ACTINIC KERATOSIS AND PHOTODAMAGE: A COMPARATIVE STUDY
(ePoster available)
                            Paul M. Friedman, Jennifer M. Landau, Megan N. Moody, Denise Marquez,
                            Jennifer Peterson, Leonard H. Goldberg1, Irene J. Vergilis-Kalner,
                            DermSurgery Associates, Houston, TX, Goldman Butterwick & Associates,
                            Cosmetic Laser Dermatology, San Diego, CA
                            1
                                Research grant from Solta




40
                           Cutaneous Laser                                      2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                           Surgery Session                                      Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                Grapevine, TX
                            Friday, April 1, 2011


4:43 pm – 4:48 pm     65    LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP OF 1927nm FRACTIONAL RESURFACING FOR
                            ACTINIC KERATOSES ON THE FACE
                            Elliot Weiss, Robert Anolik, Lori Brightman, Anne Chapas, Elizabeth Hale,
                            Julie Karen, Leonard Bernstein, Roy Geronemus1, Laser & Skin Surgery
                            Center of New York, New York, NY
                            1
                                Stockholder with Solta

4:49 pm – 4:54 pm     66    NON-ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL RESURFACING WITH THE 1927nm THULIUM
                            LASER IS AN EFFECTIVE, WELL-TOLERATED TREATMENT FOR ACTINIC
(ePoster available)         CHEILITIS
                            Robert Anolik, Elliot T. Weiss, Abdul K. El Tal, Anne Chapas, Lori Brightman,
                            Elizabeth K. Hale, Julie K. Karen, Leonard Bernstein, Leonard H. Goldberg,
                            Paul M. Friedman, Roy G. Geronemus1, Laser and Skin Surgery Center of New
                            York, New York, NY, MD Anderson Cancer Center, DermSurgery Associates,
                            Houston, TX
                            1
                                Equity position with Solta

4:55 pm – 5:03 pm           Q&A

5:04 pm – 5:09 pm     67    MULTIPLE TREATMENT, NON-INVASIVE CRYOLIPOLYSIS FOR BODY
                            CONTOURING IN CHINESE PATIENTS
(ePoster available)
                            Samantha Y. Shek, Nicola P.Y. Chan, C.K. Yeung, Henry H.L. Chan, The
                            University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China

5:10 pm – 5:15 pm     68    TREATMENT OF THE DERMIS AND HYPODERMIS JUNCTION WITH WATER
                            AND FAT SELECTIVE LASER WAVELENGTHS USING OPTICAL COMPRESSION
                            PINS
                            Brian Zelickson1, Susan Walgrave, Irmina Wallander, James Childs2, David
                            Tabatadze2, Mikhail Smirnov2, Gregory Altshuler2, Zel Skin and Laser
                            Specialists, Edina, MN, Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield, WI, Palomar Medical
                            Technologies, Inc., Burlington, MA
                            1
                             Equipment and research grant from Palomar
                            2
                             Salary from Palomar
                            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

5:16 pm – 5:21 pm     69    SIDE EFFECTS AND RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH CRYOLIPOLYSIS
                            Jeffrey Dover1, Nazanin Saedi, Michael Kaminer1, Christopher Zachary2,
(ePoster available)
                            SkinCare Physicians, Chestnut Hill, MA, University of California, Irvine, CA
                            1
                                Travel expenses, research grant, honoraria, serves on scientific advisory board for Zeltiq
                            2
                                Travel expenses and honoraria from Zeltiq

5:22 pm – 5:27 pm     70    COMPARISON OF LASER-ASSISTED LIPOLYSIS AND LIPOSUCTION:
                            HISTOLOGY AND SPLIT-BODY CLINICAL RESULTS
(ePoster available)
                            Robert Weiss1, Jeffrey Angobaldo2, Sean Doherty3, Brooke Seckel1, Maryland
                            Laser, Skin and Vein Institute, Baltimore, MD, Renaissance Plastic Surgery,
                            Plano, TX, Boston Plastic Surgery Associates, Concord, MA
                            1
                              Equipment and research grant from Palomar
                            2
                              Equipment from Palomar
                            3
                              Salary from Palomar




                                                                                                                             41
                         Cutaneous Laser                                  2011 Annual Conference
                                                                          Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                          Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                          Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                         Surgery Session                                  Grapevine, TX

                             Friday, April 1, 2011


5:28 pm – 5:33 pm   71   A 24-WEEK CONTROLLED TRIAL TO ASSESS THE EFFECTS OF AN INTENSE
                         ULTRASOUND TREATMENT ON LOWER FACE SKIN LAXITY USING A NOVEL 3-
                         D SELF-POSITIONING LASER SCANNER
                         Daniel Barolet1, Mathieu Auclair2, Francois Barolet2, Virginie C. Barolet2,
                         Isabelle Lussier3, McGill University, RoseLab Skin Optics Research Laboratory,
                         Montreal, Canada
                         1
                          Equipment from Northern Optotronics and Ulthera
                         2
                          Salary from RoseLab Skin Optics Research Laboratory
                         3
                          Consulting fees from RoseLab Skin Optics Research Laboratory
                         •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

5:34 pm - 5:39 pm   72   A NOVEL METHOD FOR OBJECTIVELY ASSESSING LIPOSUCTION OUTCOMES:
                         3-DIMENSIONAL SURFACE IMAGING
                         Elliot Weiss, Lori Brightman, Roy Geronemus, Laser & Skin Surgery Center of
                         New York, New York, NY
                         •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

5:40 pm – 5:45 pm   73   HIGH-INTENSITY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND DEVICE FOR NON-INVASIVE BODY
                         CONTOURING: AGREEMENT OF OBJECTIVE AND SUBJECTIVE AESTHETIC
                         OUTCOMES
                         Jeffrey Dover1, Patrick Martin2, Ira Lawrence2, The Sculpt Group, Skin Care
                         Physicians, Chestnut Hill, MA, Medicis Technologies Corporation, Scottsdale,
                         AZ
                         1
                           Consulting fees from Iridex, Lumenis, Medicis, Shaser, Solta, Zeltiq; stockholder with CVS/Skin
                         Effects and Shaser; research grant from Allergan, Cynosure, Lumenis, Medicis, Merz Pharma,
                         OpusMed, Palomar, Shaser, Solta, and Syneron
                         2
                           Salary from Medicis
                         •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

                         LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT

5:46 pm – 5:51 pm        EFFICACY OF A NOVEL BI-DIRECTIONAL SIDELIGHT OPTICAL FIBER AND
                         1440nm Nd:YAG LASER IN THE TREATMENT OF CELLULITE AS MEASURED
                         BY 3-DIMENSIONAL SURFACE IMAGING
                         Bruce Katz, Juva Skin & Laser Center, New York, NY

5:52 pm – 6:10 pm        Q&A




42
                                 Photobiomodulation                                    2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                       Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                       Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                       Session                                         Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                       Grapevine, TX

                                        Friday, April 1, 2011

Photobiomodulation – Texas 4-6                                                                           1:00 pm – 6:15 pm

Directors: Juanita J. Anders, Ph.D., Michael Hamblin, M.D.

Disclosures
Juanita J. Anders received equipment from Irradia Laser Therapy Systems, Lite Cure, LLC and PhotoThera
Michael Hamblin – No disclosure

Educational Needs
The purpose of this session is to present and discuss the latest findings in pre-clinical (in vitro and in vivo
experiments) and clinical investigations on the critical parameters, mechanism, and effectiveness of light as a
therapy for a broad range of clinical applications. Light and its photonic effects and photo-medicine in
general have gained recognition as an area of innovative and novel research with significant clinical
implications.
Participants
Any scientist, engineer, medical practitioner, individual in industry, as well as other health care professionals
involved in biomedical applications of lasers are invited to participate in these sessions.
Background Requirements
Participants should have an understanding of light interaction with biological tissues and basic and clinical
research.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
This session will provide the latest data on basic science and clinical application of low intensity light in a
wide spectrum of applications. The participants will increase their knowledge in this area and hopefully be
stimulated to formulate new ideas to identify the mechanisms involved and the critical parameters needed
for successful clinical application of light.
"Hot Topics"
•    New techniques for delivering laser energy deeper into tissues
•    New clinical applications for photobiomodulation including:
     • Treatment of depression
     • Treatment of severe tracheal stenosis
     • Light therapy as a promising treatment for traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury and peripheral
       nerve injury
     • Photoactivated antimicrobial collagen for wound care
     • Transcutaneous light treatment for reduction of subcutaneous fat

                        PHOTOBIOMODULATION: BASIC SCIENCE AND PRE-CLINICAL STUDIES

                                                       INVITED SPEAKER

1:00 pm – 1:34 pm                      THE EFFECT OF LOW LEVEL LASER THERAPY ON OTOTOXICITY AND NOISE
                                       INDUCED HEARING LOSS
                                       Chung-Ku Rhee, Dankook University, College of Medicine, Medical Laser
                                       Research Center, Cheonan, Korea
1:35 pm – 1:44 pm                      Discussion

1:45 pm – 1:54 pm             145      NEW TECHNIQUE FOR DELIVERING LASER ENERGY DEEPER INTO TISSUE
                                       Sean Wang, Qun Li, Kerith Wang, B&W TEK, Inc., Newark, DE
                                       •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
1:55 pm – 1:59 pm                      Discussion

                                                                                                                            43
                       Photobiomodulation                                   2011 Annual Conference
                                                                            Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                            Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                             Session                                        Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                            Grapevine, TX

                            Friday, April 1, 2011


2:00 pm – 2:09 pm           EFFECTIVE POWER AND ENERGY DENSITIES DIFFER WITH WAVELENGTH IN
                            VIVO AND IN VITRO
                            Juanita J. Anders, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences,
                            Bethesda, MD
2:10 pm – 2:14 pm           Discussion

2:15 pm – 2:24 pm     147   EFFECTS OF VEGF MIMICKING PEPTIDES AND PHOTORADIATION ON WOUND
                            HEALING IN A MURINE PRESSURE ULCER MODEL
(ePoster available)
                            Istvan Stadler1, Raymond Lanzafame2, Rochester General Hospital,
                            Rochester, NY
                            1
                             Equipment from Quantum Devices
                            2
                             Equipment from Quantum Devices; consulting fees from Duetchebank, GLG Councils and
                            Leerink Swan; editor-in-chief of Photomedicine and Laser Surgery; editorial board of General
                            Surgery News, Journal of Laparoendoscopic Surgery, Journal of the Society of Laparoscopic
                            Surgeons, and Lasers in Medical Sciences
                            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
2:25 pm – 2:29 pm           Discussion

2:30 pm – 2:39 pm     148   PHOTOACTIVATED ANTIMICROBIAL COLLAGEN REDUCES BIOBURDEN IN A
                            MURINE PRESSURE ULCER MODEL
(ePoster available)
                            Raymond Lanzafame1, Istvan Stadler2, Ryan Cunningham3, Robert Soltz4,
                            Barbara Soltz3, Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, NY, Conversion
                            Energy Enterprises, Spring Valley, NY
                            1
                              Equipment and intellectual property rights with Conversion Energy Enterprises; research grant
                            from NIH NIGM Grant #1R43GM087753-01; editor-in-chief of Photomedicine and Laser Surgery;
                            editorial board of General Surgery News, Journal of Laparoendoscopic Surgery, Journal of the
                            Society of Laparoscopic Surgeons, and Lasers in Medical Sciences
                            2
                              Equipment from Conversion Energy Enterprises; research grant from NIH NIGM Grant
                            #1R43GM087753-01
                            3
                              Equipment from Conversion Energy Enterprises
                            4
                              Equipment, stockholder, equity position, intellectual property rights with Conversion Energy
                            Enterprises; research grant from NIH NIGM Grant #1R43GM087753-01
                            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
2:40 pm – 2:44 pm           Discussion

2:45 pm – 3:44 pm           Break – Visit the Exhibits and ePosters

3:45 pm – 4:19 pm     149   IN VITRO AND IN VIVO STUDIES OF LLLT FOR TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY
                            Michael Hamblin1, Weijun Xuan1, Qiuhe Wu1, Ying-Ying Huang1, Sulbha K.
(ePoster available)
                            Sharma1, Gitika B. Kharkwal1, Wellman Center for Photomedicine,
                            Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, MIT
                            Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, MA
                            1
                             Equipment and research grant from PhotoThera
                            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
4:20 pm – 4:29 pm           Discussion




44
                                  Photobiomodulation                                      2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                          Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                          Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                        Session                                           Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                          Grapevine, TX
                                         Friday, April 1, 2011


4:30 pm – 4:39 pm               150       PULSE LIGHT IRRADIATION IMPROVES BEHAVIORAL OUTCOME IN A RAT
                                          MODEL OF CHRONIC MILD STRESS
(ePoster available)
                                          Xingjia Wuj, Stephanie Alberico, Helina Moges, Ruchir Sehra, Luis
                                          DeTaboada, Juanita Anders1, Uniformed Services University of the Health
                                          Sciences, Bethesda, MD, PhotoThera, Inc., Carlsbad, CA
                                          1
                                           Equipment from Photothera
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
4:40 pm – 4:44 pm                         Discussion

4:45 pm – 4:54 pm               151       980nm LASER IRRADIATION IMPROVED FUNCTIONAL RECOVERY AFTER
                                          PERONEAL NERVE INJURY IN RABBITS
                                          Helina Moges, Xingjia Wu, Brian Pryor, Jason Smith, Juanita Anders1,
                                          Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD,
                                          LiteCure, Newark, NJ
                                          1
                                           Equipment from LiteCure
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
4:55 pm – 4:59 pm                         Discussion

5:00 pm – 5:09 pm               152       COMBINED OCT AND MULTI-PHOTON LUMINESCENCE MICROSCOPY FOR
                                          MACROPHAGE DETECTION IN ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUES USING
(ePoster available)                       PLASMONIC GOLD NANOROSE
                                          Tianyi Wangih, S.M. Shams Kazmi, Jordan Dwelle, Veronika Sapozhnikova,
                                          Jake Mancuso, Brian Willsey, Keith Johnston, Marc Feldman, Andrew Dunn,
                                          Thomas Milner, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, University of Texas
                                          Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

5:10 pm – 5:14 pm                         Discussion

                                          LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT

5:15 pm – 5:24 pm                         810nm LOW LEVEL LASER THERAPY PENETRATION: THE EFFECTS OF
                                          DIFFERENT BEAM PROFILES IN REACHING DEEP ANATOMICAL TARGETS
                                          James Carroll1, THOR Photomedicine, Chesham, Bucks, United Kingdom
                                          1
                                           Equipment, travel expenses, salary, stockholder, equity position and intellectual property
                                          rights with THOR Photomedicine
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
5:25 pm - 5:29 pm                         Discussion




jBest Overall Basic Science Award Recipient.
hBest Student/Resident Photobiomodulation Award Recipient.
iRecipient of U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research travel grant.




                                                                                                                                    45
                        Photobiomodulation                                 2011 Annual Conference
                                                                           Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                              Session                                      Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                           Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                           Grapevine, TX
                                Friday, April 1, 2011


                            LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT

5:30 pm – 5:39 pm           PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF MULTIPLE PHOTOACTIVATED
                            ANTIMICROBIAL COLLAGEN TREATMENTS ON BIOBURDEN IN INFECTED
                            MURINE PRESSURE ULCERS
                            Istvan Stadler1, Raymond Lanzafame2, Aaron Muhlbauer, Jacob Griggs,
                            Robert Soltz3, Barbara Soltz3, Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, NY,
                            Conversion Energy Enterprises, Spring Valley, NY
                            1
                              Equipment from Conversion Energy Enterprises, Carestream Health, PathoLase; research grant
                            from NIH NIGM Grant #1R43GM087753-01
                            2
                              Equipment from Conversion Energy Enterprises, Carestream Health, PathoLase; research grant
                            from NIH NIGM Grant #1R43GM087753-01; intellectual property rights with conversion Energy
                            3
                              Equipment, stockholder, equity position, and intellectual property rights with Conversion
                            Energy Enterprises; research grant NIH NIGM Grant #1R43GM087753-01
                            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
5:40 pm - 5:44 pm           Discussion

5:45 pm – 5:54 pm     155   THE EFFECTS OF RED LIGHT ON HIGH GLUCOSE INDUCED DYSFUNCTIONAL
                            MYOBLASTS AND THEIR MECHANISM
(ePoster available)
                            Fang-Hui Li, En-Xiu Wei, Yan-Ying Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi Liu, Laboratory of
                            Laser Sports Medicine, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, China
                            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
5:55 pm – 5:59 pm           Discussion

6:00 pm – 6:09 pm     156   SIRTUIN1-MEDIATED PHOTOPROMOTION ON TNF-ALPHA INHIBITED
                            EXPRESSION OF CIRCADIAN CLOCK GENES IN CULTURED NIH3T3
(ePoster available)         FIBROBLASTS
                            De-Feng Wu, Ling Zhu, Timon Cheng-Yi Liu, Laboratory of Laser Sports
                            Medicine, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, China
                            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
6:10 pm – 6:15 pm           Discussion




46
                                  Photodynamic                                  2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                 Therapy Session                                Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                Grapevine, TX

                                  Friday, April 1, 2011

Photodynamic Therapy – Texas D                                                                    1:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Director: Ron R. Allison, M.D.

Invited Speakers: Keith A. Cengal, M.D., Ph.D., Rosa Cuenca, M.D., Gordon H. Downie, M.D., Ph.D., M. Sam
Eljamel, M.D., Colin Hopper, B.D.S., M.B.B.S., M.D., F.D.S., F.R.C.S., Thomas S. Mang, Ph.D., Herbert C.
Wolfsen, M.D.

Educational Needs
The PDT mini-symposium will include competitively chosen abstracts and invited expert lectures. Topics
include: oncologic photodynamic therapy for skin, neurologic, head and neck, pulmonary, GI and GU cancers
as well as non-oncologic therapy for cutaneous and non-cutaneous lesions and infections. The future
indications and innovations in PDT will also be discussed.
Participants
This session is designed for scientists, dermatologists, surgeons, pulmonologists, gastroenterologists, and
urologists interested in photodynamic therapy.
Background Requirements
Although it is not a prerequisite, attendees would ideally have some basic understanding of laser tissue
interactions. Individual attendees do not need to have significant experience or expertise in laser medicine or
surgery.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
At the conclusion of the session, attendees will have an overview of the current status and future endeavors
in oncologic and non-oncologic photodynamic therapy.
Hot Topics
• Nanoparticles in PDT
• PDT of infections
• Improved PDT for skin cancers
• The use of PDT in lung cancers
• The use of PDT in GI cancers
• The use of PDT in GU cancers
• The future of PDT
• Photodynamic therapy uses light to treat cancer and non-cancerous lesions and infections. Technological
   innovation has allowed PDT to achieve lesion ablation with excellent cosmetic and functional outcome.
   This session will highlight these achievements.
              MINI SYMPOSIA: NEURO AND HEAD AND NECK PRESENTATIONS AND ABSTRACTS
                                         M. Sam Eljamel, Colin Hopper

1:00 pm – 1:09 pm        168     IN VITRO STUDY OF THE PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY OF NANO-
                                 PHOTOSENSITIZER ON HUMAN ORAL TONGUE CANCER CAL-27 CELLS
(ePoster available)
                                 Pingping Li, Guolin Li, Yan Pang, Lingyue Sheb, Qing Xu, Jizhong Gu, Guoyu
                                 Zhou, Xinyuan Zhu, Michael Hamblin, Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao
                                 Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai Research Institute of
                                 Stomatology, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Stomatology, College of Chemistry
                                 and Chemical Technology, Shanghai, China, First Affiliated Hospital of
                                 Haerbin Medical University, Haerbin, China, Wellman Center for
                                 Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
                                 •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use


                                                                                                                     47
                                         Photodynamic                                    2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                         Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                         Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                        Therapy Session                                  Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                         Grapevine, TX

                                              Friday, April 1, 2011


1:10 pm – 1:19 pm              169        PDT DISINFECTION OF ORAL BIOFILM
                                          Thomas Mang, Lynn Mikulshi, Dharam Tayal, Robert Baier, SUNY at Buffalo
                                          School of Dental Medicine, Buffalo, NY
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

1:20 pm – 1:29 pm              170        MECHANISMS OF ANTIMICROBIAL PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY: AN IN VITRO
                                          STUDY ON GRAM NEGATIVE AND GRAM POSITIVE BACTERIA
(ePoster available)
                                          Liyi Huangih, Michael Hamblin, Wellman Center for Photomedicine,
                                          Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

1:30 pm – 1:39 pm              171        MECHANISM OF PROPIONIBACTERIUM ACNE DESTRUCTION BY INITIATION
                                          OF REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES BY 414nm ABSORPTION
                                          Caerwyn Ash1, Llinos Harris2, Thierry Maffeis, Marc Clement3, Gareth
                                          Stockman, Michael Kiernan3, Godfrey Town3, Swansea University, University
                                          of Wales, Global Academy, Swansea, United Kingdom
                                          1
                                            Equipment and salary from CyDen; travel expenses from Swansea University
                                          2
                                            Equipment from CyDen
                                          3
                                            Consulting fees from CyDen
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

1:40 pm – 1:44 pm                         Co-Chair Critique of Abstracts

                             MINI SYMPOSIA: PULMONARY PRESENTATIONS AND ABSTRACTS
                                                Gordon H. Downie

1:45 pm – 2:04 pm                         PDT AS PART OF MULTIDISCIPLINARY THORACIC ONCOLOCY
                                          Gordon H. Downie, Northeast Texas Interventional Medicine, Mt. Pleasant,
                                          TX

2:05 pm – 2:29 pm                         PDT FOR THE TREATMENT OF PERIPHERAL LUNG CANCERS
                                          Gordon H. Downie, Northeast Texas Interventional Medicine, Mt. Pleasant,
                                          TX

2:30 pm – 2:44 pm                         Q&A

2:45 pm – 3:44 pm                         Break - Visit the Exhibits and ePosters

                                 MINI SYMPOSIA: GI/GU PRESENTATIONS AND ABSTRACTS
                                          Herbert C. Wolfsen, Keith A. Cengal

3:45 pm – 4:04 pm                         PDT IN GASTROENTEROLOGY: A LOST DECADE
                                          Herbert C. Wolfsen, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL

4:05 pm – 4:29 pm                         MOLECULARLY TARGETED APPROACHES TO PDT
                                          Keith A. Cengal, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

iRecipient of U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research travel grant.
hBest Student/Resident Photodynamic Therapy Award Recipient.




48
                                       Photodynamic                                     2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                        Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                        Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011

                                      Therapy Session                                   Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                        Grapevine, TX

                                          Friday, April 1, 2011

                                      MINI SYMPOSIA: TECHNOLOGY AND TREATMENT
                                              Thomas S. Mang, Rosa Cuenca

4:30 pm – 4:39 pm              176       TEMPERATURE MODULATED PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY FOR THE
                                         TREATMENT OF ACTINIC KERATOSES ON THE EXTREMITIES
                                         Andrea Willey1, Fernanda Sakamoto, Solano Dermatology, Laser & Skin
                                         Surgery Center, UC Davis, Sacramento, CA, Wellman Center for
                                         Photomedicine, Boston, MA
                                         1
                                           Equipment and research grant from DUSA Pharmaceuticals
                                         •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

4:40 pm – 4:49 pm              177       FRACTIONAL CO2 LASER IMPROVES TREATMENT OF NBCC WITH ALA-PDT
                                         Roman Smucler, Jan Lippert, Marek Vlk, Charles University, Prague, Czech
                                         Republic
                                         •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

4:50 pm – 4:59 pm              178       NEW TOPICAL PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY FOR MANAGEMENT OF PRIMARY
                                         AXILLARY HYPERHIDROSIS
                                         Manal Salah, Abeer Attiai, Maha Fadel, Shahira Almenshawy, National
                                         Institute of Enhanced Laser Sciences, Cairo, Egypt
                                         •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

5:00 pm – 5:09 pm              179       INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF NON-COHERENT BLUE LIGHT IN
                                         INTRALESIONAL PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY OF BASAL CELL CARCINOMA
(ePoster available)
                                         Robert Anolikj, Elliot T. Weiss, Anne Chapas, Leonard Bernstein, Lori
                                         Brightman, Elizabeth K. Hale, Julie K. Karen, Roy Geronemus1, Laser and
                                         Skin Surgery Center of New York, New York, NY
                                         1
                                           Stockholder with Solta
                                         •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

5:10 pm – 5:14 pm                        Co-Chair Critique of Abstracts

5:15 pm – 5:29 pm                        Q&A

5:30 pm – 6:00 pm                        FUTURE OF PDT AND PROGRAM SUMMARY
                                         Ron R. Allison
Disclosures
Ron R. Allison – No disclosure
Keith A. Cengel – No disclosure
Rosa Cuenca - No disclosure
Gordan H. Downie - No disclosure
M. Sam Eljamel – No disclosure
Colin Hopper – No disclosure
Thomas S. Mang - No disclosure
Herbert C. Wolfsen – No disclosure



jRecipient of Richard E. Fitzpatrick Clinical Research and Innovations Award.
iRecipient of U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research travel grant.




                                                                                                                             49
                                           Surgical/ILT                                 2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                        Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                        Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                             Session                                    Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                        Grapevine, TX
                                         Friday, April 1, 2011

Surgical Applications and Interstitial Laser Therapy – Texas 2-3                                             1:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Directors: Raymond J. Lanzafame, M.D., M.B.A., Roger J. McNichols, Ph.D., Karl-G. Tranberg, M.D., Ph.D.,
Carson Wong, M.D., F.R.C.S.C., F.A.C.S.

Disclosures
Raymond J. Lanzafame received consulting fees from Deutsche Bank, Gerson Lehman, GLG Councils, ATRMUS, and medical device start
ups on a contract/fee for service basis. Also note that I am an SGE appointee to FDA CDRH ODE General and Plastic Surgery Devices and
other medical advisory panels
Roger McNichols received travel expenses from Bio Tex, Inc.; salary, stockholder, equity position, and intellectual property rights with
Bio Tex, Inc. and Visualase, Inc.
Karl-G.Tranberg received travel expenses, consulting fees, stockholder, equity position, and intellectual property rights with Clinical
Laserthermia Systems AB
Carson Wong received consulting fees from American Medical Systems, Inc.

Educational Needs
This session will present and discuss topical surgical applications in a variety of disciplines including general
surgery, ophthalmology, plastic surgery, urology, vascular surgery and surgical research. These combined
disciplines will report relevant clinical and laboratory investigations in a diverse cross section of biomedicine.
It is expected that interdisciplinary interaction and dialogue regarding laser tissue interaction, clinical and
basic research results will provide new insights and meet the educational need of participants attending these
sessions.
Participants
Any scientist, student, engineer, medical practitioner, and personnel involved in other aspects of health care,
and/or industries, as well as all with an interest in these topical areas are invited to attend.
Background Requirements
Individuals who participate in the sessions should have a basic interest in laser medicine and surgery and the
potential applications of these technologies. Although it is not a prerequisite, attendees would ideally have
some basic understanding of laser tissue interactions. Individual attendees do not need to have significant
experience or expertise in laser medicine or surgery.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
These sessions will provide cutting-edge information on surgical applications and interstitial laser therapy.
Participants will sample a menu of scientific presentations and have the opportunity to discuss findings with
presenters, colleagues, and peers. Participants are expected to increase their knowledge regarding basic
science and clinical applications. Various ablation or tissue destruction methods including lasers and ILT will
be presented, with reference to clinical practice and current applications. After engaging in this educational
activity participants will be able to describe current clinical techniques for focal/local tumor control or lesion
production and other applications. It is hoped that dialogue and didactic material will enable the participants
to formulate new ideas and apply new techniques and principles to solve clinical and basic science problems
relevant to their scope of practice.
"Hot Topics"
•    Use of gold-based nanoparticles to direct laser interstitial photothermal cancer therapy
•    MR-guided laser ablation of liver and kidney tumors
•    Laser interstitial thermotherapy and focal laser ablation for prostate cancer
•    Treatment planning optimization of photodynamic therapy of prostate cancer
•    Greenlight laser photoselective vaporization prostatectomy for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia
•    Photochemical tissue bonding: A potential strategy for treating limbal stem cell deficiency
•    Surface temperature distributions in rabbit auricular cartilage following laser cartilage reshaping with
     carbon dioxide spray cooling
•    Laser assisted facial rhytidectomy and facial rejuvenation
•    Treatment of cellulite using a 1440nm pulsed laser
•    High definition body contouring using laser assisted liposculpture
50
                                                Surgical/ILT                                 2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                             Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                             Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011

                                                  Session                                    Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                             Grapevine, TX

                                              Friday, April 1, 2011

                                                    GENERAL APPLICATIONS OF ILT

1:00 pm - 1:09 pm              181        USE OF GOLD-BASED NANOPARTICLES TO DIRECT LASER INTERSTITIAL
                                          PHOTOTHERMAL CANCER THERAPY
                                          Jon Schwartz1, Glenn Goodrich2, Kelly Gill-Sharp2, J. Donald Payne3,
                                          Nanospectra Biosciences, Inc., Houston, TX
                                          1
                                            Equipment, travel expenses, salary, stockholder, and intellectual property rights with
                                          Nanospectra
                                          2
                                            Equipment, salary, stockholder, and intellectual property rights with Nanospectra
                                          3
                                            Equipment, stockholder, equity position and intellectual property rights with Nanospectra
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
1:10 pm – 1:14 pm                         Discussion

1:15 pm - 1:24 pm              182        MR-GUIDED LASER ABLATION OF LIVER AND KIDNEY TUMORS
                                          Ashok Gowda1, Eric Walser, Visualase, Inc., Houston, TX, Mayo Clinic,
                                          Jacksonville, FL
                                          1
                                              Travel expenses, salary, stockholder, and equity position with Visualase
1:25 pm – 1:29 pm                         Discussion
                                                   PROSTATE APPLICATIONS OF ILT

                                    2009 ASLMS STUDENT RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENT

1:30 pm - 1:39 pm              183        LASER INTERSTITIAL THERMOTHERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER: ANIMAL
                                          MODEL AND NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF TEMPERATURE AND DAMAGE
(ePoster available)                       DISTRIBUTION
                                          Mohamad-Feras Marqai, Pierre Colin, Pierre Nevoux, Serge Mordon, Nacim
                                          Betrouni, CHRU Lille and Inserm, U703, Université Lille Nord de France,
                                          Lille, France
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
1:40 pm – 1:44 pm                         Discussion

1:45 pm – 1:54 pm              184        A PHANTOM FOR INTERSTITIAL LASER THERMOTHERAPY OF PROSTATE
                                          CANCER TRAINING
(ePoster available)
                                          Pierre Nevoux, Pierre Colin, Serge Mordon, Bertrand Leroux, Nasr Makni,
                                          Mohamad Feras Marqa, Philippe Puech, Arnauld Villers, Nacim Betrouni,
                                          CHRU Lille and Inserm, U703, Université Lille Nord de France, Lille, France
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
1:55 pm – 1:59 pm                         Discussion

2:00 pm - 2:09 pm              185        MINIMALLY INVASIVE FOCAL LASER ABLATION FOR PROSTATE TUMORS
                                          Anil Shetty1, Ashok Gowda2, Roger McNichols2, Visualase, Inc., Houston, TX
(ePoster available)                       1
                                           Travel expenses and salary from Visualase
                                          2
                                           Travel expenses, salary, stockholder, equity position, and intellectual property rights with
                                          Visualase
2:10 pm – 2:14 pm                         Discussion

2:15 pm - 2:24 pm              186        COMPARISON OF TISSUE EFFECTS AFTER PAL, WAL, SAL, UAL AND LAL
                                          Afschin Fatemi, S-thetic Clinic, Duesseldorf, Germany
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
2:25 pm – 2:29 pm                         Discussion
iRecipient of U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research travel grant.
                                                                                                                                     51
                                                Surgical/ILT                                  2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                              Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                                  Session                                     Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                              Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                              Grapevine, TX
                                              Friday, April 1, 2011

2:30 pm - 2:39 pm              187        TREATMENT PLANNING OPTIMIZATION OF PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY OF
                                          PROSTATE CANCER USING WST11-TOOKAD SOLUBLE
(ePoster available)
                                          Nacim Betrouni, Renaud Lopes, Marqa Mohamad-Feras, Pierre Colin, Pierre
                                          Nevoux, Serge Mordon, CHRU Lille and Inserm, U703, Université Lille Nord de
                                          France, Lille, France
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
2:40 pm – 2:44 pm                         Discussion

2:45 pm – 3:44 pm                         Break – Visit the Exhibits and ePosters

                                                           UROLOGIC SURGERY

3:45 pm – 3:54 pm              188        THE 180W GREENLIGHT XPS - LASER PHOTOSELECTIVE VAPORIZATION
                                          PROSTATECTOMY FOR SYMPTOMATIC BENIGN PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA:
                                          PRELIMINARY RESULTS
                                          Kurt Strom, Xiao Gu, Massimiliano Spaliviero, Carson Wong1, The University
                                          of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK
                                          1
                                              Consulting fees from American Medical Systems
3:55 pm – 3:59 pm                         Discussion

4:00 pm - 4:09 pm              189        INCIDENCE OF URETHERAL STRICTURES FOLLOWING LASER ABLATION OF
                                          TCC
                                          Kelly Healy4, Arturo Colon-Herdman, Nicholas Leone, Scott Hubosky,
                                          Demetrius Bagley, Thomas Jefferson, Philadelphia, PA
4:10 pm – 4:14 pm                         Discussion
                                                      OPHTHALMOLOGIC SURGERY

                                              2008/2009 RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENT

4:15 pm – 4:24 pm              190        PHOTOCHEMICAL TISSUE BONDING: A POTENTIAL STRATEGY FOR
                                          TREATING LIMBAL STEM CELL DEFICIENCY
(ePoster available)
                                          Chuan Gui, Robert Redmond, Irene Kochevar, Ying Wang, Min Yao, Wellman
                                          Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical
                                          School, Boston, MA
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
4:25 pm - 4:29 pm                         Discussion
                                                            PLASTIC SURGERY

4:30 pm – 4:39 pm              191        EX VIVO EVALUATION OF LASER AURICULAR CARTILAGE RESHAPING WITH
                                          CARBON DIOXIDE SPRAY COOLING IN A RABBIT MODEL
(ePoster available)
                                          Edward C. Wu1h, Victor Sun, Wangcun Jia, Dmitriy E. Protsenko, Cyrus T.
                                          Manuel, Brian J.F. Wong, J. Stuart Nelson, Beckman Laser Institute and
                                          Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, CA
                                          1
                                            Financial grant from ASLMS Student/Research grant
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
4:40 pm - 4:44 pm                         Discussion

iRecipient of U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research travel grant.
4Recipient of ASLMS travel grant.
hBest Student/Resident Surgical Applications/Interstitial Laser Therapy Award Recipient.

52
                                  Surgical/ILT                               2011 Annual Conference
                                                                             Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                             Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                    Session                                  Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                             Grapevine, TX
                                Friday, April 1, 2011


4:45 pm – 4:54 pm     192   LASER ASSISTED FACIAL RHYTIDECTOMY AND FACIAL REJUVENATION: A
                            REVIEW OF THE FIRST 500 PROCEDURES
                            Richard Gentile1, Northeastern Ohio College of Medicine, Youngstown, OH
                            1
                                Equipment, travel expenses, honoraria from Cynosure
4:55 pm - 4:59 pm           Discussion

5:00 pm – 5:09 pm     193   TREATMENT OF CELLULITE WITH 1-YEAR FOLLOW-UP USING A 1440nm
                            PULSED LASER: PRELIMINARY REPORT
                            Barry DiBernardo1, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey,
                            Newark, NJ
                            1
                              Equipment, consulting fees, research grant from Cynosure
                            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
5:10 pm - 5:14 pm           Discussion

5:15 pm – 5:24 pm     194   HIGH DEFINITION BODY CONTOURING USING LASER ASSISTED
                            LIPOSCULPTURE
(ePoster available)
                            Jamal Jomah, Med Art Clinics, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
                            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
5:25 pm - 5:29 pm           Discussion

5:30 pm – 5:39 pm     195   A CONCEPT OF BODY CONTOURING BY COMBINING MINIMAL INVASIVE AND
                            NON-INVASIVE PROCEDURES: LASER LIPOLYSIS, RADIOFREQUENCY AND
(ePoster available)         ACOUSTIC WAVES
                            Katharina Russe-Wilflingseder, Manfred Herold, Elisabeth Russe, Plastische
                            Chirurgie und Laserzentrum, Innsbruck, Austria
5:40 pm – 5:44 pm           Discussion
                                             GENERAL SURGERY

5:45 pm – 5:54 pm     196   LASER HEMORRHOIDECTOMY: RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF AN EFFECTIVE
                            AND AMBULATORY HEMORRHOIDECTOMY
(ePoster available)
                            Manish Khandelwal, M. Hemadri, E. Ewart, P.J. Moore, Scunthorpe, United
                            Kingdom
5:55 pm - 6:00 pm           Discussion




                                                                                                                  53
     2011 Annual Conference
     Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
     Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
     Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
     Grapevine, TX




54
                                               Clinical                                  2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                         Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                             Application                                 Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                         Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                         Grapevine, TX
                                              Courses
                                        (Intermediate/Advanced)
                                        Saturday, April 2, 2011

No CME credits and CE contact hours for the Student/Post-Doc/Resident Opportunities course are available.


Student/Post-Doc/Resident Opportunities – Texas 2-3                                                           7:30 am – 9:00 am

Director: Jennifer K. Barton, Ph.D., Thomas E. Milner, Ph.D.

Faculty: R. Rox Anderson, M.D., Bernard Choi, Ph.D., E. Duco Jansen, Ph.D.

Educational Needs
Pre-career professionals will learn about examples of successful scientist/physician careers. They will also
learn about funding opportunities available to them.
Participants
The course is designed for all future physicians, residents, and fellows.
Background Requirements
There are no special background requirements.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
The course will include information on career progression, including the importance of publishing, how to find
training fellowships, and information about research funding.

7:30 am - 7:34 am            Welcome and Introductions - Jennifer K. Barton, Thomas E. Milner
7:35 am - 7:44 am            Publications - How Your Published Work Impacts Your Career Options - Jennifer K.
                               Barton
7:45   am   - 7:54 am        Pre- and Post-Doctoral Fellowship Opportunities - Thomas E. Milner
7:55   am   - 8:14 am        Supporting Your Research – Building Collaborations – R. Rox Anderson
8:15   am   - 8:29 am        Supporting Your Research - How to Find Research Funding Opportunities – Bernard Choi
8:30   am   - 8:49 am        Supporting Your Research – Tips for Writing Proposals – E. Duco Jansen
8:50   am   - 9:00 am        Discussion and Wrap-Up – All Faculty

Disclosures
R. Rox Anderson received royalties from Massachusetts General Hospital which owns and licenses patents on laser hair removal, fractional
laser treatments, and cryolipolysis; serves on scientific advisory boards for PhotoMedex and Ulthera
Jennifer K. Barton – No disclosure
Bernard Choi – No disclosure
E. Duco Jansen received a salary, royalties, research grant, and intellectual property rights from Vanderbilt University; research grant
from NIH, DOD, HFSP, and Lockheed-Martin
Thomas E. Milner – No disclosure




                                                                                                                                  55
                                           Clinical                          2011 Annual Conference
                                                                             Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                         Application                         Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                             Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                             Grapevine, TX
                                          Courses
                                     (Intermediate/Advanced)
                                    Saturday, April 2, 2011
A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses. CME credits and CE contact hours
available.

Technologies for Fat Related Disorders – Longhorn F                                             7:00 am – 9:00 am

Directors: Neil S. Sadick, M.D., F.A.A.D., F.A.A.C.S., F.A.C.P., F.A.C.Ph., Brian D. Zelickson, M.D.

Faculty: Mathew M. Avram, M.D., J.D., Lori Brightman, M.D., A. Jay Burns, M.D., Henry H.L. Chan, M.D.,
Ph.D., F.R.C.P., Barry E. DiBernardo, M.D., Misbah H. Khan, M.D., Dieter Manstein, M.D., Jason N. Pozner,
M.D.

ACCME Accreditation Statement
The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. is accredited by the Accreditation Council for
Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
Continuing Medical Education Credit
The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. designates this live activity for a maximum of 2
AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of
their participation in the activity.
Continuing Education Credit
This offering by the ASLMS, in conjunction with Professional Medical Education Association is accredited for
2.4 contact hours. Professional Medical Education Association is approved by the California Board of
Registered Nursing, Provider # CEP 12386. Note: Most State Boards of Nursing accept another State Board’s
approval for granting credits. Check with the Board of Nursing in your state for clarification. Certificates of
Attendance will be provided. You will receive a statement of CE contact hours after the Annual
Conference.

Educational Needs
This course will provide information on new technologies, indications for cellulite, non-invasive lipolysis and
technology associated liposuction.
Participants
This course is designed for medical doctors utilizing these technologies.
Background Requirements
Participants should have an understanding of the treatment of cellulite, fat deposits, and liposuction in
clinical practice.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
It is expected that participants will understand the appropriate use of these technologies, identify new
treatment paradigms, understand integration of multiple technologies, and to be able to recognize and
manage complications.
7:00 am - 7:05 am           Discussion and Pre-Test - Neil S. Sadick, Brian D. Zelickson
7:06 am - 7:16 am           Basic Science Advances in Adipocyte Structure and Function - Misbah H. Khan
7:17 am - 7:27 am           Cellulite Technologies - Controversies in Technology - Why is Cellulite so Difficult to
                             Treat? - Mathew M. Avram
7:28 am - 7:38 am           Cellulite Technologies - Proven Effective Techniques - New Generational Approaches
                             Lori Brightman
7:39   am   -   7:49   am   RF Ultrasound and Laser Assisted Liposuction Approaches - Barry E. DiBernardo
7:50   am   -   8:00   am   RF Ultrasound and Laser Assisted Liposuction Approaches - Jason N. Pozner
8:01   am   -   8:11   am   Non-Invasive Lipolyctic Technologies - Henry H.L. Chan
8:12   am   -   8:22   am   Non-Invasive Lipolyctic Technologies - A. Jay Burns

56
                                               Clinical                                   2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                          Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                             Application                                  Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                          Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                          Grapevine, TX
                                              Courses
                                       (Intermediate/Advanced)
                                       Saturday, April 2, 2011
A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses. CME credits and CE contact hours
available.

Technologies for Fat Related Disorders Continued – Longhorn F                                                  7:00 am – 9:00 am

8:23 am - 8:33 am            New Technologies on the Horizon - Dieter Manstein
8:34 am - 8:54 am            Q&A - All Faculty
8:55 am - 9:00 am            Conclusion and Post Test - Neil S. Sadick, Brian D. Zelickson
Disclosures
Mathew M. Avram is a stockholder with Zeltiq
Lori Brightman received equipment from and is a clinical investigator for Candela, DUSA, Invasix, Lutronics, Lythera, Palomar, Solta,
Syneron, and Zeltiq; travel expenses and honoraria from Candela, DUSA, Lutronics, Solta, and Syneron; stockholder with Invasix;
A. Jay Burns received discount from Cutera, Cynosure, Palomar, Sciton, Zeltiq, and Zimmer; stockholder with SkinMedica and Zeltiq;
research grant from Solta, Uthera, and Zeltiq; honoraria from Sciton, Solta, Ulthera, and Zeltiq; medical advisory board for Ulthera and
Zeltiq
Henry H.L. Chan received financial grant from Lumenis; equipment from Candela, Elemé, Lumenis, Palomar, Solta, Syneron, Zeltiq;
discount from Candela; stockholder with Lumenis, Solta
Barry E. DiBernardo received royalties from Elsevier; consulting fees from Canfield, Cutera, Cynosure, Human Med, and Obagi; honoraria
from Cutera, Cynosure, and Zeltiq; research grant from Ethicon and Obagi; serves on clinical advisory board for Merz; clinical studies for
Lithera
Misbah H. Khan – No disclosure
Dieter Manstein received equipment from Quantel Derma and Solta; consulting fees from Elemé, Quantel Derma and Zeltiq; research
grant from Candela and Lumenis; stockholder with Zeltiq, royalties from Massachusetts General Hospital due to licensing contracts with
Candela, Elemé, Palomar, Solta, Zeltiq and Zimmer
Jason N. Pozner received equipment from DEKA, Elemé, Sciton, Syneron; consulting fees from Sciton, Syneron, and Ulthera; discount
from Alma and Zeltiq; stockholder with Sciton; research grant from Aesthera, Continuum Biomedical, Sciton, and Syneron; honoraria from
Sciton, Syneron, Ulthera, and Zeltiq
Neil S. Sadick received equipment from Osyris, SmoothShapes; research grant from Cynosure and Osyris
Brian D. Zelickson received equipment from Candela, Lumenis, and Syneron; consulting fees from Medicis; discount from Lumenis and
Syneron; research grant from Cutera, Lumenis, Palomar, Solta, Syneron, Ulthera, and Zeltiq; honoraria from Zeltiq; intellectual property
rights with Candela


Periorbital Therapies – Texas C                                                                                7:00 am – 9:00 am

Directors: Brian S. Biesman, M.D., F.A.C.S., Howard Conn, M.D.

Faculty: Jane Olson, M.D.

ACCME Accreditation Statement
The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. is accredited by the Accreditation Council for
Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
Continuing Medical Education Credit
The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. designates this live activity for a maximum of 2
AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of
their participation in the activity.
Continuing Education Credit
This offering by the ASLMS, in conjunction with Professional Medical Education Association is accredited for
2.4 contact hours. Professional Medical Education Association is approved by the California Board of
Registered Nursing, Provider # CEP 12386. Note: Most State Boards of Nursing accept another State Board’s
approval for granting credits. Check with the Board of Nursing in your state for clarification. Certificates of
Attendance will be provided. You will receive a statement of CE contact hours after the Annual
Conference.

                                                                                                                                   57
                                             Clinical                                   2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                        Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                           Application                                  Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                        Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                        Grapevine, TX

                                            Courses
                                      (Intermediate/Advanced)
                                     Saturday, April 2, 2011

A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses. CME credits and CE contact hours
available.

Periorbital Therapies Continued – Texas C                                                                    7:00 am – 9:00 am

Educational Needs
This course will help attendees understand the role of surgery, injectables, and lasers and other devices in
periorbital rejuvenation.
Participants
This course is designed for anyone with an interest in periorbital rejuvenation.
Background Requirements
This is a moderately advanced course for the individual who already has a working knowledge of the anatomy
and physiology of the periorbital region and who also has a working knowledge of the concepts of skin
resurfacing, skin tightening, botulinum toxins, and soft tissue fillers.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
It is expected that participants will learn the following:
• Anatomy of the periorbital region as pertains to aesthetics
• Role of botulinum toxins in the periorbital region
• Role of injectable fillers in the periorbital region
• Role of ablative skin resurfacing in the periorbital region
• Role of coagulative and ablative skin resurfacing in the periorbital region
• Role of surgery in periorbital rejuvenation
• Pitfalls of treatment and patient assessment in periorbital rejuvenation
• The role of combination therapy in periorbital rejuvenation
7:00   am   -   7:04 am   Discussion and Pre-Test - Brian S. Biesman
7:05   am   -   7:19 am   Surgical Anatomy of the Periorbital Region – Jane Olson
7:20   am   -   7:29 am   Ablative Resurfacing of the Eyelids - Brian S. Biesman
7:30   am   -   7:44 am   Fractional Resurfacing of the Eyelids - Brian S. Biesman
7:45   am   -   7:59 am   Fractional Resurfacing of the Eyelids, Ablative - Howard Conn
8:00   am   -   8:09 am   Non-Invasive Eyelid Skin Tightening - Brian S. Biesman
8:10   am   -   8:19 am   Denervation Agents in the Periorbital Region – Jane Olson
8:20   am   -   8:29 am   Periorbital Use of Soft Tissue Fillers - Howard Conn
8:30   am   -   8:39 am   Surgical Rejuvenation of the Periorbital Region – Jane Olson
8:40   am   -   8:54 am   Combination Therapies, Case Discussions, Emerging Technologies - Q&A – All Faculty
8:55   am   -   9:00 am   Conclusion and Post-Test - Brian S. Biesman

Disclosures
Brian S. Biesman received consulting fees from Cutera; research grant from Lumenis, Syneron, and TRIA Beauty; honoraria from Allergan,
Medicis, and Ulthera
Howard Conn – No disclosure
Jane Olson is a faculty trainer and speaker for Medicis




58
                                      Clinical                           2011 Annual Conference
                                                                         Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                    Application                          Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                         Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                         Grapevine, TX
                                     Courses
                                (Intermediate/Advanced)
                               Saturday, April 2, 2011
A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses. CME credits and CE contact hours
available.

Photography, Treatment Documentation, and Oversight – Texas D                                7:00 am – 9:00 am

Directors: Murad Alam, M.D., George J. Hruza, M.D., M.B.A.

Faculty: Eric F. Bernstein, M.D., Ashish Bhatia, M.D., David J. Goldberg, M.D., J.D., Freddy Jones, E. Victor
Ross, M.D.

ACCME Accreditation Statement
The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. is accredited by the Accreditation Council for
Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
Continuing Medical Education Credit
The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. designates this live activity for a maximum of 2 AMA
PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their
participation in the activity.
Continuing Education Credit
This offering by the ASLMS, in conjunction with Professional Medical Education Association is accredited for 2.4
contact hours. Professional Medical Education Association is approved by the California Board of Registered
Nursing, Provider # CEP 12386. Note: Most State Boards of Nursing accept another State Board’s approval for
granting credits. Check with the Board of Nursing in your state for clarification. Certificates of Attendance
will be provided. You will receive a statement of CE contact hours after the Annual Conference.

Educational Needs
There is a need to obtain optimal and reproducible clinical photographs that can be used in patient care and
for potential liability situations. There is a need for accurate documentation of procedures for patient care and
liability reasons. There is a need for proper oversight of personnel performing laser procedures for optimal
patient care. There is a need for using the Internet for ethical and effective communications about one’s
practice.
Participants
This course is designed for practicing physicians with an interest in laser and energy surgery in the ambulatory
setting as well as physicians entering the field.
Background Requirements
Basic understanding of digital photography in medical practice will help make the course more relevant for the
participants.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
The course will consist of a series of presentations and panel discussions focusing on the optimal way to take
digital clinical photographs; to properly integrate them into the practice electronic database; electronic
marketing of the practice; to correctly and reproducibly document laser and energy procedures performed; to
know the correct level of supervision of the laser and energy operators in the practice; and to know the
liability implications of proper documentation and information retrieval. After attending this course, the
participants will be able to 1) discuss the optimal techniques for taking clinical photographs, 2) market the
practice through electronic media, 3) more accurately document laser and energy-based procedures, 4)
understand the correct degree of oversight required when performing laser and energy-based procedures, and
5) integrate digital photographs into digital databases and digital retrieval systems.



                                                                                                              59
                                             Clinical                               2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                    Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                           Application                              Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                    Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                    Grapevine, TX
                                            Courses
                                      (Intermediate/Advanced)
                                      Saturday, April 2, 2011
A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses. CME credits and CE contact hours
available.

Photography, Treatment Documentation, and Oversight Continued –                                           7:00 am – 9:00 am
Texas D

7:00   am - 7:01 am      Discussion - George J. Hruza, Murad Alam
7:02   am - 7:05 am      Pre-Test
7:06   am - 7:25 am      Achieving Optimal and Reproducible Photographs – Freddy Jones
7:26   am - 7:45 am      Effective Integration of Photographs into EMR's - Ashish Bhatia
7:46   am - 8:05 am      Practice Marketing Through Electronic Media (Internet) – Eric F. Bernstein
8:06   am - 8:25 am      Effective Documentation for Patient Care and Liability Protection – E. Victor Ross
8:26   am - 8:45 am      Legal and Liability Implications of Laser Operator Supervision – David J. Goldberg
8:46   am – 8:55 am      Panel Discussion - Q&A
8:56   am - 9:00 am      Post-Test
Disclosures
Murad Alam – No disclosure
Eric F. Bernstein received equipment from Candela, Cynosure, DEKA, Lumenis, and Reliant; consulting fees from TRIA Beauty; discount
from Zeltiq
Ashish Bhatia received honoraria from Bioform Medical, Galderma, OrthoDermatologics, and Ranbaxy
David J. Goldberg received consulting fees from Ultrashape; research grant from Alma and Viora
George J. Hruza – No disclosure
Freddy Jones is a stockholder and holds an equity position with Profect Medical Technologies, LLC
E. Victor Ross received financial grant and consulting fees from Palomar and Syneron; equipment from Cutera, Lumenis, Palomar, and
Sciton; research grant from Cutera, Palomar, and Syneron; honoraria from Cutera, Lumenis, Palomar, and Syneron



How to Use Optical Diagnostics in Clinical Laser Medicine – Texas 1                                       7:00 am – 9:00 am

Directors: Brian S. Sorg, Ph.D., James W. Tunnell, Ph.D.

Faculty: Marc Feldman, M.D., Kishwer S. Nehal, M.D.

ACCME Accreditation Statement
The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. is accredited by the Accreditation Council for
Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
Continuing Medical Education Credit
The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.75
AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their
participation in the activity.
Continuing Education Credit
This offering by the ASLMS, in conjunction with Professional Medical Education Association is accredited for 2.2
contact hours. Professional Medical Education Association is approved by the California Board of Registered
Nursing, Provider # CEP 12386. Note: Most State Boards of Nursing accept another State Board’s approval for
granting credits. Check with the Board of Nursing in your state for clarification. Certificates of Attendance
will be provided. You will receive a statement of CE contact hours after the Annual Conference.




60
                                                 Clinical                                  2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                           Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                               Application                                 Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                           Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                           Grapevine, TX
                                                Courses
                                          (Intermediate/Advanced)
                                         Saturday, April 2, 2011
  A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses. CME credits and CE contact hours
  available.

How to Use Optical Diagnostics in Clinical Laser Medicine Continued –                                          7:00 am – 9:00 am
Texas 1

Educational Needs
This course is designed to inform clinicians on the following educational needs: 1) confocal microscopy
mechanisms and imaging of skin, with a review of clinical applications of confocal microscopy in dermatology
for diagnosis, margin mapping, and treatment monitoring of skin cancers, and 2) optical coherence tomography
mechanisms and imaging of blood vessels, with a review of clinical applications in cardiology for imaging of
arteries, diagnosis of arterial disease, and monitoring of therapies.
Participants
This course is designed for any physician who is interested in learning more modern in vivo clinical microscopy
imaging techniques, specifically confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography.
Background Requirements
Participants should have a basic understanding of how light interacts with tissues.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
At the conclusion of the course, attendees will be informed of current modern emerging in vivo clinical
microscopy techniques, and the added value of the capabilities of these techniques to clinical practice.

7:00 am - 7:04 am            Discussion and Pre-Test - Brian S. Sorg, James W. Tunnell
7:05 am - 7:39 am            Fundamentals of Confocal Microscopy and Optical Coherence Tomography - Brian S.
                              Sorg, James W. Tunnell
7:40   am - 7:44 am          Break
7:45   am - 8:14 am          Confocal Microscopy in Clinical Dermatology - Kishwer S. Nehal
8:15   am - 8:19 am          Break
8:20   am - 8:49 am          Optical Coherence Tomography in Clinical Cardiology - Marc Feldman
8:50   am - 9:00 am          Q&A and Post-Test - Brian S. Sorg, James W. Tunnell

Disclosures
Marc Feldman – Received royalties from Volcano Corporation related to their OCT program
Kishwer S. Nehal - No disclosure
Brian S. Sorg - No disclosure
James W. Tunnell received research grant from ASLMS and NIH; royalties and intellectual property rights with the University of Texas




                                                                                                                                       61
                                         Cutting Edge                                      2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                           Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                        “Translational                                     Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                           Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                           Grapevine, TX
                                       Medicine” Session
                                          Saturday, April 2, 2011
The Cutting Edge: “Translational Medicine” – Longhorn F                                                           9:15 am – 10:05 am
Directors: R. Rox Anderson, M.D., E. Duco Jansen, Ph.D.

Faculty: Anita Mahadevan-Jansen, Ph.D., J. Stuart Nelson, M.D., Ph.D., Claus-Peter Richter, M.D., Ph.D.

Educational Needs
Clinicians, health professional representatives, scientists, engineers, and industry representatives need big-picture
understanding of the success and limitations of current laser and light-based treatment for challenging medical
conditions, and of the cutting-edge research that may someday lead to an improvement in the standard of care.
Participants
All attendees of the ASLMS Annual Conference.
Background Requirements
Attendees are not required to have any prior knowledge of laser medicine or basic science.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
Leading clinicians and scientific researchers will discuss state-of-the-art and future care for patients with
challenging medical conditions. This knowledge may lead to increased cooperation among conference attendees
and new research directions.

9:15 am – 9:16 am                 INTRODUCTION - R. Rox Anderson, E. Duco Jansen

                                 GUIDING THERAPY WITH OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY/IMAGING

9:17 am – 9:26 am                 INTRAOPERATIVE GUIDANCE OF TUMOR/SURGICAL RESECTION
                                  Anita Mahadevan-Jansen, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
9:27 am – 9:32 am                 Discussion
                                               NOVEL THERAPEUTIC USE OF LASERS

9:33 am – 9:42 am                 DEVELOPMENT OF A LASER-BASED COCHLEAR IMPLANT
                                  Claus-Peter Richter, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL
9:43 am – 9:48 am                 Discussion
                          TRANSLATING NEW DISCOVERIES IN TREATMENT OF VASCULAR LESIONS

9:49 am – 9:58 am                 GAME CHANGING STRATEGIES FOR LASER TREATMENT OF VASCULAR SKIN LESIONS
                                  J. Stuart Nelson, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California,
                                  Irvine, CA
9:59 am – 10:05 am                Discussion
Disclosures
R. Rox Anderson received royalties from Massachusetts General Hospital which owns and licenses patents on laser hair removal, fractional laser
treatments, and cryolipolysis; serves on scientific advisory boards for PhotoMedex and Ulthera
E. Duco Jansen received a salary, research grant, and intellectual property rights from Vanderbilt University; research grant from NIH, DOD,
HFSP, and Lockheed-Martin
Anita Mahadevan-Jansen received a salary, research grant, and intellectual property rights from Vanderbilt University; research grant from NIH
and DOD
Claus-Peter Richter - No disclosure




   62
                                  Conference                                   2011 Annual Conference
                                                                               Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                Plenary Session                                Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                               Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                               Grapevine, TX
                                Saturday, April 2, 2011


Plenary Session – Longhorn F                                                                      10:30 am – 12:00 pm
10:30 am – 10:34 am     Presentation of Dr. Horace Furumoto Innovations Award
                        RECIPIENT TBA

10:35 am – 10:49 am     Caroline and William Mark Memorial Award
                        FROM THE EARLY DAYS OF MEDICAL LASER APPLICATIONS TO A ROUTINE CLINICAL USE
                        TODAY: PERSONAL ENCOUNTERS
                        Franz Hillenkamp, Ph.D.*, Institute for Medical Physics & Biophysics, Muenster,
                        Germany
                        *No disclosure

10:50 am – 11:04 am     Ellet H. Drake Memorial Award
                        THE EGG OF COLUMBUS: OVERCOMING BARRIERS TO INNOVATION
                        Dieter Manstein, M.D.*, Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Boston, MA
                        *Equipment from Quantel Derma and Solta; consulting fees from Elemé, Quantel Derma and Zeltiq; research
                        grant from Candela and Lumenis; stockholder with Zeltiq; royalties from Massachusetts General Hospital
                        due to licensing contracts with Candela, Elemé, Palomar, Solta, Zeltiq and Zimmer

11:05 am – 11:19 am     Leon Goldman Memorial Award
                        FINDING THE RIGHT INDICATIONS FOR PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY
                        Stephen G. Bown, M.D., F.R.C.P.*, University College, London, United Kingdom
                        *Research grants from Hamamatsu Photonics, PCI Biotech, and QLT

11:20 am – 11:29 am     Nursing/Allied Health Excellence Award
                        THE ROLE OF ALLIED NURSES AND HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS: "PRICELESS”
                        Faye M. Jenkins, R.N., B.S.N., Wilmington, MA
                        *No disclosure

11:30 am – 12:00 pm    ASLMS BUSINESS MEETING (Members Only) – Longhorn F
                       CALL BUSINESS MEETING TO ORDER – E. Duco Jansen, Ph.D., President
                       ADDITIONS TO THE AGENDA (Address questions from the Members in Attendance)
                       APPROVAL OF MINUTES OF APRIL 17, 2010 BUSINESS MEETING – E. Duco Jansen, Ph.D.
                       TREASURER'S REPORT – Mathew M. Avram, M.D., J.D., Treasurer
                       ELECTION RESULTS – E. Duco Jansen, Ph.D.
                       NEW BUSINESS – E. Duco Jansen, Ph.D.
                       SECRETARY'S REPORT – J. Stuart Nelson, M.D., Ph.D.
                       INTRODUCTION OF BRIAN D. ZELICKSON, M.D., PRESIDENT-ELECT

12:00 pm – 1:30 pm      COMPLIMENTARY LUNCH WITH TICKET IN EXHIBIT HALL (View ePosters)




                                                                                                                      63
                               Cutting Edge                              2011 Annual Conference
                                                                         Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                             “Laser and Skin”                            Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                         Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                         Grapevine, TX

                                 Session
                               Saturday, April 2, 2011

The Cutting Edge: “Laser and Skin” – Longhorn F                                               1:00 pm – 2:45 pm

Directors: Mathew M. Avram, M.D., J.D., Christopher B. Zachary, M.B.B.S., F.R.C.P.

Faculty: R. Rox Anderson, M.D., Marc R. Avram, M.D., Henry H.L. Chan, M.D., Ph.D., F.R.C.P., Michael Hamblin,
M.D., Christopher Hughes, Ph.D., Kristen M. Kelly, M.D., Jennifer Y. Lin, M.D., E. Victor Ross, M.D., Fernanda
Sakamoto, Ph.D., Zeina S. Tannous, M.D., Ben J. Vakoc, Ph.D., Jill S. Waibel, M.D.

Educational Needs
Clinicians, health professional representatives, scientists, engineers, and industry representatives need big-
picture understanding of the success and limitations of current laser and light-based treatment for challenging
medical conditions, and of the cutting-edge research that may someday lead to an improvement in the standard
of care.
Participants
All attendees of the ASLMS Annual Conference.
Background Requirements
Attendees are not required to have any prior knowledge of laser medicine or basic science.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
Leading clinicians and scientific researchers will discuss state-of-the-art and future care for patients with
challenging medical conditions. This knowledge may lead to increased cooperation among conference attendees
and new research directions.

1:00 pm – 1:02 pm        INTRODUCTION - Mathew M. Avram, Christopher B. Zachary

                         IMAGING AND LASER THERAPY: HOW MIGHT THIS WORK? POSSIBILITIES AND
                         PRACTICAL LIMITS OF TARGETING THE SKIN WITH CURRENT TECHNOLOGIES
1:03 pm – 1:07 pm        Christopher B. Zachary, University of California, Irvine, CA
1:08 pm – 1:12 pm        Ben J. Vakoc, Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital,
                         Boston, MA
1:13 pm – 1:17 pm        Q&A

                         VASCULAR MALFORMATIONS: WHAT’S AVAILABLE IN 2011, AND HOW MIGHT WE
                         PREVENT REVASCULARIZATION?
1:18 pm – 1:22 pm        Kristen M. Kelly, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California,
                         Irvine, CA
1:23 pm – 1:27 pm        Christopher Hughes, University of California, Irvine, CA
1:28 pm – 1:32 pm        Q&A

                         CASUALTIES OF WAR: HOW DO WE TREAT BURN AND TRAUMATIC SCARS?
1:33 pm – 1:37 pm        Jill S. Waibel, Dr. Jill Waibel Laser Center, Miami, FL
1:38 pm – 1:42 pm        R. Rox Anderson, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
1:43 pm – 1:47 pm        Q&A




64
                                       Cutting Edge                                     2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                        Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                     “Laser and Skin”                                   Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                        Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                        Grapevine, TX

                                         Session
                                       Saturday, April 2, 2011


                               CONGENITAL NEVI: EASY TO DIAGNOSE; DIFFICULT TO TREAT. EARLY vs LATE
                               TREATMENT, AND WITH WHAT?
1:48 pm – 1:52 pm              Henry H.L. Chan, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
1:53 pm – 1:57 pm              Jennifer Y. Lin*, Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA
1:58 pm – 2:02 pm              Q&A
                               *Content may discuss non-FDA approved device or off-label use


                               LASER TREATMENT OF ACNE: WHY CAN’T WE DO BETTER?
2:03 pm – 2:07 pm              E. Victor Ross, Scripps Clinic, San Diego, CA
2:08 pm – 2:12 pm              Fernanda Sakamoto, Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Boston, MA
2:13 pm – 2:17 pm              Q&A

                               REGROWING HAIR WITH LASER AND LIGHT SOURCES. IS THIS PRACTICAL?
2:18 pm – 2:22 pm              Marc R. Avram, Clinical Professor of Dermatology, Weill Cornell Medical School, New
                               York, NY
2:23 pm – 2:27 pm              Michael Hamblin, Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Boston, MA
2:28 pm – 2:32 pm              Q&A

2:33 pm – 2:45 pm              PANEL DISCUSSION - Mathew M. Avram, Christopher B. Zachary

Disclosures
R. Rox Anderson received royalties from Massachusetts General Hospital which owns and licenses patents on laser hair removal, fractional
laser treatments, and cryolipolysis; serves on scientific advisory boards for PhotoMedex and Ulthera
Marc R. Avram – No disclosure
Mathew M. Avram is a stockholder with Zeltiq
Henry H.L. Chan received financial grant from Lumenis; equipment from Candela, Elemé, Lumenis, Palomar, Solta, Syneron, Zeltiq; discount
from Candela; stockholder with Lumenis, Solta
Michael Hamblin – No disclosure
Christopher Hughes – Pending
Kristen M. Kelly received equipment from Candela and Solta; consulting fees from Lumenis; research grant from Candela, DUSA, Graceway
Jennifer Y. Lin – No disclosure
E. Victor Ross received financial grant and consulting fees from Palomar and Syneron; equipment from Cutera, Lumenis, Palomar, and Sciton;
research grant from Cutera, Palomar, and Syneron; honoraria from Cutera, Lumenis, Palomar, and Syneron
Fernanda Sakamoto – No disclosure
Zeina S. Tannous – No disclosure
Ben J. Vakoc – No disclosure
Jill S. Waibel received consulting fees from Allergan and Medicis; research grant from Sciton; honoraria from Candela and Syneron
Christopher B. Zachary - No disclosure




                                                                                                                                 65
                                    Experimental and                                     2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                         Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                      Translational                                      Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                         Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                         Grapevine, TX

                                        Research
                                       Saturday, April 2, 2011

Experimental and Translational Research – Texas C                                                            3:45 pm – 6:00 pm
Directors: Jennifer K. Barton, Ph.D., Bernard Choi, Ph.D.
                                                           OPTICAL IMAGING

                                                            INVITED SPEAKER

3:45 pm – 4:05 pm              20         REGULATORY PERSPECTIVE OF OPTICAL IMAGING DEVICES: TECHNOLOGY,
                                          INDICATIONS, AND FUTURE CHALLENGES
                                          Kejing Chen, Richard Felten, Long Chen, Neil Ogden, Office of Device
                                          Evaluation, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

4:06 pm – 4:17 pm              21         IN VIVO IMAGING OF KIDNEY MICROVASCULATURE USING DOPPLER OPTICAL
                                          COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY
                                          Jeremiah Wierwillei, Peter Andrews, Maristela Onozato, Yu Chen, College
                                          Park, MD, Washington, DC
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

4:18 pm – 4:29 pm              22         MULTIMODAL OPTICAL IMAGING FOR DETECTING BREAST CANCER
                                          Rakesh Pateli, Ashraf Khan, Robert Quinlan, Anna Yaroslavsky, University of
                                          Massachusetts, Lowell, MA, UMass Memorial Healthcare, Inc., Worcester, MA
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

4:30 pm – 4:41 pm                         DYE-ENHANCED MULTIMODAL CONFOCAL IMAGING OF BRAIN CANCERS
                                          Dennis Wirthi, Matija Snuderl, Sameer Sheth, William Curry, Anna
                                          Yaroskavsky, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA, Harvard Medical School,
                                          Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

                                                        OPTICAL DIAGNOSTICS
                                                            INVITED SPEAKER

4:42 pm – 5:02 pm              24         FROM LASER TISSUE INTERACTION TO MALDI MASS SPECTROMETRY
                                          Franz Hillenkamp, University of Muenster, Muenster, Germany
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

5:03 pm – 5:14 pm              25         MECHANICAL TISSUE OPTICAL CLEARING TECHNIQUE INCREASES RESOLUTION
                                          AND CONTRAST OF A TARGET IMAGE BENEATH EX VIVO PORCINE SKIN
(ePoster available)
                                          Alondra Izquierdo-Romani, William Vogt, Christopher Rylander, Virginia Tech,
                                          Blacksburg, VA
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

5:15 pm – 5:26 pm              26         HIGH-RESOLUTION, THICK-TISSUE OPTICAL HISTOLOGY OF TISSUE
                                          MICROVASCULATURE
                                          Austin Moyi, Bernard Choi, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic,
                                          University of California, Irvine, CA
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

iRecipient of U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research travel grant.
66
                                    Experimental and                                     2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                         Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                      Translational                                      Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                         Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                         Grapevine, TX

                                        Research
                                        Saturday, April 2, 2011

5:27 pm – 5:38 pm              27         PHOTOACOUSTIC DETECTION OF MELANOMA AND MICROSPHERES IN VITRO
                                          USING A MICE MODEL
(ePoster available)
                                          Sagar Guptai, Kirby Campbell, Adam Daily, Kiran Bhattacharya, Luis Parada,
                                          John Viator, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

5:39 pm – 5:50 pm              28         MULTIDOMAIN SIMULATION OF MECHANICAL TISSUE OPTICAL CLEARING
                                          DEVICES: A PLATFORM FOR DEVICE OPTIMIZATION
(ePoster available)
                                          William Vogti, Alondra Izquierdo-Roman, Christopher Rylander, Virginia Tech,
                                          Blacksburg, VA
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

5:51 pm – 6:02 pm              29         SIGNAL VARIATION OF FLUORESCEIN DYE IN ANTERIOR CHAMBER AND
                                          VITREOUS EYE
(ePoster available)
                                          Raiyan Zamani, Jeffrey Oliver, Ashley Welch, James Tunnell, Henry Rylander,
                                          University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use




iRecipient of U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research travel grant.


                                                                                                                              67
                                    Cutaneous Laser                                  2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                     Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                    Surgery Session                                  Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                     Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                     Grapevine, TX
                                    Saturday, April 2, 2011

Cutaneous Laser Surgery – Longhorn F                                                                       3:45 pm – 6:15 pm

Directors: Mathew M. Avram, M.D., J.D., Paul M. Friedman, M.D.

                                    HOT TOPICS: NEW LASERS AND NEW INDICATIONS

Educational Needs
This session focuses on the use of novel lasers, new indications, and innovative therapeutic techniques. Each of
the topics of laser-assisted vehicle delivery, new technologies for in-office and home-use devices, and
optimized treatment parameters for tattoo removal will be addressed. Participants will develop an
understanding of the present treatment indications, therapeutic techniques, and new and innovative
technologies.
Participants
This session will benefit physicians and health care personnel who treat cutaneous disorders in the disciplines of
dermatology, plastic surgery, and facial plastic surgery. It will also benefit those engineers and medical device
personnel who actively work to develop devices for the treatment of cutaneous disorders.
Background Requirements
Participants should have a basic understanding of the fundamentals of skin biology, laser physics, and laser
tissue interaction.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
Attendees will gain knowledge of cutting edge laser treatments and their clinical applications in the treatment
of a variety of cutaneous conditions.
Hot Topics
• Laser-assisted vehicle delivery
• Optimized techniques for tattoo removal

3:45 pm – 3:46 pm                    Introduction – Mathew M. Avram, Paul M. Friedman

3:47 pm – 3:52 pm             74     MELANIN OPTICAL DENSITY AS A PREDICTOR OF MAXIMUM TOLERATED
                                     FLUENCE FOR PHOTODERMATOLOGY
                                     Ilya Yaroslavsky1, Gregory Altshuler1, Guangming Wang2, Felicia Whitney2,
                                     Henry Zenzie2, Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc., Burlington, MA
                                     1
                                      Travel expenses, salary, stockholder, equity position with Palomar
                                     2
                                      Salary, stockholder, equity position with Palomar
                                     •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

3:53 pm – 3:58 pm             75     QUALITY CONTROL AND THE PULSED DYE LASER: WHEN NOT TO TREAT
                                     Joshua Shofner, Zeina Tannous, Mathew Avram, Massachusetts General
(ePoster available)
                                     Hospital, Boston, MA
                                     •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

3:59 pm – 4:04 pm             76     OPTIMAL TATTOO REMOVAL IN ONE TREATMENT SESSION WITH
                                     NANOSECOND-DOMAIN LASER PULSES
(ePoster available)
                                     Theodora Kossida4, Dimitrios Rigopoulos, Andreas Katsambas, R. Rox
                                     Anderson, A. Syggros Skin Disease Hospital, National and Kapodistrian
                                     University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece, Wellman Center for
                                     Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School,
                                     Boston, MA

4Recipient of ASLMS travel grant.


68
                                    Cutaneous Laser                                  2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                     Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                     Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011

                                    Surgery Session                                  Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                     Grapevine, TX

                                    Saturday, April 2, 2011

4:05 pm – 4:10 pm            77     COMBINATION OF MULTIPLE Q-SWITCHED WAVELENGTHS IMPROVES TATTOO
                                    CLEARANCE COMPARED TO SINGLE WAVELENGTH TREATMENT
                                    Arielle Kauvar1, New York Laser & Skin Care, New York, NY
                                    1
                                        Equipment from Candela

4:11 pm – 4:16 pm            78     REDISTRIBUTION OF INK FOLLOWING LASER TATTOO REMOVAL
                                    Arisa Ortiz4, Mathew Avram, University of California, Irvine, CA,
                                    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA

4:17 pm – 4:22 pm             79    A MULTI-CENTER EVALUATION OF THE MIRADRY SYSTEM TO TREAT
                                    SUBJECTS WITH AXILLARY HYPERHIDROSIS
(ePoster available)
                                    Mark Lupin, H. Chih-Ho Hong, Kathryn F. O’Shaughnessy, University of British
                                    Columbia, Victoria, Canada, Vancouver, Canada, Miramar Labs, Sunnyvale, CA
                                    •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

4:23 pm – 4:37 pm                   Q&A

4:38 pm – 4:43 pm            80     A PILOT STUDY OF LASER ASSISTED DELIVERY OF ALLOGENIC MESENCHYMAL
                                    STEM CELLS
                                    Evangelos Badiavas, Stephen Davis, Jill Waibel, Miller School of Medicine,
                                    University of Miami, Cutaneous Surgery Wound Healing Research Laboratory,
                                    Miami Dermatology and Laser Institute, Miami, FL
                                    •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

4:44 pm – 4:49 pm             81    A SPLIT-FACE STUDY INVESTIGATING ALLUMERA COMBINED WITH MULTIPLE
                                    LASER AND LIGHT SOURCES FOR PHOTOREJUVENATION
(ePoster available)
                                    Sabrina Fabi1, Jennifer Peterson2, Mitchel Goldman3, Goldman Butterwick &
                                    Associates, Cosmetic Laser Surgery, San Diego, CA
                                    1
                                      Research grant from Photocure
                                    1
                                      Consultant for SkinMedica, performed work for Lumenis; educational grants from Allergan
                                    3
                                      Serves on advisory board for Aesthera, Allergan (Global Alliance Council), Bio Med Sciences,
                                    Galderma, Lumenis, Merz Pharmaceutical, Sanofi-Aventis, and Theraplex; consultant for Bioniche
                                    Pharmaceuticals, Johnson & Johnson, Lithera, Lumenis, Medicis Pharmaceuticals, Mentor, New
                                    Star Lasers, Ortho Dermatologics, Quinova Pharmaceuticals, and Veinacare; medical director and
                                    stockholder with Lumenis, stockholder with New Star Lasers, medical director for Obagi Medical
                                    Products
                                    •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

4:50 pm – 4:55 pm            82     COMPARISON STUDY OF NON-ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL TREATMENT WITH AND
                                    WITHOUT ADVANCED SKIN COMPRESSION TECHNIQUE
                                    Taro Kono1, Motoko Nakata, Hiroyuki Sakurai, Henry Chan, Tokyo Women's
                                    Medical University, Tokyo, Japan, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
                                    1
                                        Equipment from Palomar

4:56 pm – 5:01 pm             83    DEEP HEATING OF DERMIS USING NON-ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL TECHNIQUE
                                    WITH MICRO-COMPRESSION OPTICS
                                    Christine Dierickx1, Sean Doherty2, Laser Clinic Boom, Boom, Belgium, Boston
                                    Plastic Surgery Associates, Concord, MA
                                    1
                                        Equipment, travel expenses, research grant from Palomar
                                    2
                                        Travel expenses, salary, equity position with Palomar

4Recipient of ASLMS travel grant.



                                                                                                                          69
                                    Cutaneous Laser                                  2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                     Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                     Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011

                                    Surgery Session                                  Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                     Grapevine, TX

                                    Saturday, April 2, 2011

                                     LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT

5:02 pm – 5:07 pm                    PULSE STACKING WITH A 1450nm LASER CAN INCREASE DEPTH OF
                                     TREATMENT
                                     Arisa Ortiz, William Lewis, R. Rox Anderson, University of California, Irvine,
                                     CA, Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Boston, MA
                                     •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
5:08 pm – 5:21 pm                    Q&A

5:22 pm – 5:27 pm            85      HISTOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF A NON-ABLATIVE 1940nm FRACTIONAL
                                     LASER
                                     E. Victor Ross1, Chad Tingey, Yacov Domankevitz2, Kevin Schomacker2, James
                                     Hsia2, Scripps Clinic, San Diego, CA, Candela, Wayland, MA
                                     1
                                      Financial grant, equipment, and honoraria from Candela
                                     2
                                      Salary from Candela
                                     •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

5:28 pm – 5:33 pm             86     CLINICAL RESULTS OF NON-ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL PHOTOTHERMOLYSIS
                                     FOR HOME-USE TREATMENT OF PHOTODAMAGED SKIN
(ePoster available)
                                     Christopher Zachary1, Marieke van Grootel, Tom Nuijs, Kerrie Jiang, Steven
                                     Struck, University of California, Irvine, CA, Philips Research, Eindhoven, The
                                     Netherlands, Solta Medical, Hayward, CA, The Struck Clinic, Palo Alto, CA
                                     1
                                      Travel expenses and educational support from Solta
                                     •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

5:34 pm – 5:39 pm             87     EFFECTS OF DEVIATION FROM FOCAL PLANE ON LESION DEPTH AND
                                     DIAMETER FOR ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL PHOTOTHERMOLYSIS
                                     Garuna Kositrana1, Henry Chan2, Dieter Manstein3, Wellman Center for
                                     Photomedicine, Boston, MA
                                     1
                                       Research grant from Lumenis
                                     2
                                       Consulting fees and equity position with Lumenis
                                     3
                                       Consulting fees from Eleme, Quantel, Zeltiq; research grant from Lumenis; royalties from
                                     Candela, Elemé, Solta, Zeltiq, Zimmer; equity position with Zeltiq
                                     •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

5:40 pm – 5:45 pm            88      PSEUDOMELANOMA FOLLOWING FRACTIONAL CO2 LASER RESURFACING
                                     Deborah Sarnoff1, Robert Gotkin1, Ritu Saini, NYU Medical Center, New York,
                                     NY
                                     1
                                         Equipment from Cynosure and DEKA

5:46 pm- 5:51 pm              89     ULCERATION OF MATURE SURGICAL SCARS FROM NON-ABLATIVE 1550nm
                                     FRACTIONAL LASER TREATMENTS ASSOCIATED WITH INTRA-LESIONAL
                                     LIDOCAINE INJECTIONS
                                     Gary Chuang4, Zeina Tannous, Mathew Avram, Wellman Laboratories of
                                     Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School,
                                     Boston, MA

5:52 pm – 5:57 pm             227    ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL RESURFACING FOR TATTOO REMOVAL
                                     Omar Ibrahimi, Fernanda Sakamoto, Mathew Avram, R. Rox Anderson,
                                     Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Boston, MA
                                     •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
5:58 pm – 6:15 pm                    Q&A
4Recipient of ASLMS travel grant.
70
                               Photobiomodulation                                   2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                    Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                     Session                                        Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                    Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                    Grapevine, TX
                                    Saturday, April 2, 2011

Photobiomodulation – Texas 4-6                                                                           3:45 pm – 5:30 pm
Directors: Juanita J. Anders, Ph.D., Michael Hamblin, M.D.

                                         PHOTOBIOMODULATION: CLINICAL STUDIES

                                                      INVITED SPEAKER

3:45 pm – 4:19 pm                    TRANSCRANIAL LASER THERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF ALZHEIMER’S
                                     DISEASE: A TRANSGENIC MOUSE MODEL
                                     Luis De Taboada, PhotoThera, Inc., Carlsbad, CA
4:20 pm – 4:29 pm                    Discussion

4:30 pm – 4:39 pm             158    A NEW POSSIBILITY TO TREAT SEVERE TRACHEAL STENOSIS APPLYING LOW
                                     LEVEL LASER THERAPY: PILOT STUDY
(ePoster available)
                                     Nathali Pinto, Tatiana Magacho, Mara Pereira, M. Cristina Chavantes,
                                     University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil, Pitagoras University, Vila Velha,
                                     Brazil
                                     •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
4:40 pm – 4:44 pm                    Discussion

4:45 pm – 4:54 pm             160    INNOVATIVE METHOD TO IMPROVE EFFICACY AND TOLERABILITY OF PDT
                                     TREATMENTS
(ePoster available)
                                     Carl Thornfeldt1, CT Derm, Fruitland, ID
                                     1
                                      Stockholder with CT Derm; salary from Episciences
                                     •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

4:55 pm – 4:59 pm                    Discussion

5:00 pm – 5:09 pm             161    A PROSPECTIVE SPLIT-FACE DOUBLE-BLIND RANDOMIZED PLACEBO-
                                     CONTROLLED TRIAL TO ASSESS THE EFFICACY OF LIGHT-EMITTING DIODE
                                     POSTFRACTIONAL ABLATIVE LASER FOR SKIN REJUVENATION
                                     Valeria Campos, Juliana Jordao4, Tatiana Cordero, Clinica Valeria Campos,
                                     Jundiai, Brazil, Curitiba, Brazil, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil
                                     •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
5:10 pm – 5:14 pm                    Discussion

5:15 pm – 5:24 pm             162    SAFETY AND EFFICACY OF FOOTLASER TREATMENT OF ONYCHOMYCOSIS IN
                                     PRIVATE PRACTICE
                                     Michael Uro, Laura Uro, Michael Abrahams, Martine Abrahams, Robert
                                     Grzywacz, Foot Doctor Laser Center, Sacramento, CA, The London Nail Laser
                                     Clinic, London, England, Las Vegas, NV
5:25 pm – 5:30 pm                    Discussion




4Recipient of ASLMS travel grant.




                                                                                                                         71
                                      International                                  2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                     Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                     Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                      Experience in                                  Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                     Grapevine, TX

                                        Lasers in
                                      Dermatology
                                     Saturday, April 2, 2011

International Experience in Lasers in Dermatology - Texas D                                               3:45 pm – 6:00 pm

Director: Thierry Passeron, M.D., Ph.D.

Disclosure
Thierry Passeron – No disclosure

Educational Needs
These sessions are directed towards sharing international expertise in lasers in the field of cutaneous
conditions. Attendees will develop an understanding of the present treatment indications, therapeutic
techniques, and new and innovative technologies.
Participants
These sessions will benefit physicians and health care personnel who treat cutaneous disorders in the disciplines
of dermatology, plastic surgery, and facial plastic surgery. It will also benefit those engineers and medical
device personnel who actively work to develop devices for the treatment of cutaneous disorders.
Background Requirements
Participants should have a basic understanding of the fundamentals of skin biology, laser physics, and laser
tissue interaction.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
These sessions will provide attendees an opportunity to learn more about the international expertise of cutting
edge laser treatments and their clinical applications in the area of cutaneous conditions. Interactions between
participants and sharing experiences will be encouraged. Novel results are presented that will impact the
development of new and more efficacious, light-based therapies and diagnostics. Safety issues are also
considered.
Hot   Topics
•     Home devices
•     Treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis
•     Cellulite
•     Melasma
                                                        HOME DEVICES
                                          Christine C. Dierickx, Thierry Passeron

3:45 pm – 3:50 pm              113    GUIDELINES ON THE SAFETY OF LIGHT-BASED HOME-USE DEVICES FROM THE
                                      EUROPEAN SOCIETY FOR LASER DERMATOLOGY
                                      Godfrey Town1, Caerwyn Ash2, Christine Dierickx, Merete Haedersdal, Klaus
                                      Fritz, University of Wales, Global Academy, Swansea Metropolitan University,
                                      Swansea, United Kingdom, University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, East Flanders,
                                      Belgium, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, Copenhagen, Denmark,
                                      European Society of Laser Dermatology, Landau, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
                                      1
                                       Consulting fees from CyDen and Unilever; travel expenses from CyDen
                                      2
                                       Equipment and equity position with CyDen; travel expenses from Swansea University; salary from
                                      Global Academy and University of Wales
                                      •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
3:51 pm – 3:52 pm                     Discussion

72
                                     International                                 2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                   Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                     Experience in                                 Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                   Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                   Grapevine, TX

                                       Lasers in
                                     Dermatology
                                    Saturday, April 2, 2011

3:53 pm – 3:58 pm             114    INVESTIGATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF A MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUE FOR
                                     THE SPATIAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF HOME-USE INTENSE PULSED LIGHT
(ePoster available)                  SYSTEMS
                                     Gareth Thomas, Caerwyn Ash1, Richard Hugtenburg, Michael Kiernan2, Godfrey
                                     Town2, Swansea University, University of Wales, Global Academy, Swansea,
                                     United Kingdom
                                     1
                                      Equipment and salary from CyDen; travel expenses from Swansea University
                                     2
                                      Consulting fees from CyDen
                                     •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
3:59 pm – 4:00 pm                    Discussion

4:01 pm – 4:06 pm             115    OPTIMUM CHOICE OF IRRADIATION WAVELENGTH FOR SKIN COLOR
                                     DETERMINATION USING SKIN REFLECTANCE MEASUREMENTS
(ePoster available)
                                     Caerwyn Ash1, Stuart Jones2, Godfrey Town3, Marc Clement3, Peter Bjerring,
                                     Michael Kiernan3, Swansea University, CyDen, University of Wales, Global
                                     Academy, Swansea, United Kingdom, Molholm Hospital, Vejle, Denmark
                                     1
                                      Equipment and salary from CyDen; travel expenses from Swansea University
                                     2
                                      Equipment and salary from CyDen
                                     3
                                      Consulting fees from CyDen
                                     •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
4:07 pm – 4:08 pm                    Discussion

                                                            OTHER

4:09 pm – 4:14 pm             116    CONCOMMITANT USE OF LASER AND ISOTRETINOIN, HOW SAFE?
                                     Ahmed Alissa, National Center for Vitiligo and Psoriasis, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
4:15 pm – 4:16 pm                    Discussion

                                                  MEDICAL USE OF LASER

4:17 pm – 4:22 pm             117    A PROSPECTIVE PILOT STUDY OF THE ALEXANDRITE LASER ON BASAL CELL
                                     CARCINOMAS
                                     Daniel I. Wasserman14, Zeina Tannous, Gary D. Monheit2, Total Skin & Beauty
                                     Dermatology Center, Birmingham, AL, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
                                     1
                                      Equipment from Candela
                                     2
                                      Equipment from Candela; consulting fees from Allergan, Electro-optical Sciences, Galderma,
                                     Genzyme, J&J, Medicis, Mentor, Merz and Revance; research grant from Electro-optical Sciences,
                                     Galderma, Kythera, Medicis, Mentor, Neocutis and Revance; honoraria from Allergan, Galderma
                                     and Medicis
                                     •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
4:23 pm – 4:24 pm                    Discussion




4Recipient of ASLMS travel grant.


                                                                                                                           73
                                        International                              2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                   Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                        Experience in                              Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                   Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                   Grapevine, TX

                                          Lasers in
                                        Dermatology
                                    Saturday, April 2, 2011

4:25 pm – 4:30 pm             118   PROPOSING CONCEPT OF SELECTIVE PHOTOTHERMOCOAGULATION AND
                                    VARIOUS DERMATOLOGIC INDICATIONS BY USING 1444nm Nd:YAG LASER
(ePoster available)
                                    Kyung Goo Lee4, Sang Geun Lee, Sang Min Yi, Jae Hwan Kim, Jae Eun Choi, Il-
                                    Hwan Kim, Korea University Hospital, An-San Si, Kyunggi Do, Korea
                                    •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
4:31 pm – 4:32 pm                   Discussion

4:33 pm – 4:38 pm             119   ERBIUM LASER DERMABRASION FOR TREATING VITILIGO: A COMBINATION
                                    APPROACH
(ePoster available)
                                    Wedd Bayoumi, Florence Le Duff, Laura Sillard, Jean-Philippe Lacour, Jean-
                                    Paul Ortonne, Thierry Passeron, University Hospital of Nice, Nice, Alpes-
                                    Maritimes, France
                                    •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
4:39 pm – 4:40 pm                   Discussion

4:41 pm – 4:46 pm             120   STUDY ABOUT EFFICACY AND SAFETY IN LASER ASSISTED SWEAT GLAND
                                    REDUCTION FOR AXILLARY HYPERHIDROSIS
                                    Afschin Fatemi, s-thetic Clinic, Duesseldorf, Germany
4:47 pm – 4:48 pm                   Discussion

                                                              ACNE

4:49 pm – 4:54 pm             121   TREATMENT OF SEVERE OR REFRACTORY ACNE WITH NON-ABLATIVE
                                    1450nm DIODE LASER
(ePoster available)
                                    Rosalind Hughes, Katerina Tsilika, Jean-Paul Ortonne, Jean-Philippe Lacour,
                                    Thierry Passeron1, University Hospital of Nice, Nice, Alpes-Maritimes, France
                                    1
                                        Research grant from Candela
4:55 pm – 4:56 pm                   Discussion

                                                              SCARS

4:57 pm – 5:02 pm             122   FRACTIONAL Er:YAG LASER FOR ACNE SCARS IN SKIN OF COLOR
                                    Mukta Sachdev4, Sunaina Hameed, Manipal Hospital, MS Skin Clinic,
                                    Bangalore, Karnataka, India
5:03 pm – 5:04 pm                   Discussion

5:05 pm – 5:10 pm             123   THE CLINICAL EFFICACY AND STATISTICAL EVALUATION OF 150 ACNE SCARS
                                    BY INSULATED MICRO-NEEDLING FRACTIONAL RF TECHNOLOGY
                                    Takashi Takahashi1, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, Japan
                                    1
                                      Equipment from Jeisys
                                    •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
5:11 pm – 5:12 pm                       Discussion

4Recipient of ASLMS travel grant.


74
                           International                                  2011 Annual Conference
                                                                          Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                           Experience in                                  Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                          Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                          Grapevine, TX

                             Lasers in
                           Dermatology
                          Saturday, April 2, 2011
                                    HAIR AND PIGMENT REMOVAL

5:13 pm – 5:18 pm   124    LONG-TERM RESULTS OF AXILLARY HAIR REMOVAL WITH A CONTINUOUSLY
                           SCANNED DIODE LASER AND A SPOT-TO-SPOT SCANNED ALEXANDRITE LASER
                           (EPICON STUDY)
                           Sonja Grunewald1, Marc Oliver Bodendorf2, Alexander Zygouris2, Jan Christoph
                           Simon2, Uwe Paasch2, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Saxony, Germany
                           1
                            Equipment from Quantel-Derma
                           2
                            Equipment and research grant from Quantel-Derma
                           •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
5:19 pm – 5:20 pm          Discussion

5:21 pm – 5:26 pm   125    INCREASED FORMATION OF FIBROSIS AFTER TREATMENT WITH ABLATIVE vs
                           NON-ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL LASER THERAPY
                           Bas S. Wind, Arne A. Meesters, Marije W. Kroon, Johan F. Beek, J.P. Wietze
                           Van der Veen, Allard C. Van der Wal, Jan D. Bos, Albert Wolkerstorfer,
                           Netherlands Institute for Pigment Disorders, Academic Medical Center,
                           University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
                           •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
5:27 pm – 5:28 pm          Discussion

5:29 pm – 5:34 pm   126    FRACTIONAL RADIOFREQUENCY FOLLOWED BY HYDROQUINONE FOR
                           TREATMENT OF MELASMA
                           Moshe Lapidoth, Shlomit Halachmi, Rabin Medical Center, Petach, Tikva, Israel
5:35 pm – 5:36 pm          Discussion

                           LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT

5:37 pm – 5:42 pm          SEVERE RHINOPHYMA: FRACTIONAL CO2 LASER – A NEW TREATMENT OPTION
                           Rafael Nunes, Daniela Nunes, Luciana Camara, Fabiana Wanick, Guilherme
                           Nunes, Ana Paula Martins, Thiara Lenzi, Slim Clinique Laser Center and
                           Bonsuesso Dermatology Hospital, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
5:43 pm – 5:44 pm          Discussion

                           LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT

5:45 pm – 5:50 pm          STRIAE IMPROVEMENT WITH A NOVEL APPROACH BY SUBLATIVE
                           REJUVENATION: A PRELIMINARY REPORT WITH OBJECTIVE MEASUREMENT
                           Maurice Adatto1, Boris Vaynberg2, Ruthie Amir2, Hanit Brenner-Lavie2, Guido
                           Mariotto3, Roman Kantor3, Skinpulse Laser Center, Geneva, Switzerland,
                           Syneron Medical, Yokneam, Israel, Miravex Limited, Dublin, Ireland
                           1
                            Equipment from Syneron
                           2
                            Salary from Syneron
                           3
                            Salary from Miravex Limited
                           •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
5:51 pm - 5:52 pm          Discussion



                                                                                                               75
                        International                              2011 Annual Conference
                                                                   Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                   Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                   Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                        Experience in                              Grapevine, TX


                          Lasers in
                        Dermatology
                    Saturday, April 2, 2011


                    LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT

5:53 pm – 5:58 pm   COMBINED ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL RADIOFREQUENCY AND ULTRASOUND IN
                    SKIN REFINING
                    Maria Angelo-Khattar1, Aesthetica Clinic, Dubai, United Arab Emirates
                    1
                     Equipment from Alma Lasers
                    •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
5:59 pm – 6:00 pm   Discussion




76
                                             Expert Panels                                  2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                            Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                            Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                            Sunday, April 3, 2011                           Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                            Grapevine, TX



Endovenous Laser Ablation Expert Panel – Longhorn F                                                                 7:00 am – 7:45 am
Directors: Ethan A. Prince, M.D., Carson Wong, M.D., F.R.C.S.C., F.A.C.S.
Faculty: Neil S. Sadick, M.D.
Objectives: This session is intended for practicing physicians who have an interest in endovenous laser ablation.
The panel will focus on ELA which is now the most widely accepted and used treatment option for insufficient great
and saphenous veins. Panel topics include: 1) differences in clinical outcomes and safety between lasers of different
wavelengths and power; 2) differences in clinical outcomes and safety between laser ablation, radiofrequency
ablation, and surgery, and 3) differences in clinical outcomes and safety between EVLA and hook avulsion
(phlebectomy) as a same day procedure or as separate staged procedures on different days.
Disclosures
Ethan A. Prince – No disclosure
Neil S. Sadick received equipment from Osyris and SmoothShapes; research grant from Cynosure and Osyris
Carson Wong received consulting fees from American Medical Systems, Inc.

PDT in Dermatology – Texas D                                                                                        7:00 am – 7:45 am
Directors: Michael H. Gold, M.D., Arielle N.B. Kauvar, M.D.
Faculty:   Joel L. Cohen, M.D., Merete Haedersdal, M.D., Ph.D., Jason K. Rivers, M.D., E. Victor Ross, M.D.,
Fernanda Sakamoto, M.D.
Objectives: This session is intended for practicing physicians who have an interest in the clinical application of
photodynamic therapy to cutaneous disease. An expert panel of clinicians with extensive experience in photodynamic
therapy will share their therapeutic approaches for the treatment of actinic keratoses, non-melanoma skin cancer,
acne and other inflammatory disorders. At the conclusion of the session, attendees will be able to recognize the
indications for photodynamic therapy and discuss various treatment regimens using available photosensitizers, lasers,
and light sources. There will be an opportunity for questions and comments from the attendees.
Disclosures
Joel L. Cohen is currently a consultant for DUSA
Michael H. Gold received travel expenses, research grant, honoraria, and is a stockholder with DUSA; consultant for Galderma and Photocure;
honoraria and equity position with Galderma
Merete Haedersdal – No disclosure
Arielle N.B. Kauvar – No disclosure
Jason K. Rivers – No disclosure
E. Victor Ross received financial grant and consulting fees from Palomar and Syneron; equipment from Cutera, Lumenis, Palomar, and Sciton;
research grant from Cutera, Palomar, and Syneron; honoraria from Cutera, Lumenis, Palomar, and Syneron
Fernanda Sakamoto – No disclosure

Burns and Trauma Expert Panel – Texas 4-6                                                                           7:00 am – 7:45 am
Directors: Maj. (Dr.) Chad Hivnor, Jill S. Waibel, M.D.
Faculty: R. Rox Anderson, M.D., Robert J. Spence, M.D.
Objectives: Attendees of this panel should be individuals who have an interest in energy based and other innovative
therapies for scar revision after severe injuries. Trauma and severe scars such as burn scars have both functional and
cosmetic issues. There continues to be a rising number of trauma and burn survivors. The market and demand for
surgery, laser and other innovative solutions for scars is growing dramatically as survival rates increase. An expert
panel will discuss how we can leverage areas of multispecialty expertise to give optimal care. The panel will consist
of burn reconstructive surgeons, laser experts from dermatology and plastic surgery as well as both military and
civilian physicians. The panel discussions will include possible prevention of scars, early scar interventions with lasers
as well as late reconstruction of mature scars with lasers. Other innovative research will also be shared. Different
scar types as well as different laser types will be discussed. Timing of surgery and laser therapy will also be
addressed. There will be an opportunity for questions and comments from the attendees.
Disclosures
R. Rox Anderson received royalties from Massachusetts General Hospital which owns and licenses patents on laser hair removal, fractional laser
treatments, and cryolipolysis; serves on scientific advisory boards for PhotoMedex and Ulthera
Chad Hivnor - No disclosure
Robert J. Spence – No disclosure
Jill S. Waibel received consulting fees from Allergan and Medicis; research grant from Sciton; honoraria from Candela and Syneron
                                                                                                                                    77
                                       Clinical                           2011 Annual Conference
                                                                          Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                          Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                     Application                          Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                          Grapevine, TX

                                       Course
                                 (Intermediate/Advanced)
                                  Sunday, April 3, 2011

A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses. No CME credits and CE contact hours
available for this course.


ILT: Principal and Clinical Role – Texas 2-3                                                   7:00 am – 10:00 am

Director: Roger J. McNichols, Ph.D., Karl-G. Tranberg, M.D., Ph.D.

Faculty: R. Jason Stafford, Ph.D., David Woodrum, M.D., Ph.D.

Educational Needs
This course will inform clinicians about features of various ablation or tissue destruction methods including lasers
and ILT, and will instruct clinicians on the best practice in use and application of ILT in clinical applications. It
will further educate clinicians on existing and recent evidence regarding clinical practice of ILT.
Participants
This course is designed for general surgeons, neurosurgeons, urologic surgeons, and interventional radiologists.
Background Requirements
Attendees should have some knowledge of laser physics, tissue interaction, and the application of ILT.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
After engaging in this educational activity physician participants will be able to: 1) describe the basic principles
that govern laser-tissue interaction and laser thermotherapy; 2) describe current clinical techniques for
focal/local tumor control or lesion production; 3) differentiate ILT from other local treatment methods based on
advantages/disadvantages; 4) describe suitable applications for ILT and differentiate indications/
contraindications for particular treatment applications; 5) determine the applicability of lasers and ILT in their
own clinical practices, and 6) demonstrate knowledge about various systems/devices available for ILT.

7:00 am – 7:05 am       Discussion and Pre-Test – Roger J. McNichols, Karl-G. Tranberg
7:06 am – 7:15 am       What is Interstitial Laser (Thermo) Therapy? – Roger J. McNichols
                        • Definitions of ILT and Other Forms of (Laser-Mediated) Heat Treatment
7:16 am – 7:30 am       Laser Tissue Effects – Roger J. McNichols
                        • Absorption, Scattering, Determinants of Tissue Effects
7:31 am – 7:45 am       Local Treatment of Cancer – Overview of Local and Systemic Effects – Karl-G. Tranberg
                        • Surgical Resection, Local Chemotherapy (Regional Cytostatic Infusion,
                            Chemoembolization, Regional Perfusion), Local Destruction Methods Such as RFA,
                            Laser, Cryotherapy, Microwave Coagulation, PDT, HIFU, Ethanol Injection
7:46 am – 7:55 am       Why is ILT Attractive – Karl-G. Tranberg
                        • Immunologic Aspects; Imaging Compatibility; Volumetric Thermal Generation
7:56 am – 8:10 am       Evaluation Before, During, and After Treatment – R. Jason Stafford
                        • Real-Time Monitoring Imaging




78
                                              Clinical                                   2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                         Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                            Application                                  Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                         Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                         Grapevine, TX
                                              Course
                                       (Intermediate/Advanced)
                                        Sunday, April 3, 2011
A separate registration fee must be paid in order to attend courses. No CME credits and CE contact hours
available for this course.

ILT: Principal and Clinical Role Continued – Texas 2-3                                                          7:00 am – 10:00 am

8:11 am – 8:20 am            Treatment Planning – David Woodrum
                             • Indications/Contraindications to Ablation; Specific Considerations for ILT; Placement
                                 Approaches; Limitations
8:21 am – 8:35 am            ILT – Experimental Results – Karl-G. Tranberg
                             • Rat Tumor Model
8:36 am – 8:45 am            Break
8:46 am – 9:00 am            ILT – Clinical Results – David Woodrum, Karl-G. Tranberg
                             • The American Experience; The Swedish Experience
9:01 am – 9:10 am            Literature Survey and Clinical Experience – Roger J. McNichols, David Woodrum, Karl-G.
                             Tranberg
                             • Review of Published Results; Presentation of Clinical Experience
9:11 am – 9:20 am            Combinations With Other Local and Systemic Therapies – R. Jason Stafford, Roger J.
                             McNichols
9:21 am – 9:30 am            Problems – Roger J. McNichols, Karl-G. Tranberg, R. Jason Stafford
                             • Tissue Analysis; Real-Time Monitoring/Imaging; Pre- and Post-Therapy Evaluation
9:31 am – 9:40 am            Levels of Evidence for ILT – Karl-G. Tranberg
                             • Comparison of Methods; Pros and Cons; Swedish Guidelines for Local Tumor
                                Destruction
9:41 am – 9:50 am            ILT – Indications and Clinical Role – Roger J. McNichols, Karl-G. Tranberg
                             • Present Status; Areas That Need to be Improved; Future Possibilities
9:51 am – 10:00 am           Discussion and Post-Test – Roger J. McNichols, Karl-G. Tranberg, David Woodrum,
                              R. Jason Stafford
Disclosures
Roger McNichols received travel expenses from Bio Tex, Inc.; salary, stockholder, equity position, and intellectual property rights with Bio
Tex, Inc. and Visualase, Inc.
R. Jason Stafford received consulting fees from Visualase, Inc.
Karl-G Tranberg received travel expenses, consulting fees, stockholder, equity position, and intellectual property rights with Clinical
Laserthermia Systems AB
David Woodrum – No disclosure




                                                                                                                                  79
                                    Experimental and                                     2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                         Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                         Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011

                                      Translational                                      Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                         Grapevine, TX


                                        Research
                                        Sunday, April 3, 2011

Experimental and Translational Research – Texas C                                                            8:00 am – 12:00 pm

Directors: Jennifer K. Barton, Ph.D., Bernard Choi, Ph.D.

                                                        IMAGE-GUIDED SURGERY

8:00 am – 8:11 am              30         IS EXTERNAL SKIN TEMPERATURE AN ADEQUATE MODALITY TO SAFELY
                                          MONITOR PATIENTS DURING LASER LIPOLYSIS?
(ePoster available)
                                          Kenneth Rothaus1, New York Presbyterian Hospital Weill Cornell, New York, NY
                                          1
                                            Discount from Palomar
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

8:12 am – 8:23 am              31         PREDICTION OF THE MAXIMAL SAFE LASER RADIANT EXPOSURE ON AN
                                          INDIVIDUAL PATIENT BASIS BASED ON PHOTOTHERMAL TEMPERATURE
(ePoster available)                       PROFILING IN HUMAN SKIN
                                          Boris Majaron, Luka Vidovic, Matija Milanic, Wangcun Jia, J. Stuart Nelson,
                                          Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical
                                          Clinic, University of California, Irvine, CA
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

8:24 am – 8:35 am              32         A LED BASED IMAGING SYSTEM FOR OPTIMIZATION OF PHOTODYNAMIC
                                          THERAPY OF BASAL CELL CARCINOMA
(ePoster available)
                                          Rolf B. Saageri, David J. Cuccia, Steven Saggesse, Kristen M. Kelly, Anthony J.
                                          Durkin, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California,
                                          Modulated Imaging, Inc., Irvine, CA
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

8:36 am – 8:47 am              33         REFLECTION MODALITY CONTINUOUS-WAVE TERAHERTZ IMAGER FOR CANCER
                                          DEMARCATION
                                          Cecil Joseph, Anna Yaroslavsky, Thomas Goyette, Robert Giles, University of
                                          Massachusetts, Lowell, MA
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

                                                        CLINICAL THERAPEUTICS

8:48 am – 8:59 am              34         TEST METHODOLOGIES FOR ESTABLISHING SAFETY OF HOME-USE LASER
                                          BASED DEVICES
                                          David Sliney2, Michail Smirnov1, Stewart Wilson1, Oldrich Laznicka1, Oksana
                                          Bradley1, Felicia Whitney1, Gregory Altshuler1, Ilya Yaroslavsky1, Fallston, MD,
                                          Palomar Medical Technologies, Burlington, MA
                                          1
                                           Salary from Palomar
                                          2
                                           Travel expenses and consultant for Palomar
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use




iRecipient of U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research travel grant.



80
                                    Experimental and                                 2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                     Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                      Translational                                  Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                     Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                     Grapevine, TX

                                        Research
                                     Sunday, April 3, 2011

                                    2009 ASLMS STUDENT RESEARCH GRANT RECIPIENT

9:00 am – 9:11 am             35      COMBINATION THERAPY FOR THE TREATMENT OF
                                      ERYTHEMATOTELANGIECTATIC ROSACEA
                                      Jane Yoo4, Ryan Turner, Amy Lynne Frankel, Jinan Chaarani, Giselle Singer,
                                      Ellen Marmur, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY
                                      •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

9:12 am – 9:23 am             36      EFFECTS ON ADIPOCYTES AND SEPTAL FIBERS AFTER HIGH INTENSE HIGH
                                      FREQUENCY ULTRASOUND
                                      Afschin Fatemi, S-thetic Clinic, Duesseldorf, Germany
                                      •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

9:24 am – 9:35 am             37      LOW-FLUENCE 1064nm Q-SWITCHED Nd:YAG LASER
                                      Yuan-Hong Li, Tian-Hua Xu, Hong-Duo Chen, No. 1 Hospital of China Medical
                                      University, Shenyang, China

9:36 am – 9:47 am             38      MICROSCOPIC OBSERVATION OF ULTRAPULSE-MODE vs SUPERPULSE-MODE
                                      FRACTIONAL CO2 LASER ON BACK SKIN
                                      Yuan-Hong Li1, Xue-Gang Xu1, Hong-Duo Chen1, No. 1 Hospital of China Medical
                                      University, Shenyang, China
                                      1
                                          Equipment from Lumenis

9:48 am – 10:29 am                    Break

                                                  PRECLINICAL THERAPEUTICS II

                                                         INVITED SPEAKER

10:30 am – 10:50 am           39      TRANEXAMIC ACID-CONTAINING LIPOSOMES FOR ANTIFIBRINOLYTIC SITE-
                                      SPECIFIC PHARMACO-LASER THERAPY OF PORT WINE STAINS
                                      Michal Heger1, Anton I.P.M. de Kroon, Academic Medical Center, University of
                                      Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, University of Utrecht, Utrecht, The
                                      Netherlands
                                      1
                                       Intellectual property rights with patent filing at EPO
                                      •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

10:51 am – 11:02 am           40      TOWARDS ENHANCEMENT OF PDT EFFICACY IN EXTRAHEPATIC
                                      CHOLANGIOCARCINOMAS USING LIPOSOMAL PHOTOSENSITIZATION
(ePoster available)
                                      Mans Broekgaarden, Anton I.P.M. de Kroon, J. Antoinette Killian, Thomas M.
                                      van Gulik, Michal Heger, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam,
                                      Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Institute of Biomembranes, University of Utrecht,
                                      Utrecht, The Netherlands
                                      •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

11:03 am – 11:14 am           41      IN VITRO TESTING OF DUAL-MODE THULIUM MICROSURGICAL LASER
                                      Matthew Keller, James Stafford, Jonathan Wells, Lockheed Martin Aculight,
                                      Bothell, WA
                                      •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

4Recipient of ASLMS travel grant.
                                                                                                                          81
                                    Experimental and                                     2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                         Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                      Translational                                      Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                         Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                         Grapevine, TX

                                        Research
                                        Sunday, April 3, 2011


11:15 am – 11:26 am            42         HYPERTHERMIA ENHANCED IMAGE GUIDED LASER-ICG THERAPY
                                          Klressa Barnesi, Gal Shafirstein, Wolfgang Baumler, Ran Friedman, Leah
(ePoster available)
                                          Hennings, Mustafa Sarimollaoglu, Jessica Webber, Cassie Jackson, James Suen,
                                          Robert Griffin, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR,
                                          Regensberg University, Regensberg, Germany
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

11:27 am – 11:38 am            43         FIBEROPTIC MICRONEEDLES FOR MICROSCALE INTERSTITIAL DELIVERY OF
                                          THERAPEUTIC LIGHT
(ePoster available)
                                          Mehmet Kosogluih, Robert Hood, Christopher Rylander, Virginia Tech,
                                          Blacksburg, VA
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

                                          LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT

11:39 am – 11:50 am                       CAN A FRACTIONAL LASER ASSIST TRANSDERMAL ABSORPTION OF LIDOCAINE
                                          IN AN IN VIVO ANIMAL MODEL?
                                          Georgette Oni, Spencer Brown, Jeffrey Kenkel, UT Southwestern Medical
                                          Center, Dallas, TX
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

                                          LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT

11:51 am – 12:02 pm                       CHARACTERIZING VARIABILITY IN RAMAN SPECTRA OF BENIGN LESIONS
                                          TOWARDS CANCER DETECTION IN SKIN
                                          Isaac Pence, Chetan Patil, Elizabeth Vargis, Alex Walsh, Matthew Keller, Harish
                                          Krishnamoorthi, Jonathan Cayce, Constantine Paras, Alex Makowski, Xiaohong
                                          Bi, Mark Mackanos, E. Duco Jansen, Darrell Ellis, Anita Mahadevan-Jansen,
                                          Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, Lockheed-Martin Aculight, Bothel, WA
                                          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use




iRecipient of U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research travel grant.
hBest Student/Resident Experimental and Translational Medicine Award Recipient.


82
                              Cutaneous Laser                                   2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                              Surgery Session                                   Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                Grapevine, TX
                                Sunday, April 3, 2011


Cutaneous Laser Surgery – Longhorn F                                                                 8:00 am – 11:40 am

Directors: Mathew M. Avram, M.D., J.D., Paul M. Friedman, M.D.

                                       FRACTIONAL LASERS, BODY CONTOURING
Educational Needs
This session focuses on the use of fractional lasers for the treatment of dyspigmentation, photoaging, acne scars,
and warts. Ultrasound and combination treatments for body contouring will also be addressed. Participants will
develop an understanding of the present treatment indications, therapeutic techniques, and new and innovative
technologies.
Participants
This session will benefit physicians and health care personnel who treat cutaneous disorders in the disciplines of
dermatology, plastic surgery, and facial plastic surgery. It will also benefit those engineers and medical device
personnel who actively work to develop devices for the treatment of cutaneous disorders.
Background Requirements
Participants should have a basic understanding of the fundamentals of skin biology, laser physics, and laser tissue
interaction.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
Attendees will gain knowledge of cutting edge laser treatments and their clinical applications in the treatment of
a variety of cutaneous conditions.
Hot Topics
• 1927nm thulium fiber laser for the treatment of melasma
• Ultrasound devices for body contouring


8:00 am – 8:01 am                Introduction – Mathew M. Avram, Paul M. Friedman

8:02 am – 8:07 am        91      TREATMENT OF MELASMA IN FITZPATRICK SKIN TYPES IV-V WITH NON-
                                 ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL PHOTOTHERMOLYSIS: A REPORT OF 14 CASES WITH
(ePoster available)              LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP
                                 Paul M. Friedman, Jennifer M. Landau, Kristel D. Polder, Megan N. Moody,
                                 Leonard H. Goldberg, Irene J. Vergilis-Kalner, Denise Marquez, DermSurgery
                                 Associates, Houston, TX, Rodgers Dermatology, Dallas, TX

8:08 am – 8:13 am        92      TREATMENT OF MELASMA WITH A NOVEL FRACTIONATED 1927nm THULIUM
                                 FIBER LASER
(ePoster available)
                                 Kristel Polder1, Suzanne Bruce2, University of Texas, Suzanne Bruce and
                                 Associates, Houston, TX
                                 1
                                  Equipment and honoraria from Solta
                                 2
                                  Equipment from Solta
                                 •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

8:14 am – 8:19 am        93      EFFICACY OF 1927nm THULIUM FIBER LASER FOR THE TREATMENT OF
                                 MELASMA IN CHINESE PATIENTS
(ePoster available)
                                 Stephanie G.Y. Ho, N. Chan, C.K. Yeung, Samantha Y. Shek, Henry H.L. Chan1,
                                 The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
                                 1
                                     Stockholder with Solta




                                                                                                                     83
                           Cutaneous Laser                                  2011 Annual Conference
                                                                            Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                            Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                           Surgery Session                                  Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                            Grapevine, TX
                           Sunday, April 3, 2011


8:20 am – 8:25 am     94   NON-ABLATIVE 1550nm FRACTIONAL LASER THERAPY NOT EFFECTIVE FOR
                           ASHY DERMATOSIS AND POST-INFLAMMATORY HYPERPIGMENTATION: A PILOT
                           STUDY
                           Marije W. Kroon, Bas S. Wind, Arne A. Meesters, Albert Wolkerstorfer, J.P.
                           Wietze Van der Veen, Jan D. Bos, Allard A. Van der Wal, Johan F. Beek, The
                           Netherlands Institute for Pigment Disorders, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
                           •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

                           LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT

8:26 am – 8:31 am          SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT OF FACIAL MELASMA WITH A COMBINATION OF
                           MICRODERMABRASION AND Q-SWITCHED Nd:YAG LASER TREATMENT
                           Arielle N.B. Kauvar, New York Laser & Skin Care, New York, NY

8:32 am – 8:42 am          Q&A

8:43 am – 8:48 am     95   ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL RESURFACING OF EYELIDS: A PROSPECTIVE
                           EVALUATION
                           Brian Biesman1, Nashville Centre for Laser and Facial Surgery, Nashville, TN
                           1
                               Research grant from Lumenis

8:49 am – 8:54 am     96   COLD INDUCED MODULATION OF TARGETED FACIAL NERVES. A PILOT STUDY
                           OF A MINIMALLY INVASIVE CRYOPROBE DEVICE FOR IMMEDIATE REDUCTION
                           OF DYNAMIC WRINKLES
                           Francis Palmer1, Vic Narurkar1, Thomas Munyon2, Kristine Tatsutani3, Los
                           Angeles, CA, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, Munyon
                           Dermatology, Myoscience, Redwood City, CA
                           1
                             Consulting fees and equity position with Myoscience
                           2
                             Consulting fees from Myoscience
                           3
                             Salary and equity position with Myoscience
                           •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

8:55 am – 9:00 am     97   ENHANCED SKIN REJUVENATION: A NOVEL COMBINED NON-ABLATIVE AND
                           FRACTIONAL APPROACH
                           Hanit Brenner-Lavie1, Yossi Adanny1, Avner Rozenberg1, Haim Epstein1, Genady
                           Nahshon1, Ruthie Amir1, Ulrich Toft1, Tal Nachlieli2, Boris Vaynberg1, Syneron
                           Medical, Ltd., Yokneam Illit, Israel, Assuta Medical Center, Haifa, Israel
                           1
                               Salary from Syneron
                           1
                               Equipment, consulting fees, honoraria from Syneron

9:01 am – 9:06 am     98   LONG-TERM EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF MICRO-FOCUSED ULTRASOUND FOR
                           SKIN TIGHTENING AND LIFTING: RESULTS IN 183 KOREAN SUBJECTS
(ePoster available)
                           Nark-Kyoung Rho, Chan-Woo Jeong, Deuk-Pyo Lee, Sangjin Park, Seung-Hui
                           Kang, Jang-Hyun Shin, Byung-Soon Park, Leaders Aesthetic Laser & Cosmetic
                           Surgery Center, Seoul, Korea

9:07 am – 9:12 am     99   CLINICAL STUDY OF TRANSCUTANEOUS FOCUSED ULTRASOUND FOR LOWER
                           FACIAL AND SUBMENTAL SKIN TIGHTENING IN ASIANS
                           Nicola P.Y. Chan, Carol S. Yu, Johnny C.Y. Chan, Samantha S. Shek, Henry H.L.
                           Chan1, The University of Hong Kong, Eye Institute, Hong Kong, China
                           1
                               Equipment from Ulthera



84
                            Cutaneous Laser                                 2011 Annual Conference
                                                                            Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                            Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                            Surgery Session                                 Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                            Grapevine, TX
                            Sunday, April 3, 2011


9:13 am – 9:18 am     100    CLINICAL AND HISTOPATHOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF A NEW NON-INVASIVE
                             BODY CONTOURING DEVICE COMBINING HIGH POWER BIPOLAR
                             RADIOFREQUENCY, INFRARED LIGHT, NEGATIVE PRESSURE AND MECHANICAL
                             TISSUE MANIPULATION
                             Hema Sundaram1, Jason N. Pozner1, Sundaram Dermatology, Cosmetic & Laser
                             Surgery, Fairfax, VA, Sanctuary Plastic Surgery, Boca Raton, FL
                             1
                                 Equipment from Syneron/Candela


9:19 am – 9:36 am            Q&A

9:37 am – 9:42 am     102    COMPARISON OF FRACTIONAL Er:YAG AND CO2 LASERS IN RESURFACING OF
                             ATROPHIC ACNE SCARS IN ASIANS
(ePoster available)
                             Woraphong Manuskiatti, Thanawan Iamphonrat, Rungsima Wanitphakdeedecha,
                             Sasima Eimpunth, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand

9:43 am – 9:48 am     103    A PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED SPLIT-FACE COMPARISON STUDY OF NON-
                             ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL LASER RESURFACING IN THE TREATMENT OF ACNE
(ePoster available)          SCARRING IN FITZPATRICK SKIN PHOTOTYPES IV-VI
                             Andrew Alexis, Marcy Coley, Janiene Luke, Sejal Shah, Yahya Argobi, Murad
                             Alam, Skin of Color Center, St. Lukes Roosevelt Hospital, New York, NY,
                             Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL

9:49 am – 9:54 am     104    EVALUATION OF THE COMBINED TREATMENT WITH FRACTIONAL LASER AND
                             FRACTIONAL RADIOFREQUENCY FOR ACNE SCARS IN ASIANS
                             Chi Keung Yeung, Nicola P.Y. Chan, Carol S. Yu, Henry H.L. Chan1, The
                             University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
                             1
                                 Equipment loan from Syneron

9:55 am – 10:00 am    105    THERMO-FRACTIONAL PDT FOR PERSISTENT WARTS
                             Leonardo Marini, SDC-The Skin Doctors’, Center, Trieste, Italy
(ePoster available)
                             •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

                             LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT

10:01 am – 10:06 am          1064nm QS Nd:YAG LASER AND 1550nm ERBIUM-DOPED FRACTIONATED
                             FIBER LASER FOR THE TREATMENT OF NEVUS OF OTA IN FITZPATRICK SKIN
                             TYPE IV
                             Paul Friedman, Irene Vergilis-Kalner, Jennifer Landau, Megan Moody, Leonard
                             Goldberg, Denise Marques, DermSurgery Associates, Houston, TX

10:07 am – 10:19 am          Q&A

10:20 am – 10:30 am          Break




                                                                                                                 85
                               Cutaneous Laser                                    2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                  Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                  Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                               Surgery Session                                    Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                  Grapevine, TX
                                 Sunday, April 3, 2011


                                          EXCIMER LASER AND HAIR REMOVAL
Educational Needs
This session focuses on the use of excimer lasers for the treatment of palmoplantar psoriasis and vitiligo. Each of
the topics of innovative in-office and home-use devices and optimized treatment techniques for hair removal will
also be addressed. Participants will develop an understanding of the present treatment indications, therapeutic
techniques, and new and innovative technologies.
Participants
This session will benefit physicians and health care personnel who treat cutaneous disorders in the disciplines of
dermatology, plastic surgery, and facial plastic surgery. It will also benefit those engineers and medical device
personnel who actively work to develop devices for the treatment of cutaneous disorders.
Background Requirements
Participants should have a basic understanding of the fundamentals of skin biology, laser physics, and laser tissue
interaction.
Instructional Content and/or Expected Learning Outcomes
Attendees will gain knowledge of cutting edge laser treatments and their clinical applications in the treatment of
a variety of cutaneous conditions and hair removal.
Hot Topics
• Excimer laser for the treatment of palmoplantar psoriasis and vitiligo
• Lasers with vacuum-assisted suction for hair removal

10:31 am – 10:36 am      106     308nm EXCIMER LASER TREATMENT OF PALMOPLANTAR PSORIASIS
                                 David Goldberg, Nathalie Dietrich-Comte, Mussarrat Hussain, Skin Laser &
                                 Surgery Specialists of NY and NJ, New York, NY

10:37 am – 10:42 am      107     STUDY OF EFFICACY AND TOLERABILITY MONOCHROMATIC EXCIMER LIGHT IN
                                 TREATMENT OF VITILIGO
(ePoster available)
                                 Niteen Dhepe, Tushar Kshirsagar, Ashok Naik, Vaishali Phadke, Pune, India

10:43 am – 10:48 am      108     USE OF COMBINATION LASERS FOR MORE EFFECTIVE HAIR REMOVAL
                                 Abnoeal Bakus, Dina Yaghmai, Jerome Garden, Northwestern Hospital, Chicago,
                                 IL

10:49 am – 10:54 am      109     CLINICAL EVALUATION OF A 800nm LONG-PULSED DIODE LASER DEVICE WITH
                                 A LARGE SPOT SIZE AND VACUUM-ASSISTED SUCTION FOR HAIR REMOVAL
                                 Omar Ibrahimi, Suzanne Kilmer1, UC Davis Medical Center, Skin and Laser
                                 Center of Northern California, Sacramento, CA
                                 1
                                     Equipment, consulting fees and research grant from Lumenis

10:55 am – 11:00 am      110     SAFETY AND EFFICACY OF A HAND-HELD DIODE LASER FOR UPPER LIP HAIR
                                 REMOVAL
                                 Brian Biesman1, Whitney Morris, Nashville Centre for Laser and Facial Surgery,
                                 Nashville, TN
                                 1
                                   Consulting fees and research grant from TRIA Beauty
                                 •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use




86
                            Cutaneous Laser                                  2011 Annual Conference
                                                                             Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                             Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                            Surgery Session                                  Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                             Grapevine, TX
                            Sunday, April 3, 2011


11:01 am – 11:06 am   111   BILATERAL AXILLA HAIR REMOVAL COMPARING A SINGLE WAVELENGTH
                            ALEXANDRITE LASER WITH COMBINED MULTIPLEXED ALEXANDRITE AND
                            Nd:YAG LASER TREATMENT FROM A SINGLE LASER PLATFORM
                            Eric Bernstein1, University of Pennsylvania, Ardmore, PA
                            1
                                Equipment and research grant from Cynosure

11:07 am – 11:12 am   112   A SPLIT AXILLA COMPARISON STUDY OF AXILLARY HAIR REMOVAL WITH LOW
                            FLUENCE HIGH REPETITION RATE 810nm DIODE LASER vs HIGH FLUENCE LOW
(ePoster available)         REPETITION RATE 1064nm Nd:YAG LASER
                            Rungsima Wanitphakdeedecha, Kanchalit Thanomkitti, Sasima Eimpunth,
                            Woraphong Manuskiatti, Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand

                            LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT

11:13 am – 11:18 am         A RANDOMIZED, BLINDED CLINICAL STUDY OF A MICROWAVE DEVICE FOR
                            TREATMENT OF AXILLARY HYPERHIDROSIS
                            Suzanne L. Kilmer, William Coleman III, Larry Fan, Dee Anna Glaser, Michael
                            Kaminer, Robert Nossa, Stacy Smith, Laser & Skin Surgery Center of Northern
                            California, Sacramento, CA, Coleman Center for Cosmetic Dermatologic
                            Surgery, Metaire, LA, Bay Area Center for Plastic Surgery, Oakland, CA, St. Louis
                            University, St. Louis, MO, SkinCare Physicians, Chestnut Hill, MA, The
                            Dermatology Group of Northern New Jersey, Verona, NJ, Therapeutics Clinical
                            Research, San Diego, CA
                            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

11:19 am – 11:40 am         Q&A




                                                                                                                  87
                      Photobiomodulation                                           2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                   Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                            Session                                                Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                   Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                   Grapevine, TX
                              Sunday, April 3, 2011


Photobiomodulation – Texas 4-6                                                                          8:00 am – 9:30 am

Directors: Juanita J. Anders, Ph.D., Michael Hamblin, M.D.

                              PHOTOBIOMODULATION: CLINICAL APPLICATIONS

                                                    INVITED SPEAKER

8:00 am – 8:34 am       164    REVIEW OF MECHANISMS BY WHICH THE SPONTANEOUS EFFECTS OF
                               PHOTONS ARE AMPLIFIED IN VIVO: THE PASER PRINCIPLE
                               Mary Dyson1, King's College, London, United Kingdom
                               1
                                Stockholder with Meditech-Bioflex International
                               •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
8:35 am – 8:44 am              Discussion

8:45 am – 8:54 am       165    A 764 PATIENT RETROSPECTIVE STUDY REGARDING THE EFFICACY OF LOW-
                               LEVEL LASER THERAPY FOR NON-INVASIVE BODY SLIMMING OF THE WAIST,
                               HIPS, AND THIGHS
                               Ryan Maloney1, Steven Shanks2, Jillian Maloney, Erchonia, McKinney, TX,
                               University of Arizona, Gilbert, AZ
                               1
                                   Consulting fees from Erchonia
                               2
                                   Salary, stockholder, intellectual property rights with Erchonia
8:55 am – 8:59 am              Discussion

9:00 am – 9:09 am       166    LOW LEVEL LASER THERAPY FOR ADIPOSE REDUCTION IN 30 WOMEN
                               Elizabeth VanderVeer, Carrie Anderson, VanderVeer Center, Portland, OR
(ePoster available)
                               •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
9:10 am – 9:14 am              Discussion

9:15 am – 9:24 am       167    NOVEL NON-INVASIVE TECHNIQUE USING LOW LEVEL LASER FOR CHIN
                               REJUVENATION
                               Vinod Podichetty1, Jean-Claude Nerette, Research Practice Partners, Inc.,
                               Miramar, FL, Bellissimo Medical Center, Weston, FL
                               1
                                 Consulting fees from Meridian Medical, Inc.
                               •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
9:25 am – 9:30 am              Discussion




88
                                   International                              2011 Annual Conference
                                                                              Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                              Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                   Experience in                              Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                              Grapevine, TX

                                     Lasers in
                                   Dermatology
                                Sunday, April 3, 2011

International Experience in Lasers in Dermatology - Texas D                                       8:00 am – 10:10 am

Director: Thierry Passeron, M.D., Ph.D.

                                                           FAT
                                          Maurice Adatto, Moshe Lapidoth

8:00 am – 8:05 am              A TWO-CENTER PROSPECTIVE CONTROLLED CLINICAL SAFETY AND EFFICACY
                               OF 980nm DIODE LASER WITH NOVEL ENERGY REGULATION AND
                               VISUALIZATION TECHNOLOGY FOR LASER ASSISTED LIPOSUCTION
                               Neil Sadick1, Carmen Kavali, Theo Diktaban, Weill Cornell Medical College, New
                               York, NY
                               1
                                   Funding and equipment from Osyris
8:06 am – 8:07 am              Discussion

8:08 am – 8:13 am       131    RADIAL ACOUSTIC WAVES FOR THE TREATMENT OF CELLULITE: A DOUBLE-
                               BLINDED RANDOMIZED PROSPECTIVE STUDY VERUM vs PLACEBO
(ePoster available)
                               Katharina Russe-Wilflingseder1, Elisabeth Russe, Plastische Chirurgie und
                               Laserzentrum, Innsbruck, Austria
                               1
                                Equipment from Storz Medical
                               •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
8:14 am – 8:15 am              Discussion

8:16 am – 8:21 am       132    BODY SCULPTING WITH ACOUSTIC WAVE THERAPY: RANDOMIZED,
                               CONTROLLED, STUDY ON 14 SUBJECTS
(ePoster available)
                               Maurice Adatto1, R. Adatto-Neilson, P. Novak2, A. Krotz2, G. Haller2, SkinPulse
                               Dermatology & Laser Center, Geneva, Switzerland, Storz Medical, Tagerwilen,
                               Switzerland
                               1
                                   Equipment discount from Storz Medical
                               2
                                   Salary from Storz Medical
8:22 am – 8:23 am              Discussion

8:24 am – 8:29 am       133    REDUCTION IN ADIPOSE TISSUE VOLUME USING A NEW HIGH POWER
                               RADIOFREQUENCY TECHNOLOGY COMBINED WITH INFRARED LIGHT AND
(ePoster available)            MECHANICAL MANIPULATION FOR BODY CONTOURING
                               Maurice Adatto1, Boris Vaynberg2, Ruthie Amir2, SkinPulse Dermatology & Laser
                               Center, Geneva, Switzerland, Syneron Medical, Yokneam Illit, Israel
                               1
                                   Equipment discount from Syneron Medical
                               2
                                   Salary from Syneron Medical
8:30 am – 8:31 am              Discussion




                                                                                                                   89
                            International                                   2011 Annual Conference
                                                                            Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                            Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                            Experience in                                   Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                            Grapevine, TX

                              Lasers in
                            Dermatology
                            Sunday, April 3, 2011

                                                SKIN TIGHTENING

8:32 am – 8:37 am     134   POST FACE LIFTING RF TREATMENT: CASE REPORTS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS
                            Tal Nachlieli1, Hanit Brenner-Lavie2, Ruthie Amir2, Eldad Moor3, Assuta Medical
                            Center, Haifa, Israel, Syneron Medical, Yokneam Illit, Israel, Ramat Aviv Medical
                            Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel
                            1
                                Equipment and salary from Syneron Medical
                            2
                                Salary from Syneron Medical
                            3
                                Equipment from Syneron Medical
8:38 am – 8:39 am           Discussion

                                          FRACTIONAL RESURFACING

8:40 am – 8:45 am     135   EFFICACY AND PATIENT SATISFACTION OF A NEW NON-ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL
                            LASER 1340nm FOR THE FACIAL REJUVENATION IN BRAZILIAN PATIENTS
                            Valeria Campos, Tatiana Cordero, Juliana Jordao, Jundiai, São Paulo, Brazil,
                            Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil, Curitiba, São Paulo, Brazil
                            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
8:46 am – 8:47 am           Discussion

8:48 am – 8:53 am     136   A PILOT STUDY OF FRACTIONAL MICRO-PLASMA RADIOFREQUENCY FOR
                            TREATMENT OF FACIAL SCARS AND RHYTIDS
                            Shlomit Halachmi, Arie Orenstein1, Tania Meneghel, Moshe Lapidoth1, Rabin
                            Medical Center, Petach, Tikva, Israel, Tel Hashomer Hospital, Tel Hashomer,
                            Israel, Renaissance Medical Center, São Paulo, Brazil
                            1
                                Equipment from Alma
8:54 am – 8:55 am           Discussion

8:56 am – 9:01 am     137   TREATMENT OF DEPRESSED ACNE SCARS AND DEEP WRINKLES WITH A NOVEL
                            MULTI-SOURCE FRACTIONAL RADIOFREQUENCY DEVICE – HISTOLOGICAL AND
(ePoster available)         CLINICAL RESULTS ON 50 PATIENTS WITH LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP
                            Yoram Harth1, Klaus Fritz2, OR Medical Center, Herzlya, Israel, University
                            Hospital, Bern, Switzerland
                            1
                             Travel expenses, salary, stockholder, equity position, intellectual property rights with EndyMed
                            2
                             Equipment from EndyMed
                            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

9:02 am – 9:03 am           Discussion

9:04 am – 9:09 am     138   SEQUENTIAL PHOTOTHERMAL 1064nm Nd:YAG AND 2940nm Er:YAG
                            FRACTIONAL RESURFACING AND REMODELING vs 2940nm Er:YAG
(ePoster available)         FRACTIONAL RESURFACING ALONE: A COMPARATIVE STUDY
                            Leonardo Marini, SDC-The Skin Doctors’ Center, Trieste, Italy
9:10 am – 9:11 am           Discussion




90
                            International                                  2011 Annual Conference
                                                                           Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                           Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                            Experience in                                  Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                           Grapevine, TX

                              Lasers in
                            Dermatology
                            Sunday, April 3, 2011

9:12 am – 9:17 am     139   COMBINED FRACTIONAL, NON-ABLATIVE TREATMENT OF STRIAE: CLINICAL
                            AND HISTOLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS
                            Vic Narurkar1, Christine Dierickx1, Carolyn Chang1, Ava Shamban1, Bay Area
                            Laser Institute/CPMC, San Francisco, CA, Skin and Laser Center, Boom, Belgium,
                            Laser Institute for Derm and European Skin Care, Santa Monica, CA
                            1
                                Equipment from Palomar
9:18 am – 9:19 am               Discussion

9:20 am – 9:25 am     140   CLINICAL EFFICACY OF FRACTIONAL ERBIUM FIBER 1410nm LASER FOR
                            TREATMENT OF DILATED PORES IN KOREANS
(ePoster available)
                            JeeYoung Park, SangJun Lee, JiHo Rho, KyeKong Song, Arundaunnara
                            Dermatologic Clinic, Chung-ang University, Seoul, Korea
9:26 am – 9:27 am           Discussion

                            LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT

9:28 am – 9:33 am           REJUVENATION OF THE NECK WITH THE E-MATRIX FRACTIONAL
                            RADIOFREQUENCY DEVICE
                            Sylvie Angel, Jean-Michel Mazer1, Paris, France
                            1
                                Honoraria from Syneron
9:34 am – 9:35 am           Discussion

                            LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT

9:36 am – 9:41 am           THE NEW FASHION VECTORIAL WAY TO IMPROVE FAT REMODELING AND
                            SCULPTING THE FACE USING NON-INVASIVE IN MOTION SELECTIVE
                            ULTRASOUND (ACCENT ULTRAFACE): 12 MONTH FOLLOW-UP
                            Almeida Guiherme, Almeida Leticia, Elaine Marques, Rachel Queiroz, Hospital
                            Sirio Libanes, São Paulo, Brazil
9:42 am – 9:43 am           Discussion

                            LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT

9:44 am – 9:49 am           COMBINED SHEAR WAVE ULTRASOUND AND UNIPOLAR RADIOFREQUENCY FOR
                            NON-INVASIVE SELECTIVE LIPOLYSIS AND SKIN TIGHTENING: A PILOT STUDY
                            Jong Min Park, ILOMYS Cosmetic Surgery and Laser Center, Seoul, Korea
                            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
9:50 am – 9:51 am           Discussion




                                                                                                                91
                            International                                  2011 Annual Conference
                                                                           Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                            Experience in                                  Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                           Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                           Grapevine, TX

                              Lasers in
                            Dermatology
                            Sunday, April 3, 2011


                            LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT

9:52 am – 9:57 am           924nm, 975nm LASER DEVICE: NEW APPROACH TO TREAT CELLULITE
                            Rafael Nunes, Francisco Leite, Daniella Nunes, Luciana Camara, Ana Paula
                            Martins, Monica Souza, Guilherme Nunes, Slim Clinique Laser Center and
                            Bonsucesso Dermatology Hospital, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil, Centro De
                            Dermatologia E Laser De Brasilia, Brasilia, Brazil
9:58 am – 9:59 am           Discussion

10:00 am – 10:05 am   130   A PILOT STUDY OF PULSED MAGNETIC THERAPY IN BODY CONTOURING
                            Shlomit Halachmi, Maurice Adatto, Moshe Lapidoth, Rabin Medical Center,
                            Petach, Tikva, Israel, SkinPulse Dermatology & Laser Center, Geneva,
                            Switzerland
                            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use
10:06 am – 10:10 am         Discussion




92
                                                                                   2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                   Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                               ePosters                            Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                   Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                   Grapevine, TX




ePoster Viewing Hours:                                                                                       Longhorn D&E

Friday, April 1, 2011 ........................................................................................ 9:00 am – 7:00 pm
Saturday, April 2, 2011 ..................................................................................... 9:00 am – 7:30 pm
Sunday, April 3, 2011 ............................................................................................ Exhibits Closed

ePoster Chair: Emil A. Tanghetti, M.D.

Disclosure
Emil A. Tanghetti received equipment and a discount from Cynosure and Palomar


ePosters
Twenty viewing stations will be located in the Exhibit Hall. We have extended the lunch hour and breaks to
allow additional time for viewing ePosters and visiting with the exhibitors. No hard copy posters will be on
display. A maximum of 4 CME credits will be offered for viewing the ePosters. In addition to the ePosters listed
below, oral presentations listed throughout the program who also prepared and submitted an ePoster will be
denoted with (ePoster available) next to their presentation time.
ePoster Q&A
Each ePoster will include a tab labeled “Questions and Answers”. When the conference attendee clicks on the
Q&A tab, they will view a running list of questions along with each question’s corresponding answer from the
author. Additionally, there will be a button labeled “Submit a Question”. When the conference attendee
clicks this button, they will be provided with a form which has a blank area for them to type and submit their
question to the author. The system will update every morning at 6:00 am local time. All questions and
answers from the previous day will be posted to each ePoster. Also, the Q&A log will be viewable in the post-
conference online version, but the ability to ask questions will not be available in the post-conference online
version.


                                                               ACNE

223       PURPURIC PULSE DYE LASER TREATMENTS OF ACNE REDUCE LESIONS – A CHART REVIEW
          Judith Hellman, Hadar Lev-Tov, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, SUNY Downstate
          College of Medicine, Brooklyn, NY
          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

250       FRACTIONAL CO2 LASER IN THE COMBINED TREATMENT OF PAPULOPUSTULAR ACNE VULGARIS
          Julia Pryaslova, Anastasia Tolstaya, Mikhail Golikov, Ksenia Krechko, Ekaterinburg, Russia

                                                          DENTAL/ENT

208       REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE: LOW LEVEL LASER THERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF
          TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS
          Hadi Daia, Heidi C. Crow, Thomas S. Mang, Buffalo, NY
          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

225       OCT vs CURRENT CLINICAL STANDARDS FOR EARLY-STAGE CARIES DETECTION
          Jennifer Holtzman, Kathryn Osann, Sandeep Potdar, Steven Duong, Yeh-chan Ahn, Zhongping Chen,
          Petra Wilder-Smith, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, CA
          •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use


                                                                                                                             93
                                                                                        2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                        Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                                     ePosters                           Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                        Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                        Grapevine, TX




     269   CLINICAL RESEARCH STUDY TO EVALUATE THE EFFECTS OF PROTOTYPE DENTIFRICES ON SOFT-
           TISSUE ARCHITECTURE
           Joseph Youssef, Steven Duong, Travis Tucker, Jun Zhang, Kathryn Osann, Petra Wilder-Smith,
           Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, CA
           •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

                                                                  FAT

     205   LOW FREQUENCY ULTRASOUND FOR NON-INVASIVE FAT CONTOURING
           Joseph Cervone1, UMDNJ, West Orange, NJ
           1
            Consulting fees, discount, and honoraria from Sound Surgical Technologies
           •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

     212   PATIENT SATISFACTION AT 2 AND 6 MONTHS AFTER A SINGLE NON-INVASIVE CRYOLIPOLYSIS
           TREATMENT FOR SUBCUTANEOUS FAT LAYER REDUCTION
           Jeffrey Dover1, Michael Kaminer1, Maureen Teahan, Lauren Barrett, SkinCare Physicians, Chestnut
           Hill, MA
           1
               Consulting fees and research grant from Zeltiq

     232   LASER LIPOLYSIS WITH A 980nm DIODE LASER vs TRADITIONAL AND ULTRASOUND ASSISTED
           LIPOSUCTION: PERSONAL EXPERIENCE
           Tiziana Lazzari, Genova, Italy

     238   THE NEW FASHION VECTORIAL WAY TO IMPROVE FAT REMODELING AND SCULPTING THE FACE
           USING NON-INVASIVE IN MOTION SELECTIVE SHEAR WAVES ULTRASOUND (ACCENT ULTRA)
           Guilherme Almeida, Leticia Almeida, Elaine Marques, Rachel Queiroz, Hospital Sirio Libanes, São
           Paulo, Brazil

     255   IS SKIN TIGHTENING AN ADDED ADVANTAGE TO LASER LIPOLYSIS AS COMPARED TO CONVENTIONAL
           SUCTION ASSISTED LIPOSUCTION? A CONTROLLED STUDY
           Kenneth Rothaus1, New York Presbyterian Hospital Weill Cornell, New York, NY
           1
               Equipment, discount, research grant from Palomar

     266   A NOVEL THERAPY FOR EFFECTIVE CELLULITE TREATMENT IN WOMEN
           Carrie Anderson, Elizabeth VanderVeer, VanderVeer Center, Portland, OR
           •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

                                                      FRACTIONAL RESURFACING

     206   TREATMENT WITH DUAL WAVELENGTH 1550nm and 1927nm FRACTIONAL LASER FOR FACIAL SKIN
           REJUVENATION IN ASIANS
           Nicola P.Y. Chan, Johnny C.Y. Chan, Mona L.S. Chiu, Henry H.L. Chan 1 The University of Hong Kong,
           Hong Kong, China
           1
               Stockholder with Solta




94
                                                                      2011 Annual Conference
                                                                      Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                               ePosters               Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                      Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                      Grapevine, TX




226   NEW TOTAL COMBINATION TECHNIQUES WITH PUNCH, FRACTIONAL AND LONG-PULSED Er:YAG
      LASER FOR THE TREATMENT OF ACNE SCARS COMPARED WITH THE CLASSIC SEQUENTIAL
      COMBINATION THERAPY
      Eun Ju Hwang, Jeanne Jung, Jong Hee Lee, Hun Suh Dae, Klaripa Clinic, Boramae Hospital, Seoul
      National Hospital, Seoul, Korea

228   CLINICAL STUDY TO EVALUATE THE EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF FRACTIONAL RADIOFREQUENCY
      SYSTEM
      Tae Woo Noh, Yoo Seok Kang, Un Ha Lee, Hyun Su Park, Sang Jai Jang, Bang Soon Kim 1, Sanggye Paik
      Hospital, S&U Clinic, Seoul, Korea
      1
          Equipment from Syneron

240   THE SAFETY AND EFFICACY OF MICRO ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL CO2 LASER IN THE TREATMENT OF
      NON-FACIAL SKIN PHOTODAMAGE, WRINKLES, PIGMENT DISORDERS AND LAXITY: A CASE SERIES OF
      480 BRAZILIAN PATIENTS
      Guilherme Almeida1, Elaine Marques, Leticia Almeida, Rachel Queiroz, Hospital Sirio Libanes, São
      Paulo, Brazil
      1
          Equipment from Ultrapulse

247   CLINICAL EFFECTS OF GROWTH FACTOR BASED GEL vs VEHICLE IN PATIENTS TREATED WITH A
      NON-ABLATIVE, FRACTIONATED RESURFACING PROCEDURE
      Jennifer Peterson1, Sabrini Fabi, Mitchel Goldman2, Goldman Butterwick & Associates Cosmetic Laser
      Dermatology, San Diego, CA
      1
          Consulting fees from Skin Medica
      2
          Consulting fees from Skin Medica and Cynosure

249   1927nm FRACTIONAL THULIUM FIBER LASER FOR THE TREATMENT OF NON-FACIAL
      PHOTODAMAGE: A PILOT STUDY
      Kristel Polder1, April Harrison, Leigh Ellen Eubanks, Suzanne Bruce2, University of Texas, Suzanne
      Bruce and Associates, Houston, TX
      1
       Equipment and honoraria from Solta
      2
       Equipment from Solta
      •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

252   PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF A CLINICAL TRIAL USING A NOVEL INTRALESIONAL FRACTIONAL
      RADIOFREQUENCY DEVICE FOR DEEP DERMAL HEATING OF FACIAL SKIN
      Nark-Kyoung Rho, Jeong-Yeop Lee, Soohong Kim, Kyung-Ae Jang, Seok-Beom Park, Leaders Aesthetic
      Laser & Cosmetic Surgery Center, Seoul, Korea
      •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

268   TREATMENT OF POST-INFLAMMATORY HYPERPIGMENTATION WITH 1927nm THULIUM FRACTIONAL
      LASER
      Jill Waibel, Dan Wasserman, Elizabeth Houshmand, Emily Tierney, Miami Dermatology and Laser
      Institute, Miami, FL, Total Skin and Beauty Dermatology Center, Birmingham, AL, Wright State
      University, Dayton, OH, South Shore Skin Center, Cohasset & Plymouth, MA




                                                                                                              95
                                                                           2011 Annual Conference
                                                                           Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                  ePosters                 Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                           Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                           Grapevine, TX




                                            HAIR, PIGMENT AND TATTOO REMOVAL

     201   AGE OF TATTOO IS AN INDICATOR FOR THE RATE OF SUCCESS OF LASER-ASSISTED TATTOO
           REMOVAL
           Robert Anolik, Julie K. Karen, Elizabeth K. Hale, Leonard Bernstein, Roy G. Geronemus 1, Laser and
           Skin Surgery Center of New York, New York, NY
           1
               Equity position with Solta

     203   HAIR REMOVAL WITH ALEXANDRITE LASER ON SKIN GRAFTS AFTER RECONSTRUCTIVE FACIAL
           SURGERY
           Cesar Arroyo, Antonio Diaz, Marcedes Martinez, Agustin De la Quintana, Patricia Homar, Madrid,
           Spain

     204   AGMINATED BLUE NEVI ARISING WITHIN A CONGENITAL MELANOCYTIC NEVUS: TREATMENT WITH
           755nm ALEXANDRITE LASER
           Portia Bradford, Corbin Petersen, Puja Puri, Claude Burton, Duke University Medical Center, Durham,
           NC

     207   HOME-USE HAIR REMOVAL DEVICES: DO THEY HAVE THE PARAMETERS DECLARED?
           Esther Cuerda, Jose Luis Lopez-Estebaranz, Jesus del Pozo-Losada, Rafael Linares, Maria Angustias
           Palomar, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Fundacion Universitaria Hospital Alcorcon, Hospital
           Universitario Juan Canalejo, Madrid, Spain
           •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

     210   TREATMENT OF BECKERS NEVUS WITH MODIFIED INTENSE PULSED LIGHT IN INDIAN SKIN
           Ashok Naik, Vaishali Phadke, Shubhangi Sundalam, Nirav Desai, Niteen Dhepe, Pune, Maharashtra,
           India

     211   USE OF A FRACTIONATED Q-SWITCHED RUBY LASER FOR TREATMENT OF FACIAL LENTIGINES
           Joseph Diehl, Lisa Chipps1, Ronald Moy1, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
           1
            Equipment from Asclepion Laser Technologies
           •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

     231   URTICARIA INDUCED BY LASER EPILATION: STUDY OF 36 PATIENTS – BRIEF: A CLINICAL AND
           HISTOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF 36 PATIENTS
           Nerea Landa, Natalia Corrons, Inaki Zabalza, Jose Azpiazu, Dermitek Clinic, Sinpelo Clinics, Madrid,
           Spain, Galdakao Hospital, Bilbao, Bizkaia, Spain

     233   INTENSE PULSED LIGHT AND LOW-FLUENCE Q-SWITCHED Nd:YAG LASER ELICITS MORE RAPID
           CLINICAL IMPROVEMENT IN ASIAN PATIENTS WITH MELASMA
           Jong Hee Lee, Se Young Na, Soyun Cho, Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul, Korea

     245   PIGMENTATION SEQUELAE OF CUTANEOUS AIDS-RELATED KAPOSI’S SARCOMA SUCCESSFULLY
           TREATED BY Q-SWITCHED ALEXANDRITE AND Nd:YAG 532nm LASERS
           Rosalind Hughes, Jean-Philippe Lacour, Thierry Passeron, University Hospital of Nice, Nice, Alpes-
           Maritimes, France
           •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use




96
                                                                       2011 Annual Conference
                                                                       Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                              ePosters                 Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                       Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                       Grapevine, TX




251   EVALUATION OF EFFICACY OF Q-SWITCHED Nd:YAG LASER FOR TATTOO REMOVAL IN INDIAN
      PATIENTS
      Srikantha Rathi, Niteen Dhepe, Ashok Naik, Dr. Dhepe’s Skin City, Solapur, Maharashtra, India

262   MELASMA TREATMENT WITH A COMBINATION OF TOPICAL CREAMS AND PULSED CO 2 FRACTIONAL
      ABLATIVE RESURFACING
      Mario Trelles, Mariano Velez, Instituto Medico Vilafortuny, Cambrils, Tarragona, Spain

285   PERIORBITAL HYPERPIGMENTATION IN ASIANS: CAN A PROPOSED CLASSIFICATION IMPROVE
      TREATMENT OUTCOME?
      C.L. Goh, H. Ranu, S. Thng, B.K. Goh, A. Burger, National Skin Centre, Unilever, Singapore, Singapore

                                                         IMAGING

236   GUIDING PROSTATE CANCER PDT/LLLT THERAPIES USING AUTOMATIC WARPING OF MRI-BASED
      PLANNING DATA
      Nasr Makni, Philippe Puech, Mohamad-Feras Marqa, Serge Mordon, Nacim Betrouni, Inserm U703,
      CHU, Lille, France
      •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

256   POLARIZED PHOTOGRAPHY OF THE SKIN
      Claudia Sa Guimaraes, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
      •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

264   EFFICACY OF A NOVEL NON-HYDROQUINONE FORMULATION IN THE TREATMENT OF MELASMA: A
      REFLECTANCE CONFOCAL MICROSCOPE STUDY
      Katerina Tsilika, Jean-Luc Levy, Hee-Yang Kang, Luc Duteil, Abdallah Khemis, Thierry Passeron, Jean-
      Paul Ortonne, Philippe Bahadoran, CHU of Nice, Nice, France, Center of Dermatological Lasers,
      Marseille, France
      •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

284   DIAGNOSIS OF BASAL CELL CARCINOMA USING REFLEXIVE CONFOCAL LASER MICROSCOPY IN THE
      CLINICAL SETTING
      Steven Nelson, David Swanson1, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ
      1
       Research grant from Mayo Clinic
      •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

                                               MEDICAL USE OF LASERS

214   COMBINATION 15% AZELAIC ACID GEL AND INTENSE PULSE LIGHT THERAPY FOR MILD TO
      MODERATE ROSACEA
      Sabrina Fabi, Jennifer Peterson, Mitchel Goldman1, Goldman Butterwick & Associates Cosmetic Laser
      Surgery, San Diego, CA
      1
          Research grant from Intendis

218   MULTIPLE SESSION LOW FLUENCE Q-SWITCHED Nd:YAG LASER TREATMENT OF MELASMA
      David Goldberg1, Nathalie Dietrich-Comte, Alia Brown, Mussarrat Hussain, Skin Laser & Surgery
      Specialists of NY and NJ, New York, NY
      1
          Research grant from Focus Medical




                                                                                                               97
                                                                           2011 Annual Conference
                                                                           Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                 ePosters                  Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                           Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                           Grapevine, TX




     224   OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY CAN DETECT AND QUANTIFY CHEMOTHERAPY-INDUCED ORAL
           MUCOSITIS
           Michael Hoang, Irvine, CA
           •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

     241   PULSED DYE LASER TREATMENT FOR JESSNER’S LYMPHOCYTIC INFILTRATION OF THE SKIN
           Jean-Loic Michel, Denis Perrin, Thierry Passeron, Laser Center, St-Etienne, Loire, France, Laser
           Center, Strasbourg, Bas-Rhin, France, University Hospital of Nice, Nice, Alpes-Maritimes, France
           •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

                                                               OTHER

     200   STRIAE IMPROVEMENT WITH A NOVEL APPROACH BY SUBLATIVE REJUVENATION: A PRELIMINARY
           REPORT
           Maurice Adatto, Boris Vaynberg1, Ruthie Amir1, Hanit Brenner-Lavie1, Skinpulse Dermatology & Laser
           Center, Geneva, Switzerland, Syneron Medical, Yokneam, Illit, Israel
           1
               Salary from Syneron Medical

     267   BOTULINUM TOXIN A FOR THE EFFECTIVE TREATMENT OF TMJ AND BRUXISM
           Dianna Burget, Elizabeth VanderVeer, VanderVeer Center, Portland, OR
           •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

                                                    PHOTOBIOMODULATION

     163   LOW-LEVEL LASER THERAPY FOR ANDROGENIC ALOPECIA: A 24-WEEK RANDOMIZED DOUBLE-BLIND
           PLACEBO CONTROLLED TRIAL
           Jee Woong Choi, Jun Young Kim, Jung Bok Jung, Se Young Na, Seok-Jong Lee, Jung Im Na, Weon Ju
           Lee, Sang Woong Youn, Do Won Kim, Kyoung Chan Park, Chang Hun Huh, Seoul National University
           Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Gyeonggi, Korea, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine,
           Dae-gu-Kyungsangpook, Korea
           •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

     235   SELF-ADAPTIVE EFFECTS OF LOW INTENSITY LASER IRRADIATION IN PROPHYLAXIS OF MUSCULAR
           FIBROSIS
           Li Luo, Lin Zhang, Timon Cheng-Yi Liu, School of Sports Science, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu,
           China, Laboratory of Laser Sports Medicine, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, Guangdong,
           China
           •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use




98
                                                                        2011 Annual Conference
                                                                        Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                            ePosters                    Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                        Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                        Grapevine, TX




                                             RESEARCH (BASIC SCIENCE)

258   FLUENCE DEPENDENCY OF THE 400nm ABLATION RATES OF SUPRA- AND SUBGINGIVAL DENTAL
      CALCULUS
      Joshua Schoenly, Wolf Seka, Peter Rechmann, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, School of
      Dentistry, University of California, San Francisco, CA
      •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

                                                     RESURFACING

217   CLINICAL EVALUATION OF 1550nm AND 1927nm LASER DELIVERED BY FRACTIONAL FOR ASIAN
      PATIENTS OF MELASMA AND ACNE SCARS
      Takahiro Fujimoto, Clinic F, Tokyo, Japan

                                                   SKIN TIGHTENING

239   THE NEW FASHION WAY TO IMPROVE THE APPEARANCE OF CELLULITE USING THE COMBINATION
      ON NON-INVASIVE SELECTIVE ULTRASOUND (ACCENT ULTRA) WITH IN MOTION UNIPOLAR
      RADIOFREQUENCY (ACCENT UNIFORM)
      Guilherme Almeida1, Elaine Marques, Leticia Almeida, Rachel Queiroz, Hospital Sirio Libanes, São
      Paulo, Brazil
      1
          Equipment from Accent

                                     SURGERY/INTERSTITIAL LASER THERAPY

219   LASH WITH A 1210nm DIODE LASER IN SECONDARY KELOID SCAR PREVENTION, SAFETY RESULTS IN
      20 PATIENTS
      David Gonnelli, Sonia Saai1, Guy Magalon, APHM, Hospital Conception, Ekkyo, Aix-en-Provence,
      Marseille, Paca, France
      1
       Salary from Ekkyo
      •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

                                                        THERAPY

220   TRIAL OF LOW LEVEL LASER ACUPUNCTURE THERAPY FOR SMOKING CESSATION
      Anurag Gupta, Bonnie Treece, Michelle Kerr, Preet Kaur, Arun Gupta, New York, NY, Monroe, MI
      •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

263   HISTOPATHOLOGY AND IMMUNOHISTOCHEMISTRY OF CUTANEOUS LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS AFTER
      PULSED DYE LASER TREATMENT
      Teresa Truchuelo, Pablo Boixeda, Carmen Moreno, Maria Luisa Zamorano, Javier Alcantara, Pedro
      Jaen, Ramon y Cajal Hospital, Madrid, Spain

                                                  VASCULAR LESIONS

209   PORT WINE STAINS PREVIOUSLY TREATED WITH AN INTENSE PULSED LIGHT SYSTEM. TREATMENT
      WITH A DUAL-WAVELENGTH LASER SYSTEM (595, 1064nm) IN 40 PATIENTS
      Jesus Del Pozo, Esther Cuerda, Lucia Perez-Varela, Laura Rosende, CHU A Coruna, A Coruna, Spain,
      University Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, Spain
      •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use




                                                                                                                99
                                                                                             2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                             Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011

                                                     ePosters                                Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                             Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                             Grapevine, TX




      244   MULTI-WAVELENGTH LASER TREATMENT FOR CUTANEOUS VASCULAR LESIONS IN ASIANS
            Takafumi Ohshiro, Toshio Ohshiro, Katsumi Sasaki, Yuki Taniguchi, Ohshiro Clinic, Tokyo, Japan

      246   SUPERFICIAL LYMPHANGIOMA TREATED WITH FRACTIONAL ABLATIVE LASER: CLINICAL AND
            REFLECTANCE CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY EVALUATION
            Katerina Tsilika, Jean-Philippe Lacour, Philippe Bahadoran, Jean-Paul Ortonne, Thierry Passeron,
            University Hospital of Nice, Nice, Alpes-Maritimes, France
            •Content discusses non-FDA approved device or off-label use

      253   TREATMENT OF PORT WINE STAIN USING A NEW OPTIMIZED PULSED LIGHT HANDPIECE
            E. Victor Ross1, Emily Yu, Scripps Clinic, San Diego, CA
            1
                Financial grant, equipment, consulting fees, research grant and honoraria from Palomar

      49    TREATMENT OF INFANTILE HEMANGIOMAS WITH THE 595nm PULSED DYE LASER USING DIFFERENT
            PULSE WIDTHS IN AN ASIAN POPULATION
            Yong-Kwang Tay, Changi General Hospital, Singapore




100
                                                                                    2011 Annual Conference

                                              Exhibits                              Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                    Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                    Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                    Grapevine, TX




Exhibit Hall Hours:                                                                                          Longhorn D&E

Friday, April 1, 2011 ........................................................................................ 9:00 am – 7:00 pm
Saturday, April 2, 2011 ..................................................................................... 9:00 am – 7:30 pm
Sunday, April 3, 2011 ............................................................................................ Exhibits Closed

Exhibit Chair: Gregory T. Absten, B.Sc., M.B.A., C.L.R.T. (Exhibit Chair)

Disclosure
Gregory T. Absten – No disclosure

THE ASLMS CONFERENCE AND COURSES ARE INTENDED SOLELY FOR SCIENTIFIC AND EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES
AND NOT TO PROMOTE OR ENDORSE PRODUCTS OR SERVICES. CHILDREN UNDER THE AGE OF 16 ARE NOT
PERMITTED IN THE EXHIBIT HALL. THE SYMBOL ™ DENOTES THOSE COMPANIES WHO HAVE DONATED TO THE 6TH
ANNUAL SILENT AUCTION.

NEW FOR 2011 - Exhibit Hall
•     Located adjacent to largest scientific sessions.
•     All ePoster viewing stations, beverage breaks, internet pavilion, and the Silent Auction will be strategically
      located in the exhibit hall so conference attendees are encouraged to enter and move throughout the
      exhibit area.
•     Special “Exhibitor Breaks” will be scheduled from 2:45 pm - 3:45 pm on Friday and Saturday. Educational
      sessions on both Friday and Saturday will be adjourned during these times.
•     Free lunches for conference registrants on Friday and Saturday in the exhibit hall with tickets.
•     Two free drink tickets for conference registrants and exhibitors (based on booth size) during the exhibitor
      reception on Saturday.
•     Overhead announcements of scheduled activities will be made in the exhibit hall to inform and attract
      registrants to the exhibit area.
•     ASLMS will display announcements in all education session rooms prior to and after promoting attendance
      in the exhibit hall.

                                           Experts in the Hall
Experts in the Exhibit Hall will give a five minute presentation followed by 10 minutes of questions and
answers. Following is a schedule of speakers, topics, and dates/times of presentations.


    Date                            Time                   Speaker                              Topic

    Friday, April 1, 2011           3:00 pm – 3:15 pm      Merete Haedersdal, M.D.              Laser Safety

    Friday, April 1, 2011           3:15 pm – 3:30 pm      Elizabeth L. Tanzi, M.D.             The Cosmetic Consultation

    Saturday, April 2, 2011         3:00 pm – 3:15 pm      Paul M. Friedman, M.D.               How to Thrive in a Difficult
                                                                                                Economy

    Saturday, April 2, 2011         3:15 pm – 3:30 pm      Mathew M. Avram, M.D., J.D.          Laser and the Law



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                                                                                   2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                   Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                   Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                   Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                   Grapevine, TX




                                                           Exhibits
      Acuderm, Inc. ........................................ 528     Alma Lasers, Ltd. ........................... Island 908
      5370 NW 35 Terrace, Suite 106                                  485 Half Day Road, Suite100
      Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309                                       Buffalo Grove, IL 60089
      Since 1983, Acuderm has built its reputation as an             Alma Lasers™ is a global developer, manufacturer
      innovator and supplier of high quality specialty               and     provider     of   laser,    light-based      and
      medical products, disposable instruments, smoke                radiofrequency equipment for cosmetic and
      evacuators and dermatologic supplies with eight                medical applications. Alma Lasers' expertise lies in
      patents across its product line (all made in the               the winning combination of an ability to innovate
      United States). Acuderm continues to be a leading              bringing unique new technologies to the global
      edge manufacturer of products for the medical                  aesthetic market, balanced by a strategic depth of
      marketplace.                                                   clinical knowledge and industry experience. Each
                                                                     day, thousands of plastic surgeons, dermatologists,
        ASLMS INDUSTRY ADVISORY COUNCIL MEMBER                       obstetricians, gynecologists and general physicians
                                                                     in 45 countries depend on Alma Lasers to deliver
      Aerolase ............................................... 801   visible results that improve lives.
      777 Old Saw Mill River Road
      Tarrytown, NY 10591                                            American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery
      Aerolase has developed innovative laser technology             (ASLMS) ................................................ 325
      that enables treatment with shorter pulse                      2100 Stewart Avenue, Suite 240
      durations, removing pain and discomfort from the               Wausau, WI 54401
      treatments on all skin types while delivering best-            The American Society for Laser Medicine and
      in-class efficacy. Our LightPod lasers, which                  Surgery is the world's largest scientific organization
      incorporate gold-standard 1064nm and 2940nm                    dedicated to facilitating research, education, and
      modalities, are used for permanent hair reduction,             high standards of clinical care in the field of
      PFB, wrinkles, skin tightening, sun and age spots,             medical laser applications. It provides a forum for
      vascular lesions, toenail fungus and many other                the exchange of scientific information and
      conditions. LightPod lasers lead the industry in               participates    in     communicating          the     latest
      terms of providing the lowest total cost of                    developments in laser medicine and surgery to
      ownership for aesthetic lasers. Aerolase has a                 clinicians, research investigators, government,
      reputation for exceptional customer service and                regulatory agencies, and the public. The Society
      support, providing training, upgrade options and               has taken the lead in formulating standards and
      materials for the marketing of your aesthetic                  guidelines for establishing safe, effective laser
      services.                                                      programs in hospitals and other institutions, and

                    VÉÑÑxÜ fÑÉÇáÉÜ                                   has recommended standards for medical laser
                                                                     training programs. Stop by our booth, pick up a
                                                                     Society brochure, and complete an on-line
                                                                     membership application today.
      ™Allergan ............................................. 716
      2525 Dupont Drive                                              Anthony Products/Gio Pelle ....................... 206
      Irvine, CA 92612                                               7740 Records Street
      Allergan Medical, a division of Allergan, Inc., offers         Indianapolis, IN 46226
      the most comprehensive, science-based, aesthetic               For 40 years, Anthony Products has specialized in
      product offerings under its Total Facial                       the manufacture and distribution of ENT, plastic
      Rejuvenation      portfolio,      including       BOTOX®       surgery and dermatology instruments and
      Cosmetic; hyaluronic acid and collagen-based                   equipment. As an authorized distributor for Welch
      dermal fillers; LATISSE™ (bimatoprost ophthalmic               Allyn and Midmark, we can meet all of your
      solution) 0.03%; and physician-dispensed skin care             practice needs. Our sister company, Gio Pelle,
      products. These products will be featured in our               specializes in customized skin care and
      booth.                                                         microdermabrasion.


102
      ™Donated to the ASLMS Silent Auction.
                                                                            2011 Annual Conference
                                                                            Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                            Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                            Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                            Grapevine, TX



Astanza Laser ........................................ 233   B&W Tek, Inc. ........................................ 215
1770 Saint James Place, Suite 105                            19 Shea Way
Houston, TX 77056                                            Newark, DE 19713
Astanza Laser is the global leader in tattoo removal         B&W Tek, Inc. is an advanced instrumentation
technology. Our lasers are designed, manufactured,           company producing optical spectroscopy and laser
and used exclusively for laser tattoo removal by             instrumentation for biomedical, physical, chemical,
practitioners worldwide. Our flagship Trinity laser          and research communities. With a strong vertical
is the most useful Q-switched laser ever                     integration capability, B&W Tek also provides
manufactured for tattoo removal – offering                   custom product development, design, and
treatments with a 1 Joule Nd:YAG as well as a 1              manufacturing. With emphasis on low cost, high
Joule Ruby laser. Astanza also shares expertise in           performance lasers and spectrometers, B&W Tek
tattoo removal treatments, patient care, and clinic          strives for versatility - innovating solutions. The
operations. Our technology makes removing tattoos            ISO 9001 and ISO 13485 certified facility and the
of all colors possible; our partnership with our             patented technologies ensure high quality
customers helps make their practices thrive.                 products, consistently proven and growing every
                                                             day. As a result, B&W Tek leads worldwide sales of
Avo Photonics, Inc. ................................. 509    Raman spectrometers. For more information go to
700 Business Center Drive, Suite 125                         www.bwtek.com.
Horsham, PA 19044
Avo Photonics, Inc. provides custom design and               BTL Industries, Inc. ................................. 132
contract    manufacturing       of      opto-electronic      312 Long Pointe Lane
components and systems. Avo’s unique pure service            Columbia, SC 29229
model supports customers in the medical, military,           BTL Aesthetics introduces RF RedeFined with Exilis.
communication, and commercial markets. From                  A     significant   technological         advance        in
design thru production, Avo Photonics is a one-stop          radiofrequency aesthetic treatments. The exclusive
shop. Avo’s personnel and equipment are an                   Energy Flow Control system with variable surface
extension of its customer’s business, providing              cooling delivers precise volumetric heating of tissue
transparent services at the volumes needed to                for wrinkles, laxity and body contouring. Exilis
advance from design to market dominance. From                patented applicators deliver maximum thermal
unique megawatt class lasers to high-volume                  effect without costly consumables, while ensuring
automated manufacturing and environmental                    total safety, comfort and control.
testing, Avo Photonics provides a cost effective
outsourcing    solution.     Optical,       mechanical,      Bank of America Practice Solutions ............. 328
electrical, thermal, materials, and system                   5 Park Plaza, Suite 350
engineering as well as all clean room production             Irvine, CA 92614
follow ISO certified quality procedures to assure            Bank of America Practice Solutions is your
consistent production.                                       specialized practice lending source. Whether you
                                                             want to purchase a single piece of equipment,
                                                             remodel or expand your office, buy or start a new
                                                             practice or purchase your office commercial real
                                                             estate we have financing programs and options to
                                                             make your goals a reality. See us at booth 328.

                                                             ™Buffalo Filter ....................................... 401
                                                             595 Commerce Drive
                                                             Buffalo, NY 14228
                                                             Buffalo Filter® is a medical device manufacturer
                                                             with a primary focus on manufacturing and
                                                             engineering products for the evacuation and
                                                             filtration of hazardous smoke plume generated
                                                             during laser/electrosurgical procedures. Products
                                                             include: surgical smoke evacuators, ULPA/HEPA
                                                             replacement filters, and accessories (tubes,
                                                             adapters, and wands) for various medical
™Donated to the ASLMS Silent Auction.                        specialties.
                                                                                                                    103
                                                                                   2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                   Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                   Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                   Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                   Grapevine, TX




      ™Canfield Imaging Systems ....................... 601
      253 Passaic Avenue
                                                                                 UÜÉÇéx fÑÉÇáÉÜ
      Fairfield, NJ 07004-2524
      Canfield Imaging Systems is the leading worldwide              ™CoolTouch, Inc. .................................... 224
      developer and provider of imaging software and                 9085 Foothills Boulevard
      photographic systems for the medical and skin care             Roseville, CA 95747
      industries. Canfield products are utilized in medical          CoolTouch Inc. is a leading United States based
      and aesthetic practices, hospitals, skin care and              developer and manufacturer of innovative,
      wellness centers, spas, and medical spas. Product              advanced laser products for medical professionals.
      lines include industry-standard Mirror® imaging                Engineering and science-based, CoolTouch is
      software, VISIA® complexion analysis, VECTRA® 3D               considered a pioneer in the medical and aesthetics
      systems, Reveal® facial imagers, customized                    technology industry. CoolTouch introduced the
      photographic studio solutions and numerous                     first 1320nm wavelength laser to medical
      specialized imaging devices and lighting systems for           professionals for non-ablative wrinkle treatment.
      clinical photography.                                          CoolTouch continued to set new standards in the
                                                                     industry with the launch of CoolTouch CTEV™ for
      CareCredit ............................................ 628    varicose vein treatment and with CoolLipo™ for
      2995 Red Hill Avenue, Suite 100                                laser lipolysis and skin tightening. CoolTouch
      Costa Mesa, CA 92626-5923                                      products are FDA-cleared and are manufactured in
      CareCredit®, a part of GE Capital, is a revolving line         Roseville, California. For more information, please
      of credit that offers patient financing programs.              visit www.CoolTouch.com.
      We offer convenient monthly payment plans to help
      you attract and schedule more patients. There is no            Cosmeticsurgery.com ............................... 434
      cost to get started today. Call 866-247-3049 or visit          8667 Haven Avenue, Suite 200
      www.carecredit.com.                                            Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730
                                                                     At CosmeticSurgery.com, we provide total internet
      Celleration ............................................ 335   marketing solutions for cosmetic surgeons and
      6321 Bury Drive, Suite 15                                      dermatologists all over the country. Medical
      Eden Prairie, MN 55346                                         professionals have the opportunity to further
      Celleration® manufactures and distributes MIST                 increase their visibility on the Internet in regional
      Ultrasound Healing Therapy®. MIST® reduces your                and national markets. CosmeticSurgery.com is one
      patient’s recovery period by accelerating the                  of the most trusted and strongest brand names in
      body’s normal healing process. The painless, non-              the field of elective health care; we specialize in
      contact, low-frequency sound waves of MIST®                    Web Design, Search Engine Optimization (SEO),
      reduce inflammation, increase collagen deposition              Social Media, Directories, Blogs, and Video
      and reduce bacteria at and below the skin’s                    Marketing.
      surface.

      Coherent, Inc. ....................................... 829
      5100 Patrick Henry Drive
      Santa Clara, CA 95054
      Coherent, Inc. is the World’s leading manufacturer
      of photonics-based products for a wide range of
      commercial and scientific applications; industry’s
      largest and most diverse selection of lasers and a
      wide range of laser test and measurement
      equipment. Highly reliable, high performance
      product lines include CO2, continuous-wave, diode,
      diode module, diode-pumped solid-state, optically
      pumped semiconductor lasers (OPSL), excimer, ion,
      tunable-dye, YAG, YLF, and ultrafast lasers.


      ™Donated to the ASLMS Silent Auction.
104
                                                                              2011 Annual Conference
                                                                              Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                              Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                              Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                              Grapevine, TX



CuraMedix, LLC ...................................... 125
500 East Washington Street, Suite 34
North Attleboro, MA 02760
                                                                            UÜÉÇéx fÑÉÇáÉÜ
CuraMedix, LLC is an emerging leader in medical
technology     focused    on     the      development,            ASLMS INDUSTRY ADVISORY COUNCIL MEMBER
distribution, utilization and commercialization of
non-invasive biologic response activating devices in            ™Cynosure, Inc. ............................ Island 414
the regenerative medicine area for the repair of                5 Carlisle Road
tissue, musculoskeletal and vascular structures.                Westford, MA 01886-3601
Extracorporeal Pulse Activation Technology (EPAT®)              Cynosure, Inc. develops and markets premier
is proprietary technology based on several unique               cosmetic laser systems that are used by physicians
sets of acoustic pressure waves that activate                   and other practitioners to perform non-invasive and
biologic and angiogenic responses to include new                minimally invasive procedures to remove hair, treat
vascularization and microcirculatory improvement,               vascular and pigmented lesions, rejuvenate the
stimulation of collagen, increased metabolism,                  skin, liquefy and remove unwanted fat through
inducement of lipolysis and break down of fiberous              laser lipolysis and temporarily reduce the
tissue. EPAT® is a breakthrough treatment which                 appearance of cellulite.
promotes healing and healthy tissue without
invasive surgery. Fast, Safe, Effective, and
Affordable!                                                                  VÉÑÑxÜ fÑÉÇáÉÜ
Cutera ......................................... Island 600       ASLMS INDUSTRY ADVISORY COUNCIL MEMBER
3240 Bayshore Boulevard
Brisbane, CA 94005                                              ™DEKA Medical, Inc. ....................... Island 814
Cutera is a leading provider of laser and other                 665 Third Street, Suite 20
energy-based aesthetic systems for practitioners                San Francisco, CA 94107
worldwide. Cutera is excited to launch two                      DEKA Medical, Inc., based in San Francisco,
breakthrough systems, the Excel V and genesisplus               California, is the medical division of the El En
lasers, at this year’s Annual Conference of the                 Group, the world's largest manufacturer of lasers
American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery. In             and pulsed light equipment for aesthetic and
addition, Cutera’s multi-application Xeo platform               medical applications. DEKA offers a range of
combines the most versatile laser and light                     premium devices, including the highly acclaimed
technologies in a single, upgradeable system. Since             SmartXide DOT, Synchro FT, Excilite-μ, PhotoSilk
1998, Cutera has been developing innovative, easy-              and MiniSilk to the North American market.
to-use products that enable physicians and other
qualified practitioners to offer safe and effective             DermaSweep ......................................... 711
aesthetic treatments to their patients. For more                3715 Atherton Road
information,     call     1-888-4CUTERA           or    visit   Rocklin, CA 95765
www.cutera.com.                                                 DermaSweep MD, the latest evolution of micro-
                                                                resurfacing    skincare…from      the     sandblasting
                                                                machines of the past to DermaSweep’s innovative
                                                                combination of vacuum pressure, precision brush
                                                                tips, and integrated topical delivery allows for the
                                                                most personalized, targeted, and comfortable,
                                                                particle-free system ever created. DermaSweep
                                                                offers the pro-active practitioner the greatest
                                                                possibility of overall skin health and benefits no
                                                                matter what unique skin care needs are required.
                                                                DermaSweep treatments can be completely
                                                                personalized and combined with additional
                                                                modalities to provide the most inclusive skin care
                                                                program available.
™Donated to the ASLMS Silent Auction.

                                                                                                                     105
                                                                                     2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                     Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                     Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                     Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                     Grapevine, TX



      DUSA Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ....................... 721          EltaMD Skincare ...................................... 720
      25 Upton Drive                                                  2055 Luna Road, Suite 126
      Wilmington, MA 01887                                            Carrollton, TX 75006
      DUSA Pharmaceuticals, Inc. is an integrated,                    EltaMD Skincare offers a variety of sunscreens,
      dermatology pharmaceutical company focused                      moisturizers,     and    post-procedure         products,
      primarily on the development and marketing of its               available to patients worldwide through approved,
      Levulan® Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) technology                  dispensing physicians. EltaMD is founded on the
      platform.     Levulan Kerastick® plus blue light                belief that the responsible and innovative
      illumination using the BLU-U® blue light                        application of medical expertise and science will
      photodynamic therapy illuminator is currently                   change the way physician-dispensed skin care
      approved for the treatment of Grade 1 or II AKs of              products treat people. EltaMD products are
      the face or scalp.                                              formulated using proven science, backed up by
                                                                      clinical testing designed to accomplish three goals:
      Eclipse Aesthetics ........................... Island 200       prevent damage, heal problems, and maintain skin
      16850 Dallas Parkway                                            health.     Visit   www.eltamd.com           for     more
      Dallas, TX 75248                                                information.
      With over 15 years experience in the aesthetic
      industry, Eclipse Aesthetics offers a wealth of                 Energist NA ........................................... 913
      practical insight and affordable aesthetic solutions            169 Main Street
      to help build a successful practice. The Eclipse                Nyack, NY 10960
      product portfolio includes: Equinox, a highly                   Energist Ltd, based is Swansea, South Wales,
      respected fractional CO2 laser system, EndyMed                  United Kingdom was founded in 1999. Energist
      PRO with 3Deep RF technology, SmoothCool IPL                    Group designs, manufactures and markets a variety
      system, the iPulse and the new RegenPlasma PRP                  of light-based aesthetic devices, serving the
      program. Visit the Eclipse Aesthetics Island 200 to             medical, spa and beauty market segments. The
      learn more about our equipment specials today!                  Group’s MedArt facility in Copenhagen, Denmark,
                                                                      manufactures a range of fractional CO2 and diode
      ™Ellman International ............................. 227         lasers for medical, surgical, and aesthetic
      3333 Royal Avenue                                               applications. With an installed base of over 8,000
      Oceanside, NY 11572                                             systems world-wide, Energist Group operates
      Ellman International is a privately held                        directly in both the United States and United
      manufacturer of medical devices used to perform a               Kingdom markets and in over 50 countries through
      variety of aesthetic and surgical procedures. The               a world class distribution network.
      Pellevé™ Wrinkle Reduction System is a key product
      used by physicians for skin tightening and to                   Enhanced Image Technologies .................... 535
      stimulate new collagen as a part of the skin                    15720 John J. Delaney Drive, Suite 300
      rejuvenation process.                                           Charlotte, NC 28277
                                                                      Enhanced Image Technologies is your aesthetic
      Elsevier ................................................ 201   solutions partner for imaging, laser and body-
      5305 Burning Spring Court                                       shaping technologies, including: Image Pro™ skin
      Arlington, TX 76017                                             imaging and Sellas™ True Fractional™ skin
                                                                      resurfacing. We help you enhance your image and
                                                                      your bottom line.




      ™Donated to the ASLMS Silent Auction.
106
                                                                             2011 Annual Conference
                                                                             Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                             Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                             Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                             Grapevine, TX



Envy Medical ......................................... 104    FiberTech-RoMack .................................. 728
31340 Via Colinas, Suite 101                                  P.O. Box 615
Westlake Village, CA 91362                                    Lightfoot, VA 23090
Envy Medical’s mission is to offer highly effective           LEONI Fiber Optics Inc. (LFOI) is a leading producer
non-invasive skin rejuvenation therapies for                  of high-end quartz/quartz multi-mode fibers and
patients suffering from either dermatologic or                specialty fiber optic probes for medical
aesthetic conditions. The company's lead products             applications. With its FiberTechR-Products, LFOI is
include SilkPeel®, a breakthrough system that                 a leading special fiber producer for medical fibers
combines precision non-invasive exfoliation with              and for laser beam delivery. The optical fibers we
Dermalinfusion™, deep delivery of a diverse set of            produce are suitable for use with Nd:YAG, Ho:YAG,
skin-specific solutions, all designed to improve and          KTP, argon and diode lasers. We offer fibers for
revitalize the skin. The company has also                     different wavelengths, with different numerical
introduced its first product line, under the brand            apertures (NA) and an Ultra low OH content in the
name Lumixyl™. Recent studies show that                       size of 50 microns to 2,000 microns and configured
Lumixyl™, incorporating a peptide chain of ten                with SMA 905 connectors or customized connector’s
amino acids, treats hyperpigmentation more                    designs. Our fiber optics are used in Aesthetic,
efficaciously than hydroquinone.                              Vascular, Dermatology, General Surgery, Urology,
                                                              Ophthalmology, Endoscopy and in all other laser
Erchonia Corporation ............................... 220      medicine applications.     We also produce fiber
2021 Commerce Drive                                           bundles and a very broad range of specialty fiber
McKinney, TX 75069                                            assemblies for many medical and industrial
Stop by our booth 220 and experience what                     applications.
Erchonia’s laser health care can do for you.
Proven, non-invasive, drug free solutions are in              Focus Medical ........................................ 824
high demand as the public gets tired of hearing the           23 FJ Clarke Circle
negative side effects to prescription drugs. Try it           Bethel, CT 06801
for yourself; we will be conducting free
demonstrations during exhibit hours.                          ™FotoFinder Systems, Inc. ........................ 725
                                                              9693 Gerwig Lane, Suite S
Fallene, Ltd. ......................................... 533   Columbia, MD 21046-2837
2555 Industry Lane                                            FotoFinder Mediscope is the imaging system for
West Norritor, PA 19403                                       consistent before and after photo documentation of
Fallene, Ltd. is very excited to introduce our                facial and body treatments. All camera settings
newest product, Tizo3 SPF40, into our physician               are administered by computer and automatically
dispensed line of products. Tizo3 is formulated               adjusted for follow-ups. Outstanding before and
with multiple physical particle sizes of titanium and         after photos are taken every time by any user.
zinc, yet dries to a clear, matte finish on any               SkinSpector quantifies vascular conditions (redness)
complexion. This unique formulation offers                    and underlying sun damage (brown spots). The
unparalleled protection, practically undetectable             software Guided Photography assures user-friendly
defense for the face that truly feels like silk on            consistent body photography.
your skin, and can also used as a make-up primer.
Tizo3 is paraben, paba, oil and fragrance free and
is specially formulated without UV absorbing
chemicals to offer superior, irritant free UVA/UVB
light protection. No other sunscreen compares to
Tizo3’s protective capability.




™Donated to the ASLMS Silent Auction.
                                                                                                                    107
                                                                                 2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                 Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                 Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                 Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                 Grapevine, TX



      Fotona Lasers ............................... Island 708
      1415 1st Street South, Suite 5
      Wilmar, MN 56201
                                                                                  ZÉÄw fÑÉÇáÉÜ
      At Fotona we pride ourselves on our technical
      know-how, our experience in research and                       ASLMS INDUSTRY ADVISORY COUNCIL MEMBER
      development and the unmatched clinical support
      and training provided to our owners. Fotona’s                ™HOYA ConBio ....................................... 415
      innovative    laser    system       platforms      allow     47733 Fremont Boulevard
      practitioners to combine two effective treatment             Fremont, CA 94538
      lasers in one system or acquire them individually.           HOYA      ConBio     designs    and      manufactures
      Fotona has a wide range of high-quality, highest             sophisticated laser systems used in aesthetic
      performance systems to suit each particular                  medical practices worldwide. The company’s
      practice’s needs. When additional applications are           innovative technologies are highly versatile,
      required, an upgrade will optimize any practice’s            clinically effective, and offer a rapid return on
      range of treatment services. When you own                    investment. The RevLite and MedLite Q-switched
      Fotona, you own the best made laser on the                   Nd:YAG lasers treats wrinkles, acne scars,
      planet.                                                      pigmented lesions, unwanted tattoos and dark,
                                                                   vellus hair. The V-Raser 980 diode is FDA cleared
      HCG True Diet........................................ 632    for facial veins. HOYA ConBio’s newest laser, the
      5203 Heritage Avenue                                         DermaSculpt Er:YAG, is cleared for skin resurfacing
      Colleyville, TX 76034                                        and cutaneous lesions.
      The HCG True Diet is a medical weight loss
      program. We teach doctors how to add the HCG                 Human Med, Inc...................................... 631
      Diet to their practice and generate leads through            1860 Crown Drive, Suite 1408
      online marketing.                                            Dallas, TX 75234
                                                                   An innovator and leader in water-jet surgery,
      Hironic Co., Ltd...................................... 511   human med® is the world’s first and foremost
      913 Sicox Tower                                              manufacturer of water-jet assisted aesthetic
      513-14 Sangdaewon-dong, Joonwon-gu                           devices. Human med’s innovative products,
      Sungnam, Kyunggi 462-120                                     including      the      body-jet®,        harvest-jet®,
      Korea                                                        FillerCollector™ and LipoCollector™ II, have helped
      Hironic Co., Ltd. manufactures medical equipment.            to usher in a fundamentally new approach to
      The new MIDAS RF machine with strong cooling                 lipoplasty and natural fat harvesting. By continuing
      system and infrared for face lifting and body                to explore and develop cutting-edge technologies,
      shaping, the MIXEL dual focusing CO2 fractional              human med® is dedicated to playing an integral
      laser with RF tube, the MIPL intense pulsed light            role in the ongoing evolution of aesthetic medicine.
      with double filtering system, and Peltier cooling
      system and the MIDEPI 808nm diode laser for hair
      removal.                                                                  VÉÑÑxÜ fÑÉÇáÉÜ
      Hopewell Pharmacy ................................. 123      ™Incredible Marketing ............................. 332
      1 West Broad Street                                          16441 Scientific Way, Suite 200
      Hopewell, NJ 08525                                           Irvine, CA 92618
      Hopewell Pharmacy is a full service compounding              Incredible Marketing, Inc. is a full service internet
      pharmacy located in central New Jersey. We                   marketing firm with emphasis on custom Web site
      specialize in custom prescriptions, from topical             development and Search Engine Optimization
      anesthetics, to injectables and other topical                (SEO). Our award winning custom work is
      medications. We have a shipping department to                specifically geared towards the medical and
      ship directly to your office or to your patients. Stop       professional industry. We bring a unique one-on-
      by and see the latest in topical anesthetics offering        one approach to all clients, with an emphasis on
      the best combinations and most cost effective                developing a long term plan for success.
      creams or ointments. Whatever laser or treatment
      you are doing, we have the solution!

      ™Donated to the ASLMS Silent Auction.
108
                                                                           2011 Annual Conference
                                                                           Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                           Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                           Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                           Grapevine, TX



Innovative Optics, Inc. ............................. 217   Iridex Corporation ................................... 300
6812 Hemlock Lane                                           1212 Terra Bella Avenue
Maple Grove, MN 55369                                       Mountain View, CA 94043
Innovative Optics, Inc. is a manufacturer and               Iridex Corporation is a leading worldwide provider
distributor of laser eye protection for the clinician       of therapeutic based laser systems used to treat a
and the patient offering a complete selection of            variety of skin conditions. The VariLite™ system is
laser and IPL glasses. We offer three sizes of              the complete skin lesion laser solution for treating
stainless steel patient intra-ocular shields as well        vascular lesions, benign pigmented lesions,
as SmartShield disposable patient eye patches. Our          cutaneous lesions, and acne vulgaris. Gemini® gives
new stainless steel patient laser goggle is designed        you both a KTP laser and an Nd:YAG laser to treat a
for comfort and has a four way adjustment for a             vast array of conditions including acne, wrinkles,
custom       fit.    Visit     our       website       at   redness diffusion, age spots, and unwanted hair.
www.InnovativeOptics.com.                                   The Gemini, with its 1064nm Nd:YAG and 532nm
                                                            KTP, stands out in an exploding non-invasive
™International Aesthetic and Laser Assoc. .... 128          aesthetic laser market by pushing the envelope on
P.O. Box 14629                                              versatility, speed and effectiveness, while
Tallahassee, FL 32317                                       maintaining a solid record of safety and reliability.
International Aesthetic and Laser Association is a          With integrated contact cooling, dual wavelengths
non-profit association that is designed to bring            and dual handpieces, the Gemini gives you one of
stakeholders in the laser cosmetic industry                 the most powerful aesthetic green lasers ever
together. The mandate for IALA is to enhance the            developed and treats a vast array of conditions
image of the laser cosmetic services industry               including acne, wrinkles, redness diffusion, age
through the provision of standardized training and          spots, and unwanted hair. The VariLite™, with its
certification programs, promotion of safe and               532nm KTP and 940nm diode wavelengths, offers
effective cosmetic procedures, proactively working          dual-wavelength versatility in a single-system
with regulatory and legislative bodies to ensure the        solution.      It combines reliability with true
appropriate level of regulation, education programs         portability, efficient performance, and clinical
for consumers and public awareness, and promote             versatility for the precision treatment of vascular,
and/or develop research programs to further the             pigmented, and cutaneous lesions.
effectiveness and safety of cosmetic laser services.
                                                            Jeisys Medical, Inc. ................................. 107
Iredale Mineral Cosmetics ......................... 722     307, Daerung Techno Tower 8th, 481-11
28 Church Street                                            Gasan-Dong, Geumcheon-gu
Great Barrington, MA 01230                                  Seoul, Korea
Jane Iredale - The SKIN CARE MAKEUP® is a                   Jeisys Medical, Inc., a worldwide medical device
comprehensive line of mineral cosmetics that                manufacturer, produces high-end products for
provides products with the utmost integrity and the         plastic surgeons, dermatologists, physicians, and
ability to enhance the lives of women through their         health care professionals.          Jeisys serves the
effectiveness, simplicity and beauty. Founder and           industry as one of the leading companies with
President, Jane Iredale, has worked with world-             rigorous research and development level and
renowned plastic surgeons and dermatologists in             valuable experience. Jeisys products are being
the development of her line because she believes            globally marketed by overseas offices and
makeup should be as good for the skin as it is              worldwide distribution partners. For more
aesthetically pleasing.                                     information, go to www.jeisys.com.




™Donated to the ASLMS Silent Auction.
                                                                                                                  109
                                                                                   2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                   Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                   Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                   Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                   Grapevine, TX



      Laser Concepts                                                MiXto has a patent pending scanning algorithm that
      www.cosmeticlaserworld.com ................... 821            delivers the ablative spots in a "Z" pattern. This
      11915 Quincy Lane                                             predetermined/reproducable scan pattern provides
      Dallas, TX 75230                                              the greatest tissue relaxation time between strikes
      Laser Concepts is the best value in the pre-owned             for greater patient comfort and lowers the risk of
      laser business. With our ten years of successful              side effects. MiXto comes with two treatment spot
      sales in the business, Laser Concepts has proven to           sizes and adjustable treatment density gen. The
      be the safest and most highly recognized company              180 micron spot is used for deeper penetration and
      to invest in aesthetic equipment. Laser Concepts              skin tightening. The 300 micron spot is used to
      has established themselves as a leader in the                 deliver superior heat energy for long term collagen
      industry with their knowledge, superior pre-owned             production. MiXto is safe for all skin types. There
      equipment, service, and training.                             are "NO" disposable costs with MiXto. MiXto is not
                                                                    just a fractional CO2 laser but can also be used in
      Laser Peripherals, LLC ............................. 106      traditional resurfacing mode and as a surgical laser
      1000 Boone Avenue, Suite 300                                  with cutting handpieces. Stop by our booth and ask
      Golden Valley, MN 55427                                       about our "Show Special".
      Laser Peripherals, LLC designs, manufactures, and
      distributes OEM's medical laser fibers for use in             Light Age, Inc. ........................................ 610
      both hard and soft tissue surgical laser                      500 Apgar Drive
      applications. We manufacture and market at least              Somerset, NJ 08873
      thirty different surgical fiber options for use with          Light Age, Inc. develops, manufactures and markets
      diode, holmium, KTP and Nd:YAG lasers. Fiber                  solid-state laser systems for aesthetic procedures
      designs include free beam and contact and lateral             and medical device research and development.
      emitting. Laser Peripherals has recently completed            Standard laser products, FDA approved, include our
      our ISO/CE certification and we are now actively              new ultra compact Q-Clear™ for treatment of age
      looking for distribution partners in a variety of             spots, pigmented lesions and tattoos, the Epicare™
      international markets.                                        for hair removal, and the Ta2Eraser™ for tattoo
                                                                    removal.
      Laser Scientific ...................................... 516
      210A Commerce Boulevard                                       Lippincott Williams & Wilkins .................... 311
      Round Rock, TX 78664                                          318 North Heartz Road
      Laser    Scientific     specializes      in     designing,    Coppell, TX 75019
      engineering, and manufacturing high performance               Lippincott Williams & Wilkins will have on display
      laser components, replacement parts and                       the latest books and journals in aesthetic medicine,
      accessories for a variety of cosmetic lasers. In              lasers, and dermatology.
      addition, we provide nationwide service and global
      sales and support. Our customers include                      LocateADoc.com ..................................... 500
      physicians, aestheticians, engineers, and medspa              1060 Woodcock Road
      owners. Our development efforts are focused on                Orlando, FL 32803
      re-engineering some of the laser parts known to               LocateADoc.com powered by PracticeDock, our
      have high failure rates. In addition to servicing and         lead generation system delivers pre-qualified,
      providing parts, Laser Scientific buys and sells both         quality patient leads to your practice. Transform
      new and previously owned cosmetic lasers.                     quality prospects into business with PracticeDock,
                                                                    and its network of health-related Web sites and
      Lasering s.r.l. ............................... Island 620    social media systems, including the award winning
      Via Staffette Partigiane, 54                                  LocateADoc.com. Use real-time tools to track the
      Modena 41122, Italy                                           success of your lead generation program down to
      The MiXto SX® was the first Micro Fractional CO2              your exact Return On Investment (ROI). With more
      Laser for skin resurfacing introducted in 2007.               than 650,000 unique Web site visitors per month
      MiXto stands apart from all other fractional CO2              and two million pages of educational content,
      lasers for many reasons. The laser energy is                  LocateADoc.com has been named a Hitwise "Top 10
      delivered in chopped CW mode. CW mode delivers                Web site" since 2005 and is certified by Health On
      more heat than any Ultra Pulse or Super Pulse                 the Net Foundation (HON).
      system. The benefits include "no pin point"
      bleading and superior short and long term results.
110
                                                                           2011 Annual Conference
                                                                           Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                           Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                           Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                           Grapevine, TX




             VÉÑÑxÜ fÑÉÇáÉÜ                                              UÜÉÇéx fÑÉÇáÉÜ
  ASLMS INDUSTRY ADVISORY COUNCIL MEMBER                     ™MedCo Data, LLC .................................. 827
                                                             1410 North Westshore Boulevard, Suite 710
™Lumenis, Inc. ............................. Island 508      Tampa, FL 33607
5302 Betsy Ross Drive                                        MedCo Data’s patent pending Workflow Centric
Santa Clara, CA 95054-1101                                   Evaluation System is a tenured, proven
Lumenis, Inc. is the leading developer,                      methodology for matching an individual practice to
manufacturer and marketer of proprietary laser               the proper electronic record solution and then
and intense pulsed light (IPL) systems. Lumenis              implementing with adoption standards exceeding
aesthetic systems are reknown worldwide for                  “Meaningful Use” criteria. MedCo Data’s process is
advanced applications including scar reduction,              the most complete solution in the industry;
fractional resurfacing, photorejuvenation, hair              covering   budgeting,     selection,     negotiation,
removal, improvement of vascular and pigmented               implementation, infrastructure and even long term
lesions, and wrinkle reduction. Leading products             support.
include DeepFX and ActiveFX with UltraPulse,
AcuPulse, LightSheer Duet, LumenisOne and M22.               MedEsthetics Magazine ............................ 709
                                                             7628 Densmore Avenue
Lutronic, Inc. ................................ Island 320   Van Nuys, CA 91406-2042
51 Everett Drive, A-50                                       MedEsthetics Magazine provides up-to-date product
Princeton Junction, NJ 08550                                 information and covers service trends and business
A global leader in aesthetic and medical laser               management issues for medical spa owners and
systems, Lutronic is focused on providing advanced           physicians offering medical aesthetic procedures in
technology at an exceptional value. Our proven               specialized facilities. Each issue includes a business
product portfolio reflects the company’s core                profile,    an    equipment      update,    marketing
competency of excellence in creating innovative,             suggestions, management solutions and information
intuitive and versatile laser systems that deliver           on legal issues and training options.
long-lasting results for clinicians and patients
worldwide. Products include systems for fractional           Medicis Aesthetics, Inc. ............................ 820
laser resurfacing, tattoo and pigmented lesion               7720 North Dobson Road
removal, non-ablative rejuvenation, laser surgery            Scottsdale, AZ 85256
and facial contouring.                                       Medicis Aesthetics, Inc. is dedicated to helping
                                                             patients attain a healthy and youthful appearance
MD-Ware Software .................................. 405      and self-image, and to help you redefine beauty in
1788 Drew Road, Suite A                                      your patients. It’s at the heart of everything we do.
Mississauga, Ontario L5S 1L7                                 Who’s better to bring you Perlane® and the
Canada                                                       category’s sales leader in the United States and
MD-Ware is the most powerful marketing and                   worldwide, Restylane®.
practice management software. MD-Ware offers an
intuitive, easy touch screen design and flexibility.         MedNet Technologies, Inc. ........................ 316
We are the obvious choice with our one-step                  1975 Linden Boulevard, Suite 407
QuickBooks Link, Credit Card Module, Online                  Elmont, NY 11003
Booking, MD-EMR, the best technical support and              MedNet Technologies, Inc. designs, hosts and
the industry's first automated marketing.                    manages Web sites for medical practices, hospitals
                                                             and other health care organizations. Clients range
                                                             in size from small medical offices to teaching
                                                             hospitals to medical societies. Developing and
                                                             optimizing your Web presence on the internet is
                                                             our goal.


™Donated to the ASLMS Silent Auction.

                                                                                                                  111
                                                                                   2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                   Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                   Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                   Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                   Grapevine, TX



      MicroAire Surgical Instruments, LLC ............ 707          NeoGraft............................................... 904
      1641 Edlich Drive                                             419 Southfork, Suite 103
      Charlottesville, VA 22911                                     Lewisville, TX 75057
      MicroAire Aesthetics Instruments, LLC is a world              The Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) technique of
      leader in aesthetic plastic surgery through two               the NeoGraft is the most advanced and minimally
      groundbreaking products: the PAL® LipoSculptor                invasive hair transplant method to date. The
      (power-assisted     lipoplasty);   and     Endotine®          NeoGraft system delivers automation of the FUE
      bioabsorbable multi-point fixation devices for                technique, the most advanced technique in the hair
      cosmetic facial procedures. MicroAire Aesthetics              transplant industry. With the NeoGraft system
      also proudly makes EpiCut™ (epithelium tissue                 procedure times are cut in half, with reduced
      removal),      SurgiWire™      and     ReleaseWire™           patient discomfort and the most natural results of
      (subcutaneous dissection). For more information,              any hair transplant technology. NeoGraft is the
      please visit microaire.com.                                   leader in automated hair restoration with over
                                                                    10,000 hair transplant procedures performed
      Miramar Labs ......................................... 429    worldwide. With a high return on investment,
      445 Indio Way                                                 cutting edge technology, and rock solid
      Sunnyvale, CA 94085                                           dependability, the NeoGraft hair restoration system
      Miramar Labs is a medical device company                      is the perfect fit for physicians searching for an
      dedicated to bringing the next generation energy              exciting new revenue stream.
      modality to dermatology. The company’s miraDry
      system is a revolutionary, non-invasive, quick                ™NexTech Systems, Inc. ........................... 619
      outpatient treatment designed to provide a lasting            5550 West Executive Drive, Suite 350
      solution for those suffering from excessive                   Tampa, FL 33609
      underarm sweat. miraDry utilizes a breakthrough               NexTech Practice 2011 is fully integrated Practice
      microwave energy technology platform.                         Management, Marketing, and (EMR/EHR) software
                                                                    designed specifically for dermatologists, cosmetic
      ™MJD Patient Communications .................. 408            medical practices, and medical spas. With a client
      4915 Saint Elmo Avenue, Suite 306                             base of over 3,500 physician clients and 30,000 in
      Bethesda, MD 20814-6093                                       staff worldwide, Practice 2011 is comprehensive,
      The new TopDocs.com is the physician’s portal with            completely modular, and CCHIT 2011 certified.
      concierge service that provides up to 40% off on              Main modules include Electronic Medical Records,
      MJD’s Web site design, procedure brochures,                   Scheduling, Cosmetic Financial Accounting, E-
      looping DVD’s and MOH systems to give your                    Prescribing, Lab Integration, Insurance and
      cosmetic, plastic or laser practice a boost. Visit            Electronic Billing, Marketing, Inventory, Surgery
      our booth to make sure you are listed in                      Center Management, Spa Management, Contact
      TopDocs.com.                                                  Management, Patient and Prospect Tracking,
                                                                    Patient Education Forms, Skin Care Invoicing,
      Neocutis, Inc. ........................................ 700   Microsoft Word Mass Merge, Web site Integration,
      512 East Eleven Mile Road                                     Photo Archiving, and Links to PDA’s and Smart
      Royal Oak, MI 48067                                           Phones.
      Neocutis, a leader in innovative, effective skin care
      brings the precision of Swiss technology and                  OSA – The Optical Society................. Tabletop 2
      cellular therapy research together for scientifically         2010 Massachusetts Avenue NW
      advanced breakthroughs in anti-aging and post-                Washington, DC 20036
      procedural recovery.        PSP® (Process Skin Cell           The Optical Society brings together optics and
      Proteins),    Neocutis’     proprietary       skin     care   photonics scientists, engineers, educators, and
      ingredient is derived from a biotechnology process            business leaders. OSA’s membership totals 15,500
      that extracts rich proteins such as anti-oxidants,            individuals from over 95 countries. Approximately
      cytokines, and fibroblasts known to optimize wound            47% of the Society’s members reside outside the
      healing and skin rejuvenation.                                United States.      Visit www.osa.org for more
                                                                    information.



      ™Donated to the ASLMS Silent Auction.
112
                                                                           2011 Annual Conference
                                                                           Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                           Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                           Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                           Grapevine, TX



Obagi Medical Products ............................ 704     PatientNOW ........................................... 100
3760 Kilroy Airport Way, Suite 500                          400 Inverness Parkway, Suite 200
Long Beach, CA 90806                                        Englewood, CO 80112
Obagi Medical Products is the leader in providing           PatientNOW provides HHS-ONC Certified EMR and
therapeutic prescription-based skin care products           Practice Management software for aesthetic
in the physician-dispensed market. The products             medical practices.        Benefits of PatientNOW
are designed to prevent, correct and improve the            include: iPad application, The ONE EMR for your
most common skin disorders in adult skin. The OMP           plastic surgery or aesthetic medical practice.
product portfolio includes Nu-Derm, Condition and
Enhance, CRx, CLENZIderm, ELASTIderm, Pro-C                 Photocure ............................................. 127
Serums and Rosaclear.                                       100 Overlook Center, 2nd Floor
                                                            Princeton, NJ 08540
™Oculo-Plastik, Inc. ................................ 403   Photocure, the world leader in photodynamic
200 Suave West                                              technology,     specializes     in    developing        and
Montreal, Quebec H3L 1Y9                                    commercializing highly selective and effective
Canada                                                      solutions for cancer and dermatology. Photocure is
Oculo-Plastik, Inc. will have on display LaserSecure        pleased to introduce their latest product,
instruments and ocular shields (Cox and II H with           Allumera™, a light-activated cosmetic treatment
offset handle and Durette II - III and IV external          specially formulated to visibly reduce skin’s
goggles). The Durette III and IV feature movable            outward signs of aging while producing a more
plastic or metal attachments, OPSoft mouthguard             radiant and glowing complexion.
for hair removal, with laser IPL and RF systems,
laser eyewear for the OR, cooling eye and face              ™PhotoMedex ........................................ 606
masks and disposable eye patches for laser IPL and          147 Keystone Drive
LED. Not for laser: autoclavable yellow transparent         Montgomeryville, PA 18936
or black plastic ocular shields, Jaeger and                 PhotoMedex offers innovative products including
Desmarres, Durette plastic goggles (black) for PDT.         XTRAC®      excimer   laser    for     dermatological
                                                            applications, such as psoriasis, fiber-optic laser

               ZÉÄw fÑÉÇáÉÜ                                 systems for surgical procedures, Neova® line of
                                                            products with patented Copper Peptide technology
                                                            for skin, hair and wound care, and Omnilux™ line of
                                                            LED products for acne, fine lines, and wrinkles.
  ASLMS INDUSTRY ADVISORY COUNCIL MEMBER
                                                            Photonics Media ..................................... 723
™Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc. .. Island 400           2 South Street
15 Network Drive                                            Pittsfield, MA 01201
Burlington, MA 01803                                        Photonics Media – the Pulse of the Industry – is
Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc. develops the             Laurin Publishing Company’s international suite of
most advanced laser and pulsed-light systems for            media with more than 50 years of the industry’s
aesthetic applications including true laser body            leading publications.     In print with Photonics
sculpting, permanent hair reduction, fractional skin        Spectra     and   BioPhotonics      magazines,        the
resurfacing, and skin rejuvenation. Palomar's               EuroPhotonics and AsiaPhotonics feature sections,
Starlux® 500 and SlimLipo™ systems empower                  the Photonics Showcase supplement and the
doctors to offer remarkable results with                    Photonics Buyer’s Guide.             Also online at
exceptional versatility, ease of use, and comfort.          www.photonics.com.
Discover    "From    Light   Comes     Beauty"    at
palomarmedical.com.




™Donated to the ASLMS Silent Auction.
                                                                                                                   113
                                                                                 2011 Annual Conference
                                                                                 Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                 Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                 Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                 Grapevine, TX



      Pierre Fabre Dermo Cosmetique USA ........... 231           Revision Skincare .................................... 911
      9 Campus Drive, 2nd Floor                                   9019 Premier Row
      Parisippany, NJ 07054                                       Dallas, TX 75247
      A global leader in dermatological skincare including        Revision Skincare makes the highest quality
      brands     Eau    Thermale    Avène,     based    on        products with one overriding purpose: to solve a
      hydrotherapy, dedicated to sensitive skin; and              patient’s skin care problems.           Based on the
      Glytone®, offering the highest level of free glycolic       principal that cosmeceuticals must provide a
      acid through a systematic approach for skin                 targeted solution, their formulas are designed to
      rejuvenation     and    optimal      skin    health.        correct each skin care condition through multiple
      www.glytone.com www.aveneusa.com                            pathways. They use only the purest, premium
                                                                  quality ingredients in their products and sell them
      Quantel Derma GmbH .............................. 732       exclusively to physicians in over 10 countries. The
      Am Wolfsmantel 46                                           crown jewel of Revision Skincare is their world-
      Erlangen 91058, Germany                                     renowned staff of chemists who have developed
      Quantel Derma GmbH develops and markets                     many breakthrough formulas that combat acne,
      innovative dermatological laser and light-based             aging skin and other complex dermatological
      systems for medical and aesthetic indications. The          conditions.    Highly    effective      products       like
      state-of-the-art technologies of the company based          Teamine®, Nectifirm®, Intellishade®, Revox II and
      in Erlangen, Germany, are a worldwide synonym for           their Advanced Skincare Line.                Every day,
      certified quality and reliable benefits for the             scientific advances in skin care are made at their
      patient. At ASLMS 2011, Quantel Derma presents              Dallas, Texas facility, where they test,
      several highlights of its comprehensive product             manufacture and distribute their own clinically-
      portfolio: The 308 EXCIMER SYSTEM, the handy,               proven, high-performing products.             For more
      highly    effective    treatment      solution     for      information     call     800-385-6652         or      visit
      monochromatic UVB therapy with 308nm; and LEDA              www.revisionskincare.com.
      EPI the cutting edge diode laser system for high
      speed hair removal on all skin types.                       ™Rockwell Laser Industries ....................... 805
                                                                  7754 Camargo Road
      RPMC Lasers, Inc. ................................... 121   Cincinnati, OH 43243
      203 Joseph Street                                           Rockwell Laser Industries offers integrated laser
      O’Fallon, MO 63366                                          safety services, consulting features FDA/CDRH/IEC
      Since 1996 RPMC has been offering high power                compliance reporting assistance, testing and ANSI
      single emitters in wavelengths from 622nm -                 audits. Training institute offers in-depth laser
      2.3μm, laser diode bar products including                   safety courses with hands-on experience. Product
      unmounted        bars,     conductive         packages,     line includes eyewear, barriers, interlock systems,
      microchannel cooled stacks, and fiber coupled               signs/labels, windows, hazard analysis software,
      packages, laser diode modules, and laser diode              viewers,          measurement            equipment,
      accessories including laser diode drivers, TEC              manuals/standards     and     interactive     training
      controllers, and heatsinks.                                 materials.

      Ra Medical Systems, Inc............................ 108
      2270 Camino Vida Roble
      Suite L
      Carlsbad, CA 92011
      Ra Medical Systems, Inc. markets the PHAROS EX-
      308, an advanced 308nm super narrowband UVB
      excimer laser for the treatment of psoriasis,
      vitiligo, atopic dermatitis, and leukoderma.




      ™Donated to the ASLMS Silent Auction.
114
                                                                             2011 Annual Conference
                                                                             Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                             Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                             Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                             Grapevine, TX



Sandstone Medical Technologies ......... Island 520           SkinMedica, Inc. ..................................... 900
105 Citation Court                                            5909 Sea Lion Place, Suite H
Homewood, AL 35209                                            Carlsbad, CA 92010
Sandstone Medical Technologies was founded with               An innovator in the area of skin health, SkinMedica
the goal of providing physicians state-of-the-art,            develops and markets prescription and non-
easy to use, aesthetic lasers and light based                 prescription products to physicians to treat
technologies at an affordable price. Current                  dermatologic     conditions     and      improve       the
products include: The Matrix LS-40 CO2 laser for              appearance of skin. Our line of aesthetic skin care
fractional skin resurfacing, the Cheveux 810nm                products enhance skin appearance and reduce signs
diode laser for permanent hair reduction, the                 of aging and include the revolutionary TNS Essential
Apollo IPL for the treatment of vascular and                  Serum™ and hallmark TNS Recovery Complex®.
pigmented lesions and active acne, the UltraLight-
Q, dual wavelength (1064/532nm) laser for the
removal of tattoos and the Whisper-3G Er:YAG
system for the famous, minimal downtime
                                                                           VÉÑÑxÜ fÑÉÇáÉÜ
“Lunchtime laser peel.” All systems include a two-
year warranty and our unmatched “Buy-Back                     ™Solta Medical, Inc. ....................... Island 214
Guarantee.”                                                   25881 Industrial Boulevard
                                                              Hayward, CA 94545
™Sciton, Inc. ................................ Island 800     Solta Medical, Inc. develops innovative products
925 Commercial Street                                         that meet and exceed needs of the growing
Palo Alto, CA 94303                                           aesthetic market. We engineer safe, effective
Sciton provides best-in-class laser and light source          solutions for patients and deliver compelling
solutions for medical professionals who want                  business opportunities for physicians. We are
superior durability, performance and value. We                committed to superior innovation, research and
offer high quality, expandable platforms with                 development. Solta Medical is a collaboration of
modules for fractional skin resurfacing, superficial          the industry’s two leading brands: Thermage,
and deep skin peeling, laser-assisted lipolysis,              pioneer in non-invasive skin tightening and
wrinkle reduction, hair removal, treatment of                 contouring, and Fraxel, premier solution for skin
vascular and pigmented lesions, phototherapy, scar            resurfacing. The Thermage and Fraxel systems,
reduction, and treatment of varicose veins and                both delivering non-invasive treatments with
acne.                                                         minimal recovery time, enable physicians to offer
                                                              more compelling solutions to the anti-aging
Skin & Aging .......................................... 630   market. For more information, call 1-877-782-2286
83 General Warren Boulevard, Suite 100                        or go to www.solta.com.
Malvern, PA 19355
Skin & Aging is an award-winning dermatology                  Sound Surgical Technologies, LLC ............... 427
journal that provides practical advice to help                357 South McCaslin Boulevard, Suite 100
dermatologists treat common conditions such as                Louisville, CO 80027
skin cancer, acne and psoriasis, as well as how to            Sound Surgical Technologies is a leading
incorporate cosmetic procedures such as Botox and             manufacturer and distributor of ultrasonic body
laser skin resurfacing into dermatology practice.             shaping technologies, including the VASER Lipo®,
Also provided are practice management topics such             VASER® Shape MC1™ and MedSculpt™ Systems.
as managed care, legal issues and coding                      VASER Lipo® effectively treats all areas of the body
techniques. This monthly journal offers timely                and is clinically proven to enhance skin retraction,
information presented by respected dermatologists             reduce blood loss, and maintain the viability of fat
in an attractive, easy-to-read format.                        cells for fat grafting procedures. The VASER Shape
                                                              MC1™ and MedSculpt™ Systems is an ideal
                                                              companion to VASER Lipo®, combining ultrasound
                                                              and massage therapies to increase lymphatic and
                                                              venous circulation, minimize postoperative pain
                                                              and swelling, and temporarily improve the
                                                              appearance of cellulite. All of the devices are FDA-
                                                              cleared for use in the United States. To learn more,
™Donated to the ASLMS Silent Auction.                         visit www.vaser.com.
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                                                                                   Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
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      SPIE........................................... Table Top 1
      1000 20th Street
                                                                                   ZÉÄw fÑÉÇáÉÜ
      P.O. Box 10
      Bellingham, WA 98227-0010                                     ™Syneron/Candela .......................... Island 306
      SPIE is an international society advancing an                 530 Boston Post Road
      interdisciplinary approach to the science and                 Wayland, MA 01778
      application of light. The SPIE Digital Library houses         Syneron manufactures and distributes medical
      over 300,000 technical papers from the Society's              aesthetic devices that are powered by the
      conference proceedings and journals in cutting                proprietary elos technology that enable physicians
      edge     technologies        such      as     biophotonics,   to offer advanced solutions for a broad range of
      nanotechnology, sensors, lasers, electro-optics,              aesthetic applications. Syneron’s recent merger
      imaging, solar energy and communications.                     with Candela Corporation now creates the largest
      Founded in 1955, the Society has 164 Student                  aesthetic medical device company with the
      Chapters around the world, and more than 16,000               broadest portfolio of products and an unrivaled
      individual; 5,000 student; and 450 corporate                  pipeline of innovation. Together, our combined
      Members in 84 countries. Visit SPIE.org.                      experience, financial strength and world-class
                                                                    customer service will provide the support our
      SPECTRUM Photomedicine ........................ 130           customers need to build their practice.
      7481 Warden Road
      Sherwood, AR 72120                                            ™Syris Scientific ..................................... 507
      Providing the S cience, P ractice, E ducation, C              22 Shaker Road
      reativity, T echnology, R esearch, U understanding            P.O. Box 127
      and M arketing of Photomedicine. Display of RJ                Gray, ME 04039
      Laser products and integration with Electronic                Syris    Scientifics'  patented        cross     polarized
      Health Record and Practice Management systems of              visualization systems continue to allow health care
      Horizon Medical World. Physician will also provide            providers to see vascular structures 1mm below the
      tips on how to integrate photomedicine in clinical            skin's    surface.    Laser,      sclerotherapy         and
      practice examples from United Pain Care and                   dermatologic procedures are enhanced by the
      Medical Esthetique.                                           reduced glare, magnification and illumination. The
                                                                    v300, v600 or the Vantage are defined as truly a
      Surgimedics........................................... 808    "Light so unique it must be experienced." Ask about
      2950 Mechanic Street                                          our 30-day no risk trial offer. Visit our Web site
      Lake City, PA 16423                                           www.syrisscientific.com or call us at 800-714-1374
      Smoke Evacuators are primarily used during ESU                for more information.
      and laser procedures to remove smoke plume,
      reduce potential mutagens, and reduce odors near
      the site. Surgimedics' unique low cost removable                           VÉÑÑxÜ fÑÉÇáÉÜ
      pre-filter protects and extends the life of the
      primary 4-stage ULPA filter which is the leading              ™THE Aesthetic Guide ............................. 203
      cost of consumables in smoke evacuation systems.              120 Vantis, Suite 470
      Get yours today!                                              Aliso Viejo, CA 92656
                                                                    THE Aesthetic Guide, which has a readership of
                                                                    20,000 medical aesthetic practices, is published by
                                                                    Medical Insight, Inc. We also publish THE European
                                                                    Aesthetic Guide. Free subscriptions are available to
                                                                    qualified medical aesthetic practices. Medical
                                                                    Insight, Inc. also conducts market research and
                                                                    publishes market studies. Visit www.miinews.com
                                                                    for a complete list of services.



      ™Donated to the ASLMS Silent Auction.
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                                                                           2011 Annual Conference
                                                                           Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                           Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                           Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                           Grapevine, TX



The Laser Network, LLC ........................... 309
19336 Goddard Ranch Court, Suite 201-203
Morrison, CO 80465
                                                                        UÜÉÇéx fÑÉÇáÉÜ
The Laser Network (TLN) was developed to service
the redeployment needs of the medical community               ASLMS INDUSTRY ADVISORY COUNCIL MEMBER
in the areas related to medical lasers and IPL
systems. The members of TLN utilize a                       ™Ulthera, Inc. ....................................... 529
revolutionary       Web       driven          service,      2150 South Country Club Drive, Suite 21
TheLaserTrader.com, designed to insure both                 Mesa, AZ 85210
buyers and sellers receive the most professional            The innovative Ulthera™ system platform utilizes
services available.                                         focused ultrasound with visualization for non-
                                                            invasive treatment of lax skin and its support
ThermoTek, Inc...................................... 810    structure. For the first time, practitioners can see
1200 Lakeside Parkway, Suite 200                            and thermally coagulate not only the dermis, but
Flower Mound, TX 75028                                      the underlying fibro-muscular layer, resulting in
ThermoTek, Inc. has been a leader in the medical            significant, reliable outcomes, and the first-ever
device industry for more than 15 years with                 energy-based device to receive FDA clearance for
innovative   designs    for     precision       thermal     non-invasive lift.
management solutions. Our newest introductions
for the aesthetic and therapeutic market are the            UltraShape NA, Inc. ................................. 333
ArTek Spot and the ArTek Air which are effective            2603 Camino Ramon, 2nd Floor
dermal cooling devices for laser/light based                San Ramon, CA 94583
treatments and injectables.                                 UltraShape® redefines aesthetic medicine by
                                                            developing,     manufacturing        and      marketing
TJ Sales Associates, Inc. ........................... 417   innovative non-invasive technologies for fat cell
3010 Route 10                                               destruction and body sculpting. The company
Denville, NJ 07834                                          develops and markets clinically proven safe and
TJ Sales Associates, Inc. is a technical laser              effective solutions that enhance the lives of
company supporting the medical, cosmetic,                   patients. The new V3 by UltraShape® uses
industrial and scientific laser markets worldwide           proprietary new Vertical Dynamic Focus™ (VDF)
since 1980. TJS also provides on-site service and           ultrasound technology that employs pulsed (non-
repairs for many lasers including Lumenis,                  thermal) focused ultrasound that instantly,
Cynosure, Candela, Alma, Cutera, Palomar, Sciton            selectively and permanently destroys fat cells
and many more. You will find we offer a                     without affecting surrounding structures and
comprehensive inventory containing such items as            RFVac™ vacuum-assisted radiofrequency to create a
OEM flashlamps, optics, fibers, crystals, cavities,         synergistic effect and tighten tissue. The Contour I
filters, safety glasses and diagnostic tools to name        V3 system is not FDA cleared for sale in the United
a few.                                                      States.




™Donated to the ASLMS Silent Auction.                                                                             117
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                                                                                    Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                    Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                    Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                    Grapevine, TX



      Venus Concept Ltd. ................................. 432
      38 HaBarzel Street
      Tel Aviv 40591, Israel
                                                                                  UÜÉÇéx fÑÉÇáÉÜ
      Venus Concept, Ltd. is a leading developer and
      manufacturer of innovative medical aesthetics                   ™Zeltiq Aesthetic, Inc. ............................. 615
      devices. The company began its operations in                    4698 Willow Road
      November 2006, and reached profitability soon                   Pleasanton, CA 94588
      afterwards. Venus Concept's products represent the              Zeltiq Aesthetics, founded in 2005, is a science-
      ultimate fusion in high-tech and aesthetics and are             based medical device company dedicated to the
      powered by patented technologies, with clinical                 development of non-invasive procedures for the
      efficacy proven in over one million successful                  reduction of unwanted fat tissue. The Zeltiq
      treatments worldwide. With over 100 years of                    approach utilizes a patented method called
      combined experience, the very seasoned senior                   Cryolipolysis™ (the use of precisely controlled
      management team of Venus Concept understands                    cooling to remove fat) that is designed to only kill
      the new industry dynamic and has set out to                     fat cells and not harm the skin or other tissue.
      develop an organization of top pedigree individuals
      committed to 100% customer satisfaction and
      success.                                                                    UÜÉÇéx fÑÉÇáÉÜ
      WON Technology Co., LTD ........................ 627              ASLMS INDUSTRY ADVISORY COUNCIL MEMBER
      538 Yongsan-dong
      Yuseong-gu                                                      ™Zimmer MedizinSystems ......................... 806
      Daejeon 305-500, South Korea                                    172 Fallow Deer Road
                                                                      Franktown, CO 80116
      Yodle ................................................... 504   Zimmer MedizinSystems offers comfort solutions for
      50 West 23rd Street, 4th Floor                                  your aesthetic practice. Our Cold Air devices are
      New York, NY 10010                                              designed to cool the epidermis while distracting
      Yodle, a leader in local online advertising and                 the patient. Zimmer Cold Air devices are used in a
      named fastest growing local online advertising                  wide range of aesthetic procedures. Please come
      company by industry analyst Borrell Associates,                 by our booth to see our adapters for many of the
      connects thousands of local businesses with                     Candela laser devices.
      consumers in a process so simple and cost-effective
      that business owners can't imagine any other way
      to advertise. Yodle has developed an integrated
      approach to signing up and serving local businesses
      that are transitioning their marketing budgets
      online. Yodle is headquartered in New York, New
      York with a presence in 25 major cities across the
      United States.




      ™Donated to the ASLMS Silent Auction.

118
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                                         Exhibitor Listing                                  Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                            Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                            Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                            Grapevine, TX



Acuderm, Inc. ................................................ 528      Light Age, Inc. ................................................ 610
Aerolase ....................................................... 801    Lippincott Williams & Wilkins .............................. 311
Allergan ........................................................ 716   LocateADoc.com ............................................. 500
Alma Lasers, Ltd... ................................... Island 908      Lumenis, Inc........................................... Island 508
American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery ...... 325              Lutronic, Inc. ......................................... Island 320
Anthony Products/Gio Pelle ................................ 206         MD-Ware Software ........................................... 405
Astanza Laser ................................................. 233     MedCo Data, LLC ............................................. 827
Avo Photonics, Inc. .......................................... 509      MedEsthetics Magazine ...................................... 709
B&W Tek, Inc. ................................................ 215      Medicis Aesthetics, Inc. ..................................... 820
BTL Industries, Inc. .......................................... 132     MedNet Technologies, Inc................................... 316
Bank of America Practice Solutions ....................... 328          MicroAire Surgical Instruments, LLC....................... 707
Buffalo Filter ................................................. 401    Miramar Labs .................................................. 429
Canfield Imaging Systems. .................................. 601        MJD Patient Communications .............................. 408
CareCredit .................................................... 628     Neocutis, Inc. ................................................. 700
Celleration .................................................... 335    NeoGraft ....................................................... 904
Coherent, Inc. ................................................ 829     NexTech Systems, Inc. ...................................... 619
CoolTouch, Inc. .............................................. 224      Obagi Medical Products ..................................... 704
Cosmeticsurgery.com ....................................... 434         Oculo-Plastk, Inc. ............................................ 403
CuraMedex LLC ............................................... 125       OSA – The Optical Society .......................... Tabletop 2
Cutera. ................................................. Island 600    Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc. ............... Island 400
Cynosure, Inc. ......................................... Island 414     PatientNOW ................................................... 100
DEKA Medical, Inc. ....................................Island 814       Photocure...................................................... 127
DermaSweep .................................................. 711       PhotoMedex ................................................... 606
DUSA Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ................................ 721         Photonics Media .............................................. 723
Eclipse Aesthetics .....................................Island 200      Pierre Fabre Dermo Cosmetique USA ..................... 231
Ellman International ......................................... 227      Quantel Derma GmbH ....................................... 732
Elsevier ....................................................... 201    RPMC Lasers, Inc. ............................................ 121
EltaMD Skincare .............................................. 720      Ra Medical Systems, Inc. .................................... 108
Energist NA .................................................... 913    Revision Skincare ............................................. 911
Enhanced Image Technologies ............................. 535           Rockwell Laser Industries ................................... 805
Envy Medical .................................................. 104     Sandstone Medical Technologies ................... Island 520
Erchonia Corporation ........................................ 220       Sciton, Inc. ............................................ Island 800
Fallene, Ltd. .................................................. 533    Skin & Aging ................................................... 630
FiberTech-RoMack ........................................... 728        SkinMedica, Inc. .............................................. 900
Focus Medical ................................................. 824     Solta Medical ......................................... Island 214
FotoFinder Systems, Inc. ................................... 725        Sound Surgical Technologies LLC .......................... 427
Fotona Lasers .......................................... Island 708     SPIE ................................................... Table Top 1
HCG True Diet ................................................ 632      SPECTRUM Photomedicine .................................. 130
Hironic Co., Ltd. ............................................. 511     Surgimedics ................................................... 808
Hopewell Pharmacy.......................................... 123         Syneron/Candela .................................... Island 306
HOYA ConBio .................................................. 415      Syris Scientific ................................................ 507
Human Med, Inc. ............................................. 631       THE Aesthetic Guide ......................................... 203
Incredible Marketing......................................... 332       The Laser Network, LLC ..................................... 309
Innovative Optics, Inc. ...................................... 217      ThermoTek, Inc. .............................................. 810
International Aesthetic and Laser Association .......... 128            TJ Sales Associates, Inc. .................................... 417
Iredale Mineral Cosmetics .................................. 722        Ulthera, Inc. .................................................. 529
Iridex Corporation ........................................... 300      UltraShape NA, Inc. .......................................... 333
Jeisys Medical, Inc. .......................................... 107     Venus Concept, Ltd. ......................................... 432
Laser Concepts – www.cosmeticlaserworld.com ........ 821                WON Technology Co., LTD .................................. 627
Laser Peripherals, LLC ...................................... 106       Yodle ........................................................... 504
Laser Scientific .............................................. 516     Zeltiq Aesthetics, Inc. ....................................... 615
Lasering s.r.l. .......................................... Island 620   Zimmer MedizinSystems ..................................... 806



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                                                                  Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                  Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                  Grapevine, TX




  The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery would like to thank the following
  companies who have generously sponsored functions at the 31st ASLMS Annual Conference.

                                ZÉÄw fÑÉÇáÉÜá
                                       HOYA ConBio
                             Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc.
                                     Syneron/Candela


                             UÜÉÇéx fÑÉÇáÉÜá
                                      CoolTouch, Inc.
                                       Cynosure, Inc.
                                     MedCo Data, LLC
                                        Ulthera, Inc.
                                   Zeltiq Aesthetics, Inc.
                                  Zimmer MedizinSystems



                              VÉÑÑxÜ fÑÉÇáÉÜ
                                          Allergan
                                   R. Rox Anderson, M.D.
                                     DEKA Medical, Inc.
                                     DermaNetwork.org
                                    Incredible Marketing
                                        Lumenis, Inc.
                                        Solta Medical
                                    THE Aesthetic Guide
                                     The Patient’s Guide




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                                                                             Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                             Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                             Grapevine, TX




      ASLMS and Industry Share in the Benefits
        of Continuing Development of Laser
                    Applications
Industry has played a critical role in the establishment and the growth of ASLMS and the use of lasers in medical
and surgical applications. Through its 2005 strategic planning process, the ASLMS Board of Directors identified the
opportunity to develop a mutually beneficial relationship with its industry partners to be a high priority. The
Industry Advisory Council concept grew out of an interest, and a commitment by the Society, to incorporate greater
interchange with industry. The Industry Advisory Council was created to provide a mutually beneficial relationship
through which ASLMS and laser and related technology industries can work together to increase the value of an
ASLMS membership, and to improve patient care by supporting research initiatives, and applications of laser and
related technologies in medicine and surgery.

Because both ASLMS and industry share in the benefits of the continuing development of laser applications, it was
decided that the resources generated from Industry Advisory Council memberships and the net proceeds generated
from the industry supported Silent Auction would be dedicated to the funding of laser application research. At the
2010 Annual Conference, ASLMS awarded $157,000 to several scientists, medical researchers, and students who are
working on important laser research projects that may be applied someday to the medical and surgical care of
patients. This year, approximately $152,000 will be awarded for new research projects. ASLMS is especially
pleased to announce that within the past five years; over $1 million in research has been awarded.

We would also like to acknowledge and thank the following members of the ASLMS Industry Advisory Council.

                       Aerolase Corporation                    Paul Efremkin, Ph.D.
                       Cynosure, Inc.                          Michael Davin
                       DEKA Medical, Inc.                      Dale Koop, Ph.D.
                       HOYA ConBio                             Tim Gehlmann
                       Lumenis, Inc.                           Robert Mann
                       Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc.      Richard Bankowski
                       Ulthera, Inc.                           Teri Larsen
                       Zimmer MedizinSystems                   Terry Schmidt




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      Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
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      Grapevine, TX




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                                                      Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                      Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                      Grapevine, TX




Presidential Citations and Awards
                      Friday, April 1, 2011
                      10:40 am – 10:59 am
                           Longhorn F

  2011 Presidential Citations are presented to:


    Ken Day, Ph.D.
    ASLMS Employee Since 2006

    In recognition of his dedication and service to ASLMS, his leadership and strategic
    vision for our Society.




   Raymond J. Lanzafame, M.D., M.B.A.
   ASLMS Member Since 1984

   For his long term dedication and service to ASLMS and for keeping our educational
   efforts compliant with the jungle of ACCME rules and our programs CME accredited.




  J. Stuart Nelson, M.D., Ph.D.
  ASLMS Member Since1987

  In recognition of his service as Editor-in-Chief of our “red” journal; for his service as
  Secretary of ASLMS; for his relentless pursuit of scientific and clinical excellence; for
  his continued efforts over many years to rebuild the Basic Science section of our
  Annual Conference; and for being a mentor and friend.



   Jason N. Pozner, M.D.
   ASLMS Member Since 1995

   In recognition for his efforts to keep our silent auction vibrant in difficult economic
   times.
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                                                                                Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                Grapevine, TX



                    Presidential Citations and Awards
                                              Friday, April 1, 2011
                                              10:40 am – 10:59 am
                                                   Longhorn F

                                2011 Best Awards are presented to:


                        DR. RICHARD E. FITZPATRICK CLINICAL RESEARCH AND INNOVATIONS AWARD

      Recipient:                   Robert Anolik
      Co-Authors:                  Elliot T. Weiss, Anne Chapas, Leonard Bernstein, Lori Brightman, Elizabeth K. Hale,
                                   Julie K. Karen, Roy Geronemus
      Location:                    Laser and Skin Surgery Center of New York, New York, NY
      Abstract Title:              INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF NON-COHERENT BLUE LIGHT IN
                                   INTRALESIONAL PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY OF BASAL CELL CARCINOMA
      Presentation Date:           Friday, April 1, 2011 – Texas D – 5:00 pm – 5:09 pm



                           BEST OVERALL EXPERIMENTAL AND TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH AWARD

      Recipient:                   Xingjia Wu
      Co-Authors:                  Stephanie Alberico, Helina Moges, Ruchir Sehra, Luis DeTaboada, Juanita Anders
      Location:                    Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, PhotoThera,
                                   Inc., Carlsbad, CA
      Abstract Title:              PULSE LIGHT IRRADIATION IMPROVES BEHAVIORAL OUTCOME IN A RAT MODEL OF
                                   CHRONIC MILD STRESS
      Presentation Date:           Friday, April 1, 2011 – Texas 4-6 – 4:30 pm – 4:39 pm




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                                                                              Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                              Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                              Grapevine, TX




                  Presidential Citations and Awards
                                          Friday, April 1, 2011
                                          10:40 am – 10:59 am
                                               Longhorn F

                            2011 Best Awards are presented to:


                         BEST STUDENT/RESIDENT CUTANEOUS LASER SURGERY AWARD

Recipient:                    Vivian Laquer
Co-Authors:                   Kristen Kelly, Belinda Dao, Janelle Marshall, Amy Nguyen, Elizabeth Rugg, Ronald
                              Harris, Tina Chen
Location:                     Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, CA
Abstract Title:               ANGIOGENESIS MEDIATOR ALTERATIONS IN ANGIOMAS AFTER PULSED DYE LASER
                              TREATMENT
Presentation Date:            April 1, 2011 – Longhorn F – 1:38 pm – 1:43 pm


                  BEST STUDENT/RESIDENT EXPERIMENTAL AND TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH AWARD

Recipient:                    Mehmet Kosoglu
Co-Authors:                   Robert Hood, Christopher Rylander
Location:                     Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Abstract Title:               FIBEROPTIC MICRONEEDLES FOR MICROSCALE INTERSTITIAL DELIVERY OF
                              THERAPEUTIC LIGHT
Presentation Date:            April 3, 2011 – Texas C – 11:27 am – 11:38 am



                           BEST STUDENT/RESIDENT PHOTOBIOMODULATION AWARD

Recipient:                    Tianyi Wang
Co-Authors:                   S.M. Shams Kazmi, Jordan Dwelle, Veronika Sapozhnikova, Jake Mancuso, Brian
                              Willsey, Keith Johnston, Marc Feldman, Andrew Dunn, Thomas Milner
Location:                     University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, University of Texas Health Science Center
                              at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX
Abstract Title:               COMBINED OCT AND MULTI-PHOTON LUMINESCENCE MICROSCOPY FOR MACROPHAGE
                              DETECTION IN ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUES USING PLASMONIC GOLD NANOROSE
Presentation Date:            April 1, 2011 – Texas 4-6 – 5:00 pm – 5:09 pm




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                                                                                    Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                                    Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                                    Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                                    Grapevine, TX




                        Presidential Citations and Awards
                                                 Friday, April 1, 2011
                                                 10:40 am – 10:59 am
                                                      Longhorn F

                                 2011 Best Awards are presented to:

                            BEST STUDENT/RESIDENT PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY THERAPY AWARD

      Recipient:                    Liyi Huang
      Co-Author:                    Michael Hamblin
      Location:                     Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
      Abstract Title:               MECHANISMS OF ANTIMICROBIAL PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY: AN IN VITRO STUDY ON
                                    GRAM NEGATIVE AND GRAM POSITIVE BACTERIA
      Presentation Date:            April 1, 2011 – Texas D – 1:20 pm – 1:29 pm



                    BEST STUDENT/RESIDENT SURGICAL APPLICATIONS/INTERSTITIAL LASER THERAPY AWARD

      Recipient:                    Edward C. Wu
      Co-Authors:                   Victor Sun, Wangcun Jia, Dmitriy E. Protsenko, Cyrus T. Manuel, Brian J.F. Wong,
                                    J.Stuart Nelson
      Location:                     Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, CA
      Abstract Title:               EX VIVO EVALUATION OF LASER AURICULAR CARTILAGE RESHAPING WITH CARBON
                                    DIOXIDE SPRAY COOLING IN A RABBIT MODEL
      Presentation Date:            April 1, 2011 – Texas 2-3 – 4:30 pm – 4:39 pm




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                                                                          Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                                          Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                                          Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                                          Grapevine, TX




Caroline and William Mark Memorial Award
                       Saturday, April 2, 2011 - 10:35 am – 10:49 am
  “From the Early Days of Medical Laser Applications to a Routine Clinical Use
                         Today: Personal Encounters”
                                                Longhorn F


William B. Mark was a design engineer who became involved with the utilization of lasers in medicine during the
mid 1970's. After attending the Second International Medical Laser Congress in Detroit, he began working to
establish an organization covering all medical specialties, an organization to allow and encourage physicians and
scientists to exchange knowledge, explore uses of present equipment, and generate new medical lasers and
accessories. At the Society's Annual Conference, the Caroline and William Mark Memorial Award is presented to a
member selected for outstanding contributions to laser technology.



                                      2011 Caroline and William Mark Memorial Award
                                      is presented to:
                                      Franz Hillenkamp, Ph.D.
                                      Institute for Medical Physics & Biophysics
                                      Muenster, Germany


Distinguished Recipients (to date)

1982   Leon Goldman              (deceased)            1997    R. Rox Anderson              Boston, MA
1983   Thomas J. Dougherty       Buffalo, NY           1998    George S. Abela              East Lansing, MI
1984   Geza J. Jako              Melrose, MA           1999    Richard O. Gregory           Celebration, FL
1985   Joseph H. Bellina         (deceased)            2000    Isaac Kaplan                 Savyon, Israel
1986   Francis A. L’Esperance    New York, NY          2001    Raymond J. Lanzafame         Rochester, NY
1987   Leonard J. Cerullo        Chicago, IL           2002    Ashley J. Welch              Austin, TX
1988   John A. Dixon             (deceased)            2003    Martin J.C. van Gemert       The Netherlands
1989   Myron L. Wolbarsht        Durham, NC            2004    Brian C. Wilson              Toronto, Canada
1990   Michael W. Berns          Irvine, CA            2005    Lars O. Svaasand             Trondheim, Norway
1991   John A. Parrish           Boston, MA            2006    Joseph T. Walsh, Jr.         Evanston, IL
1992   Robert H. Ossoff          Nashville, TN         2007    Serge R. Mordon              Lille, France
1993   James S. McCaughan, Jr.   Galena, OH            2008    Richard E. Fitzpatrick       La Jolla, CA
1994   Marvin P. Fried           Bronx, NY             2009    J. Stuart Nelson             Irvine, CA
1995   Ronald G. Wheeland        Columbia, MO          2010    E. Victor Ross               San Diego, CA
1996   Kenneth A. Arndt          Chestnut Hill, MA




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                    Ellet H. Drake Memorial Award
                        Saturday, April 2, 2011 - 10:50 am – 11:04 am
                   “The Egg of Columbus: Overcoming Barriers to Innovation”
                                                    Longhorn F
      The Ellet H. Drake Memorial Award was established in 1995 to recognize a practicing physician who has contributed
      to innovative laser procedures and/or laser products for medicine. The award is given in honor of Ellet Drake,
      M.D., co-founder of the American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery. The award recipient must be a practicing
      physician with at least five years of practice; contributed to innovative laser procedures and/or laser products for
      medicine, contributed to literature, and has demonstrated excellence in teaching on a regional or greater level
      substantiating his/her laser activity during his/her career.




                              2011 Ellet H. Drake Memorial Award
                              is presented to:
                              Dieter Manstein, M.D.
                              Wellman Center for Photomedicine
                              Boston, MA


      Distinguished Recipients (to date)

      1995   John A. Parrish           Boston, MA                    2003    Robert A. Weiss          Hunt Valley, MD
      1996   R. Rox Anderson           Boston, MA                    2004    J. Stuart Nelson         Irvine, CA
      1997   David B. Apfelberg        Palo Alto, CA                 2005    Richard E. Fitzpatrick   La Jolla, CA
      1998   Ronald G. Wheeland        Columbia, MO                  2006    Kenneth A. Arndt         Chestnut Hill, MA
      1999   Raymond J. Lanzafame      Rochester, NY                 2007    E. Victor Ross           San Diego, CA
      2000   George S. Abela           East Lansing, MI              2008    Jeffrey S. Dover         Chestnut Hill, MA
      2001   Roy G. Geronemus          New York, NY                  2009    Suzanne L. Kilmer        Sacamento, CA
      2002   Jerome M. Garden          Chicago, IL                   2010    Henry H.L. Chan          Hong Kong




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               Leon Goldman Memorial Award
                     Saturday, April 2, 2011 - 11:05 am – 11:19 am
                “Finding the Right Indications for Photodynamic Therapy”
                                                Longhorn F

The Leon Goldman Memorial Award was established in 1998 to recognize the many contributions in the areas of
clinical laser research, laser patient care, and medical laser education of Leon Goldman, M.D., the "Father of Laser
Medicine." The plenary session speaker must be a practicing physician who has demonstrated longitudinal
excellence throughout their career in performing clinical laser research, providing high quality laser services to
patients or educating others in medical laser applications. The individual must also share the characteristics of
honesty, high ethical standards, and a dedication to patients that were possessed by its namesake.



                          2011 Leon Goldman Memorial Award
                          is presented to:
                          Stephen G. Bown, M.D., F.R.C.P.
                          University College
                          London, United Kingdom


Distinguished Recipients (to date)

1999   David J. Goldberg        Hackensack, NJ               2005      Ronald G. Wheeland         Columbia, MO
2000   Jeffrey S. Dover         Chestnut Hill, MA            2006      Roy G. Geronemus           New York, NY
2001   Tina S. Alster           Washington, DC               2007      J. Stuart Nelson           Irvine, CA
2002   R. Rox Anderson          Boston, MA                   2008      Jerome M. Garden           Chicago, IL
2003   Kenneth A. Arndt         Chestnut Hill, MA            2009      Christopher B. Zachary     Irvine, CA
2004   Richard E. Fitzpatrick   La Jolla, CA                 2010      Brian S. Biesman           Nashville, TN




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          Nursing/Allied Health Excellence Award
                         Saturday, April 2, 2011 - 11:20 am – 11:29 am
              “The Role of Allied Nurses and Health Care Professionals: “Priceless”
                                                       Longhorn F

      The Nursing/Allied Health Excellence Award was established in 1991 to recognize outstanding nursing/allied health
      contributions to ASLMS and the advancement of joint practice in laser medicine and surgery. As an active member
      of ASLMS, the recipient of this award has promoted laser nursing/allied health in medicine through demonstrated
      expertise, consistent professional conduct, and exceptional standards of practice in nursing.



                            2011 Nursing/Allied Health Excellence Award
                            is presented to:

                            Faye M. Jenkins, R.N., B.S.N.
                            Wilmington, MA



      Distinguished Recipients (to date)


      1991   Sue E. Huether                Sandy, UT           2001   Susan L. Olson              Minneapolis, MN
      1992   Carolyn J. Mackety            Holland, MI         2002   Mary E. Flor                Edina, MN
      1993   Penny J. Smalley              Chicago, IL         2003   Donna C. Gabriel            Boston, MA
      1994   Patricia A. Hartwig           Minneapolis, MN     2004   Deirdre A. O’Hare           Waltham, MA
      1995   Mary A. Cayton                Milwaukee, WI       2005   Judy A. Chamberlain         Cincinnati, OH
      1996   Vangie Dennis                 Lawrenceville, GA   2006   Rebecca L. Sprague          Sacramento, CA
      1997   Patricia A. Durgin            West Columbia, SC   2007   Jeff T. Counters            Edina, MN
      1998   Kay A. Ball                   Lewis Center, OH    2008   Sharon K. Olson             Olympia, WA
      1999   Patricia A. Owens             Olympia, WA         2009   Sue Terry                   McFarland, WI
      2000   Dale P. Goodwin McMeekin      (deceased)          2010   Krystie P. Lennox           Boca Raton, FL




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      Annual Conference Program Committee
                          PROGRAM CHAIR                                              PRESIDENT, CUTTING EDGE
                                                                                     “TRANSLATIONAL MEDICINE”
                          Serge R. Mordon, Ph.D.
                                                                                     CO-DIRECTOR
                          Director, INSERM Laboratory
                                                                                     E. Duco Jansen, Ph.D.
                          #703, Photomedicine Center,
                          Lille University Hospital, Lille,                          Professor of Biomedical
                          France                                                     Engineering and Neurosurgery,
                                                                                     Vanderbilt University,
                                                                                     Nashville, TN



Thank you to the following outstanding group of Section Chairs and staff who voluntarily labored tirelessly this year
to select the best abstracts for presentation at the Annual Conference. During this conference, they will continue
to work hard to ensure that their sessions run on time and that the speakers provide appropriate disclosures of
interest to maintain our current CME accreditation by the Accreditation Council of Continuing Medical Education.

                        CUTANEOUS LASER SURGERY                                   CUTANEOUS LASER SURGERY
                        SECTION CHAIR, CUTTING EDGE                               SECTION CO-CHAIR
                        “LASER AND SKIN” CO-
                                                                                  Paul M. Friedman, M.D.
                        DIRECTOR
                                                                                  Director of the DermSurgery Laser
                        Mathew M. Avram, M.D., J.D.
                                                                                  Center of Houston, Houston, TX
                        Director, Massachusetts General
                        Hospital Dermatology Laser &
                        Cosmetic Center, Wellman
                        Center for Photomedicine,
                        Harvard Medical School, Boston,
                        MA
                        CUTTING EDGE                                              CUTTING EDGE “LASER AND SKIN’
                        “TRANSLATIONAL MEDICINE”                                  CO-DIRECTOR
                        CO-DIRECTOR
                                                                                  Christopher B. Zachary, M.B.B.S.,
                        R. Rox Anderson, M.D.                                     F.R.C.P.
                        Professor at Harvard Medical                              Professor and Chair, Department of
                        School, Adjunct Professor at MIT,                         Dermatology, University of
                        Director of the Wellman Center                            California, Irvine, CA
                        for Photomedicine at
                        Massachusetts General Hospital,
                        Boston, MA

                        EXPERIMENTAL AND                                          EXPERIMENTAL AND
                        TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH                                    TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH
                        SECTION CO-CHAIR                                          SECTION CO-CHAIR
                        Jennifer K. Barton, Ph.D.                                 Bernard Choi, Ph.D.
                        Professor and Head of Biomedical                          Assistant Professor of Biomedical
                        Engineering, University of                                Engineering and Surgery at
                        Arizona, Tucson, AZ                                       University of California, Irvine, CA


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      NURSING/ALLIED HEALTH CO-                 NURSING/ALLIED HEALTH CO-
      CHAIR                                     CHAIR
      Faye M. Jenkins, R.N., B.S.N.             Krystie P. Lennox, PA-C
      Laser Nurse Consultants,                  Sanctuary Medical Aesthetic
      Wilmington, MA                            Center, Boca Raton, FL




      PHOTOBIOMODULATION                        PHOTOBIOMODULATION SECTION
      SECTION CO-CHAIR                          CO-CHAIR
      Juanita J. Anders, Ph.D.                  Michael R. Hamblin, M.D.
      Professor of Anatomy, Physiology          Associate Professor, Harvard
      and Genetics, Uniformed                   Medical School, Principal
      Services University of the Health         Investigator, Wellman Center for
      Sciences, Bethesda, MD                    Photomedicine, Boston, MA


      PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY                      PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY
      SECTION CO-CHAIR                          SECTION CO-CHAIR
      Ron R. Allison, M.D.                      Keyvan Moghissi, B.Sc., M.D.,
                                                F.R.C.S., F.E.T.C.S.
      Medical Director, 21st Century
      Oncology, Greenville NC                   Professor/Consultant
                                                Cardiothoracic Surgeon, The
                                                Yorkshire Laser Centre
                                                East Yorkshire, United Kingdom

      SURGICAL APPLICATIONS/                    SURGICAL APPLICATIONS/
      INTERSTITIAL LASER THERAPY                INTERSTITIAL LASER THERAPY
      SECTION CO-CHAIR                          SECTION CO-CHAIR
      Raymond J. Lanzafame, M.D.,               Roger J. McNichols, Ph.D.
      M.B.A.
                                                Chief Scientist, BioTex, Inc.,
      Raymond J. Lanzafame, MD,                 Houston, TX
      PLLC, Rochester, NY


      SURGICAL APPLICATIONS/                    SURGICAL APPLICATIONS/
      INTERSTITIAL LASER THERAPY                INTERSTITIAL LASER THERAPY
      SECTION CO-CHAIR                          SECTION CO-CHAIR
      Karl-G. Tranberg, M.D., Ph.D.             Carson Wong, M.D., F.R.C.S.C.,
                                                F.A.C.S.
      Emeritus Professor of Surgery,
      Lund University Hospital, Medical         Medical Director, Center for
      Director, Clinical Laserthermia           Robotic Surgery, OU Medical
      Systems, Lund, Sweden                     Center, Associate Professor Chief,
                                                Endourologic, Minimally Invasive
                                                and Robotic Surgery, Urology, The
                                                University of Oklahoma Health
132                                             Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK
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ePOSTER SECTION CHAIR                  INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE IN
                                       LASERS IN DERMATOLOGY
Emil A. Tanghetti, M.D.
                                       SECTION CHAIR
Center for Dermatology & Laser
                                       Thierry Passeron, M.D., Ph.D.
Surgery, Sacramento, CA
                                       Department of Dermatology &
                                       INSERM U895 Team 1, University
                                       Hospital of Nice, Nice, France


ASLMS STAFF                            ASLMS STAFF
Dianne Dalsky                          Ken Day, Ph.D.
Executive Director                     Strategic Initiatives Director
Wausau, WI                             Wausau, WI




ASLMS STAFF                            ASLMS STAFF
Barb Brown                             Paula Deffner
Program and Services                   Accounting Assistant
Coordinator                            Wausau, WI
Wausau, WI




ASLMS STAFF                            ASLMS STAFF
Diane Dodds                            Jane Frohm
Member and Customer Service            Industry Relations Specialist
Assistant                              Wausau, WI
Wausau, WI




ASLMS STAFF                            ASLMS STAFF
Corri Marschall                        Michelle Theiler
Conference Specialist                  CME/Conference Coordinator
Wausau, WI                             Wausau, WI




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                      General Conference Information
      ABSTRACTS
      Each presentation is listed with the corresponding abstract number and can be found in the back of your Final
      Program.

      CHILDCARE SERVICES
      Children under the age of 16 are not permitted in the Exhibit Hall or scientific sessions.       The Gaylord TexanTM
      recommends the following childcare services:
      - Professional Sitter (Ms. Cris Waits) (972) 788-0022 / Cell (214) 477-0767
      - Nannies on the Go (817) 442-0225
      - Mom’s Best Friend (972) 446-0500 or (817) 226-2669

      CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST / COMPLIMENTARY LUNCH
      A continental breakfast will be provided to course attendees and a continental breakfast (Friday-Sunday) and a
      complimentary lunch with ticket (Exhibit Hall) will be provided to Annual Conference attendees on Friday and
      Saturday.

      DIGITAL MEDIA SALES
      If you would like to pre-order digitally and audio captured courses and sessions from the 31st ASLMS Annual
      Conference, visit the Digital Media Sales desk located across from the ASLMS Registation Desk. We are offering an
      on-site special only – buy one get one of equal or lesser value for FREE (limit 2 free).
      Digital Medical Sales Desk Open Hours:
      Thursday, March 31, 2011                 12:00 pm – 6:00 pm
      Friday, April 1, 2011                    10:00 am – 6:00 pm
      Saturday, April 2, 2011                  10:00 am – 6:00 pm
      Sunday, April 3, 2011                     7:00 am – 1:00 pm


      DISASTER POLICY
      In the event of an emergency situation during the Annual Conference, information will be posted on the Society’s
      Web site, www.aslms.org.

      HOTEL INFORMATION
      Gaylord TexanTM Resort & Convention Center
      1501 Gaylord Trail
      Grapevine, TX 76051
      Main Hotel Number: (817) 778-1000
      Guest Fax: (817) 778-1001
      Check-in: 3:00 pm / Check-out 11:00 am




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                General Conference Information
INTERNET PAVILION
For the convenience of our conference attendees, an “Internet Pavilion” is located in the Exhibit Hall during open
hours for conference attendees. Six internet stations are available.

LITERATURE / PHOTOGRAPHY / VIDEOTAPING POLICY
NO literature can be distributed during courses and scientific sessions. NO photography or videotaping is permitted
in courses, scientific sessions, and exhibit hall.

OFFICIAL LANGUAGE
The official language at the 31st ASLMS Annual Conference and Courses is English. No simultaneous translation is
available.

PHOTOGRAPHS
The ASLMS reserves the right to take photos at the Annual Conference and to publish the photos in ASLMS marketing
materials. Your attendance and registration authorizes the ASLMS to publish photos in our publications, marketing
materials and on our Web site. If your photo appears on the Web site or in a publication, and you prefer that we
discontinue using the image, please contact our office to identify the photo.

PRESS
The official ASLMS press room is located in San Antonio 3. Please feel free to contact Ms. Nadine Tosk who will be
available throughout the Annual Conference. Press releases and background information will also be available in
the Press Room. Members of the press are invited to all courses, and Annual Conference sessions (excludes
luncheons); however they must adhere to the guidelines below:
    • Members of the press must wear badges identifying them as media representatives.
    • Members of the press are neither allowed to ask questions at the microphones during a session nor are they
        allowed to interview members of the Society except in controlled situations. We encourage media
        representatives to schedule interviews with Ms. Nadine Tosk in the press room so she can coordinate the
        interview with the speakers. After the Annual Conference, you can contact Ms. Tosk at (847) 920-9858,
        nadinepr@gmail.com.

RESPONSIBLE DRINKING POLICY
With alcohol served at the Annual Conference reception, the ASLMS encourages responsible drinking. In addition to
alcoholic beverages, non-alcoholic options are provided. No alcohol is served to anyone under age 21.

REFUND POLICY
No refunds after March 15, 2011.

RESEARCH EDUCATION FUND RIBBONS AND PINS
You may note on attendee badges ribbons that signify a member who has given a contribution to the Research and
Education Fund. Top research contributors will receive a pin to wear.

SMOKING
It is a policy of the ASLMS and Gaylord Texan that the use of tobacco products is strictly prohibited at the
conference and in all areas of the exhibit hall (including setup and dismantle of exhibits). Thank you for not
smoking.
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                      General Conference Information
      SPEAKER READY ROOM: Dallas 1
      Hours of Operation:
      Wednesday, March 30, 2011               6:30 am - 5:00 pm
      Thursday, March 31, 2011                6:30 am - 6:00 pm
      Friday, April 1, 2011                   6:30 am - 6:00 pm
      Saturday, April 2, 2011                 6:30 am - 6:00 pm
      Sunday, April 3, 2011                   6:30 am - 12:30 pm

      ATTENTION: INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES
      The ASLMS is committed to making its conference accessible to all individuals. If you have a disability, check the
      individual with disabilities line on the conference registration and hotel reservation forms. Advance notification of
      any special needs will help us better serve you. Most requests for auxiliary aids or services can be accommodated,
      if the ASLMS is notified prior to the Annual Conference.

      COPYRIGHT
      All of the proceedings of the Annual Conference, including the presentation of scientific papers, are intended solely
      for the benefit of the members of the American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. No statement of
      presentation made is to be regarded as dedicated to the public domain. Any statement or presentation is to be
      regarded as limited publication only and all property rights in the material presented, including common law
      copyright, are expressly reserved to the speaker or to the American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc.
      Any sound reproduction, transcript, or other use of the material presented at the Annual Conference without the
      permission of the speaker or the ASLMS is prohibited to the full extent of common law copyright in such material.

      DISCLAIMER
      The views expressed and materials presented throughout the Annual Conference whether during scientific sessions,
      instructional courses, or otherwise, represent the personal views of the individual participants and do not represent
      the opinion of the American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. This organization assumes no
      responsibility for the content of the presentations made by an individual participant or group of participants.




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                General Conference Information
DISCLOSURE OF FACULTY'S AND SPEAKER'S COMMERCIAL RELATIONSHIP(S)
Consistent with the ASLMS policy, faculty and speakers for the conference are expected to disclose to you at the
beginning of their presentation, any economic or other personal interests that create, or it may be perceived as
creating, a conflict related to the material discussed. This policy is intended to make you aware of faculty's and
speaker's interests, so you may form your own judgments about such material. Disclosure of faculty's and speaker's
relationship(s) is indicated in the conference program. Please be advised that FDA approval is specific in regard to
approved uses and labeling of drugs and devices. The presenter must disclose whether or not the device/treatment
is approved by the FDA or if it is considered to be investigational, and must fully disclose any off-label use of
devices, drugs or other materials that constitute the subject of the presentation. In order to meet the guidelines
established by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education, the ASLMS Committee on Continuing
Education has endorsed the policy that disclosure of all proprietary interests or other potential conflicts of interest
must be provided to conference registrants of all speakers and spouses who have relationships with industry.

GUIDELINES FOR REVIEW AND SELECTION OF ABSTRACTS
The Program Chairperson performs an initial review of all abstract submissions. The Program Chairperson may at
his/her discretion, re-categorize the abstracts. Abstracts are then submitted to the individual Section Chairpersons
who review, rank, and select abstracts for presentation at the Annual Conference. Given the brevity of the
abstracts, the Program and Section Chairpersons realize that the detail level obtained through this process cannot
achieve the level of a full article in a peer-reviewed journal. However, the spirit of this Annual Conference is that
full disclosure (in so far as conflicts of interest as well as details in methodology) will be expected at the time of
presentation. Abstracts that cannot meet this criterion due to intellectual property concerns or withhold vital
methodology specifics do not meet the criteria for acceptance and do not represent the spirit and intent of the
Annual Conference should not be submitted.

The Section Chairpersons also take into consideration the following criteria when reviewing abstracts:
•    Abstracts must not have been published or presented previously (clinical series updates are an exception).
•    All scientific research referred to, reported on, or used in the abstract must conform to the generally
     accepted standards of experimental design, data collection, and analysis.
•    Selection priority will be given to those abstracts that report already collected data. Abstracts should contain
     tangible factual information and should accurately reflect work that has actually been performed.
     Statements such as "results will be discussed' should be avoided.
•    Recommendations in the abstract involving clinical medicine must be based on evidence that is accepted
     within the profession of medicine as adequate justification for their indications and contraindications in the
     care of patients.
•    The abstract must not present recommendations, treatment, or manners of practicing medicine that are not
     within the definitions as noted above, are known to have risks or dangers that outweigh the benefits, or are
     known to be ineffective in the treatment of patients.
•    The number of patients in the study will be taken into consideration. Scientific, well-designed studies are
     given preference over anecdotal findings or single experiment or case.
•    High quality abstracts with no bias toward a specific company(ies).
•    Each author of an abstract submitted to ASLMS must have made a significant contribution to the research and
     must assume responsibility for the content of the abstract.
•    The number of abstracts submitted by an individual and/or institution will be taken into consideration. In
     order to provide diversity of input, we discourage any one author making more than two presentations in a
     session. The other submissions could be submitted for the poster session.
•    The purpose of our conference is to disseminate accurate, balanced and objective information regarding
     lasers and other optical sources in medicine and surgery. This purpose is best served by including
     presentations that are varied in terms of topics and presenters.
•    Abstracts should feature category-specific data with the expectation of full disclosure regarding methods and
     materials.
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(INSERT CME FORMS)




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                       Continuing Education Credits
A statement of CME credit hours will be issued to you on-site and/or following the conference which you can
forward to your specialty boards, specialty academies or to your State Medical Examining Boards to meet your
continuing education requirements.
                                            ANNUAL CONFERENCE
ACCME ACCREDITATION STATEMENT
The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing
Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION CREDIT
The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, Inc. designates this live activity for a maximum of 20 AMA
PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their
participation in the activity.

                                     ASLMS COURSES AND LUNCHEONS
EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY                                               CME CREDIT HOURS           CE CONTACT HOURS*
Fundamentals of Lasers in Health Care Course                        16.25 credit hours         17.1 contact hours
Fundamentals of Lasers in Health Care Course With Exam              18.25 credit hours         19.5 contact hours
     Units I – VII (Day One Only)                                    7.75 credit hours          9.3 contact hours
     Units VIII – XIII (Day Two Only)                                6.5 credit hours           7.8 contact hours
Exam Only                                                            2.0 credit hours           2.4 contact hours
Nursing/Allied Health – Merging Lasers and Technology
   Design in 2011 Course                                                  N/A                    8.4 contact hours
Resurfacing and Contouring Course                                    3.75 credit hours           4.5 contact hours
Laser Treatment of Vascular Lesions Course                           3.5 credit hours            4.2 contact hours
Hair and Pigment Removal Course                                      3.75 credit hours           4.5 contact hours
Laser Treatment of Patients of Color Course                          3.0 credit hours            3.6 contact hours
Complications, Controversies, and Legal Issues Course                2.75 credit hours           3.4 contact hours
PDT: Principle and Clinical Role Course                              3.0 credit hours            3.6 contact hours
Student/Post-Doc/Resident Opportunities Course                            N/A                           N/A
Technologies for Fat Related Disorders Course                        2.0 credit hours            2.4 contact hours
Periorbital Therapies Course                                         2.0 credit hours            2.4 contact hours
Photography, Treatment Documentation, and Oversight Course           2.0 credit hours            2.4 contact hours
How to Use Optical Diagnostics in Clinical Laser Medicine Course     1.75 credit hours           2.2 contact hours
ILT: Principle and Clinical Role Course                                    N/A                          N/A
My Approach to Fractional Resurfacing Luncheon                       1.0 credit hours            1.2 contact hours
My Approach to Skin Tightening Technologies Luncheon                 1.0 credit hours            1.2 contact hours
Practical Pearls to Optimize Clinical Outcomes for Laser
  And Light-Based Procedures Luncheon                                1.0 credit hours            1.2 contact hours
Non-Invasive and Invasive Fat Removal Luncheon                       1.0 credit hours            1.2 contact hours
Difficult Cases and Complications Luncheon                           1.0 credit hours            1.2 contact hours
Scar Revision Luncheon                                               1.0 credit hours            1.2 contact hours
Acne Luncheon                                                        1.0 credit hours            1.2 contact hours


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                                      CME Mission Statement
      The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery (ASLMS) is a multi-disciplinary organization whose
      membership includes representatives from all medical and surgical disciplines, nursing, dentistry, podiatric
      medicine, veterinary medicine, industry, research and government.

      Purpose
      ASLMS is dedicated to enhancing the understanding of lasers and the application of lasers and related technologies
      in biomedicine. The ASLMS is committed to continuous quality improvement and excellence in all of its activities.

      Target Audience
      The ASLMS is the largest organization of its kind and seeks to enhance dialogue between clinicians, scientists,
      industry and government through its variety of educational formats. The educational offerings are organized so that
      whether a novice or an expert, the attendees are provided with useful information.

      Types of Activities Provided
      The ASLMS accomplishes this goal through committee meetings, general sessions, the Annual Conference,
      educational courses, regional courses and other programs. A variety of educational formats are used including
      plenary lectures, scientific paper and poster presentations, panel discussions, didactic lectures, and educational
      courses. The latest information regarding biomedical applications of laser technologies is presented by experts
      from these fields. The ASLMS also functions as both advocate and advisor to a variety of groups and organizations as
      well as the Food and Drug Administration. These programs are designed to foster dialogue and discussion between
      clinicians, scientists, and manufacturers.

      Content
      Educational programs are designed to enable each participant to select the program and course of learning which
      best meets individual educational needs while at the same time covering a broad and more balanced range of
      topics.

      Expected Results
      Written and verbal evaluations as well as pre-test and post-test results measure the degree to which these
      educational objectives are met and also provide information used for planning and implementation of future
      activities. All attendees will have exposure to basic science and clinical laser use in their particular field(s) of
      interest through their attendance and participation in plenary sessions, focus sessions, specialty breakout sessions,
      and clinical entity-based courses and panel sessions. The multispecialty nature of ASLMS educational offerings, as
      well as the spirit of disclosure among scientists and clinicians, provides cross-fertilization between specialties that
      often leads to breakthroughs in medicine, and facilitates the ability of the participants to fill gaps in their
      knowledge relative to these technologies and their applications. Specialty-specific courses provide exposure to
      information of clinical and scientific importance to those practicing in the field. Other content, including but not
      limited to courses and comprehensive educational activities such as the “Fundamentals of Lasers in Health Care"
      course and regional courses provide educational tools and will measure the degree to which material has been
      learned through the use of standardized testing methods. It is expected that participants in these activities will
      identify gaps in their knowledge, competence, or performance. It is expected that participants will use the
      knowledge gained to improve their clinical outcomes as a result of their improved understanding of the best
      practices relative to patient treatment with these technologies, and their safe use.

      Approved by the Board of Directors, November 10, 2010




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                      Annual Conference Objectives
Educational Needs
The purpose of the ASLMS Annual Conference is to instruct in basic science and clinical aspects of laser surgery and
medicine by didactic lectures, panels, courses, and specialty specific lectures. The conference serves as an annual
clearinghouse for new light based technologies in medicine.

Designated Participants
Physicians attending the conference include dermatologists, plastic surgeons, otolaryngologists, urologists, general
surgeons, ophthalmologists, orthopedic surgeons, neurologists, neurosurgeons, cardiologists, cardiac surgeons,
oncologists, surgical oncologists as well as other physicians interested in laser technology. The conference is
organized so that whether a novice or an expert, the attendee will be provided with useful information. Physicians,
dentists, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, nursing/allied health laser professionals, laser researchers, laser industry
representatives, students, residents, fellows, post-doctoral associates and governmental laser professionals will
share information on lasers including clinical and research uses.

Background Requirements
Individuals attending the Annual Conference are not required to have any particular background in laser medicine
and surgery.

Expected Learning Outcomes
All attendees will have exposure to basic science and clinical laser use in their particular field(s) of interest
through their attendance and participation in plenary sessions, focus sessions, specialty breakout sessions, and
clinical entity-based courses and panel sessions. In addition, the multispecialty nature of this conference, as well
as the spirit of disclosure among scientists and clinicians, provides cross-fertilization between specialties that often
leads to breakthroughs in medicine, and facilitates the ability of the participants to fill gaps in their knowledge
relative to these technologies and their applications. Specialty-specific courses provide exposure to information of
clinical and scientific importance to those practicing in the field. Other content, including but not limited to
courses and comprehensive educational activities such as the “Fundamentals of Lasers in Health Care" program will
provide educational tools and will measure the degree to which material has been learned through the use of
standardized testing methods. It is expected that participants in these activities will identify gaps in their
knowledge and performance and will use the knowledge gained to improve their clinical outcomes as a result of
their improved understanding of the best practices relative to patient treatment with these technologies and their
safe use.

Annual Conference Highlights
This conference will bring attendees up-to-date on the current understanding and theories of laser-tissue
interactions. Special panel sessions will be convened on the new laser applications, such as skin resurfacing and
pediatric treatment of lesions. This years’ conference will emphasize a multidisciplinary approach and integrated
physician/scientist efforts to solve clinical challenges. The conference will focus on the best international laser
research.


                                CORPORATE MISSION AND VISION STATEMENT

The mission of the American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery is to promote excellence in
patient care by advancing biomedical application of lasers and other related technologies worldwide.

The vision of the ASLMS is to be the world's preeminent resource for biomedical laser and other
related technologies, research, education, and clinical knowledge.



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             ASLMS Policy on Mechanism to Identify
                and Resolve Conflict of Interest
      The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing
      Medical Education (ACCME). As such, we have made the choice to meet the ACCME’s criteria for our practice of
      continuing medical education. Our accreditation is important to us. We look forward to working together to
      provide CME at the highest standard.

      The ASLMS has implemented a process where everyone who is in a position to control the content of an educational
      activity must disclose to us all relevant financial relationships with any commercial interest they and their
      spouse/partner may have received within the last 12 months. Should it be determined that a conflict of interest
      exists as a result of a financial relationship, it will need to be resolved prior to their involvement. In order to do
      this, all individuals who are in a position to control the content must complete a disclosure form. If any conflict
      develops between the time the disclosure form is completed and the educational activity, the individual must
      notify the ASLMS in writing and disclose the additional conflict of interest. Individuals, who refuse to disclose
      relevant financial relationships, will be disqualified from being a part of the planning and implementation of the
      CME activity.


      Process of Identifying and Resolving Conflict of Interest
      Annual   Conference (Program Chair, Section Chairs, Speakers)
      1)       The President selects the Program Chair.
      2)       A Disclosure of Conflict of Interest “COI” form is completed by the Program Chair.
      3)       If the Program Chair refuses to disclose relevant financial relationships, he/she will be disqualified from
               participating in the program.
      4)       The CME Director reviews the Program Chair disclosure form and completes an Acknowledgement of
               Disclosure Review form. If it appears that the Program Chair has a COI as a result of a financial
               relationship, it will need to be resolved in order for the person to serve as Program Chair. If necessary,
               determination will be made by the CME Director under the guidance of the Board of Directors whether the
               proposed Program Chair can participate in the program.
      5)       The Program Chair selects Section Chairs.
      6)       A COI form is completed by all of the Section Chairs.
      7)       If the Section Chair refuses to disclose relevant financial relationships, he/she will be disqualified from
               participating in the program.
      8)       The Program Chair reviews the Section Chair COI forms and completes an Acknowledgement of Disclosure
               Review form. If it appears that a Section Chair has a COI as a result of a financial relationship, it will need
               to be resolved in order for the person to serve as Section Chair. If necessary, determination will be made
               by the Program Chair and CME Director under the guidance of the Board of Directors whether the proposed
               Section Chair can participate in the program.
      9)       The Speakers complete the online abstract form, which contains "required fields" for disclosure. The
               Section Chairs review the abstract and Speaker disclosure and completes an Acknowledgement of
               Disclosure Review form. If it appears that a Speaker has a COI as a result of a financial relationship, it will
               need to be resolved prior to the activity. If necessary, determination will be made by the Section Chair,
               Program Chair and CME Director under the guidance of the Board of Directors whether the proposed
               speaker can participate in the program.
      10)      If any conflicts develop between the time the disclosure form is completed and the educational activity,
               the individual must notify the ASLMS in writing and disclose the additional conflict of interest.
      11)      The Section Chair and Speaker disclosure information is printed in the Final Program and journal.


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12)     At the Annual conference:
        a)      Each Section Chair is provided with a checklist of Speakers who are required to disclose COI. The
                Section Chair is instructed to remind the Speaker to verbally disclose COI prior to their
                presentation, sign off on the checklist provided, and return the form to the ASLMS.
        b)      In addition to a COI statement being printed in program materials, a COI slide will be prepared by
                the ASLMS Central Office based on the information provided on the completed disclosure form. The
                slide will be inserted before each presentation on the Central Server and will include any
                proprietary interest in any drugs, instruments, or devices discussed in the presentation and/or any
                compensation received. Similarly, a slide will be shown to disclose the fact that the presentation
                content includes off-label uses of drugs or devices.
        c)      A copy of the session schedule and disclosure is posted at the entrance of the session room.
        d)      If a Speaker discloses a COI in writing, but does not verbally disclose prior to his/her presentation,
                the Section Chair will remind the Speaker at the end of the presentation to disclose the COI.
        e)      If a Speaker does not pre-disclose in writing or verbally, but it becomes apparent that a COI exists,
                the Section Chair, Program Chair, CME Director and/or Board Member will notify the audience and
                the Speaker of the perceived COI. The Speaker will be warned that further failures to comply with
                policy will result in the Speaker’s inability to participate in CME related activities of ASLMS in the
                future. (The Board of Directors may, at its discretion, impose other sanctions it feels are
                appropriate).
        f)      Board members are provided with audit forms and asked to verify if Speakers disclose COI.
        g)      Attendees complete evaluation forms and are asked to comment about proper COI disclosure.
                Evaluation forms are reviewed by the CME Director, Program Chair, and Section Chairs and
                appropriate corrective action is taken.

Courses (Directors/Faculty)
1)     The Program Chair selects Course Directors.
2)     A Disclosure of Conflict of Interest “COI” form is completed by all Course Directors.
3)     If the Course Director refuses to disclose relevant financial relationships, he/she will be disqualified from
       participating in the program.
4)     The Program Chair and CME Director review the Course Director disclosure forms. The Program Chair
       completes an Acknowledgement of Disclosure Review form. If it appears that a Course Director has a COI
       as a result of a financial relationship, it will need to be resolved in order for the person to serve as Course
       Director. If necessary, determination will be made by the Program Chair and CME Director under the
       guidance of the Board of Directors if the proposed Course Director can participate in the program.
5)     The Course Director selects Faculty.
6)     The COI forms are completed by all Faculty.
7)     If the Faculty Member refuses to disclose relevant financial relationships, he/she will be disqualified from
       participating in the program.
8)     The Faculty COI forms are reviewed by the Course Director and CME Director. Course Director completes
       an Acknowledgment of Disclosure Review form. If it appears that a Faculty Member has a COI as a result
       of a financial relationship, it will need to be resolved in order for the person to serve as a Faculty Member.
       If necessary, determination will be made by the Course Director, Program Chair, and CME Director under
       the guidance of the Board of Directors whether the proposed Faculty Member can participate in the
       program.
9)     If any conflicts develop between the time the disclosure form is completed and the educational activity,
       the individual must notify the ASLMS in writing and disclose the additional conflict of interest.
10)    Disclosure information is printed in course books.
11)    At the conference:
       a)     The Course Director is provided with a checklist of Faculty Members who are required to disclose
              COI. The Course Director is instructed to remind the Faculty to verbally disclose COI prior to their
              presentation, sign off on the checklist provided, and return the form to the ASLMS.




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             b)    In addition to a COI statement being printed in program materials, a COI slide will be prepared by the
                   ASLMS Central Office based on the information provided on the completed disclosure form. The slide
                   will be inserted before each presentation on the Central Server and will include any proprietary
                   interest in any drugs, instruments, or devices discussed in the presentation and/or any compensation
                   received. Similarly, a slide will be shown to disclose the fact that the presentation content includes
                   off-label uses of drugs or devices.
             c)    A copy of the session schedule and disclosure is posted at the entrance of the session room.
             d)    If a Faculty Member discloses a COI in writing, but does not verbally disclose prior to his/her
                   presentation, the Course Director will remind Faculty at the end of the presentation to disclose COI.
             e)    If a Faculty Member does not pre-disclose in writing or verbally, but it becomes apparent that a COI
                   exists, the Course Director, Program Chair, CME Director and/or Board Member will notify the
                   audience and the Speaker of the perceived COI. The speaker will be warned that further failures to
                   comply with policy will result in the speaker’s inability to participate in CME related activities of
                   ASLMS in the future. (The Board of Directors may, at its discretion, impose other sanctions it feels
                   are appropriate).
             f)    Board members are provided with audit forms and asked to verify if Faculty discloses COI.
             g)    Attendees complete evaluation forms and are asked to comment about proper COI disclosure.
                   Evaluation forms are reviewed by the CME Director, Program Chair, and Course Directors and
                   appropriate corrective action is taken.

      Board of Directors
      In order for the Society to further the purpose for which it is organized and to maintain its reputation for
      excellence, it is important that Society decisions and actions not be influenced unduly by any special interests or
      individual members. The Society depends upon its members to shape its policies and the actions of those
      organization policy makers must not be inappropriately affected by outside influences. Members of the ASLMS
      Board of Directors are required to complete a Disclosure of Interest Statement annually. Copies of the completed
      disclosure forms are available at the ASLMS Central Office upon request.

      Approved by the Board of Directors, April 15, 2010




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                       ASLMS Learner Bill of Rights
The American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery recognizes that you are a life-long learner who has chosen to
engage in continuing medical education to identify or fill a gap in knowledge, skill, or performance. As part of
ASLMS’ duty to you as a learner, you have the right to expect that your continuing medical education experience
with ASLMS includes:


   •   Content that:

           o   promotes improvements or quality in health care;
           o   is valid, reliable, and accurate;
           o   offers balanced presentations that are free of commercial bias for or against a product/service;
           o   is vetted through a process that resolves any conflicts of interests of planners, teachers, or authors;
           o   is driven and based on learning needs, not commercial interests;
           o   addresses the stated objectives or purpose; and
           o   is evaluated for its effectiveness in meeting the identified educational need.


   •   A learning environment that:

           o   supports learners’ ability to meet their individual needs;
           o   respects and attends to any special needs of the learners;
           o   respects the diversity of groups of learners; and
           o   is free of promotional, commercial, and/or sales activities.


   •   Disclosure of:

           o   relevant financial relationships planners, teachers, and authors have with commercial interests
               related to the content of the activity; and
           o   commercial support (funding or in-kind resources) of the activity.




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                              Presenter Index             Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                          Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                          Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                            (Abstracts and ePosters)      Grapevine, TX




Abrahams, Martine, 71                        Bagley, Demetrius, 52
Abrahams, Michael, 71                        Bahadoran, Philippe, 34,97,100
Adanny, Yossi, 84                            Bahmani, Baharak,
Adatto, Maurice, 75,89,92,98                 Baier, Robert, 48
Adatto-Neilson, R., 89                       Bakus, Abnoeal, 86
Ahn, Yeh-chan, 93                            Barnes, Klressa, 82
Alam, Murad, 85                              Barolet, Daniel, 42
Alberico, Stephanie, 45                      Barolet, Francois, 42
Alcantara, Javier, 99                        Barolet, Virginie C., 42
Alexis, Andrew, 85                           Barrett, Lauren, 94
Alissa, Ahmed, 73                            Baum, Olga, 35
Allison, Ron, 49                             Baumler, Wolfgang, 82
Almeida, Guilherme, 91,94,95,99              Bayoumi, Wedd, 74
Almeida, Leticia, 91,94,95,99                Beek, Johan F., 75,84
Almenshawy, Shahira, 49                      Been, Stefan, 35,36
Alster, Tina, 19                             Belikov, Andrey, 34
Altshuler, Gregory, 34,38,41,68,80           Bernstein, Eric, 87
Amir, Ruthie, 40,75,84,89,90,98              Bernstein, Leonard, 37,41,49,96
Ananthakrishnan, Vasanthi, 34                Betrouni, Nacim, 51,52,97
Anders, Juanita, 44,45                       Bhattacharya, Kiran, 67
Anderson, Carrie, 88,94                      Bi, Xiaohong, 82
Anderson, R. Rox, 62,64,68,70                Biesman, Brian, 84,86
Anderson, Robert, 40                         Bjerring, Peter, 73
Andrews, Peter, 66                           Bodendorf, Marc Oliver, 75
Angel, Sylvie, 91                            Boixeda, Pablo, 99
Angelo-Khattar, Maria, 76                    Bos, Jan D., 75,84
Angobaldo, Jeffrey, 41                       Bostoen, Jessica, 38
Anolik, Robert, 31,37,41,49,96               Boutoussov, Dmitri, 35,36
Anvari, Bahman, 34,35                        Boutros, Sean, 40
Argobi, Yahya, 85                            Bown, Stephen, 63
Arisawa, Emilia, 33                          Bradford, Porcia, 96
Arroyo, Cesar,96                             Bradley, Oksana, 80
Ash, Caerwyn, 48,72,73                       Brazil, James, 19
Attia, Abeer, 49                             Brenner-Lavie, Hanit, 75,84,90,98
Auclair, Mathieu, 42                         Brightman, Lori, 37,41,42,49
Avram, Marc, 65                              Broekgaarden, Mans, 81
Avram, Mathew, 37,64,65,68,70,83             Brown, Alia, 97
Ayala, Rao, 35                               Brown, Spencer, 82
Azpiazu, Jose, 96                            Bruce, Suzanne, 83,95
Babu, Supriya, 34                            Bryan, Holly, 19
Badiavas, Evangelos, 69                      Burger, A., 97
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      Burget, Dianna, 98                     Crow, Heidi C., 93
      Burton, Claude, 96                     Cuccia, David J., 80
      Camara, Luciana, 75,92                 Cuerda, Esther, 96,99
      Campbell, Kirby, 67                    Cunningham, Ryan, 44
      Campos, Valeria, 71,90                 Curry, William, 66
      Carroll, James, 45                     Dae, Hun Suh, 95
      Cayce, Jonathan, 33,82                 Daia, Hadi, 93
      Cengal, Keith,48                       Daily, Adam, 67
      Cervone, Joseph, 94                    Dao, Belinda, 38
      Chaarani, Jinan, 81                    Davis, Stephen, 39,69
      Chaffins, Marsha, 38                   Dayananda, G., 34
      Chan, Henry H.L., 41,65,69,70,83,84,   de Kroon, Anton, I.P.M., 81
      85,94                                  De la Quintana, Agustin, 96
      Chan, Johnny C.Y., 84,94               del Pozo-Losada, Jesus, 96,99
      Chan, Nicola P.Y., 41,83,84,85,94      Desai, Nirav, 96
      Chang, Carolyn, 91                     DeTaboada, Luis, 45,71
      Chang, Ka-yeun,                        Dhavan, Sahil, 38
      Chapas, Anne,37,41,49                  Dhepe, Niteen, 38,86,96,97
      Chavantes, M. Cristina, 33,71          Diagaradjane, Parameswaran, 34,36
      Chen, Hong-Duo, 81                     Diaz, Antonio, 96
      Chen, Kejing, 66                       DiBernardo, Barry, 53
      Chen, Long, 66                         Diehl, Joseph, 96
      Chen, Tina, 38                         Dierickx, Christine,
      Chen, Yu, 66                           Dietrich-Comte, Nathalie, 86,97
      Chen, Zhongping, 93                    Diktaban, Theo, 89
      Childs, James, 38,41                   Doherty, Sean, 41,69
      Chipps, Lisa, 96                       Domankevitz, Yacov, 70
      Chiu, Mona L.S., 94                    Dover, Jeffrey, 41,42,94
      Cho, Soyun, 96                         Downie, Gordon, 48
      Choi, Bernard, 35,37,66                Dunn, Andrew, 45
      Choi, Jae eun, 74                      Duong, Steven, 93,94
      Choi, Jee Woong, 98                    Durkin, Anthony J., 80
      Christine, Dierickx, 69,72,91          Duteil, Luc, 97
      Chuang, Gary, 70                       Dwelle, Jordan, 45
      Chwalek, Jennifer, 39                  Dyson, Mary, 88
      Clement, Marc, 48,73                   Edward, Kert, 36
      Coleman, William, 87                   Eimpunth, Sasima, 85,87
      Coley, Marcy, 85                       El Tal, Abdul K.,
      Colin, Pierre, 51,52                   Ellis, Darrel, 82
      Colon-Herdman, Arturo, 52              Epstein, Haim, 40,84
      Cordero, Tatiana, 71,90                Eubanks, Leigh Ellen, 95
      Cornil, Alain, 35                      Ewart, E., 53
152   Corrons, Natalia, 96
                                                 2011 Annual Conference
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                                                 Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
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Fabi, Sabrina, 69,95,97             Gu, Chuan, 52
Fadel, Maha, 49                     Gu, Jizhong, 47
Fan, Larry, 87                      Gu, Xiao, 52
Farhat, Elizabeth, 38               Guerrero, Yadir, 35
Fatemi, Afschin, 51,74,81           Guimaraes, Claudia, 97
Feldman, Marc, 45                   Guller, Anna, 35
Felten, Richard, 66                 Gupta, Anurag, 99
Ferrario, Angela, 34                Gupta, Arun, 99
Fleming, Trudy, 19                  Gupta, Sagar, 67
Fournier, Nathalie, 39              Gupta, Sharad, 34
Frankel, Amy Lynne, 81              Haedersdal, Merete, 72
Friedman, Paul M., 37,40,41,83,85   Hage, Raduan, 33
Friedman, Ran, 82                   Halachmi, Shlomit, 75,90,92
Fritz, Klaus, 72,90                 Hale, Elizabeth K., 37,41,49,96
Fujimoto, Takahiro, 99              Haller, G., 89
Garcia, Neila, 33                   Hamblin, Michael R., 44,47,48,65
Garden, Jerome, 86                  Hameed, Sunaina, 74
Gentile, Richard, 53                Harris, Llinos, 48
Geronemus, Roy G., 37,41,42,49,96   Harris, Ronald, 38
Giles, Robert, 80                   Harrison, April, 95
Gill-Sharp, Kelly, 51               Harth, Yoram, 90
Giraud, Sylvain, 35                 Healy, Kelly, 52
Glaser, Dee Anna, 87                Heger, Michal, 81
Goh, B.K., 97                       Hellman, Judith, 93
Goh, C.L., 97                       Hemadri, M., 53
Goldberg, David, 39,86,97           Hennings, Leah, 82
Goldberg, Leonard H., 40,41,83,85   Herold, Manfred, 53
Goldman, Mitchel, 69,95,97          Hillenkamp, Franz, 63,66
Golikov, Mikhail, 93                Ho, Stephanie G.Y., 83
Gomer, Charles, 34                  Hoang, Michael, 98
Gonnelli, David, 99                 Holtzman, Jennifer, 93
Goodrich, Glenn, 34,36,51           Homar, Patricia, 96
Gotkin, Robert, 70                  Hong, H. Chih-Ho, 69
Goturu, Jaisri, 34                  Hood, Robert, 36,82
Gowda, Ashok, 51                    Houshmand, Elizabeth, 95
Goyette, Thomas, 80                 Hsia, James, 70
Graber, Emmy, 39                    Huang, Liyi, 48
Grace, Michael, 34                  Huang, Ying-Ying, 44
Griffin, Robert, 82                 Hubosky, Scott, 52
Griggs, Jacob, 46                   Hughes, Christopher, 64
Grunewald, Sonja, 75                Hughes, Rosalind, 74,96
Grzywacz, Robert, 71                Hugtenburg, Richard, 73
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      Huh, Chang Hun, 98                Khemis, Abdallah, 97
      Hussain, Mussarrat, 39,86,97      Kiernan, Michael, 48,73
      Hwang, Eun Ju, 95                 Killian, J. Antoinette, 81
      Iamphonrat, Thanawan, 85          Kilmer, Suzanne, 18,86,87
      Ibrahimi, Omar, 70,86             Kim, Bang Soon, 95
      Izquierdo-Roman, Alondra, 66,67   Kim, Do Won, 98
      Jackson, Cassie, 82               Kim, Hyunjoo,
      Jaén, Pedro, 99                   Kim, Il-Hwan, 74
      Jang, Kyung-Ae, 95                Kim, Jae hwan, 74
      Jang, Sang Jai, 95                Kim, Jun Young, 98
      Jansen, Duco, 31,33,62,82         Kim, Soohong, 95
      Jenkins, Faye, 63                 Kim, Won-Serk, 40
      Jeong, Chan-Woo, 84               Kochevar, Irene, 52
      Jia, Wangcun, 35,52,80            Kono, Taro, 69
      Jiang, Kerrie, 70                 Konrad, Peter, 33
      Johnston, Keith, 45               Koong, Luke, 36
      Jomah, Jamal, 53                  Kositrana, Garuna, 70
      Jones, Stuart, 73                 Kosoglu, Mehmet, 36,82
      Jordao, Juliana, 71,90            Kossida, Theodora, 68
      Joseph, Cecil, 80                 Krechko, Ksenia, 93
      Jung, Bongsu, 35                  Krishnamoorthi, Harish, 82
      Jung, Jeanne, 95                  Krishnan, Sunil, 34,36
      Jung, Jung Bok, 98                Kroon, Marije W., 75,84
      Kaminer, Micheal, 41,87,94        Krotz, A., 89
      Kang, Hee-Yang, 97                Kshirsagar, Tushar, 86
      Kang, Seung-Hui, 84               Kumar, Arun, 34
      Kang, Yoo Seok, 95                Lacour, Jean-Philippe, 74,96,100
      Kantor, Roman, 75                 Lambert, Jo, 38
      Kao, Chris, 33                    Landa, Nerea, 96
      Karen, Julie K., 37,41,49,96      Landau, Jennifer M., 40,83,85
      Katsambas, Andreas, 68            Landgraf, Werner, 35,36
      Kaur, Preet, 99                   Lanzafame, Raymond, 31,44,46
      Kauvar, Arielle, 69,84            Lapidoth, Moshe, 75,90,92
      Kavali, Carmen, 89                Laquer, Vivian,38
      Kazmi, S.M. Shams, 45             Lawrence, Ira, 42
      Keller, Matthew, 81,82            Laznicka, Oldrich, 80
      Kelly, Kristen M., 37,38,64,80    Lazzari, Tiziana, 94
      Kenkel, Jeffrey, 82               Le Duff, Florence, 74
      Kerr, Michelle, 99                Lee, Deuk-Pyo, 84
      Khan, Ashraf, 66                  Lee, Ga-young, 40
      Khandelwal, Manish, 53            Lee, Jeong-Yeop, 95
      Kharkwal, Gitika B., 44           Lee, Jong Hee, 95,96
154
                                                2011 Annual Conference
                                                Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                Grapevine, TX



Lee, Kyung goo, 74                  Maloney, Ryan, 88
Lee, Sang geun, 74                  Malphrus, Jonathan, 33
Lee, Sang-jun, 91                   Mancuso, Jake, 45
Lee, Seok-Jong, 98                  Mang, Thomas S., 48,93
Lee, Un Ha, 95                      Manstein, Dieter, 63,70
Lee, Weon Ju, 98                    Manuel, Cyrus T., 52
Leite, Francisco, 92                Manuskiatti, Woraphong, 85,87
Lemberg, Vladimir, 35,36            Marini, Leonardo, 85,90
Lenzi, Thiara, 75                   Mariotto, Guido, 75
Leone, Nicholas, 52                 Marmur, Ellen, 81
Leroux, Bertrand, 51                Marqa, Mohamad-Feras, 51,52,97
Lev-Tov, Hadar,93                   Marques, Elaine, 91,94,95,99
Levy, Jean-Luc, 97                  Marquez, Denise, 40,83,85
Lewis, William, 70                  Marshall, Janelle, 38
Li, Fang-Hui, 46                    Martin, Patrick, 42
Li, Guolin, 47                      Martinez, Marcedes, 96
Li, Pingping, 47                    Martins, Ana Paula, 75,92
Li, Qun, 43                         Mazer, Jean-Michel, 91
Li, Yuan-Hong, 81                   McNichols, Roger, 51
Liew, Se Hwang,                     Meesters, Arne A., 75,84
Lin, Jennifer, 65                   Meneghel, Tania, 90
Linares, Rafael, 96                 Michel, Jean-Loic, 98
Lippert, Jan, 49                    Mikulski, Lynn, 48
Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi, 46,98          Milanic, Matija, 80
Liu, Tom, 35                        Milner, Thomas, 45
Liu, Yan-Ying, 46                   Mitra, Kunal, 34
Lopes, Renaud, 52                   Moges, Helina, 45
Lopez-Estebaranz, Jose Luis, 96     Monheit, Gary D., 73
Luke, Janiene, 85                   Moody, Megan N., 40,83,85
Luna, Marian, 34                    Moor, Eldad, 90
Luo, Li, 98                         Moore, P.J., 53
Lupin, Mark, 69                     Mordon, Serge, 31,51,52,97
Lussier, Isabelle, 42               Moreno, Carmen, 99
Mackanos, Mark, 82                  Morris, Whitney, 86
Maffeis, Thierry, 48                Motamedi, Saam, 36
Magacho, Tatiana, 71                Moy, Austin, 66
Magalon, Guy, 35,99                 Moy, Ronald, 38,96
Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita, 33,62,82   Muhlbauer, Aaron, 46
Majaron, Boris, 80                  Munavalli, Girish, 40
Makni, Nasr, 51,97                  Munyon, Thomas, 84
Makowski, Alex, 82                  Na, Jung Im, 98
Maloney, Jillian, 88                Na, Se Young, 96,98
                                                                                       155
                                                          2011 Annual Conference
                                                          Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                          Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                          Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                          Grapevine, TX



      Nachlieli, Tal, 41,84,90               Park, JeeYoung, 91
      Nahshon, Genady, 84                    Park, Jong Min, 91
      Naik, Ashok, 38,86,96,97               Park, Kyoung Chan,98
      Nakata, Motoko, 69                     Park, Sangjin, 84
      Narurkar, Vic, 84,91                   Park, Seok-Beom, 95
      Nelson, J. Stuart, 31,35,37,52,62,80   Parker, Matthew, 36
      Nelson, Steven, 97                     Passeron, Thierry, 74,96,97,98,100
      Nerette, Jean-Claude, 88               Patel, Rakesh, 66
      Nevoux, Pierre, 51,52                  Patil, Chetan, 82
      Newlove, Tracey, 37                    Payne, J. Donald, 51
      Nguyen, Amy, 38                        Pence, Isaac, 82
      Noh, Tae Woo, 95                       Pereira, Mara, 71
      Nossa, Robert, 87                      Pérez-Varela, Lucía, 99
      Novak, P., 89                          Perrin, Denis, 98
      Nuijs, Tom, 70                         Petersen, Corbin, 96
      Nunes, Daniela, 75,92                  Peterson, Jennifer, 40,69,95,97
      Nunes, Guilherme, 75,92                Phadke, Vaishali, 86,96
      Nunes, Rafael, 75,92                   Philandrianos, Cécile, 35
      Ogden, Neil, 32,66                     Pinto, Nathali, 33,71
      Ohshiro, Takafumi, 100                 Podichetty, Vinod, 88
      Ohshiro, Toshio, 100                   Polder, Kristel D., 83,95
      Oliver, Jeffrey, 67                    Potdar, Sandeep, 93
      Olson, Sharon, 19                      Pozner, Jason N., 31,40,85
      Ongenae, Katia, 38                     Protsenko, Dmitriy E., 36,52
      Oni, Georgette, 82                     Pryaslova, Julia, 93
      Onozato, Maristela, 66                 Pryor, Brian, 45
      Orenstein, Arie, 90                    Puech, Philippe, 51,97
      Ortiz, Arisa, 69,70                    Puri, Puja, 96
      Ortonne, Jean-Paul, 74,97,100          Puvanakrishnan, Priyaveena, 34
      Osann, Kathryn, 93,94                  Queiroz, Rachel, 91,94,95,99
      OShaughnessy, Kathryn F., 69           Qui, Suimin, 36
      Owens, Patricia A, 19                  Quinlan, Robert, 66
      Ozog, David, 38                        Ranu, H., 97
      Paasch, Uwe, 75                        Rao, Bheemsain, 34
      Palmer, Francis, 84                    Rathi, Srikantha, 97
      Palomar, Maria Angustias, 96           Rechmann, Peter, 99
      Pang, Yan, 47                          Redmond, Robert, 52
      Parada, Luis, 67                       Rhee, Chung-Ku, 43
      Paras, Constantine, 82                 Rho, JiHo, 91
      Park, Byung-Soon, 84                   Rho, Nark-Kyoung, 84,95
      Park, Hyun Su, 95                      Richter, Claus-Peter, 62
      Park, Jaesook, 36                      Rigopoulos, Dimitrios, 68
156
                                                      2011 Annual Conference
                                                      Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                      Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                      Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                      Grapevine, TX



Rosende, Laura, 99                       Shin, Jang-Hyun, 84
Ross, E. Victor, 38,65,70,100            Shin, Minkyung,
Rothaus, Kenneth, 80,94                  Shofner, Joshua, 68
Rozenberg, Avner, 84                     Sillard, Laura, 74
Rugg, Elizabeth, 38                      Silva, Claudia, 33
Russe, Elisabeth, 40,53,89               Simon, Jan Christoph, 75
Russe-Wilflingseder, Katharina, 40,53,   Simonenko, Georgy, 34
89                                       Singer, Giselle, 81
Rylander, Christopher, 36,66,67,82       Sliney, David, 80
Rylander, Henry, 67                      Smirnov, Mikhail, 38,41,80
Saager, Rolf B., 80                      Smith, Jason, 45
Saai, Sonia, 35,99                       Smith, Stacy, 87
Sachdev, Mukta, 74                       Smucler, Roman, 49
Sadick, Neil, 89                         Snuderl, Matija, 66
Saedi, Nazanin, 41                       Sobol, Emil, 35
Saggesse, Steven, 80                     Sofos, Stratos, 37
Saini, Ritu, 70                          Soltz, Barbara, 44,46
Sajjadi, Amir, 34                        Soltz, Robert, 44,46
Sakamoto, Fernanda, 49,65,70             Son, Ho-Chan,
Sakurai, Hiroyuki, 69                    Song, Kyeyoung, 91
Salah, Manal, 49                         Souza, Monica, 92
Sapozhnikova, Veronika, 45               Spaliviero, Massimiliano, 52
Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa, 82               Sprague, Rebecca, 18
Sarnoff, Deborah, 70                     Stadler, Istvan, 44,46
Sasaki, Katsumi, 100                     Stafford, James, 81
Schoenly, Joshua, 99                     Stockman, Gareth, 48
Schomacker, Kevin, 70                    Strom, Kurt, 52
Schwartz, Jon, 34,36,51                  Struck, Steven, 70
Seckel, Brooke, 41                       Suen, James, 82
Sehra, Ruchir, 45                        Suh, Dong-Hye,
Seka, Wolf, 99                           Sun, Victor, 35,52
Shafirstein, Gal, 82                     Sundalam, Shubhangi, 96
Shah, Sejal, 85                          Sundaram, Hema, 85
Shah, Shilpa, 38                         Swanson, David, 97
Shamban, Ava, 91                         Tabatadze, David, 34,41
Shanks, Steven, 88                       Takahashi, Takashi, 74
Sharma, Sulbha K., 44                    Tanghetti, Emil, 38
Sheb, Lingyue, 47                        Taniguchi, Yuki, 100
Shek, Samantha Y., 41,83,84              Tannous, Zeina, 68,70,73
Shekhter, Anatoly, 35                    Tanzi, Elizabeth, 19
Sheth, Sameer, 66                        Tatsutani, Kristine, 84
Shetty, Anil, 51                         Tay, Yong-Kwang, 100
Shilagard, Tuya, 36                                                                          157
                                                        2011 Annual Conference
                                                        Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                                        Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                                        Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                                        Grapevine, TX



      Tayal, Dharam, 48                     Vlk, Marek, 49
      Teahan, Maureen, 94                   Vogt, William, 66,67
      Thanomkitti, Kanchalit, 87            Vorobieva, Natalia, 35
      Thng, S., 97                          Waibel, Jill, 39,64,69,95
      Thomas, Gareth, 73                    Waiker, Veena, 34
      Thomsen, Sharon, 33                   Walgrave, Susan, 41
      Thornfeldt, Carl, 70                  Wallander, Irmina, 41
      Tierney, Emily, 95                    Walser, Eric, 51
      Tingey, Chad, 38,70                   Walsh, Alex, 82
      Toft, Ulrich, 84                      Wang, Guangming, 68
      Tolstaya, Anastasia, 93               Wang, Kerith, 43
      Town, Godfrey, 48,72,73               Wang, Sean, 43
      Treece, Bonnie, 99                    Wang, Tianyi, 45
      Trelles, Mario, 97                    Wang, Weiwei
      Truchuelo, Teresa, 99                 Wang, Ying, 52
      Tsilika, Katerina, 74,97,100          Wanick, Fabiana, 75
      Tuchin, Valery, 34                    Wanitphakdeedecha, Rungsima, 85,87
      Tucker, Travis, 94                    Wasserman, Daniel I., 73,95
      Tulipan, Noel, 33                     Webber, Jessica, 82
      Tunnell, James, 34,36,67              Wei, En-Xiu, 46
      Turner, Ryan, 81                      Weiss, Elliot T.,37,41,42,49
      Uebelhoer, Nathan, 39                 Weiss, Robert, 38,41
      Uro, Laura, 71                        Welch, Ashley, 67
      Uro, Michael, 71                      Wells, Jonathan, 33,81
      Vakoc, Ben, 64                        Whitney, Felicia, 68,80
      Van der Veen, J.P. Wietze,75,84       Wierwille, Jeremiah, 66
      Van der Wal, Allard A., 75,84         Wilder-Smith, Petra, 93,94
      van Grootel, Marieke, 70              Willey, Andrea, 49
      van Gulik, Thomas, M., 81             Willsey, Brian, 45
      VanderVeer, Elizabeth, 88,94,98       Wilson, Stewart, 80
      Vargas, Gracie, 36                    Wind, Bas S., 75,84
      Vargis, Elizabeth, 82                 Wirth, Dennis, 66
      Vasily, David B., 38                  Wolfsen, Herbert, 48
      Vaynberg, Boris, 40,75,84,89,98       Wolerstorfer, Albert, 75,84
      Veen van der, Albert, 35,36           Wong, Brian J.F., 36,52
      Velez, Mariano, 97                    Wong, Carson, 52
      Verdaasdonk, Rudolf, 35,36            Wu, De-Feng, 46
      Vergilis-Kalner, Irene J., 40,83,85   Wu, Edward C., 52
      Verhaeghe, Evelien, 38                Wu, Qiuhe, 44
      Viator, John, 67                      Wu, Xingjia, 31,45
      Vidovic, Luka, 80                     Xu, Qing, 47
      Villers, Arnauld, 51                  Xu, Tian-Hua, 81
158
                                           2011 Annual Conference
                                           Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
                                           Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
                                           Gaylord TexanTM Resort and Convention Center
                                           Grapevine, TX



Xu, Xue-Gang, 81              Yu, Carol S., 84,85
Xu, Yang-Yi,                  Yu, Emily, 38,100
Xuan, Weijun, 44              Zabalza, Iñaki, 96
Yaghmai, Dina, 86             Zachary, Christopher, 41,64,65,70
Yang, Bruce, 37               Zaman, Raiyan, 67
Yang, Owen, 37                Zamorano, María Luisa, 99
Yanina, Irina, 34             Zelickson, Brian, 41
Yao, Min, 52                  Zenzie, Henry, 68
Yaroslavsky, Anna, 66,80      Zhang, Jun, 94
Yaroslavsky, Ilya, 34,68,80   Zhang, Lin, 98
Yeung, Chi Keung, 41,83,85    Zhou, Guoyu, 47
Yi, Sang min, 74              Zhu, Ling, 46
Yoo, Jane, 81                 Zhu, Xinyuan, 47
Youn, Sang Woong, 98          Zygouris, Alexander, 75
Youssef, Joseph, 94




                                                                                  159
      2011 Annual Conference
      Pre-Conference Courses: March 30-31, 2011
      Annual Conference: April 1-3, 2011
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      Grapevine, TX




160
                          American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts                                                   1

                              AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR
                           LASER MEDICINE AND SURGERY



                                                     ABSTRACTS

                                                                      Conclusion: This study represents the first application of INS to
      EXPERIMENTAL AND                                                humans. The advantages of INS (spatial selectivity, contact-free
                                                                      delivery, and no stimulation artifact) demonstrated in animal
       TRANSLATIONAL                                                  studies were preserved. These results establish the efficacy
                                                                      needed for future studies to investigate the utility of INS for
     RESEARCH (FORMERLY                                               peripheral nerve mapping applications and functional
                                                                      applications.
        BASIC SCIENCE)
                                                                      #2
#1                                                                    TREATING TRACHEAL STENOSIS USING LOW
                                                                      LEVEL LASER THERAPY: AS A POTENTIAL TOOL
SAFETY AND EFFICACY OF INFRARED NEURAL                                IN AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY IN RAT MODEL
STIMULATION IN HUMANS                                                 Nathali Pinto, Claudia Silva, Raduan Hage,
Jonathan Cayce, Jonathon Wells,                                       Neila Garcia, Emilia Arisawa,
Jonathan Malphrus, Chris Kao, Sharon Thomsen,                         M. Cristina Chavantes,
Noel Tulipan, Peter Konrad, Duco Jansen,                                           ˜o     ´                             ˜o
                                                                      UNIVAP, Sa Jose dos Campos, Brazil; USP, Sa Paulo, Brazil
Anita Mahadevan-Jansen                                                Background: Tracheal stenosis (TS) is a life threat complication
Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN; Lockheed Martin Aculight,        after traumatic procedures in the central airways conduct. The
Bothel, WA; University of Texas, Austin, TX                           study’s aim was to evaluate Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT)
Background: Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a new                preventing and treating tracheal stenosis in an experimental rat
approach for precise neural stimulation that involves pulsed          model that could help treating patients.
infrared laser energy through a non-contact interface, and has        Study: At first stage of this study, 45 Wistar rats were
been well characterized in animal models. However to study the        anesthetized and induced tracheal stenosis by surgical
potential of this new technique in humans, safety and efficacy         procedure, divided in three groups (15 animals each one): Group 1
must be demonstrated. A preclinical safety and efficacy evaluation     (G1)—Control group, in which laser were simulated; Group 2
of INS was conducted in patients undergoing selective dorsal root     (G2)—LLLT 24 hours after tracheal stenosis induction (surgical)
rhizotomy.                                                            procedure; Group 3 (G3)—LLLT 7 days after tracheal stenosis
Study: Seven patients undergoing selective dorsal root rhizotomy      induction procedure. After tricotomy, G2 and G3 were irradiated
were recruited for this study. Each patient was monitored by          w/LLLT transcutaneously onto cervical area (? ¼ 685 nm,
electromyogram (EMG) recordings in seven muscle groups on             P ¼ 150 mW, dose ¼ 100 J/cm2, T ¼ 13 min). As a second stage,
each leg. Electrical stimulation was used to identify dorsal lumbar   five animals of each group were sacrificed and tracheal tissue’s
spinal roots which exhibited spasticity. Spinal roots identified for   samples were collected for histomorphometry by counting
transection were optically stimulated on 2–3 sites per nerve with     apoptotic cells, after 3 Â laser application: G1A, G2A, G3A—7
our safest clinical laser parameters and muscle responses were        days after laser irradiation; G1B, G2B, G3B—14 days post-LLLT;
recorded and compared to electrically evoked potentials prior to      G1C, G2C, G3C—21 days after irradiation.
transection. After laser stimulation, a small portion of the spinal   Results: G1A presented a more intense inflammatory infiltrate in
root was analyzed histologically.                                     the submucosa area, while G2A showed more cells w/a thin
Results: Infrared neural stimulation evoked neuromuscular             submucosa and G3A an infiltrate loose tissue. G1B exhibited less
responses through anterograde, trans-synaptic excitation of           inflammatory infiltrate while compared w/G2B and G3B. G2C
alpha-motor neurons, and demonstrated higher spatial precision        presented an intense inflammatory infiltrate, when compared w/
than electrical stimulation and no stimulation artifact.              G1C e G3C, which showed straighter w/a large number of
Stimulation threshold was identified as 0.53 J/cm2. Overall            fibroblast near lesion. In all animals observed dilated glands on
efficacy of INS in this study was 63% (34/54) for non-damaging         the lesion area w/reduced number in G2C.
radiant exposures between 0.53 and 1.00 J/cm2. Damage                 Conclusion: The results suggest that laser phototherapy is an
threshold was identified at 1.09 J/cm2. The overall safety ratio was   effective method to modulate granulated tissue in acute
calculated as 2.05:1 which is similar to the safety ratio identified   inflammatory process and avoiding widespread granuloma and
in animal studies.                                                    scar tissue. The importance of this study for patients w/TS, it is


                                                                        Published online in Wiley Online Library
ß 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.                                                 (wileyonlinelibrary.com).
                                                                        DOI 10.1002/lsm.21034
2                        American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts
signing that LLLT can significantly contribute to prevent such         and phototherapy. Here, we investigate if surface coating using
appalling condition.                                                  polyethylene glycol (PEG) will alter the biodistribution of ICG-
                                                                      NCs.
                                                                      Study: We synthesize ICG-NCs using a self-assembly process
#3                                                                    that utilizes polyallylamine hydrochloride and sodium phosphate
                                                                      salt as the encapsulating structure. ICG-NCs are coated
NOVEL APPROACH FOR HEALING LEG ULCERS:                                covalently with PEG of either 5,000 or 30,000 Da molecular
CASE STUDY INVOLVING COMBINED EFFECT OF                               weight, through reductive amination. PEG-coated ICG-NCs are
LOW LEVEL LASER THERAPY AND                                           administrated through tail vein injection in healthy mice. Whole
BIOCERAMICS                                                           body florescent imaging is performed at different post-injection
Supriya Babu, Bheemsain Rao, Veena P. Waiker,                         times. To quantify the biodistribution of PEG-coated ICG-NCs,
Jaisri Goturu, Vasanthi Ananthakrishnan,                              various organs including liver, lungs, spleen, intestine, kidneys
Dayananda G, Arun Kumar, M.S. Ramaiah                                 and heart are harvested and homogenized following euthanasia.
Institute of Technology, Bangalore, India; M.S. Ramaiah Medical       Blood sample is also collected to investigate amount of PEG-
College & Hospital, Bangalore, India                                  coated ICG-NCs remaining in the vasculature at different post-
                                                                      injection times.
Background: Of all the wounds, leg ulcers are more common in
Indian population and are a major cause of amputation. An             Results: Our preliminary results suggest that encapsulation of
increased resistance of micro-organisms in the wound calls for        ICG in polymeric nanocapsules alters the dynamic biodistribution
novel approaches in wound management and therapy. We propose          of ICG in healthy mice. PEGylation of ICG-NCs appears to delay
                                                                      the accumulation of ICG within the liver in comparison with
combining the bacteriostatic action of Bioceramics and the well-
established advantages of LLLT in achieving a quick recovery of       uncoated ICG-NCs and free ICG.
the ulcer with reduced treatment cost.                                Conclusion: Results of this study will provide important
                                                                      information in engineering ICG-NCs with prolonged blood
Study: A male patient aged 60 years with chronic non-healing
venous ulcers on both lower limbs. The lateral half of the both the   circulation time and potential applications for fluorescence
wounds was used as control with routine dressings with betadine.      imaging and phototherapy of various abnormalities.
The medial half of the right leg ulcer was treated with bioceramic
wound healing device (WHD), The medial half of left leg ulcer was
treated with LLLT (0.63 mm, 10 mW, CW) for 10 minutes and later       #5
dressed with WHD. Treatment was given for seven consecutive
days and serial photographs were taken. Efficacy was assessed by       NARROWBAND IMAGING OF TARGETED GOLD
taking bacterial culture and sensitivity (C/S) on first and eighth     NANORODS IN TUMORS
day.                                                                  Priyaveena Puvanakrishnan, Parameswaran
Results: Significant improvement was noticed with respect to the       Diagaradjane, Glenn Goodrich, Jon Schwartz, Sunil
exudate amount, color, and edges in ulcer treated with combined       Krishnan, James Tunnell
therapy whereas minimal change was seen in WHD therapy
                                                                      University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX; University of Texas/MD
alone. No significant changes were seen on control side of the
                                                                      Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; Nanospectra Biosciences,
wound. The initial C/S report indicated bacterial growth and in
                                                                      Inc., Houston, TX
the final report, no growth of organisms was noted.
                                                                      Background: A significant challenge in the surgical resection of
Conclusion: With the promising effects of combination therapy
                                                                      tumors is accurate identification of tumor margins. Current
for chronic, non-healing venous leg ulcers requires further
                                                                      methods for margin detection are time-intensive and often result
controlled studies with larger study group to validate the results.
                                                                      in incomplete tumor excision and recurrence of disease. Gold
                                                                      nanoparticles have recently gained significant traction as
                                                                      exogenous contrast agents for identifying tumors ex vivo. The
#4                                                                    objective of this study was to determine the potential of topically
                                                                      administered antibody conjugated gold nanorods (GNR) for real-
EFFECT OF POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL COATING
                                                                      time tumor margin detection using near-infrared narrowband
ON BIODISTRIBUTION OF ICG-LOADED
                                                                      imaging (NIRNBI). NIRNBI images narrow wavelength bands to
POLYMERIC NANOCAPSULES IN MICE
                                                                      enhance contrast from plasmonic particles in a widefield, portable
Baharak Bahmani, Sharad Gupta, Bahman Anvari                          and non-contact device that is clinically compatible for real-time
University of California, Riverside, CA                               tumor margin demarcation.
Background: Nano-constructs with near infrared (NIR)                  Study: We conjugated GNR to Cetuximab, a clinically approved
absorption capability present a promising technology for optical      humanized antibody that targets the epidermal growth factor
imaging and phototherapy of malformations. The advantage of           receptor (EGFR). We excised subcutaneous xenografts of
utilizing NIR light is minimum absorption by water and tissue         squamous cell carcinomas from Swiss nu/nu mice and divided the
components and consequently higher penetration depth.                 tumors into two groups: (1) the targeted group (anti-EGFR
Indocyanine green (ICG) is the only FDA approved near infrared        conjugated GNR) and (2) the control group (PEG-conjugated
chromophore used clinically in imaging applications, and is under     GNR). After topical application of particles and incubation for
investigation for photothermal and photodynamic therapy.              30 minutes, the tumors were washed and imaged using NIRNBI.
However, ICG suffers from short circulation time within the           To quantify the binding of GNR in tumors, we measured the
vasculature, and is almost exclusively uptaken by the liver. To       contrast enhancement for each particle type.
overcome these shortcomings, we have encapsulated ICG within          Results: The NIRNBI images showed a visual increase in
polymeric nanocapsules (ICG-NCs). Our long-term objective is to       contrast from tumors administered with targeted GNR over the
enhance circulation time of ICG through nano-encapsulation, and       control particles and without the particles. There was a
use the encapsulated platform for site-targeted optical imaging       statistically significant increase in contrast (400%) from tumors
                         American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts                                                      3
after administration of targeted GNR. Additionally, the NIRNBI        damage to surrounding untreated tissues. After ablation, the
images collected from targeted GNR tumors (n ¼ 4) showed a            extent of thermal ablation and the heat-affected zone was
220% increase in contrast compared to untargeted tumors.              analyzed by immunofluorescence localization of heat shock
Conclusion: We have demonstrated that a topical application of        proteins, the expression of which increases when cells are
gold nanorods targeted specifically to tumor growth factors results    exposed to elevated temperature or other stresses. Thermal
in a significantly higher image contrast compared to non-targeted      imaging was performed during laser irradiation to monitor
gold nanorods. These results demonstrate the initial feasibility of   temperature effects in real time. To investigate the extent of
NIRNBI in demarcating tumor margins during surgical resection         thermal damage and the initial events in healing, 47- and 70-kDa
using topical administration of targeted GNR.                         heat shock proteins (HSP47 and HSP70) were localized in a
                                                                      double-labeling procedure using HSP47- and HSP70-specific
                                                                      primary antisera followed by Alexa-dye-labeled secondary
#6                                                                    antisera. HSP analyses were performed at 0, 24, 36 and 48 hours
                                                                      after laser irradiation. Images were obtained by laser scanning
INDUCTION OF LIPOLYSIS IN HUMAN                                       confocal microscopy.
ADIPOCYTES BY HYPERTHERMIA ALONE AND                                  Results: Expression patterns of HSP70 and HSP47 delineated
IN COMBINATION WITH PHOTODYNAMIC                                      the extent of thermal damage, and may illustrate the biochemical
TREATMENT                                                             process of wound healing. Analysis of the effects of laser
Valery Tuchin, Irina Yanina, Georgy Simonenko,                        irradiation over the course of time using different laser
Andrey Belikov, David Tabatadze, Ilya Yaroslavsky,                    parameters followed by immunohistochemistry defines the time
Gregory Altshuler                                                     course of laser effects on skin tissues. Extent of damage was
Institute of Optics and Biophotonics, Saratov State University        correlated with temperature rise using measured temperature
Saratov, Russian Federation; Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc.,      distribution and ablation depth for different laser parameters.
                                                                      Conclusion: HSP70 and HSP47 can be simultaneously
Burlington; Laser Center, SPITMO Saint-Petersburg, Russia
Background: Reduction of fat deposits is a goal of many               visualized using immunofluorescence and laser scanning confocal
treatment approaches. Liposuction remains de facto gold-              microscopy, and temporal changes in HSP expression patterns
standard procedure, providing high reduction in the volume of         may define both the laser-induced thermal damage zone and the
                                                                      process of healing. Careful temporal analysis of HSP distribution
adipose tissue in a short period of time. Minimally and non-
invasive alternatives to liposuction are highly desirable and are     following laser irradiation supports the development of effective
being actively pursued by many groups world-wide. Objective of        new laser therapy protocols.
this study was to investigate feasibility of inducing lipolysis in
human adipose tissue with hyperthermia alone and by combining
it with photodynamic treatment.                                       #8
Study: Samples of human adipose tissue were subjected to
hyperthermia (up to 43.58C) using several temporal regimens of        MOBILIZATION OF ENDOTHELIAL PROGENITOR
heating and cooling down. In addition, some samples were stained      CELLS FOLLOWING PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY
by photosensitizer Brilliant Green (maxima of absorption at 440       Charles Gomer, Angela Ferrario, Marian Luna
and 650 nm) and then irradiated by a two-color diode lamp
                                                                      University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA;
(W ¼ 70 mW/cm2 at ? ¼ 442 nm and W ¼ 121 mW/cm2 at
                                                                      Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
? ¼ 597 nm). The viability and status of the adipocytes were
                                                                      Background: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated oxidative
assessed by light microscopy at several time points.
                                                                      stress induces direct tumor cell kill and, indirectly, modulates the
Results: Pronounced changes in shape and size of adipocytes
                                                                      tumor microenvironment leading to local responses such as
were registered. Observed dynamics of cell morphology is
                                                                      inflammation, hypoxia and acute vascular injury. These local
consistent with hypothesis of induced lipolysis. Photodynamic
                                                                      reactions effect PDT tumor responsiveness by inducing
treatment accelerated the change significantly.
                                                                      angiogenesis. To expand our understanding of PDT-mediated
Conclusion: Hyperthermic treatment of adipocytes can be used
                                                                      tumor responses we are conducting a study to examine whether
to induce lipolysis. The process can be accelerated by
                                                                      PDT mobilizes bone marrow-derived vascular progenitor cells, a
photodynamic treatment. This technique has a potential for
                                                                      mechanism associated with vasculogenesis, growth and
minimally or non-invasive fat reduction in vivo.
                                                                      metastatic potential.
                                                                      Study: We monitored the number of circulating endothelial cells
                                                                      (CECs) and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEPs)
#7                                                                    following PDT using four color flow cytometry. We also examined
                                                                      the in vitro and in vivo expression of the chemokine stromal
HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN EXPRESSION IN TISSUES
                                                                      derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1a) and its receptor CXCR4, which
AFTER SHORT PULSE LASER-INDUCED DAMAGE
                                                                      are key molecules associated with hematopoietic stem cell homing
Amir Sajjadi, Kunal Mitra, Michael Grace                              and tumor angiogenesis.
Melbourne, FL                                                         Results: Flow cytometry results showed a twofold increase of
Background: Effective laser-based therapeutics requires               CECs and CEPs in the peripheral blood of Balb/c mice bearing 4T1
detailed understanding of the biochemical mechanisms of laser–        mammary tumors 24 hours after PDT when compared to
tissue interaction. Therefore, we characterized the extents of        untreated controls. Western blot analysis of lysates from PDT-
thermal damage and heat-affected zones following skin ablation        treated cells showed, at 24 hours, a four- to fivefold increase in
by analyzing the spatiotemporal distribution of heat shock            expression of CXCR4 while no SDF-1a was detected in media by
proteins.                                                             ELISA. We observed increase of SDF-1a levels in plasma of
Study: A focused-beam short-pulse laser was used to ablate the        treated mice as well as activation of the SDF-1a receptor CXCR4
skin surface of live anesthetized mice with minimal thermal           in 4T1 tumors soon after PDT.
4                        American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts
Conclusion: These results indicate that subcurative PDT doses          LIB has characteristics of microexplosion and is accompanied by
lead to induction of SDF-1a/CXCR4 expression and increased             two secondary phenomena: cavitation bubble and high energy
levels of CECs and CEPs. Studies are currently underway to             pressure wave. In ophthalmic microsurgical procedures
examine if CEC and CEP levels can be used as biomarkers of PDT         amplitude of high energy pressure wave determines the area of
response and to determine if preventing CEP mobilization and           potential damage of nearby tissue, while the size of cavitation
incorporation into tumor vasculature can, by blocking                  bubble is proportional to removal of unwanted eye tissue. The area
angiogenesis, improve PDT responsiveness.                              of LIB in eye is small, but surrounded by many fragile structures.
                                                                       These structures could be damaged by microexplosion itself or by
                                                                       secondary effects which could damage more extensive area. The
#9                                                                     size of area of mentioned laser effects is directly proportional to
                                                                       laser pulse energy. Lower laser pulse energy level should
COMPARISON OF ANTIANGIOGENIC AGENTS                                    therefore lower the possibility of injuries of surrounding
FOR INHIBITING REPERFUSION OF                                          structures.
PHOTOCOAGULATED BLOOD VESSELS IN AN                                    Study: In the first part LIB and secondary effects in the water
ANIMAL MODEL                                                           and porcine vitreous following use of photodisruptor with pulse
Wangcun Jia, Victor Sun, Tom Liu, Bernard Choi,                        duration of 5 nanoseconds and new model with pulse duration of
J. Stuart Nelson                                                       near 1 nanosecond is studied. In the second part we are comparing
Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of              number of pulses, average and total energy needed to create an
California, Irvine, CA; Conrex Pharmaceuticals, Newtown                open iridotomy on animal model (porcine iris).
                                                                       Results: Nd:YAG laser with shorter pulse duration needs almost
Square, PA
Background: Antiangiogenic agents have been demonstrated to            the same acting power but less energy to reach threshold for laser
reduce the reperfusion of photocoagulated blood vessels with           induced breakdown (LIB). Consecutively the size of cavitation
                                                                       bubble and amplitude of high energy pressure wave is smaller. To
varying degrees of success, which might improve the therapeutic
efficacy of port wine stain laser treatment. Our objective was to       create an open iridotomy on porcine iris Nd:YAG laser with
compare the safety and efficacy of different antiangiogenic agents      shorter pulse duration needs lower energy of one pulse and less
for preventing photocoagulated blood vessels from reperfusing.         total energy.
                                                                       Conclusion: Recently developed photodisruptor based on
Study: Two macrolide lactones, rapamycin and tacrolimus were
tested in this study. Rapamycin is a specific mTOR inhibitor and        Nd:YAG laser enables shorter pulse duration and consecutively
tacrolimus is a calcineurin/NFAT inhibitor. Both agents were           lower energy level while performing ophthalmic laser procedures.
formulated as topical ointments which contained 1% effective           Ophthalmic laser procedures made by this laser should be safer
                                                                       with less adverse effects.
ingredient, solvent, medical base and a skin penetration
enhancer. The animal model was the dorsal skinfold window
chamber on hamster. Immediately after laser irradiation of blood
vessels in the window, a topical antiangiogenic agent was applied      #11
to the epidermal side of the window daily for 14 days. Color digital
photography and laser speckle imaging were used to document            EFFECTS OF LASER BEAM MODIFICATION ON
structure and flow dynamics of blood vessels.                           THE ANTERIOR CHAMBER ANGLE STRUCTURAL
Results: The reperfusion rate was reduced from nearly 100% for         CHANGES AFTER SELECTIVE LASER
control (laser irradiation only) to 39% and 78% for rapamycin and      TRABECULOPLASTY IN ANIMAL MODEL
tacrolimus, respectively. Skin irritation was observed on animals      Rok Grcar, Brigita Drnovsek-Olup
treated with tacrolimus. It was also noted that efficacy varied
                                                                       Eye Hospital Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia
significantly among animals treated with the combined therapy.
                                                                       Background: Selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) is a relatively
Conclusion: More antiangiogenic agents need to be screened to
                                                                       new, efficient and safe method for reduction of intraocular
determine the best candidate for combined laser and topical anti-
                                                                       pressure in patient with glaucoma and ocular hypertension.
angiogenic therapy for port wine stain and other cutaneous
                                                                       Histological analysis of human anterior chamber angle after SLT
vascular lesions, which is currently being pursued in our lab.
                                                                       showed absence of coagulative necrosis and minor trabecular
                                                                       meshwork (TM) damage. After SLT, TM endothelial cells secrete
                                                                       certain cytokines and metalloproteinases which increase
#10                                                                    trabecular meshwork fluid permeability resulting in intraocular
                                                                       pressure reduction. The effects of laser beam or its modifications
INFLUENCE OF PULSE DURATION ON
                                                                       on structural changes of the anterior chamber angle and the
EFFICIENCY AND SOME ADVERSE EFFECTS OF
                                                                       mechanism of intraocular pressure reduction are not yet known.
ND:YAG LASER IRIDOTOMY
                                                                       Study: The effect of laser beam modification on the anterior
Gregor Hawlina, Brigita Drnovsek-Olup                                  chamber angle structural changes in an animal model (porcine
Eye Clinic, University Medical Centre, Ljubljana Ljubljana,            eyes) is studied with transmission electron microscopy. The effect
Slovenia                                                               of new parameters with more constant power density profile is
Background: Most common adverse effects following Nd:YAG               compared to the standard SLT parameters, where laser beam with
laser iridotomy are intraocular pressure elevation, reduction of       power density profile similar to Gaussian curve is used.
endothelial cell count, cystoid macular edema, retinal rupture/        Results: Modified laser beam with more constant power density
detachment and acceleration of cataract. The causes of some            profile induces less damage to the trabecular meshwork than
adverse effects are still poorly understood, but they are more         classic laser beam with power density profile similar to Gaussian
frequent when using laser pulses of higher energy level.               curve.
Photodisruptors trigger laser induced breakdown (LIB) by               Conclusion: Modified laser beam with more constant profile is
transferring very high energy on very small area in focal region.      expected to deliver energy more evenly to the treated area and to
                         American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts                                                      5
reduce central TM endothelial cell damage. The greater number of       within the periodontal pockets, a radial emitting perio fiber tip
surviving cells could be stimulated to secrete certain cytokines       (RFPT) was developed.
that increase trabecular meshwork fluid permeability, resulting         Study: The optical, mechanical and thermal effects in tissue of
in greater intraocular pressure reduction.                             Er;Cr:YSGG laser pulses delivered through a radial emitting fiber
                                                                       tip were studied using high speed optical thermography. High
                                                                       speed color Schlieren techniques were used to visualize the extent
#12                                                                    of heating and thermal relaxation after the laser exposure at
                                                                       recording frame rate of 500 f/second (millisecond range). The
OPTIMAL WAVELENGTH SELECTION FOR LASH                                  ablation process was observed with back-light illumination with
TREATMENT OF SKIN PHOTOTYPES I TO VI                                   frame rates of speed imaging setup up to 8,000 f/second
Alain Cornil, Sylvain Giraud, Sonia Saai,                              (microsecond range). Pulses were delivered to the surface of a
 ´
Cecile Philandrianos, Guy Magalon                                      polyacrylamide gel that acted as a transparent model tissue to
Ekkyo Aix-en-Provence, France; APHM, Hopital Nord, Marseille,          observe effect below the surface.
France                                                                 Results: The radial tip created a straight primary beam and a
Background: Previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of          secondary conical beam that ablated the tissue in the center
                                                                       surrounded by ring of thermal effect at a short distance from the
laser assisted skin healing (LASH) treatment using a 810 nm
diode laser for improving scars following surgical intervention.       surface. In contact with tissue, a small channel was created with
However this new modality was limited to phototypes I to IV, due       thermal ‘lobes’ to the side. The energy distributions correlated
to high absorption of melanin at this wavelength. Another              well with ray-trace modeling of the radial tip design.
                                                                       Conclusion: The special design radial emitting tip provides a tool
limitation is linked to the relatively high absorption of hemoglobin
at 810 nm, which may pose problem when treating surgical               for effective cutting in combination with moderate thermal effects
incisions. This in vitro study aimed at finding the optimal             to induce haemostasis during cutting in soft tissue and
                                                                       decontamination in cavities like periodontal pockets. The tip
wavelength for LASH, in particular with regards to phototype
compatibility and minimum absorption by blood.                         might also have potentials for precise surgical applications.
Study: Eight human skin explants of phototypes I to VI,
harvested from abdominoplasties, as well as sheep blood plates
were irradiated using 810, 980, 1,064, 1,210, and 1,320 diode          #14
lasers. Handpieces were designed to shape the beam profiles into
rectangular top hat to ensure optimum heating of the full skin         IS IT POSSIBLE TO PERFORM LASER
thickness. Surface temperature was monitored using an IR               RESHAPING WITHOUT DRAMATIC EFFECT ON
camera. Micro-thermocouples were placed at 2 and 4 mm depth in         CHONDROCYTES?
the explants. Temperatures were recorded at baseline and during        Emil Sobol, Natalia Vorobieva, Olga Baum, Anatoly
the irradiation. Irradiance was 4 W/cm2. Maximum temperature           Shekhter, Anna Guller
and speed of heating were plotted and irradiance needed to
                                                                       Institute on Laser and Information Technologies, Troitsk, Russia;
achieve 508C at 2 mm depth was extrapolated from these data.
                                                                       Medical Academy of Moscow, Moscow, Russia
Results: Among the four wavelengths tested, 1,210 nm is the
                                                                       Background: Laser reshaping of cartilage is a new, effective
optimum compromise between efficacy of heating and minimum
                                                                       technique which began to be used in otolaryngology and cosmetics
variance due to phototype and blood. Contrary to other
                                                                       for correction of cartilage shape of the nose, ear and throat. The
wavelengths, no difference in heating patterns was observed at
                                                                       main objective of the paper is to study the effect of various laser
1,210 and 1,320 nm when skin explants were soaked in blood or
                                                                       settings on morphological alterations in chondrocytes during laser
not. Less than 18C gradient between surface and À2 mm
                                                                       reshaping of nasal septum.
temperature was observed at 1,210 nm compared with 48C for
                                                                       Study: The nasal septums of the pigs have been treated using an
1,320 nm.
                                                                       Erbium glass fiber laser of 1.56 mm in wavelength (Arcuo Medical,
Conclusion: This in vitro study demonstrate the optimal
                                                                       Inc.) with an opto-thermo-mechanical contactor providing
characteristic of 1,210 nm wavelength for heating homogeneously
                                                                       mechanical pressing of the mucosa and delivering 1.56 mm laser
skin of all phototypes even in the presence of blood.
                                                                       radiation to the spot of 3 mm in diameter. Two series of
                                                                       experiments have been performed: (1) to determine the energy
                                                                       threshold for stable laser reshaping and (2) to study the effect of
#13                                                                    mechanical loading and irradiation of the fresh pig septum using
                                                                       the threshold laser setting and different levels of exceeding
TISSUE EFFECTS INDUCED BY Er;Cr:YSGG
                                                                       regimes. Histological analysis of the cartilage samples have been
LASER PULSES DELIVERED THROUGH A
                                                                       performed to study the zones of altered chondrocytes, including
RADIAL EMITTING FIBER STUDIED WITH HIGH
                                                                       the sizes and positions of the necrotic zones.
SPEED OPTICAL THERMOGRAPHY
                                                                       Results: (1) Stable reshaping of pig nasal septum cartilage has
Rudolf Verdaasdonk, Vladimir Lemberg, Albert                           been achieved at laser power of 0.8 W, pulse length 0.5 seconds,
Veen van der, Stefan Been, Dmitri Boutoussov,                          pulse spacing 0.2 seconds, exposure time of 3 seconds. (2) No
Werner Landgraf                                                        significant changes in chondrocyte shape and structure have been
VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands;                  observed for above laser setting. (3) Increase of laser power and
Optomix, Santa Clara, CA; University Medical Center Utrecht,           exposure time enhanced dramatically structural alterations in
Utrecht, Netherlands; Biolase, Irvine, CA; Biolase Floss, Germany      chondrocytes.
Background: The Waterlase MD Er;Cr:YSGG laser system has               Conclusion: The threshold laser settings allow to obtain stable
been successfully used for cutting, removing, shaping and              reshaping without significant alterations to chondrocytes.
contouring of hard and soft tissues including endodontic and           Exceeding regimes of laser radiation lead to substantial
periodontal therapies. To increase the efficiency of laser treatment    alterations (up to necrosis) of the cells. Since cell damage may
6                        American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts
activate regeneration processes resulting in new tissue growth        exposure of mechanically deformed cartilaginous tissue to a laser
and therefore in some alteration of cartilage shape obtained          heating. Bio-chemical reactions within the tissue lead to reduction
immediately after laser procedure, the results obtained are of        of internal stress, and establishment of a new equilibrium shape.
importance to forecast the stability of laser reshaping procedure.    The same reactions offset the electric charge, osmotic and
                                                                      hydraulic balances between collagen and proteoglycan matrix and
                                                                      interstitial fluid responsible for maintenance of cartilage
#15                                                                   mechanical properties. The objective of this study was to
                                                                      investigate correlation between the temperature rise during LCR
FLUID CHARACTERIZATION OF A NOVEL                                     and cartilage mechanical behavior.
HOLLOW-CORE MICRONEEDLE DESIGN                                        Study: We used a finite element model based on the modified
Robert Hood, Mehmet Kosoglu, Matthew Parker,                          triphasic theory to study how internal temperature field
Christopher Rylander                                                  generated in the laser heating of cartilage can modulate its
Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA                                         mechanical responses to step displacements in unconfined and
Background: Microneedles have been successfully utilized to           confined compression. The native concentrations of the ions,
deliver small fluid volumes for many different applications. We        collagen matrix stiffness and the fluid and ion velocities within the
                                                                      specimen were estimated from compression and stress relaxation
are investigating a novel hollow-core microneedle design that will
permit co-localized, simultaneous light and fluid delivery.            experiments.
Successful skin penetration of similar microneedle designs has        Results: The results from finite element calculations
been previously demonstrated by our group. The potential              demonstrated apparent stress increase during heating due to
                                                                      thermal expansion. Generally, stress relaxation following the
applications for such a device range from cosmetic fat reshaping to
targeted destruction of tumors. The primary objective of this study   heating accelerates with increase in temperature and irradiation
was to determine the optimal microneedle parameters for fluid          time. To compare numerical model with experimental observation
                                                                      we measured stress evolution in cartilage during and after lasers
flow.
Study: Microneedles with tip diameters varying between 15 and         heating.
90 mm were fabricated via a custom melt-draw apparatus from           Conclusion: Good correlation between experimental and
capillary tubing (150 mm inner diameter) capable of co-delivering     theoretical data (R < 0.9) confirms contribution of thermal
                                                                      expansion to stress evolution and suggests softening of collagen
light and fluids. A series of experiments characterizing the
capillary tubing’s fluid resistance were conducted by measuring        matrix as a major mechanism of stress relaxation.
the volumetric flow rate of water through the tubing at constant
pressures ranging from 10 to 90 psi. Following accurate
characterization of tubing resistance, additional experiments         #17
investigating the flow resistance of different microneedle
geometries were conducted.                                            COMPARISON OF THERMAL AND MECHANICAL
Results: The first set of experiments determined that fluid flow in      CHARACTERISTICS DURING TISSUE ABLATION
tubing lengths longer than 50 mm adhered highly to Poiseuille’s       OF Er:YAG, Er,Cr:YSGG AND CO2 IN THE
Law in the range of pressures investigated (10–90 psi). For           MICROSECOND TO MILLISECONDS PULSE
lengths < 50 mm, turbulent effects in the flow caused Poiseuille’s     RANGE IN VIEW OF SOFT TISSUE APPLICATIONS
Law to under-predict the fluid resistance. In either laminar or        IN SURGERY
turbulent flow regimes, the flow rate increased significantly as         Rudolf Verdaasdonk, Vladimir Lemberg, Albert
tubing length decreased. Increased microneedle resistance was         Veen van der, Stefan Been, Dmitri Boutoussov,
correlated with small tip diameter, shorter needle length, and        Werner Landgraf
bending in the needle bore.                                           VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands;
Conclusion: This study sought to determine the best geometry
                                                                      Optomix, Santa Clara, CA; University Medical Center Utrecht,
balancing minimal invasiveness and low flow resistance in a novel      Utrecht, Netherlands; Biolase, Irvine, CA; Biolase Floss, Germany
hollow-core microneedle design. The experiments indicated that        Background: Erbium lasers are being used successfully in
the optimal design involves having a microneedle with a               dentistry for hard tissue ablation. In dermatology, Erbium laser
completely straight bore, length between 0.5 and 0.8 mm, and tip
                                                                      dermabrasion has been replaced with fractional techniques
diameter between 40 and 60 mm preceded by the shortest tubing         mainly with CO2 lasers. Due to the precise and controlled
length possible. The next developmental step will involve             ablation, Erbium lasers might be considered as alternatives for
determining the best geometries for incorporation of light delivery
                                                                      fractional applications as well as for microsurgery in, for example,
in addition to fluid flow.                                              ENT, reconstruction and neurosurgery. In this study, the ablation
                                                                      effect of several Erbium lasers was examined in relation to pulse
                                                                      duration, wavelength and fiber delivery system.
#16                                                                   Study: Three Erbium based laser modalities, Er:YSGG at
                                                                      2.78 mm, pulse 60 or 700 microseconds and Er:YAG at 2.94 mm
USING TRIPHASIC THEORY TO EVALUATE                                    60 microseconds delivered through 200 and 400 mm diameter silica
CARTILAGE MECHANICAL RESPONSE TO                                      tips were compared during the ablation of phantom tissue
LASER RESHAPING                                                       (polyacrylamide gel 90% water content) at pulse energies from 10
Dmitry Protsenko, Brian Wong                                          to 100 mJ. High speed and thermal Schlieren imaging techniques
Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic,                           were applied to visualize the mechanical and thermal effects.
University of California, Irvine, CA                                  Results: The differences in ablation depth were significant as
Background: Laser cartilage reshaping (LCR) has been                  well as the thermal residual in relation to pulse length. The
suggested as an alternative to the classical surgical techniques of   ablation at 2.94 mm was around 25% more effective compared to
modifying the shape of facial features. The method is based on        2.78 mm with less thermal residual. There was minimal difference
                         American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts                                                          7
between the fiber diameters. The ablation effect observed were          College Park, MD; Washington, DC
similar to the microsecond pulsed CO2 laser; tissue water is           Background: Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) is
effectively turned to explosive hot vapour that is expelled from the   an extension of OCT that detects phase shifts in backscattered
imploding channel leaving some residual thermal energy behind          light resulting from contact with moving scatterers. DOCT
depending on pulse length.                                             enables detection of blood flow in vivo. DOCT is potentially very
Conclusion: Fiber delivered Erbium lasers can provide                  useful in a clinical setting having high resolution ($10–20 mm)
controlled soft tissue cutting using pulse lengths in the ms to ms     and the ability to be miniaturized into handheld devices or
range to control the thermal residual depending on the                 endoscopic probes. While the imaging depth of DOCT is limited to
application.                                                           $2 mm, we have shown that this penetration is sufficient for
                                                                       imaging of the kidney hemodynamics in the superficial cortical
#20                                                                    region.
                                                                       Study: To image the kidney in vivo, Munich-Wistar rats (n ¼ 3)
REGULATORY PERSPECTIVE OF OPTICAL                                      were anesthetized and the kidney exposed beneath a swept-source
IMAGING DEVICES: TECHNOLOGY,                                           microscope (?0 ¼ 1,300 nm). Many glomeruli were easily identified
INDICATIONS, AND FUTURE CHALLENGES                                     by scanning the surface of the kidney, capturing 3D DOCT
                                                                       volumetric data sets at each location. The Doppler signal at each
Kejing Chen, Richard Felten, Long Chen, Neil                           en face plane was integrated over its respective area as a measure
Ogden                                                                  of glomerular blood flow. Flow histograms were also extracted for
Office of Device Evaluation, Food and Drug Administration,              each distinct Doppler signal that could be isolated. To test changes
Silver Spring, MD                                                      in physiological blood flow, mannitol and angiotensin II were
Background: Medical imaging is a rapidly developing area that          administered intravenously to induce and increases and decreases
provides novel diagnostic information and/or facilitates image         in glomerular flow, respectively.
guided therapy to areas of interest. Optical imaging devices, when     Results: Individual blood flow patterns were readily visible by
used in conjunction with minimally invasive endoscopes, collect        DOCT. 3D reconstructions of these images provided an enhanced
reflected, scattered, laser-induced fluorescent, and other light         visualization of the blood flow throughout the capillary network in
signals in the ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared spectra. Based   the glomeruli. An increase in glomerular blood flow was observed
on the collected signal, images are constructed to reveal tissue       following injection of mannitol and a decrease was observed
structure information at microscopic level. Contrast to other          following injection of angiotensin II. These observations were
imaging methods, optical imaging could yield high spatial              confirmed to be significant after calculating and comparing the
resolution near the mm scale.                                          glomerular blood flow affected by each drug.
Study: In the past, the FDA has cleared a number of optical            Conclusion: DOCT is able to determine different directional flow
imaging devices, which are currently used in clinical practice,        patterns in glomerular capillaries and to detect changes in these
through the Premarket Notification process as Class-II Medical          patterns blood flow in real-time. We conclude that DOCT may be
Devices. Due to the evolution of new technology associated with        helpful in monitoring the status of glomerular blood flow in the
the development of optical imaging devices, there now exist            clinical setting.
challenges, from the regulatory perspective, in the following
areas:
Results: (1) The sensitivity and specificity of optical imaging         #22
devices to detect the claimed diseased lesions. (2) The output
readability of some optical imaging devices may be in the form of      MULTIMODAL OPTICAL IMAGING FOR
action spectrum or numerical readout, which although still             DETECTING BREAST CANCER
yielding structure information is unconventional for the reading       Rakesh Patel, Ashraf Khan, Robert Quinlan,
practice of many health practitioners. (3) The use of contrast         Anna Yaroslavsky
agents to improve the contrast resolution. While most optical
                                                                       University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA;
imaging only requires device technology to produce images, the
                                                                       UMass Memorial Healthcare, Inc., Worcester, MA
concurrent use of contrast enhancing agents may improve the
                                                                       Background: Re-excision is required in up to 60% cases of breast
image qualities, particularly for laser induced fluorescence
                                                                       conserving surgeries, as most are performed without
imaging systems. The advancement of imaging contrast agents
                                                                       intraoperative margin control. Real-time mapping of cancer
has been historically outpaced by that of imaging devices and a
                                                                       margins during surgeries would be indispensible. The long-term
number of such imaging drugs have been off-label used with
                                                                       goal of this research is to improve the quality of life and survival in
imaging devices in medical practice.
                                                                       patients with breast cancer. We seek to improve the surgeon’s
Conclusion: In this presentation, we review the optical imaging
                                                                       ability to distinguish breast tissue from tumor over wide-fields
literature, identify its cleared clinical beneficial effects,
                                                                       and on microscopic scale at the margin.
summarize the regulatory status, and analyze the regulatory
                                                                       Study: At the initial stage of the project, we are testing the
challenges that might be important for bridging the academic
                                                                       combination of wide-field and high-resolution multimodal
development and marketing delivery of optical imaging devices.
                                                                       imaging, that is, polarization, reflectance and fluorescence
                                                                       imaging for detecting breast cancer. Fresh excess breast cancer
#21                                                                    tissue is collected from surgeries and subsequently imaged and
                                                                       processed for H&E histopathology. Then the histological slides are
IN VIVO IMAGING OF KIDNEY                                              digitized and compared side-by-side with the multimodal optical
MICROVASCULATURE USING DOPPLER                                         images.
OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY                                           Results: We have acquired high resolution confocal and
Jerry Wierwille, Jeremiah Wierwille,                                   polarization images of breast cancer tissue and correlated these
Peter Andrews, Maristela Onozato, Yu Chen                              images to the digitized corresponding H&E histopathology. We
8                        American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts
are in the process of procuring additional samples, imaging and        Micro Mass Analyzer (LAMMA) together with Raimund
analyzing them.                                                        Kaufmann, which eventually led to the invention of the Matrix
Conclusion: The obtained results demonstrate the feasibility of        Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry
the proposed approach to breast cancer delineation. Although this      (MALDI)-MS in 1986, jointly with Michael Karas. MALDI-MS is,
study is designed to analyze tissue ex vivo, it will serve as a first   by now, one of the two methods of choice for the routine and high
step that will permit construction and optimization of an in vivo      throughput analysis of biomedical (macro) molecules and has been
system capable of enabling complete and accurate image guided          the main focus of my work during the last 20 years. Still all the
resections of cancer.                                                  work until now is based on the search for a better understanding
                                                                       of how the laser interacts with tissue and, indeed with the
                                                                       molecules it consists of.
#23
MULTISCALE FLUORESCENCE IMAGER AS AN                                   #25
OPTICAL BIOPSY TOOL
Anna Yaroslavsky, Dennis Wirth                                         MECHANICAL TISSUE OPTICAL CLEARING
University of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA
                                                                       TECHNIQUE INCREASES RESOLUTION AND
Background: Accurate real-time pathology detection would be            CONTRAST OF A TARGET IMAGE BENEATH EX
indispensible. This contribution reports implementation and            VIVO PORCINE SKIN
testing of a multi-scale fluorescence imager as an optical biopsy       Alondra Izquierdo-Roman, William Vogt,
tool.                                                                  Christopher Rylander
Study: The system implements wide-field and high-resolution             Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
modalities in one instrument. Previous studies have shown              Background: Tissue optical clearing permits delivery of light
tetracycline (TCN) and eosin Y (EY) to be good contrast agents in      deeper into turbid tissue, which may improve numerous current
pathology detection. For excitation of TCN and EY, we use 402          methods of optical diagnostics as well as laser-based therapeutic
and 530 nm diode lasers, respectively. Band pass filters of             techniques. Mechanical stimulation of tissue, such as localized
470 Æ 40 and 570 Æ 20 nm combined with PMT systems are                 compression, may reduce light scattering by reversibly displacing
employed for simultaneous registration of high-resolution TCN          water from regions of altered stress and strain. In this study, we
and EY emission images, respectively. To accomplish                    investigated the effects of localized compression on the delivery of
simultaneous registration of wide-field images we use a four-way        light through ex vivo porcine skin by evaluating contrast and
image splitter equipped with linearly polarizing and band pass         resolution of a USAF 1951 target placed beneath either native or
filters. The developed system was tested using resolution targets,      compressed specimens.
fluorescence phantoms, and ex vivo cancer tissues.                      Study: A manual force transducer was used to compress $2 mm
Results: The system enables simultaneous wide-field, high-              thick ex vivo porcine tissue to 1, 5, and 10 lbf with a 5 mm
resolution fluorescence and fluorescence polarization images.            hemispherically tipped glass rod for 60 seconds. Resolution and
Conclusion: The use of the constructed imager may allow for            contrast of the detected signal through the specimens was
efficient differentiation between normal and pathological               analyzed using established image processing techniques based on
tissue.                                                                image intensity profiles of the compressed and uncompressed
                                                                       regions of the skin.
                                                                       Results: Experimental results indicate that while uncompressed
#24                                                                    skin did not allow resolution of the lowest line spacing of the
                                                                       target (0.25 line-pairs (lp)/mm, 2,000 mm line width), localized
FROM LASER TISSUE INTERACTION TO MALDI                                 compression at 1, 5, and 10 lbf allowed resolution of 1.6304 lp/
MASS SPECTROMETRY                                                      mm Æ 0.31, 1.0265 lp/mm Æ 0.72, and 1.6599 lp/mm Æ 0.72,
Franz Hillenkamp                                                       respectively. All values are reported with 95% confidence. Image
University of Muenster, Muenster, Germany                              intensity profile analysis showed an enhancement in the target
Background: First biomedical laser application followed the            peaks distinguishable after compression between 5 lbf
                                                                       compression and 10 lbf compression specimens. Contrast also
invention of the laser 51 years ago almost on the heels, pioneered
by peers such as Leon Goldmann, Francis L’Esperance, Isaac             increased about 1.5-fold between 5 and 10 lbf compression
Kaplan and several others. We came into the field in the late 1960s     specimens.
                                                                       Conclusion: Localized mechanical compression proved to be an
with work on laser eye safety. In that work it quickly became clear
that serious estimates of the risks and even more so any useful        effective technique for increasing resolution and contrast of a
medical laser application would require a thorough                     target imaged through ex vivo biological tissue. Based on these
understanding of the mechanisms with which laser radiation of          results, implementation of this optical clearing technique may
                                                                       enable enhanced resolution and contrast of light-based
different wavelengths and pulse duration interacts with tissues.
Much of our work during the 70th and 80th was devoted to this          diagnostics.
topic. The common interest in such interaction and the question of
how to correlate physical beam parameters to biological measures
such as histologic analyses initiated a collaboration with John
                                                                       #26
Parrish and Rox Anderson at what is now the Wellman Center of
Photomedicine at the Mass. Gen. Hospital in Boston, a friendship       HIGH-RESOLUTION, THICK-TISSUE OPTICAL
which has continued until today. Parallel to work on laser–tissue      HISTOLOGY OF TISSUE MICROVASCULATURE
interaction I got interested early on in laser microirradiation, a     Austin Moy, Bernard Choi
field I shared with colleagues such as Michael Berns and                Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic,
Christian Salet. As a result of this work we developed the Laser       University of California, Irvine, CA
                         American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts                                                        9
Background: The microvasculature is the primary route by                system. After 10 minutes of circulation time a decreasing
which nutrients are delivered to tissue. Direct visualization of the    photoacoustic signal was observed due to increased accumulation
microvasculature would enable detailed study of tissue during           of cells in the organs.
disease progression. Typically, a histology-based approach is used      Conclusion: Histological studies identified that lungs were the
to characterize the microvasculature. This method is impractical        most susceptible organs for the accumulation of the injected
for characterization of the microvasculature in large tissue            cancer cells and microspheres. We further intend to study the
organs, especially if the three-dimensional architecture of the         photoacoustic detection of induced cancer in mice.
vascular network is desired. Therefore, there is a critical need for
a technique that will facilitate quick and efficient imaging of the
entire microvascular network of large tissue volumes. We have           #28
developed an all-optical method that utilizes optical clearing of the
tissue and subsequent optical imaging to produce high-resolution,       MULTIDOMAIN SIMULATION OF MECHANICAL
depth-sectioned, three-dimensional images of the                        TISSUE OPTICAL CLEARING DEVICES: A
microvasculature in thick tissues.                                      PLATFORM FOR DEVICE OPTIMIZATION
Study: Tissue microvasculature is first stained in vivo via cardiac      William Vogt, Alondra Izquierdo-Roman,
perfusion using DiI, a lipophilic dye that binds to the endothelial     Christopher Rylander
cells of the microvasculature. Tissues are then excised and sliced      Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
into $1 mm thick sections. These sections are incubated in              Background: Biological tissues are naturally high-scattering
FocusClear (CelExplorer Labs, Hsinchu, Taiwan), a novel optical         media as a result of mismatches in refractive index between
clearing agent, for up to 120 minutes, and then visualized with
                                                                        constituents, including water, fat, and proteins. As a result, the
both a CCD based wide-field fluorescence imaging system and a             efficacy of light-based diagnostic and therapeutic methods is
laser-scanning multiphoton microscope with the appropriate              drastically reduced. Tissue optical clearing devices (TOCDs)
excitation wavelengths and emission filters for DiI.
                                                                        utilize localized mechanical loading to induce optical clearing in a
Results: We have successfully acquired both fluorescence and             non-invasive reversible manner. Mechanical clearing is thought
three-dimensional images of brain and tumor sections $1 mm in           to be the result of lateral water displacement from compression
thickness using both our wide-field fluorescence imaging system           regions in the tissue, but the nature of this water transport and
and confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscope. Arterioles,
                                                                        resulting clearing effect is not well understood. A coupled
venules, and capillaries are readily visualized.                        mathematical model of mechanical deformation and the transport
Conclusion: Tissue microvasculature structure can be visualized         of water and light will provide a framework for optimizing TOCDs
in three dimensions and with high spatial resolution, in $1 mm          for specific theranostic applications.
thick tissue sections, using combined ex vivo optical clearing and
                                                                        Study: A finite element model of ex vivo porcine skin compressed
optical imaging techniques. Imaging of serial sections of tissue is     under a hemispherically tipped indenter was developed using
expected to enable visualization of entire microvascular networks       Abaqus (Simulia, Providence, RI). A coupled porous medium
in entire organs.                                                       model based on Darcy’s law was used to simulate the coupling
                                                                        between mechanical stress/strain and interstitial water transport.
                                                                        Experimental stress/strain data were used to fit a hyperelastic
#27                                                                     constitutive model to govern tissue mechanical response. After
                                                                        determining spatial distribution of tissue water content, optical
PHOTOACOUSTIC DETECTION OF MELANOMA                                     Monte Carlo simulation was used to determine tissue fluence
AND MICROSPHERES IN VITRO USING A MICE                                  distribution. Simulation was performed using TIM-OS, an open
MODEL                                                                   source Monte Carlo simulator.
Sagar Gupta, Kirby Campbell, Adam Daily, Kiran                          Results: Simulations indicate that water transport during
Bhattacharya, Luis Parada, John Viator                                  compression is highly sensitive to Poisson’s ratio as well as tissue
University of Missouri, Columbia, MO                                    hydraulic conductivity. Fluence distributions are highly sensitive
Background: Metastasis is a complex physiological phenomenon            to scattering coefficient, which is dependent on both local water
that involves the movement of cancer cells from one organ to            content and wavelength of light delivered to the tissue. Tissue
                                                                        geometry changes may account for $65% of total light
another by means of blood and lymph. An understanding about
metastasis is extremely important to device diagnostic systems to       transmission increase, with optical property changes contributing
detect and monitor its spread within the body. Photoacoustic            $35%.
                                                                        Conclusion: This multidomain modeling framework can be used
technology is a sunrise sector, which is gaining prominence as the
promising field in medical diagnostics. This article makes an effort     to study the coupling of mechanical loading, water transport, and
to understand metastasis in a mouse model and also plays a              light transport through biological tissues. Future work will focus
crucial role in extending the boundary of photoacoustic circulating     on experimentally determining key input parameters, including
                                                                        mechanical, chemical, and optical properties.
tumor cell detection in animals.
Study: Human cultured melanoma cell line HS936 and
2 micrometer fluorescent microspheres were injected through
cardiac puncture to the female ICR mice and allowed to circulate        #29
from 1.5 to 10 min. A study was also performed to identify the
accumulation of melanoma and microspheres in various organs of          SIGNAL VARIATION OF FLUORESCEIN DYE IN
the injected mice.                                                      ANTERIOR AND POSTERIOR CHAMBERS OF EYE
Results: We were able to successfully detect 5-cells/10 ml of the       Raiyan Zaman, Henry Rylander
injected melanoma and 5-microspheres/10 ml of the injected              The University of Texas, Austin, TX
microspheres obtained from the processed mice blood drawn at            Background: Identifying the location of a drug for treating
various time intervals in a photoacoustic ultrasound detection          ocular disease is an important aspect for any drug delivery. Thus,
10                       American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts
we have tested a hypothesis where signal of a fluorescein dye may        temperatures were recorded at intervals throughout the
vary based on the location of the dye either by the presence of         treatment using a non-contact infrared radiometer (Raytek
natural occurring fluorophores of the eye tissue or the dye itself.      Mini-Temp) for external temperature and a internal probe and
In this study, we have identified a unique phenomenon in signal          Ebro thermometer for internal temperature. Laser energies were
variation of fluorescence emission spectra based on the variation        delivered until an internal temperature of 45–508C was achieved.
of the location.                                                        All internal and external temperature measurements were
Study: We have developed a fluorescence spectrophotometer (FS)           conducted simultaneously and immediately after the cessation of
system to identify the emission spectra at 520 nm from the 10% Na       lasing. Following the laser lipolysis, the patients underwent
fluorescein USP sterile dye. The FS system consists of four main         traditional liposuction using 1.7–2.5 mm cobra cannulae. The
components: (i) a tungsten halogen lamp to shine white light (LS-       patients have been followed for up to 1 year post-op for
1, Ocean Optics), (ii) a low pass filter with transmission between       complications, results and patient satisfaction.
390 and 480 nm with cutoff at 505 Æ 15 nm wavelength (FD1B, an          Results: Dual data points (585) of internal and external
additive dichroic color filter, blue, Thorlabs, Inc., Newton, NJ,        temperature were collected from 227 treatment sites in 50
USA) (iii) a custom-designed fiber-optic probe (core                     patients. Statistical analysis revealed low correlation between
diameter ¼ 200 mm; NA ¼ 0.22; FiberTech Optica), and (iv) a             internal and external skin temperatures (correlation ¼ 0.27,
spectrometer (USB4000, Ocean Optics). The fiber-optic probe              P < 0.0001). For every degree rise in internal temperature, the
consists of two individual fibers with core-to-core separation of        external temperature rose 0.158. There were no complications.
370 mm that are terminated with SMA connectors. For both in             Patients reported a high degree of satisfaction with the results.
vitro and in vivo experiments we have injected 0.01 ml dye in           Conclusion: Monitoring of the internal temperature during laser
either the anterior or posterior chamber (not both) of an               lipolysis appears to be a more accurate means of assessing the
enucleated pig (n ¼ 4) and in vivo rabbit eye (n ¼ 2), respectively.    desired effects on target tissue. Relying on external temperature
Then, fluorescence emission spectra are collected every 2 minutes        alone may result in over-treatment or under-treatment of skin
up to 10 minutes using the FS system. However, for the in vivo          and adipose tissue and result in either increased complications or
experiment the emission spectra is only collected after the pupil is    unsatisfactory results.
dilated using three drops of 1% tropicamide every 11 minutes for
                                                       2
5 minutes and the dilation completes within 10 minutes.
Results: Preliminary results showed signal variation between the
anterior and posterior chambers of the eye. The emission peak of
                                                                        #31
the fluorescence signal from the posterior chamber slightly blue         PREDICTION OF THE MAXIMAL SAFE LASER
shifted about 28 nm unlike the anterior chamber. Also, the line         RADIANT EXPOSURE ON AN INDIVIDUAL
shape of the emission signal was distinctive for the posterior
                                                                        PATIENT BASIS BASED ON PHOTOTHERMAL
chamber. We eliminated the possibility of this signal difference        TEMPERATURE PROFILING IN HUMAN SKIN
(by further experiment) due to the constituents of the aqueous and
vitreous humors from the anterior and posterior chambers,
                                                                        Boris Majaron, Matija Milanic, Wangcun Jia,
respectively. Thus, the most likely reason for this blue shift to the   J. Stuart Nelson, Luka Vidovic
shorter wavelength may be due to the presence of intrinsic              Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia, Beckman Laser
fluorescence of protein in the crystalline lens of the enucleated pig    Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, CA
and in vivo rabbit eyes. The aromatic amino acid residue                Background: Despite the application of dynamic cooling, the
tryptophan (Trp) can cause such a distinct emission shapes.             efficacy and safety of cutaneous laser treatments are often
Conclusion: These results clearly identify the variability in           compromised by nonselective absorption in epidermal melanin,
fluorescence emission spectra of the 10% Na fluorescein dye based         which limits the light fluence delivered to the subsurface target
on the location of the dye in the eye. This unique phenomenon           site (e.g., blood vessel, hair follicle, tattoo granule) and induces a
could help determine the location of a fluorescently tagged              risk of permanent side effects, such as scarring or
molecule within the eye and deserves further investigation.             dyspigmentation, due to overheating of the basal layer. Our aim is
                                                                        to determine the potential of pulsed photothermal radiometric
                                                                        (PPTR) temperature depth profiling for prediction of maximal safe
                                                                        radiant exposure (Hmax) for human skin on an individual basis.
#30                                                                     Study: Diagnostic PPTR measurements were performed on 326
                                                                        distinct spots on the extremities of 13 healthy volunteers using
IS EXTERNAL SKIN TEMPERATURE AN                                         3 milliseconds laser pulses at 755 nm and 6 J/cm2. From these
ADEQUATE MODALITY TO SAFELY MONITOR                                     radiometric signals, the respective laser-induced temperature
PATIENTS DURING LASER LIPOLYSIS?                                        depth profiles in skin were reconstructed using a custom iterative
Kenneth Rothaus                                                         algorithm with adaptive regularization. The same test spots were
New York Presbyterian Hospital Weill Cornell, New York, NY              irradiated with the same laser at radiant exposures from 10 to
Background: Currently, most laser lipolysis systems use                 90 J/cm2 with application of cryogen spray precooling at constant
external skin temperature as a guide to assess adequacy of              settings. The resulting adverse effects were quantified by blind
treatment. Reports of complications or unsatisfactory results may       scoring and correlated with various characteristics of the
reflect poor assessments of the effects of laser energy on target        corresponding PPTR temperature profiles.
tissue using external skin temperature as an end point of               Results: The area under the epidermal part of the reconstructed
treatment. The purpose of this study is to determine if the change      temperature profiles (representing the surface density of the laser
in the external skin temperature accurately reflects the change in       energy deposited in the epidermis) enables a rather robust
internal temperature during laser lipolysis.                            prediction of individual epidermal damage threshold across a wide
Study: A 24 W 924/975 nm laser (Palomar Medical Technologies)           range of tested skin phototypes (I–IV).
was used to perform laser lipolysis. Treatments were performed          Conclusion: PPTR depth profiling appears promising for
using local tumescent anesthesia. External and internal skin            prediction of the maximal safe radiant exposure on an individual
                        American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts                                                      11
patient basis for increased efficacy and safety of cutaneous laser     technique for demarcating skin cancers. The implementation of a
treatments.                                                           coherent room temperature detection scheme, which offers
                                                                      increased SNR, is critical to the eventual goal of implementing a
                                                                      continuous-wave terahertz imaging system that can delineate
                                                                      cancer margins.
#32                                                                   Study: The goal of this study was to construct a heterodyne
                                                                      receiver based imager at 1.39 THz, determine its resolution and
A LED BASED IMAGING SYSTEM FOR                                        available signal-to-noise ratio, and demonstrate imaging of skin
OPTIMIZATION OF PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY                                  cancer specimens. CO2 laser pumped far-infrared gas lasers were
OF BASAL CELL CARCINOMA                                               used as the terahertz sources for the experiments. A room
Rolf B. Saager, David J. Cuccia, Steven Saggesse,                     temperature heterodyne detection scheme was designed and
Kristen M. Kelly, Anthony J. Durkin                                   implemented. The system was tested using resolution targets and
Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of             skin cancer specimens. Its resolution and signal-to-noise ratio
California, Irvine, CA; Modulated Imaging, Inc., Irvine, CA           (SNR), in reflection modality, were determined. The samples were
Background: PDT offers the potential for enhanced treatment of        scanned across the focal plane using a two axis motion controlled
                                                                      stage, and the on-axis reflection image was generated.
BCC skin cancer without the detriments associated with current
treatment methods: healthy tissue loss, scarring. Yet, PDT has        Results: The system resolution was determined to be 0.5 mm. The
still not achieved the consistent performance required to gain        SNR was determined to lie between 110 and 130 dB. Preliminary
widespread clinical acceptance for treatment of skin cancer. One      imaging data of cancer specimens show good correlation between
                                                                      the terahertz images and Hematoxylin & Eosin (H&E)
particular limitation is a lack of quantitative tools to perform in
vivo dosimetry that monitors the light dose during therapy. Even      histopathology.
when dosimetry is used, lesion variability leads to treatment plans   Conclusion: A coherent hetrodyne detection scheme significantly
                                                                      improves the SNR of continuous-wave terahertz imaging for
that are not optimum. To this end, we have developed a new
quantitative imaging device that may enable optimized therapy.        cancer demarcation.
Study: Clinical imaging of BCC lesions was performed using
Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (SFDI). SFDI can quantify
spatially resolved absorption and reduced scattering coefficients.
With knowledge of these properties, it is possible to address         #34
critical aspects of PDT dosimetry including: (1) therapeutic light
dose within the affected tissue, (2) oxygen supply necessary to       TEST METHODOLOGIES FOR ESTABLISHING
generate destructive radicals within the lesion and (3)               SAFETY OF HOME-USE LASER BASED DEVICES
photosensitizer distribution and uptake within the tissue. We         David Sliney, Michail Smirnov, Stewart Wilson,
present a device designed to address these aspects by: (1)            Oldrich Laznicka, Oksana Bradley, Felicia Whitney,
determining the optical properties at the therapeutic wavelength,     Gregory Altshuler, Ilya Yaroslavsky
(2) deducing spatially resolved absorption values to determine        Fallston, MD; Palomar Medical Technologies, Burlington, MA
blood oxygenation in the tissue microvasculature, and (3)
                                                                      Background: A number of home-use, laser-based devices for
quantifying fluorescence from the photosensitizer by                   treatment of various skin conditions either have been recently
compensating for native tissue properties.                            introduced to the marketplace or are in different stages of
Results: Preliminary clinical study of nine lesions demonstrate
                                                                      development. A common feature of these devices is the presence of
that optical properties vary greatly both spatially (101%, 48%) for   a safety suite designed to enable safe operation of the device by the
absorption and reduced scattering, respectively, and from patient     average person with no prior experience or training. This state of
to patient (102%, 57%). Oxygenation maps may be generated at          affairs highlights the need for formulating realistic, universally
50-mm resolution. Fluorescence signals from the photosensitizer
                                                                      accepted product safety requirements, reflected in an industry-
can be accurately converted to drug concentrations to within          wide standard, such as IEC 60825. A Class 1C (conditional Class
Æ 0.2 mg/L.                                                           1) has been proposed and is currently under discussion by the
Conclusion: These preliminary results indicate that this              respective technical groups. One important aspect of codifying the
technique provides quantitative, non-invasive assessments
                                                                      safety requirements for such devices is to define the most suitable
which characterize lesions based on physiologic parameters            testing techniques to ensure both compliance and practical safety
that are inaccessible to clinicians. This technology may lead to      of the device.
the development of subject and lesion specific treatment
                                                                      Study: Two principal approaches to the test are considered: (1)
strategies.                                                           clinical test (possibly with a mock-up device) attempting to
                                                                      reproduce real-life scenarios of the device use; and (2) an ex vivo
                                                                      and/or phantom test with a pre-formulated set of quantitative
                                                                      criteria. Both types of tests have been conducted on a home-use,
#33                                                                   fractional non-ablative laser device (PaloVia, Palomar Medical
                                                                      Technologies, Inc.).
REFLECTION MODALITY CONTINUOUS-WAVE                                   Results: Ocular safety of the tested device has been demonstrated
TERAHERTZ IMAGER FOR CANCER                                           with both types of tests. Similarities and differences in the
DEMARCATION                                                           outcomes of the two types of testing, as well as their relative
Cecil Joseph, Anna Yaroslavsky, Thomas Goyette,                       advantages and disadvantages for the purpose of laser safety
Robert Giles                                                          standards, have been evaluated.
University of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA                               Conclusion: Phantom test methodologies can be considered the
Background: Continuous-wave terahertz imaging has the                 preferred method to ensure compliance of the tested device with
potential to offer a non-invasive and comparatively inexpensive       the requirements of the future performance standard.
12                       American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts
#35                                                                    and put them in relation to treatment parameters. Blood was
                                                                       taken from a small group of patients before, and after the
COMBINATION THERAPY FOR THE TREATMENT                                  treatment, up to 3 months to look at serum levels of lipids and
OF ERYTHEMATOTELANGIECTATIC ROSACEA                                    liver enzymes. We tried to correlate clinical results to histologic
Jane Yoo, Ellen Marmur, Amy Lynne Frankel, Jinan                       findings.
Chaarani, Ryan Turner, Giselle Singer                                  Results: The studies show clearly that adipocytes are disrupted
Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY                               by HIFU. The correlation between focal depth, energy levels and
Background: Rosacea is a common cutaneous disorder                     clinical results is evident. The average circumference reduction
                                                                       after treatment of abdomen and waist is 4–5 cm. Extensive proof
characterized by facial erythema, papules and pustules and
telangiectasias. The flushing and telangiectasias associated with       with histologies and gross pathologies was delivered, to show the
erythematotelangiectatic rosacea (ETR) are notoriously difficult        extent of disruption, correlated to focal depth and energy settings.
                                                                       Disruptions or denaturation of septal fibre collagen was seen,
to treat with standard medications. We investigated a novel
synergistic approach using pulsed dye laser (PDL) in combination       dependent on different treatment parameters. This can be
with topical therapy to treat individuals with ETR. PDL is widely      correlated to clinical skin tightening effects. The sizes of the
considered as the treatment of choice for vascular malformations.      lesions would vary, dependent on treatment parameters.
                                                                       Conclusion: Adipocytes are disrupted by HIFU. Septal fibres are
Calcium dobesilate (2,5-dihydroxybenzene sulfonate) is a drug
that hinders vascular smooth muscle cell growth and inhibits           heated effectively by HIFU different clinical results can be
fibroblast growth factor (FGF), thus targeting angiogenic growth        correlated to the different histologic findings. HIFU is effective in
factors leading to uncontrolled blood vessel growth.                   non-surgical body sculpting. HIFU tightens skin due to effects on
                                                                       collagen fibres.
Study: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the overall
response rate to treatment and to assess the safety and the
tolerability of the treatment regimen. We performed a split face,
single blinded pilot study involving six patients at Mount Sinai
                                                                       #37
Medical Center. Patients applied topical calcium dobesilate gel to
the whole face once daily for 12 weeks and concurrently received
                                                                       LOW-FLUENCE 1,064 NM Q-SWITCHED ND:YAG
PDL treatment to one randomized side of the face at 2-week
                                                                       LASER
intervals for a total of four sessions. Subjects were followed for 4   Yuan-Hong Li, Tian-Hua Xu, Hong-Duo Chen
and 8 weeks post-treatment.                                            No. 1 Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, China
Results: Six patients participated in this study. One patient          Background: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the low-
discontinued the study after week 6 due to personal reasons.           fluence 1,064 nm Q-Switched Neodymium-doped Yttrium
Compared to calcium dobesilate alone, topical therapy combined         Aluminium Garnet (Nd:YAG, QSNY) laser in treating infraorbital
with PDL led to a greater reduction in telangiectasias and non-        dark circles.
transient erythema but there was no difference in the reduction of     Study: Thirty women with infraorbital dark circles (predominant
flushing or papules and pustules. At the end of the study, 50% of       color: dark brown) were enrolled in this open-labeled study. The
patients experienced moderate improvement of symptoms. No              subjects received eight sessions of low-fluence QSNY laser
adverse effects of lasting pain, persistent purpura, crusting, hypo-   treatment at 4.2 J/cm2 at 3- or 4-day intervals. Spot size of 3.5 mm
or hyper-pigmentation or scarring were observed during the trial.      was used with pulse duration of 8 nanoseconds. The melanin
Conclusion: Calcium dobesilate, in conjunction with PDL,               deposition in the lesional skin was observed in vivo by reflectance
presents itself as a therapeutic treatment option for patients with    confocal microscopy (RCM). Morphological changes were
erythematotelangiectatic rosacea. As this is a single center pilot     evaluated using a global evaluation, an over-all self-assessment, a
study, further investigation is warranted.                             Mexameter, and a Corneometer.
                                                                       Results: Twenty-six of 30 patients showed a global improvement
                                                                       as excellent or good. Twenty-eight patients rated the over-all
#36                                                                    satisfactory assessment as excellent or good. Melanin index
                                                                       indicated a substantial decrease from 225.84 (baseline) to 182.65
EFFECTS ON ADIPOCYTES AND SEPTAL FIBERS                                (P < 0.05). RCM results showed a dramatic decrease of melanin
AFTER HIGH INTENSE HIGH FREQUENCY                                      deposition in the upper dermal. Adverse actions were minimal.
ULTRASOUND                                                             Conclusion: The characteristic findings of the dark-brown
Afschin Fatemi                                                         infraorbital dark circles are increased melanin deposition in the
                                                                       upper dermis. The treatment of the infraorbital dark circles by
S-thetic Clinic, Duesseldorf, Germany
Background: HIFU is used to disrupt adipocytes percutaneously          low-fluence 1,064 nm QSNY laser is rapid and effective. Adverse
and can be regarded as a non-surgical treatment for unwanted fat       effects were minimal and acceptable.
deposits. We wanted to find out about tissue effects not only on
adipocytes, but also on septal fibres.
Study: We treated abdominoplasty patients immediately before           #38
and 2 weeks before surgery with different energy settings and
different focal depths, we looked at gross pathology to determine      MICROSCOPIC OBSERVATION OF ULTRAPULSE-
whether there are lesions and how the lesions look like. We looked
                                                                       MODE VERSUS SUPERPULSE-MODE
at histologies to see if there are immediate adipocyte disruptions     FRACTIONAL CO2 LASER ON BACK SKIN
and how the lesions are cleared by macrophages and other cells.        Yuan-Hong Li, Xue-Gang Xu, Hong-Duo Chen
We also analyzed the effects of HIFU on septal fibers.                  No. 1 Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, China
Abdominoplasty patients and fresh cadavers were treated with           Background: Both ultrapulse-mode (UPCO2) and superpulse-
different energy settings and histologies were taken and analyzed.     mode (SPCO2) fractional CO2 lasers have been widely used in
We looked at different histologic sizes of lesions, measured them      treating photo-aged skin, acne scar, etc. Yet histological evidences
                        American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts                                                   13
are still needed to prove and compare their short-term and long-      respectively. Osmolarity had no influence on passive leakage and
term effects.                                                         plasma reduced passive leakage rates. Plasma had no notable
Study: Seven healthy Chinese women received one pass of               impact on calcein release profiles compared to TA release profiles
UPCO2 treatment on left back and SPCO2 treatment on right             in buffer at any of the assayed temperatures.
back. The pulse energies were 15 mJ at a density of 5%. The           Conclusion: Both liposomal formulations are suitable for
clinical outcomes and side effects were evaluated by two blinded      antifibrinolytic SSPLT in that almost all TA is released within
certified dermatologists. Dermatoscope, in vivo reflectance             2.5 min and no detrimental effects of plasma were found on release
confocal microscopy (RCM) and high frequency ultrasonic               kinetics and stability.
equipment were used to observe skin responses non-invasively.
Biopsies were taken for hematoxylin–eosin (HE) stains and
Verhoeff-iron-hematoxylin stain.                                      #40
Results: RCM and the histopathology showed that SPCO2
treatment could penetrate as deep as UPCO2 does. Both UPCO2           TOWARDS ENHANCEMENT OF PDT EFFICACY IN
and SPCO2 treatment need about 7 days for the microscopic             EXTRAHEPATIC CHOLANGIOCARCINOMAS
epidermal necrotic debris (MEND) to shed off. The two modes           USING LIPOSOMAL PHOTOSENSITIZATION
have similar efficacy in stimulating the synthesis and remodeling
of collagen and elastin, which was also confirmed by                   Mans Broekgaarden, Anton, I.P.M. de Kroon,
ultrasonography image.                                                J. Antoinette Killian, Thomas, M. van Gulik,
Conclusion: There is no significant difference between UPCO2
                                                                      Michal Heger
and SPCO2 treatment in skin rejuvenation by histological              Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands,
findings, RCM and ultrasonography observation.                         University of Amsterdam and Biochemistry of Membranes,
                                                                      Membrane Enzymology, Institute of Biomembranes,
                                                                      University of Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands
                                                                      Background: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) yields suboptimal
#39                                                                   results in the treatment of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas
                                                                      (EHCCs) due to the use of inferior photosensitizers, insufficient
TRANEXAMIC ACID-CONTAINING LIPOSOMES                                  photosensitization of the tumor, and the biological properties of
FOR ANTIFIBRINOLYTIC SITE-SPECIFIC                                    the malignancy. To optimize PDT for these tumors, a second-
PHARMACO-LASER THERAPY OF PORT WINE                                   generation photosensitizer, zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPC), will be
STAINS                                                                encapsulated in liposomes and targeted to the tumor endothelium,
Michal Heger, Anton I.P.M. de Kroon                                   tumor cells, and interstitial spaces. Inasmuch as an appropriate
Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam,          animal model is lacking, a chicken chorioallantoic membrane
The Netherlands; University of Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands      (CAM) model for EHCC and other tumors was developed for
Background: Site-specific pharmaco-laser therapy (SSPLT) is a          testing the PDT efficacy of the liposomal formulations. This work
development stage treatment modality for refractory port wine         describes the development of the animal model and ZnPC
stains (PWS), whereby conventional selective photothermolysis is      liposomes for interstitial targeting.
combined with the prior administration of a prothrombotic/            Study: The CAM model was used to grow Sk-Cha1, HepG2, and
antifibrinolytic-containing liposomal drug delivery system (DDS).      IGROV-1 cells into EHCCs, hepatocellular carcinomas, and
The aim of this study was to determine release profiles of             ovarian carcinomas, respectively. Tumors were imaged after 4
tranexamic acid (TA, antifibrinolytic agent) from thermosensitive      days of incubation using stereomicroscopy and 1,300-nm swept-
liposomes in buffer and plasma at different temperatures and          source optical coherence tomography. Liposomes for stromal
osmotic gradients and to determine liposome stability in plasma.      targeting composed of 4.8 mM DPPC and 0.2 mM DSPE-PEG2000
Study: Thermosensitive liposomes were prepared from DPPC/             and 0–50 mM ZnPC were characterized for size/polydispersity,
DSPE-polyethylene glycol (PEG) lipids (96:4 molar ratio) and          drug-to-lipid ratio, fluorescence emission, and singlet oxygen
DPPC/MPPC/DSPE-PEG (86:10:4) by the lipid film hydration               radical-mediated membrane damage. The latter was assayed by
technique using 318 mM TA in 10 mM HEPES, 0.88% NaCl,                 fluorometric calcein leakage assays from vesicles with a target
pH ¼ 7.4, 0.292 osmol/kg or with 52.8 mM calcein (self-quenching      cell-like lipid composition, on which PDT was performed.
concentration) in hypo- or iso-osmolar HEPES buffer. An offline        Results: Successful tumor growth of Sk-Cha1, HepG2, and
quantification assay was developed to determine TA release from        IGROV-1 cells was achieved in ovo, although tumor-type
liposomes in buffer at the phase transition temperature (Tm) of the   associated differences in vascularization and growing patterns
bilayer and at À48C/ þ 48C/658C/908C as a function of heating         were observed. Liposomes with various concentrations ZnPC had
time. An online spectrofluorometric assay was employed to              an average size of 105.4 Æ 6.4 nm with a polydispersity of
determine passive leakage of calcein from the liposomes at            0.37 Æ 0.12. Optimal ZnPC fluorescence was observed at
increasing plasma concentrations at 378C. Lastly, an RT-PCR           drug-to-lipid ratios of 0.002. Maximum PDT-induced leakage of
instrument was used to establish (online) temperature-dependent       calcein from vesicles with a cell-like lipid composition co-
calcein release profiles from the liposomal formulations at            incubated with ZnPC liposomes was observed at drug-to-lipid
increasing plasma concentrations.                                     ratios of 0.001.
Results: TA release rates from DPPC/DSPE-PEG liposomes were           Conclusion: Successful tumor growth was achieved for various
13%/5.0 min, 96%/2.5 min, 107%/1.5 min, 107%/0.5 min, and 98%/        cell lines with different degrees of vascularization. Liposomes
0.5 min for 39.38C/43.38C/47.38C/65.08C/90.08C, respectively. TA      developed for interstitial targeting were shown to fluoresce and
release rates from DPPC/MPPC/DSPE-PEG liposomes were 0%/              produce oxygen radicals, allowing the liposomes to be
5.0 min, 94%/2.0 min, 96%/1.0 min, 105%/0.5 min, and 89%/             concomitantly imaged and used for therapy. Further research will
0.5 min for 36.08C/40.08C/44.08C/65.08C/90.08C, respectively.         focus on developing and characterizing liposomal formulations for
Passive leakage of calcein at 378C was 4.77 and 5.95%/min for         tumor cell and vascular targeting as well as on studying the PDT
DPPC/DSPE-PEG and DPPC/MPPC/DSPE-PEG liposomes,                       efficacy of the formulations in vivo using the CAM models.
14                       American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts
#41                                                                     85 W) preceded by tail vein injection of ICG dye (4 mg/kg) and
                                                                        60 minutes hyperthermia at 41.58C prior to ICG injection.
IN VITRO TESTING OF DUAL-MODE THULIUM                                   Epidermal cooling was accomplished by applying ultrasonic gel at
MICROSURICAL LASER                                                      28C to the skin, 1 minute prior to laser irradiation, in all groups.
Matthew Keller, James Stafford, Jonathon Wells                          Tumor size was measured daily and animals were euthanized at
Lockheed Martin Aculight, Bothell, WA                                   specific time points post treatment for histopathological
Background: The Ho:YAG laser is commonly used for a variety             evaluation and ICG content measurements.
of surgical applications, especially in urology. Recently, thulium      Results: We observed elevated temperatures of 308C or greater in
                                                                        animals that received ICG above that of saline alone. In those
(Tm) fiber lasers have been investigated for use in place of the
Ho:YAG because their 1.94 mm output is absorbed by tissue $5            animals that received ICG administration prior to hyperthermia,
times stronger than the 2.1 mm of the Ho:YAG. Lockheed Martin           we saw an increase in the accrual of ICG in the tumor region. In
                                                                        both groups that received ICG before irradiation, there was an
Aculight has recently developed the first truly dual-mode Tm
laser, which can be operated in either CW or in pulsed mode             enhancement in anti-tumor effect compared to laser only.
(rather than modulated) to produce high peak power. The goal of         Conclusion: Hyperthermia prior to intravenous administration
this study was to assess the ablation performance and collateral        of 4 mg/kg ICG significantly enhanced accumulation of ICG in the
                                                                        tumor region and, in turn, enhanced the efficacy of thermal
damage characteristics of this laser in vitro.
Study: The laser was operated with a 200 mm diameter spot in CW         ablation during a single NIR laser irradiation session.
and at both 10 and 1 kHz rep rates ($150 nanoseconds pulse
width), with total energy delivered to the tissue (chicken muscle)
held constant for a given comparison. Ablation efficiencies for 5-
minute exposures, crater size for 5-second exposures, and               #43
collateral damage zones for both stationary and scanned laser
delivery for 5-second exposures were calculated for the different       FIBEROPTIC MICRONEEDLES FOR
pulse modes and a range of pulse energies (1.1–2.2 mJ).                 MICROSCALE INTERSTITIAL DELIVERY OF
Results: The most energy-efficient ablation (lowest J/g) occurred        THERAPEUTIC LIGHT
for the 10 kHz pulsed mode operating just above ablation                Mehmet Kosoglu, Robert Hood, Christopher
threshold with 1.1 mJ pulses, while the highest mass removal rate       Rylander
occurred in 10 kHz pulsed mode operating at max energy (2.2 mJ).
                                                                        Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
In histological sections from short exposures, 10 kHz pulsed            Background: Light-based cosmetic procedures such as hair
exposures created slightly larger craters and slightly smaller          removal and skin rejuvenation are limited due to the poor
thermal coagulation zones than matched CW exposures, while              penetration depth of light in skin. Novel fiberoptic microneedles
1 kHz deliveries removed smaller volumes and also had smaller
                                                                        provide a means for mechanically penetrating tissue several
thermal damage zones.                                                   millimeters to deliver light directly into a target area. Our goal is
Conclusion: The dual-mode Tm laser can provide a variety of             to develop novel fiberoptic microneedles for minimally invasive
ablation characteristics in generic soft tissue based on its mode of    interstitial delivery of diffuse therapeutic light into epithelial
operation and energy/power levels.
                                                                        tissues.
                                                                        Study: A novel manufacturing technique which utilizes angle
                                                                        polishing and hydrofluoric acid etching of optical fibers was
                                                                        developed to control diffuse light delivery from the microneedle
                                                                        surface. The light delivery and the resulting temperature
#42                                                                     distribution for two new microneedle designs and a flat-cleaved
                                                                        fiber control were determined. The light delivery on white paper
HYPERTHERMIA ENHANCED IMAGE GUIDED                                      was evaluated using microscopic imaging and thermal
LASER-ICG THERAPY                                                       distribution was measured by IR thermography. These micro-
Klressa Barnes, Gal Shafirstein, Wolfgang Baumler,                       optical diffusers were also used to liquefy ex vivo porcine fat.
Ran Friedman, Leah Hennings,                                            Results: Acid etching removed the fiber cladding, exposing a
Mustafa Sarimollaoglu, Jessica Webber,                                  greater length of the fiber core, which allowed the circumferential
Cassie Jackson, James Suen, Robert Griffin                               delivery of light along a 3 mm length. Distribution of light
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR;           intensity correlated closely with the resulting temperature map.
Regensberg University, Regensberg, Germany                              The microneedle design with a double-thinning etched taper
Background: Indocyanine green (ICG) dye effectively converts            generated a more homogenous light distribution and lower
near infrared (NIR) laser light into heat that can destroy              temperatures compared to the other more uniformly etched
vasculature and kill tumor cells. However, the short half-life of the   microneedle and the flat cleaved fiber control. In addition, no
ICG in the vascular system limits the treatment time and efficacy.       carbonization of the tissue was observed during lipolysis
We postulate that hyperthermia prior to ICG administration and          experiments for the double-thinned microneedle design while
near infrared (NIR) laser therapy can improve the efficacy of ICG-       delivering 3 W of laser power (1,064 nm wavelength, CW). In
laser treatment of solid tumors. To test this hypothesis, we            comparison, the flat-cleaved fiber carbonized the fat tissue sample
quantified the effect of local hyperthermia on ICG accumulation in       while delivering 1 W of power.
the tumor site prior to NIR laser therapy.                              Conclusion: These novel fiberoptic microneedles avoided
Study: Three groups of A/J mice were inoculated with mammary            carbonization of the tissue and thermal damage to the
adenocarcinoma cells. Tumor sizes ranged from 7 to 9 mm. The            microneedle while providing a greater homogeneous light
first group received an intravenous saline injection prior to laser      distribution than any existing optical diffuser at this scale.
treatment. The second received ICG prior to laser treatment. The        Promising new modality for the treatment of acne scars in skin of
third was irradiated with a 808-nm NIR laser (5 mm, 0.2 seconds,        color.
                        American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts                                                     15
                                                                      Background: Laser speckle imaging (LSI) is a technique in
        CUTANEOUS LASER                                               which imaging of coherent light remitted from an object results in
                                                                      a speckle pattern. The spatio-temporal statistics of this pattern is
            SURGERY                                                   related to the movement of optical scatterers, such as red blood
                                                                      cells, and image processing algorithms are applied to produce
                                                                      speckle flow index (SFI) maps, which are representative of tissue
                                                                      blood flow. If performed in real time, LSI can play an important
#46                                                                   role in image-guided surgery. Previous publications reported use
                                                                      of LSI as a tool in assessing photocoagulation during laser
INVESTIGATION INTO SAFE AND EFFECTIVE                                 treatment of port wine stain (PWS) birthmarks; however, the time
TREATMENT INTERVALS OF PORT WINE STAINS                               necessary to acquire and process images rarely allowed for
USING THE PULSED DYE LASER                                            immediate feedback during laser treatment. Therefore, we
                                                                      integrated graphics-processing-unit (GPU)-based processing into
Robert Anolik Tracey Newlove, Elliot T. Weiss,
                                                                      our clinical LSI instrument.
Anne Chapas, Leonard Bernstein,
                                                                      Study: With real-time LSI, we have imaged 22 patients ranging
Roy G. Geronemus
                                                                      from 2 to 64 years of age. Imaging at eight frames per second, we
Laser and Skin Surgery Center of New York, New York, NY               continuously calculate SFI values for both the treated PWS
Background: Pulsed dye laser (PDL) therapy is a proven                regions as well as the surrounding normal tissue. We look to see if
therapeutic option in the management of port wine stains (PWSs).      treated regions show a uniform reduction in flow exhibited by
Although several studies demonstrate greater efficacy when             decreased SFI values, similar to that of surrounding normal
treatment is initiated as soon as possible, optimal treatment         tissue. If the treated region appears to have high or non-uniform
intervals are not yet defined. We suggest more frequent treatment      SFI values, that area will undergo retreatment.
intervals may capitalize on the therapeutic advantage of              Results: In general, SFI values within treated regions showed a
delivering additional therapy at more responsive younger ages. In     progressive decrease with each treatment pass, as well as a border
addition, more frequent sessions might expedite overall treatment     of hyperemia surrounding the treated region. With real-time
period. The purpose of this study is to assess the relative safety    feedback, the physician was in most cases able to achieve uniform
and efficacy of PDL treatments at 2-, 3-, and 4-week intervals         vascular shutdown in the region of interest.
among patients with PWSs.                                             Conclusion: Access to real-time blood-flow maps enables direct
Study: This is a retrospective chart review of infants with PWSs      visualization of the degree of photocoagulation achieved with
who received at least five PDL treatments in a private                 pulsed-dye laser therapy. In several cases, we have retreated
dermatology center. Twenty-four patients were randomly selected       regions with persistent perfusion, to achieve complete vascular
by including the first eight PWS patients found to have been           shutdown, which is the hallmark of a successful PWS treatment
treated every 2 weeks, every 3 weeks, and every 4 weeks on review     session.
of charts in reverse chronological order. Charts were screened for
adverse events and efficacy was assessed by comparison of
photographs before and after five treatment sessions by blinded,       #48
non-treating dermatologists.
Results: Adverse events were equivalent in all interval groups        THE USE OF LONG PULSED LASER ND:YAG
and only included expected side effects of erythema, swelling, and    LASER IN THE TREATMENT OF PEDIATRIC
bruising. These findings resolved before subsequent treatment          VENOUS MALFORMATION
sessions in all groups. No group showed any long-term adverse
                                                                      Stratos Sofos, Se Hwang Liew
event. In addition, all interval groups showed a diminished
appearance of their PWSs. Notably, more frequent treatment            Liverpool, United Kingdom
interval groups demonstrated more rapid and effective resolution      Background: Venous malformation in the pediatric population
of their PWSs relative to less frequent groups, taking into account   can present with pain, bleeding or debilitating deformity, which
anatomic location.                                                    can be difficult to manage. Sclerotherapy, surgery and more
Conclusion: PDL treatments at 2-, 3-, and 4-week intervals            recently the long pulsed Nd:YAG laser have been used with
permit safe and effective management of PWSs. Shorter                 variable success rates. We aim to investigate the use of the long
treatment intervals, however, allowed for relatively more rapid       pulsed Nd:YAG laser in treating symptomatic venous
and effective treatment. Practitioners treating PWSs should           malformation, and to identify the specific group of patients most
consider these findings when establishing their own treatment          likely to benefit from such treatment.
protocols.                                                            Study: A prospective clinical trial was carried out on 59
                                                                      consecutive patients. Treatment criteria include large facial
                                                                      deformity, painful or bleeding lesions. One to three treatments
                                                                      were given at 6–8 weekly intervals. Results were evaluated both
#47                                                                   subjectively and objectively.
                                                                      Results: A total of 59 patients were treated. The average follow-
REAL-TIME LASER SPECKLE IMAGING AS AN                                 up was 24 months. Subjective and objective assessment of efficacy
INTRAOPERATIVE DIAGNOSTIC TOOL DURING                                 correlated well, and all patients achieved good to excellent results
TREATMENT OR PORT WINE STAIN                                          in pain and bleeding control and in reducing size of lesions in lip
BIRTHMARKS                                                            and oral mucosa. It is, however, not effective in reducing the size
Bruce Yang, Owen Yang, Kristen Kelly,                                 of large, relatively high flow lesions in the limbs. Complications
J. Stuart Nelson, Bernard Choi                                        from treatment include skin blistering (n ¼ 4), ulceration (n ¼ 4)
Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic,                           and subsequent hypertrophic scarring (n ¼ 3). Three patients had
University of California, Irvine, CA                                  partial.
16                       American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts
Conclusion: Complex venous malformation cannot be cured, but            absorption, shorter pulsewidths and higher fluences than
can be symptomatically controlled with the long pulsed Nd:YAG           previous intense pulsed light (IPL) devices.
laser. The treatment satisfaction is high, and there is a small but     Study: Sixteen subjects were enrolled with unwanted facial
definite risk of scarring from treatment.                                telangiectasia. This study was approved by IRB and all subjects
                                                                        provided signed informed consent. Facial areas were split
                                                                        vertically and the two sides randomized to receive up to three
#50                                                                     treatments approximately one month apart with either PDL
                                                                        (VStar1, Cynosure, Westford, MA) or OPL (MaxGTM Optimized
OPTIMIZED SPECTRAL OUTPUT AND PULSE                                     Light Handpiece, Palomar, Burlington, MA). PDL used 595 nm,
SHAPES FOR VASCULAR TREATMENTS                                          10 milliseconds, 10 mm spot and average fluence of 8.2 Æ 0.1 J/
Robert Weiss, E. Victor Ross, Emil Tanghetti, David                     cm2. OPL used spectral range of 500–670 and 870–1,200 nm;
B. Vasily, James Childs, Mikhail Smirnov, Gregory                       10 milliseconds; 10 mm  15 mm tip, and average fluence of
Altshuler                                                               35.5 Æ 0.9 J/cm2. Subjects were seen for follow-up at 48–96 hours,
Maryland Laser, Skin and Vein Institute, Baltimore, MD;                 and 1–2 months. Clinical photographs were taken at each visit to
Scripps Clinic, San Diego, CA; Center for Dermatology and               score improvement on a 0 (0%) to 5 (100%) Telangiectasia Grading
                                                                        Scale (TGS). Presence and severity of side effects were recorded.
Laser Surgery, Sacramento, CA; Aesthetica Cosmetic &
Laser Surgery Center, Bethlehem, PA; Palomar Medical                    Results: Most commonly reported side effects at 48–96 hours
Technologies, Burlington, MA                                            were mild, transient purpura (62%), and mild to moderate edema
Background: An optimized pulsed-light (OPL) device is                   (21%) and erythema (18%) which resolved completely by 1–2
                                                                        months and were comparable with both study devices. All subjects
described and its performance is compared with two pulsed dye
laser (PDL) systems in a vascular phantom setup and with                improved with 12/15 (80.0%) subjects having a TGS score of 3 or
computer modeling. Clinical case studies are described to evaluate      more (50–75%) with OPL versus 11/15 (73.3%) of subjects treated
                                                                        with PDL. There were no differences in subject self-assessment
OPL treatment of facial vascular lesions.
Study: The OPL (MaxGTM, Palomar Medical Technologies)                   between the two devices.
provides a dual-band output spectrum from 500 to 670 nm and 850         Conclusion: The new OPL tested in this study, with enhanced
to 1,200 nm with pulse widths 3–100 milliseconds and fluences to         spectral specificity for vasculature, treated facial telangiectasia
                                                                        successfully and was equivalent to PDL.
80 J/cm2. Two PDL systems (VBeam and Perfecta, Candela Corp.)
provide 595 nm laser pulses (1.5, 3, 6, or 10 milliseconds). The OPL
spectral and power output is characterized and described. A
vascular phantom consists of quartz capillaries filled with              #52
hemoglobin and placed beneath 1 mm thick porcine skin.
Capillary temperatures are measured with a FLR 4000 IR camera           ANGIOGENESIS MEDIATOR ALTERATIONS IN
during the pulse sequence. In order to determine PDL and OPL            ANGIOMAS AFTER PULSED DYE LASER
settings to treat the phantom, purpuric threshold fluences for           TREATMENT
each device and pulse width were determined clinically on back          Kristen Kelly, Belinda Dao, Janelle Marshall,
skin. Typical clinical settings for OPL were 50–100 J/cm2,              Amy Nguyen, Vivian Laquer, Elizabeth Rugg,
100 milliseconds and 28–38 J/cm2, 10 milliseconds.                      Ronald Harris
Results: At purpuric threshold settings (PDL, 8 J/cm2,                  Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of
3 milliseconds and OPL, 38 J/cm2, 3 milliseconds), the OPL (88C)
                                                                        California, Irvine, CA
caused 60% higher vessel temperature rise than the PDL (58C).           Background: Tissue effects of vascular lesion laser treatment are
The fraction of near-IR energy from the OPL increases from 35%          incompletely understood. Injury caused by pulsed dye laser
to 60% with decreasing power or increasing pulse width                  treatment may result in altered expression of mediators associated
(3 milliseconds, 30 J/cm2 to 100 milliseconds, 100 J/cm2) and
                                                                        with angiogenesis. An understanding of laser effects on angiogenesis
contributes approximately 15% to phantom vessel heating at 36 J/        may allow development of novel and improved treatment
cm2, 3 milliseconds. Clinical results demonstrated effective deep       techniques. Our objective is to evaluate tissue presence of vascular
vessel closure and clearance of telangiectasia.                         endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor
Conclusion: An optimized pulsed arc-lamp device is more
                                                                        (BFGF), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and angiopoietin 2
efficient at larger and deeper vessel treatments with lower risk of      (ANG-2) in angiomas before and 1 week after laser treatment.
purpura compared to the PDL devices using a vascular phantom            Study: Three subjects had one angioma treated with a pulsed dye
setup. Clinical correlation is seen with treatment of facial vascular
                                                                        laser (7 mm; 1.5 milliseconds; 9 J/cm2; 30 milliseconds of cryogen
lesions of various sizes.                                               with a 30 milliseconds delay). One week later, three biopsies were
                                                                        taken: normal skin; untreated angioma; angioma treated with
                                                                        laser. Tissue was frozen and sections processed for
#51                                                                     immunohistochemistry staining of VEGF, BFGF, MMP-9, and
                                                                        ANG-2. Images were taken and were graded in a blinded fashion
SPLIT-FACE RANDOMIZED TREATMENT OF                                      by a board certified dermatopathologist.
FACIAL TELANGIECTASIA COMPARING PULSED                                  Results: Untreated angiomas demonstrated a slight increase in
DYE LASER AND A NEW OPTIMIZED LIGHT                                     VEGF and ANG-2 expression compared to normal skin. Following
HANDPIECE                                                               laser treatment, an increase in ANG-2 and MMP-9 was noted.
Emil Tanghetti                                                          Conclusion: Alterations in angiogenesis mediators were noted
Center for Dermatology and Laser Surgery, Sacramento, CA                after laser therapy. Observed changes associated with laser
Background: This study was designed to compare treatment of             treatment were different as compared to those reported with other
facial telangiectasia with a pulsed dye laser (PDL) and a new           injuries such as punch biopsies. Further understanding of laser
optimized light handpiece (OPL) that provides enhanced spectral         induced alterations may be used to optimize treatment outcomes.
                         American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts                                                      17
#53                                                                                                                  2
                                                                       and the average treatment area was 280 cm . Patients were
                                                                       treated were biopsied prior to treatment with fractional CO2
NON-ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL LASER                                          Ultrapulse laser (Lumenis Corp). The area was marked and
RESURFACING FOR THE TREATMENT OF SCARS                                 photographed. Over a 6-month timeframe, three treatments were
AND GRAFTS AFTER MOHS MICROGRAPHIC                                     performed on subjects. A follow-up biopsy was performed on all
SURGERY: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL                                 subjects 1 month after final treatment. Biopsies were stained with
Evelien Verhaeghe, Katia Ongenae, Jessica                              collagen stains and reviewed by dermatopathologists.
Bostoen, Jo Lambert                                                    Results: Patients had significant improvement in gross
                                                                       histological appearance of hypertrophic burn scars. Collagen
University Hospital Ghent, Gent, Belgium
Background: Mohs micrographic surgery is a tissue sparing              subtype profiles returned toward normal ratios.
surgical technique for removal of skin cancer in the head and neck     Conclusion: Treatment with fractional CO2 lasers of mature
                                                                       burn scars improves the histological gross appearance of these
region. To optimize the cosmetic result of the scars and skin grafts
after surgery non-invasive procedures as non ablative fractional       scars. Additionally, the type of collagen produced trends toward
laser resurfacing are a treatment of choice. The objective of this     normal ratios.
study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 1,540 nm non-
ablative fractional laser (NAFL) in the treatment of scars and full
thickness grafts after Mohs surgery.                                   #55
Study: Intra-individual randomized controlled trial (RCT) with
split lesion design and single blinded outcome evaluations.            SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT OF POST BURN
Patients receive four treatments at monthly interval with NAFL
                                                                       SCARS WITH FRACTIONAL CO2 LASER IN INDIAN
(Starlux-300 with Lux 1,540 nm fractional hand piece (Palomar          SKIN
Technologies)). Patients are evaluated 1 and 3 months after the        Niteen Dhepe, Ashok Naik, Sahil Dhavan, Shilpa
last treatment. Primary outcome measures are clinical efficacy          Shah
(assessed by blinded on site visual and palpable Physician Global      Pune, India
Assessment (PhGA)), adverse effects and pain (assessed by a            Background: There are no reports from India of treatment of
visual analogue scale (VAS)). Patients Global Assessment (PGA)         post burn scars with lasers. We present a report of successful
was also measured.                                                     treatment of post burn scars with a novel fractional CO2 laser
Results: Preliminary results based on 18 patients show a               delivery system.
significant difference of the PhGA comparing the laser treated          Study: Patients (24) with post-burn scars of average 6-year
parts to the untreated control side 1 (P ¼ 0.04) and 3 months          duration were treated with Ultrapulse Deep FX fractional CO2
(P ¼ 0.007) after treatment (Wilcoxon signed rank test). Patients      laser. Typical protocol is three treatments at an interval of 2–3
experienced mild to moderate pain (median VAS score 3.1) during        months in between and used 0.12 mm spots with density 5%,
the treatment. Four days after treatment patients reported             single stacking and pulse fluence of 20 mJ to 35 mJ/pulse as per
erythema (69%), edema (38%), crusts (17%), burning sensation           thickness of scar with topical tetracaine 7% and lignocaine 7%.
(13%), purpura (6%) and vesicles (3%). No long-term adverse            The scars are assessed for thickness, surface wrinkling, color
effects were seen 3 months after the last treatment. There is also a   match with surrounding at the time of each treatment, 1, 2, and 3
significant difference of the PGA 1 (P ¼ 0.02) and 3 months             months post-operatively after last sitting by two independent
(P ¼ 0.01) after the last treatment (Wilcoxon signed rank test).       dermatologists on VAS of 4. Pain during treatment is scored by
Conclusion: Based on these preliminary results non-ablative            patient on a VAS of 4.
1,540 nm fractional laser seems to be a safe and effective treatment   Results: Three months after three sessions of fractional CO2
for the improvement of scars and grafts after Mohs surgery.            treatment reduced the scar thickness to a mean VAS score of 3.47
                                                                       out of 4. The score increased from 2.14 before second sitting to 3.47
                                                                       at 3rd month follow-up of last sitting. Reduction in scar surface
#54                                                                    wrinkling was 3.85, and color match to surrounding was 2.89 on a
                                                                       VAS scale of 4. Pain during procedure scored by patient was 1.12
HISTOLOGIC CHARACTERISTICS OF MATURE                                   on scale of 4 using topical anesthesia.
BURN SCARS BEFORE AND AFTER THREE                                      Conclusion: Fractional CO2 laser with DeepFx scanner is a well
TREATMENTS WITH FRACTIONAL CO2 LASER                                   tolerated and effective treatment of hypertrophic post-burn scars
David Ozog, Marsha Chaffins, Ronald Moy,                                in Indian patients.
Elizabeth Farhat
Henry Ford Hospital Detroit, MI; UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
Background: Treatment of mature burn scars (greater than 1             #56
year since injury) have been reported to show clinical
improvement after treatment with fractional CO2 lasers in non-
                                                                       TREATMENT OF SCARS WITH A NEW HANDHELD
controlled studies and case reports. Currently, there are no           810 NM LASER
prospective reports showing the histological and gene expression       Nathalie Fournier
changes after treatments. Additionally, little is known about the      Clapiers, France
remodeling of collagen by subtype after treatment. This                Background: Previous evaluations have demonstrated that a
prospective study intended to quantify the changes to collagen         novel 810 nm diode laser system could improve skin healing
gross structure as well as changes in type I and type III collagen     leading to a scar reduction 1,2. This technique named Laser
after treatment. Additional gene parameters were also examined.        Assisted Skin Healing (LASH) has demonstrated its efficacy in
Study: Ten patients with mature burn scars were recruited from         plastic surgery. This study aimed to demonstrate the interest of
the Grossman Burn Center in Sherman Oaks California. The               that laser for another application: patients with hypertrophic
average age was 35 years old, average body surface area was 35%,       scars or cheloids.
18                       American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts
Study: Patients with at least one hypertrophic active scars or          #58
cheloid, phototypes I to IV, were enrolled in this prospective study.
The scar was treated with a (Ekkylite, Ekkyo, Aix en Provence,          FRACTIONAL ABLATIVE RADIOFREQUENCY
France) 810 nm diode laser system delivering a top hat spot of          TREATMENT FOR SKIN TYPES V–VI: RISK-
20 mm  4 mm. Treatments were applied every 3 weeks. Clinical           BENEFIT ANALYSIS
evaluations, digital pictures, improvement of life quality, patient’s   Jennifer Chwalek, Mussarrat Hussain,
satisfaction were performed at each visit, then at 90 and 180 days      David Goldberg
after the last session.                                                 Skin Laser & Surgery Specialists of NY and NJ, New York, NY
Results: Fifteen patients, on decoletage, limbs, back, face,
                                                                        Background: Laser resurfacing has remained the gold standard
phototypes I to IV were included. Diminution of itching and             for the treatment of rhytides, dyspigmentation and skin laxity for
redness, reduced height and thickness, and whitening were noted         many years. However, the potential risks of resurfacing such as
mostly after three sessions on hypertrophic scars. Results were
                                                                        infection, prolonged erythema, pigmentary changes and scarring,
less reproducible on cheloids.                                          especially in darker skin types, have led to a search for safer and
Conclusion: This innovative 810 nm diode laser is a new device          more effective treatments. Radiofrequency (RF) technology
already used in practice for aesthetic surgery, and it may be           produces volumetric heating of the dermis to elicit collagen
utilized to improve hypertrophic scar and cheloid after surgery.
                                                                        shrinkage and skin tightening. Fractionated radiofrequency
                                                                        devices create controlled radiofrequency thermal zones (RFTZ) at
                                                                        regularly spaced intervals with intervening normal tissue. Unlike
#57                                                                     ablative and nonablative laser modalities, which cause significant
                                                                        epidermal damage, RF devices have minimal epidermal effect and
TREATMENT OF SCARS USING LASER AND                                      may be safer for darker skin types. To assess the safety and
LASER ASSISTED CORTICOSTEROID DELIVERY                                  efficacy of a new bipolar ablative radiofrequency device in
Jill Waibel, Stephen Davis, Emmy Graber,                                the treatment of rhytides and texture in patients with skin
Nathan Uebelhoer                                                        types V–VI.
                                                                        Study: Twenty-five male and female subjects 35–70 years of age
Miami Dermatology and Laser Institute: University of Miami
Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL; Boston University School of       with Fitzpatrick skin types V–VI with mild to moderate
Medicine and Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA; Naval Medical           photoaging were evaluated. Subjects underwent three monthly
                                                                        full-face treatments with the fractional ablative radiofrequency
Center San Diego, San Diego, CA
Background: Severe cutaneous scarring affects patients                  device. Energy settings were increased incrementally at each
following trauma, burns and surgical procedures. Treating a scar        treatment session as tolerated. Follow-up evaluations were
is a dynamic process since the scar changes as therapy progresses.      performed at each treatment interval and at 6 months following
                                                                        the final treatment. Two non-treating physicians evaluated each
A combination of vascular, pigment and resurfacing lasers may be
needed for maximal scar improvement. Fractional lasers create           subject for changes in rhytides and skin texture.
zones of ablation at variable depths. These zones may be used           Results: All subjects showed improvement in either rhytides or
immediately post-operatively to deliver drugs and other                 skin texture. Post-treatment erythema was seen in 10 subjects.
                                                                        Post-treatment swelling was seen in only 1 subject after 1
substances to synergistically create a therapeutic response. By
delivering topical or intralesional corticosteroids immediately         treatment. No pigmentary changes or scars was noted.
after fractional laser therapy the drug may take advantage of the       Conclusion: Bipolar fractional ablative radiofrequency
                                                                        treatments may be successfully used to treat photodamage in skin
ablative fractional channels to penetrate deep into dermal scars
and decrease fibroblast proliferation. Cutaneous scars can be            types V–VI.
complex and thus the approach to therapy may need to be
multimodal. A new combination therapy is suggested that
incorporates the use of one or more wavelengths of laser in the same
                                                                        #59
treatment session as topical or intralesional triamcinolone acetonide
to synergistically decrease hypertrophic and keloidal scars.
                                                                        THE EFFECTS OF FRACTIONAL
Study: Retrospective study with 15 subjects with hypertrophic or
                                                                        RADIOFREQUENCY MICRONEEDLE ON
keloidal scars from 3rd degree burn injury, surgical or traumatic
                                                                        PERIORBITAL WRINKLE OF KOREAN PATIENTS
injuries. Subjects were treated with three to five treatment             Won-Serk Kim, Ga-young Lee
sessions of at least one or more wavelengths of laser and same day      Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of
immediately post-operative topical or intralesional delivery of         Medicine, Seoul, Korea
triamcinolone acetonide injectable suspension into fractional           Background: Fractional radiofrequency microneedle (FRM), the
ablative tunnels. Three blinded investigators evaluated                 minimally invasive device using insertion microneedles of bipolar
photographs taken at baseline and 6 months after the final               and monopolar radiofrequency for deep dermal heating, has been
therapy session. Scores were assigned using a quartile                  used for various cosmetic problems in Korea. Asian periorbital
improvement score to evaluate overall improvement, dyschromia,          skin is thicker than white people, so more powerful dermal
degree of hypertrophy and texture.                                      heating is necessary. We investigated the usefulness of FRM for
Results: Combination same session laser therapy and post-               periorbital wrinkle reduction.
operative corticosteroid delivery resulted in average overall           Study: Twenty healthy volunteers with periorbital wrinkle over
improvement of 2.73/3.0. Dyschromia showed the least amount of          grade 2 participated in this study. Every patients had three
improvement with texture showing the most improvement.                  treatments with 1-month interval and checked clinical
Conclusion: Combination same session therapy with multiple              photograph, adverse problems and questionnaire about subjective
laser wavelengths and laser assisted delivery of topical or             satisfaction and discomforts during 6 months. Pre- and post-
intralesional triamcinolone acetonide may offer an efficient, safe       clinical photographs were used for assessing wrinkle severity. It
and effective treatment of challenging cutaneous scars.                 was assessed by three independent, blinded dermatologists.
                         American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts                                                     19
Results: All patients were subjectively satisfied by FRM               Background: New energy based technologies are being
treatment. Seventeen among 20 patients had good or excellent          developed for effective subcutaneous fat removal with less
improvement, 3 had moderate improvement. Without transient            bleeding and minimal down time for the patient while easier,
bleeding or erythema, no serious adverse effects were found.          faster and smoother to operate for the physician. According to our
Conclusion: FRM enables the deep dermal fractional heating,           theoretical model, laser energy is the best choice for opening the
sparing the epidermis and upper dermis except the penetration         channel in the tissue while the RF energy when used in a bi-polar
site of needle. FRM is very safe and powerful tool for the            form is an optimal choice for volumetric heating around the
treatment of periorbital wrinkle, especially dark and thick           cannula allowing homogenous fat liquefaction. We investigated in
skinned Asian people.                                                 vivo the efficacy and safety of combined radiofrequency, laser
                                                                      lipolysis and liposuction.
                                                                      Study: An IRB approval was obtained in order to evaluate in vivo
#60                                                                   the safety and efficacy of this new RF/laser approach.
                                                                      Abdominoplasty patients (n ¼ 2) were infiltrated in a staged
BIPOLAR PARALLEL RADIOFREQUENCY FOR                                   approach with tumescent fluid. One-half of the abdomen was
REDUCTION DEPTH OF WRINKLES: A                                        treated with combined 940 nm CW Laser at 25 W and RF power
PROSPECTIVE STUDY VISUALIZED BY COLORED                               at 20 W while the other half was treated with SAL.
3D IMAGING SYSTEM                                                     Skin temperature, number of hand strokes and percent
Katharina Russe-Wilflingseder, Elisabeth Russe                         fat removed were evaluated as well as subjective ease of
Plastische Chirurgie und Laserzentrum, Innsbruck, Austria             treatment.
                                                                      Results: The RF/laser treatment required significantly fewer
Background: Demand in treatments for wrinkle reduction
without downtime can be satisfying by using the thermal effects of    hand strokes to achieve equal amount of fat (3.7 vs. 4.6 strokes per
the bipolar parallel radiofrequency (RF) for skin tightening          cc of fat) and resulted in increased fat extract (23%). The RF/laser
                                                                      approach was faster and easier to use for the operating surgeon
induced by neocollagenesis.
Study: In this prospective study the results of improvement of        especially in extremely fibrotic tissue (2.1 vs. 3.1 seconds per cc of
wrinkles after treatment with bipolar parallel RF were evaluated      fat). There was no significant increase in skin surface temperature
by 3D visualization and measurement (face areas). Twenty-five          during deep layer treatment. No adverse events or complications
                                                                      occurred.
areas on different body sites of 10 patients were treated five times
at an interval of 1 week between first to second procedure and of 2    Conclusion: The human data support the efficacy and safety of
weeks between second through fifth. Different handpieces (small        the combined RF and laser approach for subcutaneous fat
25–65 J/cm3, 2 seconds, vacuum 1–2; medium 20–60 J/cm3, 2–            removal.
3 seconds, vacuum 2–3; large 10–20 J/cm3, 2–3 seconds, vacuum
1–2) were used and adapted to treatment area. Small for thin skin
areas like periocular, medium for face, neck, hand and large for      #62
upper arms, abdomen. Density, pulse duration, number of passes
used depended on handpiece, area and skin condition. An               FRACTIONAL BIPOLAR RADIOFREQUENCY
integrated skin cooling controlled the emerging temperature           DELIVERED THROUGH A VACUUM-ASSISTED,
automatically to protect the epidermis. Improvement and side          MICRONEEDLE ARRAY FOR THE TREATMENT
effects were assessed independently by doctor and therapist.          OF ACNE SCARRING—A PILOT STUDY
Documentation and evaluation was done before and at week 4 and        Girish Munavalli, Robert Anderson
12 after last treatment: Height and depth of wrinkles were            Dermatology Laser and Vein Specialists Charlotte, NC;
measured by a 3D imaging system; standardized photo                   Theravant Corporation, Pleasanton, CA
documentation was evaluated by therapist, doctor and                  Background: Device treatment of acne scarring has historically
independent observer using a visual analog scale (VAS 1–100).
                                                                      involved ablative laser resurfacing. Fractional resurfacing has
Patients rated wrinkle reduction, appearance of skin, overall         been shown to be effective with reduced downtime. However,
satisfaction using a VAS (1–100).                                     recent studies have shown prolonged erythema and post-
Results: Reduction of wrinkles improved over time. Better results     inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH), especially in darker skin
were verified at 3 months compared to one (P < 0.001) by all
                                                                      types. A vacuum-assisted radiofrequency (RF) device was utilized
evaluators. Patients rated mean improvement better (P < 0.003)        that spares the epidermis and precisely delivers RF in a fractional
than the other evaluators. 3D false color pictures waviness           pattern using microneedle array. Bipolar RF energy was delivered
calculation showed a reduction of the maximum height of wrinkles
                                                                      to dermal depths of 800–1,000 mm, using 1 mm long, 6 Â 4
up to 31%. Results depended on body site.                             microneedle array. Objectives were to show improvement in acne
Conclusion: Bipolar parallel radiofrequency is effective and safe     scarring, while minimizing epidermal injury and the resulting
to reduce depth of wrinkles. The improvement is statistically         complications thereof.
significant and increases up to 3 months.
                                                                      Study: Twelve subjects (Fitzpatrick skin types II–V) with
                                                                      moderate to severe acne scarring were recruited. The appearance
                                                                      and distribution of the lesions involved the bilateral cheeks, and
#61                                                                   was roughly equivalent in severity. Treatments were randomized
                                                                      to one side, with contralateral side as control. Each patient
A NOVEL ENERGY ASSISTED LIPOLYSIS                                     received four treatments (each treatment was three passes,
APPROACH USING COMBINED RF AND LASER                                  totalling 20 minutes) at 3- to 4-week intervals. Baseline and post-
TECHNOLOGY                                                            treatment standardized photography was obtained. Unlabeled
Jason Pozner, Haim Epstein, Boris Vaynberg,                           baseline and 6-month photography were evaluated by a blinded,
Ruthie Amir                                                           non-treating physician assessor using a quartile grading scale to
Cleveland Clinic, Weston, FL; Syneron Yokneam Illit, Israel           denote improvement.
20                       American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts
Results: Blinded assessment correctly identified the treated side       pigmentation after fewer treatments as well as more persistent
over control side in 11/12 patients. Patients (10/12) were graded as   improvement of photodamage at long-term follow-up.
having at least 50% improvement in the appearance, with 6/10           Adverse effects were limited to transient erythema and edema
showing 75% or greater improvement. Average downtime as                localized to the treatment site. Histologic results will be
reported by subjects was less than 4 days, and no incidence of         presented.
prolonged erythema or post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation               Conclusion: Combination laser treatment with a 1,550 nm
were noted by subjects or the blinded assessor. Histology of post-     erbium-doped fiber laser and 1,927 nm thulium fiber laser and
auricular treated skin showed typical fractional columnar              treatment with the 1,927 nm thulium fiber laser alone yielded a
collagen heating.                                                      significant decrease in the clinical appearance of actinic lesions
Conclusion: In this pilot study, vacuum-assisted bipolar RF            and improvement of pigmentation and overall photodamage. One
energy delivered by microneedle array appears to be a safe and         month after four treatments spaced 3–5 weeks apart, the mean
effective treatment option for treating acne scarring. Other           reduction in the number of AK lesions was greater than 75%. At 1-
attractive features of this technology included rapid treatment        month, 3-months, and 6-months after 3–4 treatments, the side
times, minimal downtime, and no PIH.                                   treated with the 1,927 nm laser alone experienced greater clinical
                                                                       reduction in AK counts. Furthermore, pigmentation changes were
                                                                       noticeably superior on the side treated by the 1,927 nm alone at
#64                                                                    long-term follow-up.

1,550 NM AND 1,927 NM FRACTIONAL LASER
RESURFACING FOR THE TREATMENT OF                                       #65
ACTINIC KERATOSIS AND PHOTODAMAGE: A
COMPARATIVE STUDY                                                      LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP OF 1,927 NM
Paul M. Friedman, Jennifer M. Landau,                                  FRACTIONAL RESURFACING FOR ACTINIC
Megan N. Moody, Denise Marquez,                                        KERATOSES ON THE FACE
Jennifer D. Peterson, Leonard H. Goldberg,                             Elliot Weiss, Rob Anolik, Lori Brightman,
Irene J. Vergilis-Kalner                                               Anne Chapas, Elizabeth Hale, Julie Karen,
DermSurgery Associates Houston, TX; Goldman, Butterwick &              Leonard Bernstein, Roy Geronemus
Associates Cosmetic Laser Dermatology, San Diego, CA                   Laser & Skin Surgery Center of New York, New York, NY
Background: The primary objective of this study was to compare         Background: Actinic keratoses (AK) are precancerous epidermal
the safety and efficacy of a combination treatment with a 1,550 nm      proliferations seen on photo-damaged skin. A fractionated
erbium-doped fiber laser and 1,927 nm thulium laser versus              1,927 nm thulium laser has received FDA approval for treating
treatment with the 1,927 nm thulium fiber laser alone for the           AK. This device delivers microscopic thermal zones within treated
treatment of actinic keratosis (AK) on the face. Secondary             skin using a wavelength with moderate/high water absorption.
objectives included the evaluation of the improvement of skin          The resulting laser–tissue interaction creates precise, superficial
pigmentation and overall photodamage, specifically rhytides,            zones of thermal damage best suited for removal of epidermal
lentigines, and texture.                                               lesions such as AK. We assess the long-term safety and efficacy of
Study: Fifteen patients, ages 52–82 years, with Fitzpatrick skin       1,927 nm fractional resurfacing of facial AK.
types I–III and multiple actinic lesions underwent 1–4 split-face      Study: Twenty-five subjects with facial AK receiving up to four
treatments at 3- to 5-week intervals. Half of the face was treated     treatments (2- to 6-week intervals) with a 1,927 nm laser (Fraxel
with the 1,927 nm thulium fiber laser and the other half was            Dual, Solta Medical, Hayward, CA) were followed for 6 months.
treated with a combination of the 1,550-nm erbium-doped fiber           Topical anesthetic and optional ketorolac were administered
laser followed by the 1,927 nm thulium fiber laser. Laser settings      1 hour before treatment. Treatment parameters ranged from 5 to
were as follows: the 1,927 nm thulium fiber laser was set at            20 mJ/pulse with coverage densities of 30–70%.
fluences of 10–20 mJ and treatment levels of 5–11, corresponding        Results: Individual AK counts decreased in all patients during
to 40–70% surface area coverage, 4–8 passes. The 1,550-nm              treatment. One month after the final treatment, average AK
erbium-doped fiber laser was set at fluences of 20–40 mJ and             clearance per patient was 88.9% (n ¼ 20, range 63–100%). At 3
treatment levels of 5–8, corresponding to 14–23% surface area          months, average AK clearance was 87.5% (n ¼ 16, range 63–100).
coverage, 4 passes. The number of AKs was counted at baseline          At 6 months, average AK clearance was 75% (n ¼ 8, range 58–
and at all treatment and follow-up visits. Photodamage and             100%). The average patient score for treatment discomfort was 3/
pigmentation were assessed using a quartile grading scale.             10. Post-treatment, mild/moderate erythema and mild exfoliation
Biopsies at baseline and 6-month follow-up were taken from both        lasted approximately 7 days. No incidents of infection or scarring
sides of the face and stained for p16 and p53.                         were observed. At 3 months, average scores for improvement in
Results: The percent reduction in AK count 1 month after 1, 2, 3,      photo-damage and AK were 3.3/4 for both subject and investigator
and 4 combination laser treatments was 47%, 66%, 75%, and 76%,         ratings. For skin texture and pigmentation, average improvement
respectively. The percent reduction in AK count 1 month after 1, 2,    scores were 3.0/4 and 3.1/4 for subject and investigator ratings,
3, and 4 treatments with the 1,927 nm laser alone was 43%, 57%,        respectively. At 6 months, average scores for improvement in
71%, and 83%, respectively. The percent reduction in AK count 3        photo-damage and AK were 3.5/4 and 3.8/4 for subject and
months after 3–4 treatments (n ¼ 5) was 57% after combination          investigator, respectively. For skin texture and pigmentation,
laser treatments and 67% after 1,927-nm laser treatments alone.        improvement scores were 3.5/4 and 3.7/4 for subject and
The percent reduction in AK count 6 months after four treatments       investigator, respectively.
(n ¼ 4) was 55% after 1,927 nm laser alone treatments. The             Conclusion: 1,927 nm fractional resurfacing safely results in
majority of patients showed moderate to marked improvement in          dramatic clinical clearing of AK with sustained clearance
pigmentation and photodamage. In the facial areas treated with         observed over 6 months follow-up. This well-tolerated treatment
the 1,927 nm alone, evaluators noticed greater improvement in          is an effective new field therapy for facial AK.
                         American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts                                                    21
#66                                                                    treatment parameters were CIF 41.6 (À73 mW/cm ) for2

                                                                       60 minutes per site at the desired anatomical region. The areas
NON-ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL RESURFACING                                    treated included the abdomen and love handles. At baseline visit,
WITH THE 1,927 NM THULIUM LASER IS AN                                  their weight was measured and caliper measurement was used at
EFFECTIVE, WELL-TOLERATED TREATMENT                                    the maximum area of fat when standing. Standard photographs
FOR ACTINIC CHEILITIS                                                  were taken with Canfield Visia CR system1. They were followed-
Robert Anolik, Paul M. Friedman, Elliot T. Weiss,                      up 2 months after, when the physician will perform assessment
Anne Chapas, Lori Brightman, Elizabeth K. Hale,                        then a second treatment. Subjects were followed-up again 2
Julie K. Karen, Leonard Bernstein,                                     months post-second treatment.
Roy G. Geronemus, Leonard H. Goldberg,                                 Results: During the study, the weight of the subjects remained
Abdul K. El Tal                                                        relatively constant. For both the abdomen and love handles, there
                                                                       was a statistically significant improvement after one treatment
Laser and Skin Surgery Center of New York, New York, NY;
DermSurgery Associates; MD Anderson Cancer Center Houston,             (P < 0.001, P ¼ 0.003) with a further improvement after a second
TX                                                                     treatment (P ¼ 0.02, P ¼ 0.084). However, the decrease in
Background: Actinic cheilitis is an ultraviolet radiation-induced      measurement with the caliper was of lesser extend with the
                                                                       second treatment compared to the first. Control sites had no
transformation of the vermillion portion of the lower lip. The
finding raises medical and cosmetic concerns, as it is both             significant difference post-treatment.
premalignant and disfiguring. Despite some having apparently            Conclusion: Multiple treatment with a cryolipolysis device for
focal involvement, the entire vermillion should be considered          body contouring in Chinese patients demonstrated a cumulative
                                                                       effect.
during treatment, as actinic cheilitis tends to be a multifocal and
diffuse process. Absent from existing treatment options are well-
tolerated procedures with little side effect or downtime. Recent
evidence finds nonablative fractional resurfacing using the             #68
thullium 1,927 nm laser as effective and well tolerated for the
treatment of actinic keratosis. The objective of this study is to      TREATMENT OF THE DERMIS AND HYPODERMIS
assess its efficacy and tolerability for actinic cheilitis.             JUNCTION WITH WATER AND FAT SELECTIVE
Study: This is a multicenter, retrospective chart review of            LASER WAVELENGTHS USING OPTICAL
patients presenting with actinic cheilitis to a private laser and      COMPRESSION PINS
skin surgery center. Upon chart review in reverse chronological        Brian Zelickson, Susan Walgrave,
order, the first fifteen patients found to have been treated with the    Irmina Wallander, James Childs, David Tabatadze,
nonablative fractional 1,927 nm laser for actinic cheilitis were       Mikhail Smirnov, Gregory Altshuler
selected for analysis. All patients were pretreated with topical
                                                                       Zel Skin and Laser Specialists, Edina, MN; Marshfield Clinic,
anesthetic creams and given oral antiviral prophylaxis. Efficacy        Marshfield, WI; Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc., Burlington,
was rated using a quartile improvement scale (0–25%, 25–50%,           MA
50–75%, and 75–100%) by three blinded, non-treating staff              Background: Indications benefiting from deep reticular and
dermatologists using pre- and post-treatment standardized
                                                                       hypo-dermis remodeling include cellulite, deep wrinkles and
photographs. Charts were also reviewed for any adverse effects.        scars. 1,540 and 1,208 nm laser micro-beams (mb) are co-aligned
Results: Actinic cheilitis showed marked improvement after laser       with optical pins to provide skin compression that minimizes
therapy. All patients showed either 50–75% or 75–100%
                                                                       epidermal injury while treating deeper skin layers. The fractional
improvement after just one or two treatments. No adverse effects       devices are characterized ex vivo and clinically.
were observed, and the only side effects were mild erythema and        Study: The 1,540 nm device delivers up to 70 mJ/mb in an array of
edema of 1–4 days duration.                                            49 pyramid-shaped pins (the XDTM optic, Palomar Medical
Conclusion: The non-ablative fractional thullium 1,927 nm laser
                                                                       Technologies, Inc., Burlington, MA). The 1,208 nm prototype
a well tolerated and effective global treatment strategy for           consisted of a five-pin array delivering 4 W/mb in 5–20 seconds
patients with actinic cheilitis. The treatment is achieved without     pulse widths. Porcine skin was treated ex vivo. Abdominal skin of
any downtime or significant adverse effects.                            two subjects was treated and biopsied prior to abdominoplasty.
                                                                       Coagulation profiles were assessed with cell viability staining
                                                                       (NBTC) of sections. Effects of compression were assessed clinically
#67                                                                    by measuring the size of pigmented spots on volar forearms or
                                                                       back 2 days post-treatment with the 1,540 device and by
MULTIPLE TREATMENT, NON-INVASIVE                                       measuring skin transmission through the fingers’ webs with a
CRYOLYPOLYSIS FOR BODY CONTOURING IN                                   1,450 nm test device. Medial or lateral thighs of two subjects were
CHINESE PATIENTS                                                       treated with the 1,208 device under local anesthesia and
Samantha Y. Shek, Nicola P.Y. Chan,                                    evaluated to 3 weeks post.
Henry H.L. Chan                                                        Results: In vivo skin transmission of 1,450 nm light increased
The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China                          and the diameters of the 1,540 spots decreased with compression
Background: Non-invasive cryolipolysis has been demonstrated           time. The 1,540 device provided deeper coagulation to 1.5 mm
to be effective in body contouring. The objective of the study is to   depths and less epidermal injury than without compression. The
determine the efficacy of multiple treatments with a cryolipolysis      depths of the 1,208 device reached below 3 mm into the
device for body contouring in Chinese patients.                        hypodermis with papillary dermis preservation. Clinically
Study: This is a retrospective study where 12 patients, age 35–        palpable indurations persisted to 3 weeks post-treatment and
60, with discreet bulges were treated with two treatments of           resolved with no adverse side effects.
cryolipolysis at their own cost. On average, the two treatments        Conclusion: The fractional 1,208 and 1,540 nm devices
were 2 months apart. The cryolipolysis system was used and the         effectively de-couple depth of treatment from epidermal coverage
22                       American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts
to remodel deeper reticular dermis and hypodermis without               months. Photographs and physician self-assessments were
increased risk of epidermal injury side effects. Additional clinical    collected to 3 months. Suction cups were applied to sites with
evaluations are warranted.                                              200 mmHg vacuum pressure to measure the amount of drawn
                                                                        skin. Two subjects were tattooed and underwent split-body
                                                                        treatment followed by abdominoplasty 3 and 6 months later.
#69                                                                     Clinical endpoint for LAL was 458C temperature 3 mm below the
                                                                        skin. Localized hardness developed in one subject who did not
SIDE EFFECTS AND RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH                                  massage post-op. A fifth subject underwent abdominoplasty 9
CRYOLIPOLYSIS                                                           months post-LAL.
Nazanin Saedi, Jeffrey Dover, Micheal Kaminer,                          Results: The LAL-treated side had smoother contours, less
Christopher Zachary                                                     bruising and 10–20% less vacuum-drawn skin than the
                                                                        liposuction-only side. Skin contraction increased with time to 20–
SkinCare Physicians, Chestnut Hill, MA; University of California,
Irvine, CA                                                              30% vertical and 5–15% horizontal at 3 months on both sides. The
Background: Cryolipolysis, the non-invasive destruction of fat          local hardness was not palpable ex vivo but was sectioned and
cells by controlled cooling of a targeted treatment area, has been      analyzed histologically (H&E). Contour irregularities on the SAL-
                                                                        treated sites were greater than on the LAL-treated side, one
shown to be safe and effective in several clinical trials. During the
initial clinical studies involving 341 patients, common side effects    subject requested revisions to the SAL-side. The irregularities
included discomfort during treatment, followed by numbness,             were most pronounced 1 month post-op but still visible at 3
bruising, and soreness/aching. During the first year of clinical use,    months. Fibrotic tissue was easily identified 9 months post-LAL
                                                                        presumably coincident with the aspiration cannula and/or the
thousands of patients have been treated, allowing for more
thorough evaluation of adverse events.                                  laser fiber. No adhesion of the dermis to underlying fascia was
Study: Data were collected from three sources: clinical trials in       found.
                                                                        Conclusion: The results suggest that a laser adjunct to
which we (JD and MK) participated as investigators, side effects
reported to the manufacturer, and the authors’ clinical experience      liposuction can decrease bruising, improve contours and reduce
using the CoolSculpting procedure.                                      skin laxity compared with suction-assisted liposuction. Histology
Results: The most commonly reported side effects included               supports the view that thermally altered adipose connective
                                                                        tissue can affect skin laxity. Additional multi-site studies are
discomfort during treatment, numbness and tingling lasting an
average of 3.6 weeks, bruising, and erythema which was present          warranted.
in most cases and lasted only minutes. Vasovagal symptoms
during the treatment were very uncommon. Discomfort during
the procedure could be mitigated by reducing vacuum pressure,           #71
adjusting applicator placement, and through proper patient
selection. Several less common side effects, not encountered            A 24-WEEK CONTROLLED TRIAL TO ASSESS THE
during the original clinical studies, occurred in the first year of      EFFECTS OF AN INTENSE ULTRASOUND
commercial use during which over 30,000 treatments were                 TREATMENT ON LOWER FACE SKIN LAXITY
performed. These include severe pain, skin sensitivity, and skin        USING A NOVEL 3-D SELF-POSITIONING LASER
changes. Severe pain during and after the procedure was rare            SCANNER
(0.03%), and pain medications were not consistently effective.          Daniel Barolet, Mathieu Auclair, Francois Barolet,
This pain was self-limiting, resolving over a few weeks. The            Virginie C. Barolet, Isabelle Lussier
incidence of first or second degree burns and transient pigment          McGill University Montreal, Canada; RoseLab Skin Optics
changes were low (0.01%).                                               Research Laboratory, Montreal, Canada
Conclusion: The side effects and risks associated with                  Background: IUS exposure appears to be safe and effective to
cryolipolysis are transient and generally mild. The most
                                                                        treat skin laxity of the lower face. The novel 3D laser scanner is a
significant side effects are rare and include severe pain, skin          promising method for quantitative measurements of the lower
sensitivity, and skin changes, all of which appear to fully resolve     face following IUS treatment. Further trials to advance
spontaneously.                                                          therapeutic applications of this innovative approach are
                                                                        warranted.
                                                                        Study: This was 24-week single blinded randomized controlled
#70                                                                     clinical study. Twenty-four healthy adults (42- to 65-year old) with
                                                                        skin laxity of the lower face participated in this trial, and received
COMPARISON OF LASER-ASSISTED LIPOLYSIS                                  either one IUS treatment to the nasolabial folds, jowls, and
AND LIPOSUCTION: HISTOLOGY AND                                          submental areas, or served as controls (2:1). Change in skin
SPLIT-BODY CLINICAL RESULTS                                             morphology, measured by a 3D self-positioning handheld laser
Robert Weiss, Jeffrey Angobaldo, Sean Doherty,                          scanner (VIUscanTM), was determined by computing the ratio of
Brooke Seckel                                                           the target areas that underwent a variation of Æ 1 mm.
Maryland Laser, Skin and Vein Institute Baltimore, MD;                  Additional efficacy assessments included blinded clinical
Renaissance Plastic Surgery, Plano, TX; Boston Plastic Surgery          impression of change based on digital photographs, subject
Associates, Concord, MA                                                 assessments of pain and discomfort, treatment satisfaction, and
Background: Laser-assisted lipolysis (LAL) supplements                  adverse reactions.
liposuction (SAL) with laser heating of fat and connective tissue.      Results: Statistical significant differences in skin topographical
The two procedures are compared histologically and clinically in        changes between the IUS-treated and control subjects were
multiple-site, split-body studies.                                      observed for the submental and jowls areas at week 12 and week
Study: Two subjects underwent split-body fat-removal                    24, and for nasolabial folds, at week 24 (P < 0.05). Clinical
procedures for arms, thighs, back and flanks with follow-ups to 3        impression of change revealed that the majority of treated
                         American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts                                                     23
subjects improved, while the majority of control subject showed no     Background: In clinical practice, body contouring must achieve
change over the trial period (P < 0.01). Patients’ satisfaction with   subjective aesthetic improvement, but clinical trials require
treatment was high. IUS therapy was generally well tolerated           objective data for analysis. In a randomized controlled trial,
with no unusual adverse effects observed. The most common              noninvasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) was
adverse reactions included transitory mild erythema, oedema,           evaluated using change from baseline waist circumference
and parasthesia.                                                       (CBWC) as an objective surrogate marker of aesthetic
Conclusion: IUS exposure appears to be safe and effective to           outcome. This post hoc analysis compared CBWC with
treat skin laxity of the lower face. The novel 3D laser scanner is a   subjective investigator and patient assessments of aesthetic
promising method for quantitative measurements of the lower face       improvement.
following IUS treatment. Further trials to advance therapeutic         Study: One hundred eighty adults (mean [SD] age, 42 (11) years)
applications of this innovative approach are warranted.                with abdominal subcutaneous fat ¼ 2.5 cm thick and body mass
                                                                       index < 30 kg/m2 were randomized to HIFU of the anterior
                                                                       abdomen and flanks at energy levels (each of 3 passes total) of 47
#72                                                                    (141 total), 59 (177 total), or 0 (sham) J/cm2. CBWC at the level of
                                                                       the iliac crest was assessed at week 12 using validated assessment
A NOVEL METHOD FOR OBJECTIVELY                                         tools. Subjective endpoints included investigator-assessed Global
ASSESSING LIPOSUCTION OUTCOMES:                                        Aesthetic Improvement Scale and a patient satisfaction survey at
3-DIMENSIONAL SURFACE IMAGING                                          week 12.
Elliot Weiss, Lori Brightman, Roy Geronemus                            Results: After 12 weeks, least square mean CBWC was
                                                                       statistically significantly superior with 59-J/cm2 treatment
Laser & Skin Surgery Center of New York, New York, NY
Background: Although the field of body contouring is evolving           (À2.44 cm, P ¼ 0.01) and showed a nonsignificant trend toward
rapidly, quantitative methods of evaluating treatment outcomes         greater CBWC with 47-J/cm2 treatment (À2.06 cm, P ¼ 0.13)
                                                                       compared with sham (À1.43 cm). The proportion of patients rated
are lacking. Outcomes are often evaluated with qualitative
photographic comparisons and tape measure changes in                   by investigators as improved/very much improved was
circumference. These techniques introduce human error and do           significantly higher with 59-J/cm2 (78.3%) and 47-J/cm2 (72.4%)
not allow measurement of 3-dimensional (3D) changes in body            treatments compared with sham (15.5%). Similarly, the
                                                                       proportion of patients rating their abdomen as improved/very
shape. 3D photography enables precise circumference, skin
tightening, and volumetric measurements to be performed on pre-        much improved was greater with 59-J/cm2 (68.3%) and 47-J/cm2
and post-treatment 3D images. We present the first series of            (55.2%) treatments compared with sham (24.1%; P < 0.001 for
abdominal liposuction outcomes quantitatively evaluated using a        each comparison). Adverse events (AEs) included procedural/
                                                                       postprocedural discomfort, bruising, and edema. No serious AEs
3D photographic imaging system.
Study: Five female subjects underwent abdominal laser-assisted-        were reported.
liposuction procedures, and baseline and follow-up (average 11         Conclusion: Objective CBWC results and subjective
weeks) 3D photographic images were obtained for each treatment         physician and patient assessments each indicated that
                                                                       active HIFU treatments were superior to sham for reduction of
area. Corresponding baseline and follow-up image were aligned
using surface landmarks, and quantitative measurements of              waist circumference, suggesting that CBWC is a reliable
circumference, surface contour, and volume change were                 surrogate marker of overall aesthetic outcome for body
                                                                       contouring.
performed.
Results: In all treated subjects, 3D photography detected
decreases in abdominal circumference, surface contour, and
volume post-liposuction. For abdominal circumference, the              #74
average reduction at follow-up was 2.26 cm. For each abdominal
treatment area, average volume reduction at follow-up was 213 cc.      MELANIN OPTICAL DENSITY AS A PREDICTOR
3D imaging detected surface contour changes in all subjects            OF MAXIMUM TOLERATED FLUENCE FOR
corresponding to the liposuction treated areas.                        PHOTODERMATOLOGY
Conclusion: 3D photography allows investigators to reliably            Ilya Yaroslavsky, Gregory Altshuler,
detect and quantify minute changes in body shape. Using a 3D           Guangming Wang, Felicia Whitney, Henry Zenzie
photographic imaging system, we have demonstrated the ability          Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc., Burlington, MA
to reproducibly quantify circumference, surface contour, and           Background: Fitzpatrick skin typing (FST) is the standard
abdominal volume changes post-abdominal liposuction. 3D
                                                                       method used to predict maximum tolerated fluence for
imaging provides superior objective assessments of liposuction         photothermal treatments with visible/near-IR light. FST assesses
treatment outcomes.                                                    skin response to UV; however, for visible/near-IR wavelengths,
                                                                       melanin optical density (MOD) is more appropriate as a predictor
                                                                       of maximum tolerated fluence. The goal of this work was to find a
#73                                                                    correlation between maximum tolerated fluence and MOD. We
                                                                       present a retrospective analysis of data from five clinical studies.
HIGH-INTENSITY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND                                      Study: Maximum tolerated fluence was measured on over 150
DEVICE FOR NON-INVASIVE BODY                                           patients in five clinical studies with different 800 nm pulsed lasers
CONTOURING: AGREEMENT OF OBJECTIVE AND                                 and an intense pulsed light source with wavelengths from 400–
SUBJECTIVE AESTHETIC OUTCOMES                                          1,200 nm, 500–1,200 m, 500–650/850–1,200 nm, and 600–
Jeffrey Dover, Patrick Martin, Ira Lawrence,                           1,200 nm. Testing was conducted on the face, thigh, bikini line,
The Sculpt Group                                                       axilla, and back. FST was conducted by using a standard patient
Skin Care Physicians, Chestnut Hill, MA; Medicis Technologies          questionnaire, and MOD was measured in the test area by using a
Corporation, Scottsdale, AZ                                            dual-wavelength backscattering reflectometer. Maximum
24                       American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts
tolerated fluence was determined by treating the test areas with a     divided into two symmetrical parts which were then
series of laser pulses of increasing fluence and assessing the         randomized for treatment with either the administration of a
patient’s pain rating and erythema.                                   single Q-switched alexandrite laser exposure (755 nm,
Results: Strong correlation was found between the maximum             100 nanoseconds pulse duration, 3 mm spot size, 5.5 J/cm2), or four
tolerated fluence and the MOD. The MOD tended to increase with         consecutive exposures separated by 20 minutes. Digital
the skin type; however, strong variations of the MOD within given     photographs taken 3 months later were blindly evaluated to
skin type were observed. Effect of the pulsewidth on the maximum      compare tattoo lightening. Biopsies obtained before and
tolerated fluence was also observed, with higher MOD being more        immediately post-treatment from both halves were also compared
sensitive to changes of the pulsewidth.                               in blinded fashion.
Conclusion: MOD measurement can be used to predict                    Results: Immediate response after the first laser exposure
maximum tolerated fluence for visible/near-IR phototreatment           consisted of typical whitening which faded over the next
devices. The MOD measurement device can be integrated into the        20 minutes, while little or no whitening appeared right after
treatment device, which allows real-time MOD measurement and          subsequent exposures. Three months later, lightening was much
automatic adjustment of the treatment fluence.                         greater in all sites treated with four exposures delayed by
                                                                      20 minutes (the ‘‘R20’’ method), compared with sites treated
                                                                      conventionally with a single laser exposure (P < 0.01). In
#75                                                                   addition, a single treatment session using the ‘‘R20’’ method
                                                                      removed most of the tattoos. There was greater epidermal injury
QUALITY CONTROL AND THE PULSED DYE                                    with the ‘‘R20 method,’’ followed by transient pigmentary
LASER: WHEN NOT TO TREAT                                              changes. No permanent side effects or scarring occurred.
Joshua Shofner, Zeina Tannous, Mathew Avram                           Histology showed greater and deeper dispersion of tattoo ink with
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA                            the ‘‘R20’’ method.
                                                                      Conclusion: The ‘‘R20’’ method of tattoo removal was safe, well
Background: The availability of effective laser treatment for
cutaneous vascular lesions has risen dramatically in recent years.    tolerated and much more effective than conventional Q-switched
At the same time, there has been a proliferation of laser providers   laser treatment. This method can potentially reduce the number
with varying amounts of training—both medical and non-medical.        of treatment visits and/or increase overall efficacy for tattoo
                                                                      removal. New laser device technology is not required. Larger
Study: We performed a retrospective analysis of four cases from
our clinic, where patients presented for cosmetic evaluation of       prospective studies are warranted.
vascular lesions and were discovered to have more significant
pathologic disease.
Results: We report four separate cases with images in which           #77
prompt recognition of a pathologic skin finding directed the
healthcare provider to pursue a more aggressive work-up, leading      COMBINATION OF MULTIPLE Q-SWITCHED
to the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma, melanoma, connective        WAVELENGTHS IMPROVES TATTOO
tissue disease, and immune thrombocytopenic purpura.                  CLEARANCE COMPARED TO SINGLE
Conclusion: In presenting these cases, we hope to illuminate a        WAVELENGTH TREATMENT
basic differential diagnosis that exists for cutaneous vascular       Arielle Kauvar
lesions and remind healthcare providers that not all cosmetic         New York Laser & Skin Care, New York, NY
consults are benign in origin. There is a differential diagnosis
                                                                      Background: Q-switched lasers can safely lighten tattoos, but
framework that exists for vascular lesions that is worth reviewing,   treatment of multicolored tattoos usually requires six or more
and it should be considered in all patients presenting for laser      treatments, and incomplete pigment removal is common. The
treatment.                                                            purpose of this study was to determine whether using a
                                                                      combination of laser wavelengths could improve tattoo clearance
                                                                      in multicolored tattoos compared to single wavelength treatment.
#76                                                                   Study: This was an IRB-approved, prospective, split-lesion
                                                                      controlled trial of large ( > 6 cm), multicolored tattoos in 13
OPTIMAL TATTOO REMOVAL IN ONE                                         subjects with phototypes I–III. Each tattoo was bisected
TREATMENT SESSION WITH NANOSECOND-                                    symmetrically. The entire tattoo was treated with one pass of a QS
DOMAIN LASER PULSES                                                   532 nm laser (50 nanoseconds, 3 mm, 1.5–2.6 J/cm2) to the red,
Theodora Kossida, Dimitrios Rigopoulos,                               yellow and orange pigments and one pass of QS 1,064 nm laser
Andreas Katsambas, R. Rox Anderson                                    (50 nanoseconds, 3 mm, 3.0–5.0 J/cm2) to the black, blue and
A. Syggros Skin Disease Hospital, National and Kapodistrian           green pigments to an endpoint of tissue whitening. After
University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece; Wellman          20 minutes, a second laser pass was performed over one-half of the
Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital,             tattoo using a QS 755 nm laser (50 nanoseconds, 3 mm, 5.0–9.0 J/
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA                                    cm2) for all pigments to an endpoint of tissue whitening. Each
Background: Presently, Q-switched lasers are the gold standard        tattoo received a total of four treatments, performed at 4- to 8-
for safe and effective tattoo removal. However, multiple and costly   week intervals, with follow-up at 1 and 3 months after the last
therapeutic sessions are usually required with variable results       laser treatment. Subjects were given the option to continue
which leads to patients’ dissatisfaction and abandonment of the       receiving an additional four laser treatments in the same manner
treatment.                                                            to their tattoos. Standardized digital photographs and
Study: The efficacy of a single laser exposure was compared to         chromometer measurements were obtained before each treatment
that of multiple laser exposures about 20 minutes apart within a      session, and at the follow-up visits. Adverse effects were recorded
single treatment session. Each of 18 tattoos on 12 adults was         at each visit.
                        American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts                                                       25
Results: At the 3-month follow-up visit, there was 25–50%             #79
increased clearance on the half of the tattoo that received
combination compared to single wavelength treatment in 10/11          A MULTI-CENTER EVALUATION OF THE
tattoos which had already completed treatment and 3-month             MIRADRY SYSTEM TO TREAT SUBJECTS WITH
follow-up visits. Less than 25% increased clearance on the side       AXILLARY HYPERHIDROSIS
treated with the combination of wavelengths versus the single         Mark Lupin, H. Chih-Ho Hong,
wavelength treatment was observed in one tattoo. After the 3-         Kathryn F. O’Shaughnessy
month follow-up, no subject elected to pursue additional              University of British Columbia, Victoria, Canada;
treatments under the study protocol due to the increased
                                                                      University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada;
clearance observed on the side treated with the combination of        Miramar Labs, Sunnyvale, CA
wavelengths. Combination treatment did not increase the               Background: A third generation microwave-based device has
incidence of adverse effects. Additional safety and efficacy data
                                                                      been developed to treat axillary hyperhidrosis by selectively
will be reported for this ongoing clinical trial.                     heating the interface between the skin and underlying fat where
Conclusion: The application of a second pass of QS 755 nm laser       the sweat glands reside.
treatment to multicolored tattoos after a first pass treatment         Study: Thirty-one (31) adult subjects were enrolled in this
using either the QS 532 or 1,064 nm lasers to the absorbing
                                                                      multi-center, single-group study. All subjects had primary
pigments significantly increased tattoo pigment clearance without      axillary hyperhidrosis evidenced by Hyperhidrosis Disease
increasing adverse effects.                                           Severity Scale (HDSS) ratings of 3 or 4 and a gravimetric sweat
                                                                      assessment of at least 50 mg in each axilla (in 5 minutes). Subjects
                                                                      were excluded if they had surgery for axillary hyperhidrosis or
#78                                                                   botulinum toxin injections in the axillae in the last 12 months.
                                                                      All subjects had between one and three treatment sessions over a
REDISTRIBUTION OF INK FOLLOWING LASER                                 6-month period to fully treat both axillae. Local anesthetic was
TATTOO REMOVAL                                                        used for pain management. Follow-up visits between and after
Arisa Ortiz, Mathew Avram                                             treatments measured effectiveness by collecting HDSS scores
University of California, Irvine, CA; Massachusetts General           and gravimetric assessments at approximately 30-day intervals.
Hospital, Boston, MA                                                  Subject safety was assessed at each visit. Subjects will be
                                                                      followed for 12 months after all treatment sessions are complete.
Background: Q-switched lasers are known to be effective for
selectively targeting and removing unwanted tattoos with              Results: The mean age of enrolled subjects was 33 (range 18–65);
minimal damage to the skin. Exogenous pigment is the                  74% were female; mean BMI was 24.8. Efficacy measurements for
chromophore for Q-switched lasers, which have a shorter pulse         the 21 subjects that had a visit 30 days after their second
                                                                      treatment session show 100% with HDSS scores of 1 or 2 and
duration compared to the thermal relaxation time of the tattoo
pigment particles. By delivering high-energy, nanosecond pulses,      gravimetric assessments show 86% have had at least a 50%
the laser targets the pigment-containing cells and fragments the      reduction in axillary sweat compared to baseline (while the
tattoo pigment into smaller particles which are re-phagocytized       median reduction was 90%). Regarding safety, all subjects
                                                                      experienced transient effects in the treatment area such as
and cleared by lymphatics.
Study: Three patients with Fitzpatrick skin type II–III received      swelling, discomfort or numbness. As of the time of this report, the
several treatments with a Q-switched 694 nm ruby laser                most common adverse event (n ¼ 8 subjects) has been the
                                                                      presence of discrete, localized numbness in the arm that appears
(Spectrum RD-1200, Palomar, Burlington, MA) for unwanted
tattoos on the abdomen, arm, and ankle. All patients were             to be resolving.
anesthetized with approximately 12–15 cc of 1% lidocaine with         Conclusion: The device tested provides an efficacious treatment
1:100,000 epinephrine using a 30 gauge needle. It was noted that      for axillary hyperhidrosis. Further follow-up for safety and
                                                                      efficacy duration is planned.
the anesthesia for these patients was delivered via numerous
puncture wounds into the tattoo and surrounding skin. Patients
were then treated with a 6.5 mm spot and an irradiation of
4–8 J/cm2.
                                                                      #80
Results: At follow-up visits, all three patients had good
improvement of their tattoos. An unexpected finding was                A PILOT STUDY OF LASER ASSISTED DELIVERY
clinically evident discoloration in the surrounding normal skin       OF ALLOGENEIC MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS
consistent with the original color of the tattoo.                     Jill Waibel, Evangelos Badiavas, Stephen Davis
Conclusion: We theorize that repeated injury to the skin from         Miami Dermatology and Laser Institute; Miller School of
the needle puncture created tunnels which allowed ink particles       Medicine, University of Miami, Cutaneous Surgery Wound
to disperse into the surrounding tissue after Q-switched laser        Healing Research Laboratory, Miami, FL
treatment. Another contributing factor may have been excess           Background: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent
amounts of lidocaine, which assisted in the migration of the ink      cells that can differentiate into a variety of cell types. Optimal
particles through the tunnels. These cases demonstrate a possible     delivery of stem cells that enable their viability is a current
complication when using multiple injections of anesthesia prior to    challenge to MSC research. Fractional laser technology has
laser tattoo removal. One might avoid this complication by using      revolutionized laser therapy. The fractional ablative tunnels can
small amounts of lidocaine and minimizing the number of needle        be utilized for laser assisted delivery systems of a variety of drugs,
punctures into the skin prior to laser tattoo removal or by using a   topicals and other living tissue. This is the first pilot study to test
topical anesthetic. This finding may also indicate a potential         the hypothesis that ablative fractional laser could deliver
avenue for new treatment strategies for improved efficacy of laser     mesenchymal stem cells to skin using a porcine full thickness
tattoo removal.                                                       wound model.
26                        American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts
Study: A porcine model was chosen due to the morphological               by the Global Score for Photoaging. Secondary objectives included:
similarities between swine skin and human skin. Allogeneic cells         improvement of fine/lines, hyperpigmentation, telangiectasias,
were obtained by bone marrow aspiration from a donor pig.                tactile roughness, erythema, sallowness, global evaluation of
Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from the donor bone                 response to treatment, patient evaluation of photoaging, patient
marrow aspirate and transduced with a lentiviral vector                  preference and patient satisfaction. A total of 20 patients were
containing a fluorescent marker gene. One recipient pig was               randomized to receive split face treatment with Allumera cream
placed under general anesthesia and 60 full thickness skin               or placebo cream. On day 1 (Visit 1), day 30 (Visit 2), and day 60
wounds were made using a 10 mm punch biopsy. The wounds were             (Visit 3), the face of study subjects was pretreated with
randomly assigned to two laser treatment regimens: laser CO2/            microdermabrasion and acetone wash, followed by randomized
MSC and laser Er:YAG/MSC. After AFL the stem cells were                  treatment to half of the face with Allumera cream (Photocure
pipetted into the vertical channels. Wounds were covered with an         ASA, Oslo, Norway), and the other half with placebo cream, with
occlusive polyurethane film dressing. Three punch and wedge               unoccluded application for 1 hour. Photoactivation followed with
biopsies were taken from each group on days 5, 7, and 21.                first pulsed dye laser (PDL) to individual lesions, then intense
Results: Labeled allogeneic bone marrow cells were observed in           pulsed light (IPL) to the entire treatment area, and finally
papillary and reticular dermis on days 5 and 7 in both the Er:YAG        treatment to entire face with both red and blue light sources.
and CO2 laser treated wounds. Some labeled cells were noted in           Investigator assessment of global photoaging, fine lines/wrinkles,
close proximity to the ablated vertical channels created by laser        hyperpigmentation, tactile roughness, sallowness,
treatment. Allogeneic cell showed persistence in the treated             telangiectasias, erythema, and adverse events (using a 5-point
wounds despite intense inflammation associated with the full              scale) occurred prior to treatment at day 1 (Visit 1), day 30 (Visit
thickness wounds created.                                                2), day 60 (Visit 3), and on day 90 (Visit 4). Patient questionnaires
Conclusion: Preliminary study suggests that ablative fractional          were completed after day 1 (Visit 1), day 30 (Visit 2), and day 60
lasers may be useful technology to deliver mesenchymal stem              (Visit 3), for a total of 1 week after treatment. Standardized
cells and this has broad implications for many branches of               photography was completed at day 1 (Visit 1) and day 90 (Visit 4).
medicine.                                                                Results: Eighteen of 20 patients (18 females), aged 32–64 years
                                                                         old (mean 52.11), had completed visit 2 (day 30) of the study at the
                                                                         time of data analysis; and 8 patients of those patients (8 females),
#81                                                                      had completed visit 3 (day 60) by the time of data analysis. All
                                                                         patients were Fitzpatrick skin types II–IV with moderate to
A SPLIT-FACE STUDY INVESTIGATING                                         severe photodamage. Investigator assessment (using a 5 point
ALLUMERA COMBINED WITH MULTIPLE LASER                                    scale) comparing baseline to day 30 found a trend towards
AND LIGHT SOURCES FOR                                                    improvement in global photoaging, fine lines/wrinkles,
PHOTOREJUVENATION                                                        hyperpigmentation, tactile roughness, sallowness,
Sabrina Fabi, Jennifer Peterson, Mitchel Goldman                         telangiectasias, and erythema. Comparing baseline to day 60, a
Goldman Butterwick & Associates, Cosmetic Laser Surgery,                 statistical significance in improvement was noted in global
San Diego, CA                                                            photoaging, fine lines/wrinkles, hyperpigmentation, tactile
Background: Chronic exposure to sun can result in                        roughness, and sallowness. There was no significant difference
photodamage manifested as fine lines/wrinkling, erythema,                 noted in post-treatment pain, erythema and edema, between the
tactile roughness, hyperpigmented macules and patches,                   Allumera versus placebo-treated side by patients. Patient
sallowness, skin laxity, and telangiectasias. Photodynamic               assessment of pain, redness, swelling, and itching for seven days
therapy (PDT) uses a photosensitizer such as aminolevulinic acid         following Visit 1 did not show a statistically significant difference
or methyl aminolevulinic which is converted to protoporphyrin IX         between the Allumera versus placebo-treated sides.
in vivo. These photosensitizers concentrate in rapidly                   Conclusion: Treatment with Allumera shows a trend towards
proliferating cells, sebaceous glands, superficial melanin, and           improvement in global photoaging, fine lines/wrinkles,
vasculature. When visible light radiation is applied, reactive           hyperpigmentation, tactile roughness, sallowness,
oxygen species are generated. While originally indicated for the         telangiectasias, and erythema. Allumera is well tolerated by
treatment of nonhyperkeratotic actinic keratosis, improvement in         patients and does not result in significant post-treatment pain,
the signs of photoaging was noticed as an advantageous side              erythema and edema compared to placebo. Preliminary data are
effect. Most commonly, blue fluorescent light or a red light              presented. This is a single-site study of a small cohort of patients
emitting diode is used to activate the photosensitizer; however,         followed for an average of 45 days at the time of data analysis.
any laser or light source that emits visible light radiation can be      This study will be completed by February 28, 2011, by which time
used including the pulsed dye laser (PDL) and intense pulsed light       we will have followed all 20 patients for a total of 120 days, and all
(IPL). When administering PDT in our practice, a sequence of four        patients will have received an additional photodynamic therapy
laser and light sources are used: PDL, IPL, blue light, and red          session with Allumera.
light to work synergistically to activate the photosensitizer.
Photocure has developed Allumera cream (Photocure ASA, Oslo,
Norway), a precursor to photoactive protoporphyrins (PAP), that
                                                                         #82
enhances the skin appearance. This product is applied without
occlusion and allowed to incubate before activation by visible light
                                                                         COMPARISON STUDY OF NON-ABLATIVE
radiation. The purpose of this study is to investigate if the
                                                                         FRACTIONAL TREATMENT WITH AND WITHOUT
addition of Allumera to a series of laser and light sources results in
                                                                         ADVANCED SKIN COMPRESSION TECHNIQUE
further improvement of photoaging as compared to a placebo.              Taro Kono, Motoko Nakata, Hiroyuki Sakurai,
Study: The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the           Henry Chan
efficacy of Allumera versus placebo combined with a series of laser       Tokyo Women’s Medical University, Tokyo, Japan; University of
and light sources in the improvement of photoaging as measured           Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
                         American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts                                                     27
Background: Recently a specially designed point-array                  #85
compression tip (XD Optics, Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc.)
for fractional non-ablative laser was been investigated. The           HISTOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF A
objective of this study is to compare the efficacy and complications    NON-ABLATIVE 1,940 NM FRACTIONAL LASER
of fractional non-ablative laser with compression versus without       E. Victor Ross, Chad Tingey, Yacov Domankevitz,
compression.                                                           Kevin Schomacker, James Hsia
Study: Twelve Asian patients were enrolled in the study. Half of       Scripps Clinic, San Diego, CA; Candela, Wayland, MA
the face was treated with 1,540 nm fractional non-ablative laser       Background: The standard CO2 and Er:YAG laser non-
(45 mJ, 15 milliseconds, 50% overlap, 2 passes, single treatment)
                                                                       fractional systems for skin resurfacing produce predictable
with compression and the other half of the face was treated with       cosmetic enhancement, however, because of the prolonged
same laser without compression. A Canfied Visia CR system was           recovery period, they have decreased in popularity. Non-ablative
used to objectively evaluate the patient.
                                                                       fractional lasers cause little down time, however, some patients
Results: There is no significant difference of efficacy. However,        want more noticeable results with fewer treatments. The
pain score is significantly lower and dowmtime is significantly          1,940 nm wavelength matches one of the water absorption peaks
shorter in fractional non-ablative laser with compression side. All    in the mid infrared band of electromagnetic energy. The skin
patient selected fractional non-ablative laser with compression in
                                                                       absorption is much stronger than other non-ablative wavelengths
the next treatment.                                                    (1,440–1,550 nm) and weaker than ablative wavelengths. The
Conclusion: 1,540 nm fractional non-ablative laser with                objective was to characterize laser tissue interactions
compression has a possibility to reduce the epidermal damage and       histologically in an ex vivo model. A human study is approved and
pain. Further study is warranted to compare the efficacy with
                                                                       initial treatments are planned.
multiple treatment sessions.                                           Study: Ex vivo porcine samples were irradiated with a fractional
                                                                       1,940 nm laser. The thulium laser rod was pumped by a
                                                                       3 milliseconds pulsed alexandrite laser. The fractional patterns
#83                                                                    included dot and grid geometries. The ‘‘dot’’ beamlet size was
                                                                       230 mm and the fixed pitch between lenslets was 480 mm. There
DEEP HEATING OF DERMIS USING NON-                                      were 481 beamlets per macrospot. The macro-spot size was 12 mm
ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL TECHNIQUE WITH                                     and a total energy was about 5 J (about 10 mJ per beamlet) and
MICRO-COMPRESSION OPTICS                                               fluence of $40 J/cm2. The grid pattern included 700 mm wide lines.
Christine Dierickx, Sean Doherty                                       Results: Histological analysis has shown that with the
                                                                       appropriate laser settings, damage extended about 200 mm deep to
Laser Clinic Boom, Boom, Belgium; Boston Plastic Surgery
                                                                       the surface.
Associates, Concord, MA                                                Conclusion: The study demonstrated that the 1,940 nm diode
Background: Non-ablative fractional treatment (NAFT) has               laser, at appropriate settings, achieves injury patterns capable of
been proven as safe and effective technique for skin resurfacing.      skin rejuvenation.
Up to recently, however, the depth of NAFT was limited to $1 mm,
restricted by acceptable level of surface damage. In this study, we
investigated feasibility of creating fractional coagulative damage
in the reticular dermis and subcutis without skin cooling by using     #86
advanced micro-compression optics and pulse stacking. The
principal hypothesis was that point-like tissue compression            CLINICAL RESULTS OF NON-ABLATIVE
allowed accumulation of the absorbed optical energy in the deep        FRACTIONAL PHOTOTHERMOLYSIS FOR
dermis resulting in incremental increase of the size of the zones of   HOME-USE TREATMENT OF PHOTODAMAGED
coagulation.                                                           SKIN
Study: A 1,540 nm fractional system with point-array                   Christopher Zachary, Marieke van Grootel,
compression tip (Lux1540, XD Optics, Palomar Medical) was used.        Tom Nuijs, Kerrie Jiang, Steven Struck
The study comprised three parts: (1) computer modeling of opto-        University of California, Irvine, CA; Philips Research, Eindhoven,
thermal dynamics to optimize treatment regime; (2) histological        The Netherlands; Solta Medical, Hayward, CA; The Struck Clinic,
ex vivo evaluation of columns of microdamage (CMD); and (3) pilot      Palo Alto, CA
clinical tests with emphasis on facial skin tightening. Up to five      Background: Fractional photothermolysis (FP) has been proven
pulses were stacked, with total cumulative fluence up to 65 J/cm2       to be effective in the hands of professionals for the treatment of a
in three passes.                                                       broad range of skin conditions, including pigmented lesions, fine
Results: Both computer simulations and ex vivo histology data          wrinkling and textural changes. In this study, we have
suggested feasibility of creating CMDs protruding deep into            investigated the safety, efficacy and acceptability of repeated, low-
dermis. Pilot clinical tests have been initiated in parallel           density in-home treatments for photodamaged skin.
at two centers. Total of seven subjects have been treated on the       Study: Multiple sequential clinical studies were conducted
face up to date. The treatment was well tolerated and did not          employing a twice weekly treatment regimen for a period of 8–16
require any anesthesia. Side effects included pronounced               weeks. Studies involved both investigator-conducted and self-
erythema and edema and resolved completely in 2 weeks.                 administered full-facial treatments and treatment of off-face, sun-
Follow-ups conducted up to 2 months post-treatment                     exposed areas. Improvement was assessed by study subjects and
demonstrated significant improvement in skin laxity and                 investigators. Objective improvement was assessed by
appearance.                                                            independent blinded evaluators based on clinical photographs.
Conclusion: Micro-compression-enhanced NAFT may provide                Histological analysis was performed on both ex vivo skin and
means for efficient yet safe treatment of deep dermis and subcutis,     on biopsies taken from treated areas according to the study
with the potential benefit of skin tightening.                          regimen.
28                       American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts
Results: Independent evaluator assessment demonstrated                  Study: A retrospective study of 112 consecutive patients who
statistically significant improvement in overall appearance,             underwent full face fractional CO2 laser skin resurfacing for
pigmented lesions, dyschromia, textural irregularities and fine          rhytides, photodamage, acne scarring and dyschromia was
lines of all treated body areas. Near-optimal results were reached      performed. Patients ranged in age from 22 to 85 and were
after 8 weeks of treatment and effects were still apparent 1 month      Fitzpatrick skin types I–V. There were 11 men and 101 women.
and 3 months following the final treatment. Subject perception of        The lasers used were the DEKA SmartXide DOT and the
treatment outcomes was positive. The treatment was well-                Cynosure SmartSkin CO2 lasers. Preoperative and post-operative
tolerated, with a very low incidence of side effects and with limited   photographs were taken with the Canfield VISIA-CR photographic
downtime. Histological results revealed that thermal damage,            system. The post-operative photographs were taken at 1 week,
epidermal regeneration, pigment removal and neocollagenesis             1 month, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year following treatment.
were consistently observed and were similar to treatments with          Results: Both clinical and photographic analysis revealed three
professional non-ablative FP devices.                                   patients who developed ‘new’ dark brown pigment in previously
Conclusion: It is demonstrated that self-administered, low-             flesh-toned nevi within the treatment area. Biopsy of the lesions
density FP treatments lead to objective and visible improvement         revealed the presence of irregularly nested proliferations of
of photodamaged and photoaged skin with minimal discomfort              slightly atypical melanocytes overlying superficial dermal
and downtime.                                                           fibrosis.
                                                                        Conclusion: We postulate that pseudomelanoma is likely to
                                                                        occur more frequently following fractional, as opposed to fully
#87                                                                     ablative, CO2 laser resurfacing. The persistence of melanin within
                                                                        zones of thermal sparing may give rise to ‘new’ atypical pigmented
EFFECTS OF DEVIATION FROM FOCAL PLANE                                   lesions. It is of utmost importance for the clinician to be aware of
ON LESION DEPTH AND DIAMETER FOR                                        the phenomenon of pseudomelanoma in order to avoid the pitfall
ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL PHOTOTHERMOLYSIS                                    of misdiagnosis of malignant melanoma.
Garuna Kositrana, Henry Chan
Dieter Manstein, Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Boston, MA
Background: Ablative fractional photothermolysis (AFP) uses             #89
highly focused laser radiation. Therefore the lesion geometry is
highly dependent of the positioning of the target relative to the       ULCERATION OF MATURE SURGICAL SCARS
focal plane. The effects of deviation from the focal plane on lesion    FROM NON-ABLATIVE 1,550 NM FRACTIONAL
diameter and depth were investigated.                                   LASER TREATMENTS ASSOCIATED WITH INTRA-
Study: In vitro, full thickness human skin samples and a                LESIONAL LIDOCAINE INJECTIONS
standardized phantom (paper pad, 3 M) were used to investigate          Gary Chuang, Mathew Avram, Zeina Tannous
the lesion diameter and depth generated by an AFP system (deep          Wellman Laboratories, Massachusetts General Hospital,
FX, Lumenis). Lesion geometry in tissue was assessed by                 Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
histological analysis of cryosections. Lesions created within the       Background: Non-ablative fractional laser resurfacing has
paper phantom were simply assessed by counting the number of            gained increased popularity for treatment of scars, due to its
perforated paper sheets and optical measurement of lesion               efficacy, shortened downtime, and safety profile for treatment of
diameter. Deviation from focal plane (À2 to þ 3 mm) was achieved        scars in comparison to traditional ablative resurfacing. Topical
by insertion of standardized spacers.                                   and injectable local anesthetics are routinely applied to the skin
Results: Ablation depth was nearly identical for tissue and paper.      prior to the laser treatment. Injected anesthetics are especially
Deviation from the focal plane by 1 mm caused a reduction of            useful due to their immediate effects. To date, ulceration with
ablation depth by approximately 40% and an increase in spot size        non-ablative fractional laser treatment of surgical scars has not
by approximately 40%.                                                   been reported. Here, we report two cases of mature surgical scars
Conclusion: Minor deviation from focal plane has a marked               developing ulceration after treatments with a non-ablative
impact on lesion depth and diameter for AFP. A simple paper             1,550 nm fractional laser treatment associated with intra-lesional
phantom correlates well with tissue ablation and can serve as a         lidocaine injection.
tool for quick and simple assessment of lesion geometry for AFP.        Study: Two patients presented for treatment of mature
                                                                        abdominal surgical scars. Both were treated with the same non-
                                                                        ablative 1,550 nm fractional laser. Prior to these treatments, both
#88                                                                     patients were injected with multiple intra-lesional 1% lidocaine
                                                                        with 1:100,000 epinephrine. Each of these patients developed
PSEUDOMELANOMA FOLLOWING FRACTIONAL                                     ulceration shortly after non-ablative fractional laser resurfacing.
CO2 LASER RESURFACING                                                   The first case was a 20-year-old man with a 26 cm linear surgical
Robert Gotkin, Deborah Sarnoff, Ritu Saini                              scar on the abdomen from a biliary surgery as an infant. The scar
NYU Medical Center, New York, NY                                        was treated with a non-ablative fractional 1,550 nm laser at a
Background: Pseudomelanoma has been described as the                    pulse energy of 40 mJ (1,120 mm) and treatment level 8 (23%
appearance of recurrent pigment following trauma, cryotherapy,          surface area). Subsequent treatments were spaced 2–3 weeks
dermabrasion, various laser treatments and incomplete excision          apart at the pulse energy of 50 mJ (1,224 mm) with level 9 (26%
of benign nevi. Differentiating between pseudomelanoma and              surface area) and 60 mJ (1,300 mm) with level 10 (29% surface
malignant melanoma can be extremely difficult, even for an               area). The scar showed improvement with the laser treatments. A
experienced dermatopathologist, because pseudomelanoma                  few days after the third treatment, an ulceration was noted 6 cm
exhibits atypical histologic features in common with malignant          from one end of the scar. The second patient is a 47-year-old
melanoma. We report the first three cases of pseudomelanoma              woman who presented with a 38 cm abdominal scar from an
following full face fractional CO2 laser skin resurfacing.              abdominoplasty 8 years ago. The scar was anesthesized with
                         American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts                                                       29
intra-lesional lidocaine injection prior to non-ablative fractional     Fitzpatrick skin types (FST) IV–V. Patients were evaluated for
1,550 nm laser treatment. The pulse energy was 45 mJ (1,176 mm)         improvement at variable follow-up intervals.
with level 7 (20% surface area) at the first treatment. The same         Study: Fourteen patients (13 female, 1 male), FST IV–V, with
treatment settings were repeated 1 month later. One week after          melasma of the face were treated with a 1,550-nm fractionated
the second laser treatment, multiple superficial ulcerations             Erbium-doped fiber laser. Patients underwent 2–5 treatments at
occurred where injectable lidocaine was applied.                        6- to 8-week intervals (4–12 passes per treatment session) at
Results: In both of these cases, the ulcerations occurred on the        energy fluences ranging from 5 to 20 mJ and treatment levels
sites of intra-lesional lidocaine injections. Cellular studies have     ranging from 3 to 7, which corresponds to surface area coverage of
demonstrated that injected local anesthetics such as lidocaine can      9–20% (0.58–3.70 total kJ; average 2.06 kJ). All patients were
lead to thermal destabilization of cellular membrane.                   started on a topical bleaching cream at their initial treatment visit
Conclusion: Although non-ablative fractional resurfacing has            and continued use in between and after laser treatments. Patients
shown good safety profile, ulceration can occur in the setting of        were evaluated for improvement in the clinical appearance of
intra-lesional lidocaine injection prior to laser treatment.            melasma before each treatment and at a follow-up visit after the
Ulceration is likely caused by the thermal instability of skin          final treatment.
cellular membrane to exposure to lidocaine. We recommend that           Results: 57.1% of subjects (8 of 14) had greater than 50% initial
topical application of local anesthetics prior to a non-ablative        improvement, 35.7% of subjects (5 of 14) had greater than 25%
fractional laser treatment.                                             initial improvement, and 7.1% of subjects (1 of 14) had less than
                                                                        25% initial improvement following the last treatment session.
                                                                        Eight subjects had 2- to 6-month follow-up, three subjects had 6-
#227                                                                    to 12-month follow-up, and three subjects had follow-up greater
                                                                        than 12 months after the last treatment session. Only one subject
ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL RESURFACING FOR                                     noted a worsening of the condition at follow-up greater than 1 year
TATTOO REMOVAL                                                          post-treatment. Side effects were limited to mild, transient
Omar Ibrahimi, Fernanda Sakamoto,                                       erythema and edema. One patient developed PIH which improved
Mathew Avram, R. Rox Anderson                                           with bleaching creams.
Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Boston, MA                            Conclusion: Our results indicate that fractional photothermolysis
                                                                        with the 1,550 nm erbium-doped fiber laser is a safe and effective
Background: Currently, Q-switched lasers are the gold standard
for tattoo treatment. Allergic tattoo reactions present a               treatment option for melasma in patients with FST IV–V.
challenging treatment dilemma. We present the application of
ablative fractional resurfacing as a novel method for the removal
of tattoos in two patients with tattoo allergies.                       #92
Study: We describe two patients with tattoo allergies, referred to
us for treatment. Ablative fractional erbium (Er:YAG; 2,940 nm)         TREATMENT OF MELASMA WITH A NOVEL
laser resurfacing was used in a series of treatments, to remove the     FRACTIONATED 1,927 NM THULIUM FIBER
allergic-ink portion of a large multi-colored tattoo on the upper       LASER
extremity of a 52-year-old man. In a 31-year-old woman with a red       Kristel Polder, Suzanne Bruce
and black tattoo on her lower extremity, ablative Er:YAG laser          University of Texas Houston; Suzanne Bruce and Associates,
fractional resurfacing was combined with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser.     Houston, TX
Results: Following a series of treatments, both patients
                                                                        Background: Non-ablative laser devices have been
experienced significant to complete removal of the offending tattoo      demonstrated to be highly effective treatment options for skin
inks with substantial or complete resolution of their symptoms.         resurfacing. This study is the first to investigate the clinical
Conclusion: Ablative fractional laser resurfacing appears to be         efficacy of a new non-ablative 1,927 nm fractional thulium fiber
safe and effective for staged removal of allergic tattoos. Fractional
                                                                        laser for improvement of facial melasma.
laser resurfacing can be combined with other treatments such as         Study: Eighteen subjects with an average age of 48.2 Æ 9 years,
Q-switched lasers. The potential for a series of fractional ablative    with clinically identifiable facial melasma were enrolled and
laser treatments to remove tattoos, including allergic tattoos and      consented at one dermatologic laser center. Five subjects were
inks of any color, merits further study.
                                                                        Fitzpatrick Skin Type (FST) II; four were FST III; and seven were
                                                                        FST IV. The subjects received 3–4 full face treatments with the
                                                                        1,927 nm laser at 3- to 4-week intervals. Subjects were treated at
#91                                                                     settings of 10–15 mJ with treatment levels ranging from 2 to 7
                                                                        (25–50% coverage), and eight passes at each session.
TREATMENT OF MELASMA IN FITZPATRICK                                     Investigators performed baseline and follow-up skin assessments
SKIN TYPES IV–V WITH NON-ABLATIVE                                       using a melasma severity scale and pigmentation intensity scale.
FRACTIONAL PHOTOTHERMOLYSIS: A REPORT                                   Photographs were taken prior to and immediately after each
OF 14 CASES WITH LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP                                    treatment and at follow-up visits occurring at 1, 3, and 6 months
Paul M. Friedman, Jennifer M. Landau,                                   after the final laser treatment. Side effects were assessed at all
Kristel D. Polder, Megan N. Moody,                                      study visits, and patients rated pain using a visual analog scale
Irene J. Vergilis-Kalner, Denise Marquez, Leonard                       (0–10).
H. Goldberg                                                             Results: At baseline, the average melasma disease severity was
DermSurgery Associates, Houston, TX;                                    rated 3.70 (0 ¼ none, 1 ¼ minimal trace, 2–3 ¼ mild,
Rodgers Dermatology Dallas, TX                                          4–5 ¼ moderate, 6–7 ¼ marked, 8 ¼ severe). At the 1-month
Background: The objective of this study was to determine                follow-up, melasma disease severity was rated as 1.77; 3-month
optimal treatment parameters utilizing non-ablative fractional          follow-up was 1.50; and 6-month follow-up was 3.00. Pigmentation
photothermolysis for the treatment of melasma in patients with          intensity scores averaged 3.50 at baseline; 1.38 at the 1-month
30                      American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts
follow-up; 1.50 at the 3-month follow-up; and 2.00 at the 6-month    Background: Ashy dermatosis, also known as erythema
follow-up. Average pain reported over all treatments was 4.5.        dyschromicum perstans, is an acquired benign disease,
Moderate erythema and mild edema were post-treatment responses.      characterized by blue-gray pigment patches with erythematous
There were no incidences of scarring or post-inflammatory hyper- or   borders. No effective treatment is available. Postinflammatory
hypopigmentation throughout the course of this study.                hyperpigmentation is a pigment disorder resulting after
Conclusion: Non-ablative fractional resurfacing with the             inflammation of the skin due to various causes. Existing
1,927 nm thulium fiber laser is a safe and effective treatment        treatments often show disappointing effects. The aim of this study
modality for melasma on the face.                                    was to assess the efficacy and safety of non-ablative 1,550 nm
                                                                     fractional laser therapy (FLT) in the treatment of
                                                                     postinflammatory hyperpigmentation and ashy dermatosis.
#93                                                                  Study: Eight patients with ashy dermatosis (skin type IV–V) and
                                                                     six patients with postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (skin type
EFFICACY OF 1,927 NM THULIUM FIBER LASER                             II–V) were included in a randomized controlled, observer blinded
FOR THE TREATMENT OF MELASMA IN CHINESE                              trial. In each patient, two similar square test regions of 5–10 cm2
PATIENTS                                                             were randomized to receive either five non-ablative FLT
Samantha Y. Shek, C.K. Yeung, Stephanie G.Y. Ho,                     treatments (?: 1,550 nm, 15 mJ/microbeam, final coverage: 14–
Henry H.L. Chan                                                      17%; 3 weeks inter-treatment interval) in combination with
The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China                        intermittent daily topical bleaching (to prevent laser-induced
Background: 1,927 nm thulium fiber laser contains two fiber            postinflammatory hyperpigmentation) or the same intermittent
                                                                     regimen of topical bleaching alone (to allow comparison of the
lasers in one system. It is FDA approved for non-ablative skin
resurfacing and rejuvenation. The objective of the study is to       regions). Three months after the last treatment clearance of
assess the efficacy of 1,927 nm thulium fiber laser for the            hyperpigmentation was assessed by melanin index, reflectance
                                                                     spectroscopy, physician’s global assessment, patient’s global
treatment of melasma in Chinese patients. It provides a higher
wavelength with higher absorption.                                   assessment and patient’s satisfaction. In addition, a biopsy of both
Study: Twelve female subjects aged 44–58 with mild to severe         treated and control site was evaluated by an independent blinded
melasma were recruited. All subjects received a single treatment.    pathologist.
                                                                     Results: Three months after the last laser treatment, no clinical
They were assessed at baseline, 1 day, 7 days, 1 month and 2
months post-treatment. Adverse effects were noted and clinical       improvement of hyperpigmentation was observed. Reflectance
photos were taken using (Canfield Visia CR System). A                 spectroscopy, melanin index, number of melanocytes and amount
questionnaire was given at the follow-ups for the subjects to rate   of dermal melanin did not significantly differ between both
                                                                     regions. Patient’s global assessment and patient’s satisfaction
the pain level, swelling, dryness, wrinkles, pore size,
pigmentation, any hyper/hypopigmentation as well as overall          were both 3.6 and 5.7, and 4.5 and 4.5, respectively (visual
satisfaction. Two independent physicians assessed the clinical       analogue scale 0–10). Moreover, three patients developed laser-
photos, giving the MASI score, rating the skin texture and           induced postinflammatory hyperpigmentation.
                                                                     Conclusion: With these laser settings, non-ablative FLT was not
identifying any adverse effects.
Results: All subjects experienced pain and swelling, all of which    effective for the treatment of ashy dermatosis and
subsided within 7 days post-treatment. 54.5% and 58.3% subjects      postinflammatory hyperpigmentation.
noticed an improvement in their melasma at 1 and 2 months post-
treatment, respectively. A decrease in wrinkles was observed by
36.4% at 1-month post-treatment but the effect only lasted in        #95
16.7% by 2 months post-treatment. Sixty-two percent noticed an
improvement in pore size. Physician assessment supported the         ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL RESURFACING OF
above with a statistically significant improvement in MASI score      EYELIDS: A PROSPECTIVE EVALUATION
(P ¼ 0.018), pore size (P ¼ 0.011) and skin texture (P ¼ 0.005).     Brian Biesman
The improvement in fine lines was also significant at 1-month          Nashville Centre for Laser and Facial Surgery, Nashville, TN
follow-up (P ¼ 0.014) but was not enough to be statistically         Background: Ablative fractional resurfacing of the eyelids has
significant at 2 months follow-up.
                                                                     been previously described. These reports are few and have not
Conclusion: 1,927 nm thulium fiber laser is temporarily effective     evaluated many of the factors important to eyelid aesthetics. The
for treating melasma in Chinese patients. The treatment also         goal of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of eyelids treated
improves the overall skin texture.
                                                                     via ablative fractional techniques.
                                                                     Study: This was a single site, prospective study in which 20
                                                                     subjects underwent fractional ablative resurfacing using a carbon
#94                                                                  dioxide (CO2) laser (Lumenis, Inc., Santa Clara, CA). The laser
                                                                     was used in two separate modes, one in which small (120 m) spots
NON-ABLATIVE 1,550 NM FRACTIONAL LASER                               were used to create deep injury and another in which larger
THERAPY NOT EFFECTIVE FOR ASHY                                       (1.3 mm) spots were used to treat more superficially. Energies
DERMATOSIS AND POSTINFLAMMATORY                                      used with the small spot ranged from 12.5 to 20 mJ and with the
HYPERPIGMENTATION: A PILOT STUDY                                     larger spot ranged from 80 to 100 mJ. All treatments were
Bas Wind, Marije W. Kroon, Bas S. Wind,                              performed under topical anesthesia only. Follow-up was at 1
Arne A. Meesters, Albert Wolkerstorfer,                              week, 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. Subjects were assessed
J.P. Wietze Van der Veen, Jan D. Bos,                                for skin wrinkling, color, roughness, erythrosis and texture, upper
Allard A. Van der Wal, Johan F. Beek                                 eyelid hooding, lower eyelid appearance, and crow’s feet
The Netherlands Institute for Pigment Disorders Amsterdam,           appearance. Professional photographs were taken at baseline,
The Netherlands                                                      3 months, and 6 months after treatment.
                         American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts                                                    31
Results: Average treatment times for the deep and superficial           Background: Ablative devices provide high efficacy but with
treatments were 3.1 and 3.6 minutes, respectively. No serious          prolonged recovery times, whereas non-ablative devices have
adverse events occurred. Seventy-five percent of subjects               shortened recovery periods but offer modest efficacy. Fractional
demonstrated improvement in upper eyelid hooding at the 6-             devices have shorter downtime and fewer adverse effects than
month follow-up visit using a novel grading scale. This scale will     ablative devices and greater efficacy than non-ablative devices.
be presented and discussed. Eyelid skin wrinkling improved in          Combining non-ablative and fractional treatment can offer higher
70% of subjects. Improvement in lower lid appearance was noted         efficacy than achieved by each procedure alone.
in 80% of subjects at the 6-month follow-up. Sixty percent of          Study: We used physical modeling to describe temperature
subjects demonstrated improvement in the appearance of crow’s          distribution in the skin induced by the application of combined
feet lines at 6 months. Change from baseline in other endpoints        broadband IR light and bipolar RF. Histology of human facial skin
was more variable.                                                     under the impact of sublative RF evaluated in vivo the biological
Conclusion: Ablative fractional resurfacing can produce                tissue effects. A biological model for the combined application
dramatic improvement in eyelid appearance. Some characteristics        mechanism of action has been developed.
predispose favorable outcomes.                                         Results: Based on biophysical modeling, combined broadband IR
                                                                       light and bipolar RF applied simultaneously with cooling of the
                                                                       skin surface creates reticular dermal tissue islands reaching
#96                                                                     > 50–558C, surrounded by deep volumetric heating of the entire
                                                                       dermis (45–508C) with complete sparing of the epidermis. In vivo
COLD INDUCED MODULATION OF TARGETED                                    analysis of fractional sublative RF demonstrates epidermal tissue
FACIAL NERVES. A PILOT STUDY OF A                                      ablation up to 150 mm depth beyond which the papillary dermis is
MINIMALLY INVASIVE CRYOPROBE DEVICE FOR                                affected mainly by coagulation (up to 150 mm deeper and
IMMEDIATE REDUCTION OF DYNAMIC                                         occasionally lateral). A biological model for the combined
WRINKLES                                                               application will be presented.
Vic Narurkar, Francis Palmer, Thomas Munyon,                           Conclusion: The underlying mechanism of action of this unique
Kristine Tatsutani                                                     combination is the synergistic induction of local healing response
Los Angeles, CA; California Pacific Medical Center,                     leading to modification of connective tissue via collagen
                                                                       remodeling. With sublative RF, tissue injury leads to
San Francisco, CA; Munyon Dermatology; Myoscience,
Redwood City, CA                                                       inflammatory reaction and the responsive healing process
Background: Reduction of dynamic lines using neurotoxins is            involves ECM remodeling of the upper dermis. Conversely, deep
the most demanded procedure in the United States. The study            volumetric heating by the non-ablative application causes
                                                                       immediate tissue tightening due to collagen denaturation and
objective was to evaluate a minimally invasive cryoprobe device
that targets motor nerves to achieve immediate reduction of            collagen contraction followed by a delayed healing response of the
dynamic wrinkles without the use of a neurotoxin.                      deep dermis. Ongoing clinical studies suggest that this novel
Study: In a cohort of 31 subjects a 27 gauge cryoprobe was             approach promotes the desired biological responses leading to a
                                                                       more and better organized younger dermal matrix.
inserted subcutaneously near the temporal branch of the facial
nerve that innervates the frontalis muscle. After administering
each cooling cycle of less than 60 seconds, the investigator
monitored reduction in muscle contractility to determine if            #98
additional cryoprobe insertions were needed to achieve the
desired cosmetic effect.                                               LONG-TERM EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF MICRO-
Results: One hundred percent of subjects experienced immediate         FOCUSED ULTRASOUND FOR SKIN TIGHTENING
dynamic line reduction after two to eight cryoprobe insertions         AND LIFTING: RESULTS IN 183 KOREAN
near the motor nerves that power the frontalis muscle. The most        SUBJECTS
frequent observed side effects were headaches and small focal          Nark-Kyoung Rho, Chan-Woo Jeong, Deuk-Pyo Lee,
areas of minor epidermal cold injury. Efficacy was sustained            Sangjin Park, Seung-Hui Kang, Jang-Hyun Shin,
through subsequent follow-up visits.                                   Byung-Soon Park
Conclusion: Cold induced neuromodulation using a minimally
                                                                       Leaders Aesthetic Laser & Cosmetic Surgery Center, Seoul, Korea
invasive cryoprobe results in immediate and sustained reduction        Background: The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-
of dynamic lines of the frontalis by targeting the associated facial   term safety and efficacy of a micro-focused ultrasound treatment for
nerve. Immediate endpoint observation allows optimization of the
                                                                       non-invasive skin tightening and lifting in Korean patients.
effect for facial muscle groups.                                       Study: A total of 183 Korean subjects ranging in age from 25 to 76
                                                                       received a full face treatment utilizing the micro-focused
                                                                       ultrasound therapeutic system. For upper third of the face, only
#97                                                                    the 3.0 mm-depth transducer was used while two transducers
                                                                       (3.0 mm, 4.5 mm) were used in combination for the treatment of
ENHANCED SKIN REJUVENATION: A NOVEL                                    mid- and lower face. Photographs taken at 1 month, 3 months, 6
COMBINED NON-ABLATIVE AND FRACTIONAL                                   months, and 9 months following treatment were evaluated by two
APPROACH                                                               independent dermatologists not involved in the treatment.
Hanit Brenner-Lavie, Yossi Adanny,                                     Clinical improvement was also assessed subjectively. Any adverse
Avner Rozenberg, Haim Epstein, Genady Nahshon,                         events and patient discomfort was also recorded.
Ruthie Amir, Ulrich Toft, Tal Nachlieli,                               Results: Overall, the percentage of subjects responding with an
Boris Vaynberg                                                         improvement was 82% at 1 month, 87% at 3 months, 79% at 6
Syneron Medical, Ltd, Yokneam Illit, Israel; Assuta Medical            months, and 65% at 9 months following treatment. Objective
Center, Haifa, Israel                                                  assessment at 3 months showed significant improvement for
32                       American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts
eyebrow position (85%), midface laxity (81%), jawline definition         Background: The combination of externally applied bipolar
(77%), mentolabial folds (68%), infraorbital folds and wrinkles         radiofrequency (RF), infrared light (IR), negative pressure and
(64%), cervicomental angle (62%), and nasolabial folds (44%).           mechanical tissue manipulation has been shown to be safe and
Assessment at 6 and 9 months revealed that mid- and lower face          efficacious for temporary circumferential reduction and cellulite
improvement lasted longer than the upper third of the face. Other       improvement. The bipolar RF allows for a reduction in optical
than slight transient erythema and edema immediately post-              energy applied to the skin. Furthermore, bipolar RF is not
treatment, generally, there were no major adverse effects noticed.      preferentially absorbed by melanin and thus has potential utility
There were three cases of linear erythematous papules on the            in treating all Fitzpatrick skin phototypes. It was hypothesized
neck which lasted 2–4 weeks. Slight infraorbital nerve palsy was        that increasing the power of the bipolar RF would enhance
observed in two subjects. Distressful scalp paresthesia developed       treatment efficacy and might allow reduction in the duration and/
in one subject. All neurologic symptoms resolved spontaneously          or number of treatment sessions required.
within a month.                                                         Study: In this prospective study, patients received one treatment
Conclusion: The micro-focused ultrasound technique is a safe            per week over 6 weeks to one thigh while the non-treated thigh
and effective treatment for lifting and tightening facial soft tissue   served as the control. Patients were followed for several months
in Koreans. Our study showed that in Korean subjects, treatment         post-completion of the treatment protocol. Thigh circumferences
of the mid- and lower face showed more patients’ satisfaction and       were measured and baseline to post treatment comparisons were
longer-lasting effects than upper face treatment.                       made. Thigh circumference reductions were compared between
                                                                        the treated and non-treated thighs. Safety issues and treatment-
                                                                        emergent adverse effects were monitored throughout the study.
#99                                                                     Results: There was a significant difference in mean
                                                                        circumferential reduction from baseline to post 6 treatments
CLINICAL STUDY OF TRANSCUTANEOUS                                        between the treated and the non-treated thighs. The incremental
FOCUSED ULTRASOUND FOR LOWER FACIAL                                     reduction in thigh circumference appeared as soon as 2 weeks
AND SUBMENTAL SKIN TIGHTENING IN ASIANS                                 from the beginning of treatment and occurred exclusively in the
Nicola P.Y. Chan, Carol S. Yu, Johnny C.Y. Chan,                        treated thighs. Overall improvement in body contour was clearly
Samantha S. Shek, Henry H.L. Chan                                       noticeable on comparison of the before and after photographs. The
                                                                        use of high power bipolar RF was well tolerated and was not
The University of Hong Kong; Eye Institute, Hong Kong, China
Background: The objective of this study was to determine the            associated with adverse events or complications.
clinical efficacy of a focused ultrasound device for the treatment of    Conclusion: External application of high power (200 W) RF energy
lower facial and submental skin laxity in Asians.                       combined with IR, negative pressure and tissue manipulation
                                                                        appears to be a safe and efficient modality for temporary
Study: Each patient received one treatment with the
transcutaneous focused ultrasound device. Two transducers               circumferential reduction and body contouring. Histopathological
(7.5 MHz, 3.0 mm depth; 4.0 MHz, 4.5 mm depth) were used to             correlation suggests that the underlying mechanism of action is
deliver two passes of microthermal areas of coagulation over the        reduction in the hypodermal adipose tissue volume via confined
                                                                        thermal targeting.
lower facial and submental regions at two different depths.
Standardized photos and three-dimensional images were taken
with the Canfield Visia CR and Vectra systems1, respectively, at
baseline, 1 month and 3 months post-treatment. They assessed by         #102
two independent physicians.
Results: Sixteen Chinese patients were included. Erythema and           COMPARISON OF FRACTIONAL ER:YAG AND CO2
edema were the only temporary adverse effects, which resolved by        LASERS IN RESURFACING OF ATROPHIC ACNE
1 month. Preliminary objective assessment of standardized photos        SCARS IN ASIANS
showed statistically significant improvement for skin laxity along       Woraphong Manuskiatti, Thanawan Iamphonrat,
the jawline (P ¼ 0.046), and cheek (P ¼ 0.008) at last follow-up. The   Rungsima Wanitphakdeedecha, Sasima Eimpunth
degree of improvement was graded as slight to moderate. Vectra 3D       Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand
images showed positive skin tightening in submental region.             Background: Ablative fractional lasers including fractional
Conclusion: The dual-plane approach of energy delivery with
                                                                        Er:YAG and CO2 lasers have recently been introduced to address
transcutaneous high intensity focused ultrasound appeared               some limitations of nonablative fractional lasers. There has been
effective for lower facial and submental skin laxity in Asians.         very little evidence on the comparative efficacy and safety of these
Further studies to optimize treatment parameters may enhance
                                                                        two laser systems, especially in dark-skinned patients who inherit
clinical outcomes.                                                      higher risk of adverse effects following ablative laser treatment.
                                                                        The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy and
                                                                        safety of fractional Er:YAG and CO2 lasers in the treatment of
#100                                                                    atrophic acne scars in Asian individuals.
                                                                        Study: This is a split-face, single-blind, controlled, comparison
CLINICAL AND HISTOPATHOLOGICAL                                          study. Twenty-four Thai subjects with atrophic acne scars were
EVALUATION OF A NEW NON-INVASIVE BODY                                   randomly treated using a fractional Er:YAG laser on one side of the
CONTOURING DEVICE COMBINING HIGH                                        face and a fractional CO2 laser on the other side. Each subject
POWER BIPOLAR RADIOFREQUENCY,                                           received with two treatments at 2 months apart. Objective
INFRARED LIGHT, NEGATIVE PRESSURE AND                                   (ultraviolet A-light video camera) and subjective (clinical evaluation
MECHANICAL TISSUE MANIPULATION                                          by two blinded dermatologists) assessments were obtained at
Hema Sundaram, Jason N. Pozner                                          baseline and at 1, 3, and 6 months after the 2nd treatment. The
Sundaram Dermatology, Cosmetic & Laser Surgery, Fairfax, VA;            assessment of pain score, recovery time, side effects, and patient
Sanctuary Plastic Surgery, Boca Raton, FL                               satisfaction were recorded at every follow-up visit.
                         American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts                                                      33
Results: At the 1-month follow-up, 25% of the subjects were rated       #104
as having at least 25–50% improvement of their scars on both
treatment sides. There was no significant difference in                  EVALUATION OF THE COMBINED TREATMENT
therapeutic outcome between the sides treated with fractional           WITH FRACTIONAL LASER AND FRACTIONAL
Er:YAG and CO2 lasers. However, postinflammatory                         RADIOFREQUENCY FOR ACNE SCARS IN ASIANS
hyperpigmentation (PIH) and discomfort were significantly more           Chi Keung Yeung, Nicola P.Y. Chan, Carol S. Yu,
pronounced on the CO2 laser side.                                       Henry H.L. Chan
Conclusion: Ablative fractional Er:YAG and CO2 lasers are safe          The University of Hong Kong; Eye Institute, Hong Kong, China
and effective for treatment of atrophic acne scars in Asians. As of 1
                                                                        Background: The fractionated RF induces deep dermal heating
month following the treatment, both laser systems showed                while leaving the epidermis less affected. Thus it may reduce
comparable post-operative healing periods and comparable                downtime and lower the risk of postinflammatory
cosmetic improvement. However, the side treated with fractional
                                                                        hyperpigmentation. Combining fractional bi-polar RF and diode
CO2 lasers was associated with higher degree of pain and was            laser is intended to improve acne scars by enhancement of
complicated with higher incidence of PIH.                               collagen production in the scar indentation and by causing
                                                                        ablation and resurfacing of the scar edges. The objective is to
                                                                        determine the safety and efficacy of the combined treatment on
                                                                        acne scars in Asians.
#103                                                                    Study: Twenty-one Asians with skin types IV–V and acne scars
                                                                        were recruited. Each received three treatments with fractional
A PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED SPLIT-FACE                                     915 nm laser using Matrix IR (Syneron, Irvine, CA) with fluence
COMPARISON STUDY OF NON-ABLATIVE                                        at 70 J/cm2, RF at 100 J/cm3, double passes followed by fractional
FRACTIONAL LASER RESURFACING IN THE                                     RF using Matrix RF at energy of 62 mJ/pin, at 4 week intervals.
TREATMENT OF ACNE SCARRING IN                                           Serial standardized photographs were assessed by two
FITZPATRICK SKIN PHOTOTYPES IV–VI                                       independents observers. Subjective evaluation was also obtained.
Andrew Alexis, Marcy Coley, Murad Alam,                                 Results: Nineteen patients completed third treatment. There was
Janiene Luke, Sejal Shah, Yahya Argobi                                  significant improvement of acne scarring with mean score
Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY; Northwestern                    decreased from 7.5 to 5.9 out of 10 (P < 0.001) and 67% were rated
                                                                        at least moderate objective global improvement. There was also
University Chicago, IL; Skin of Color Center, St. Lukes Roosevelt
Hospital, New York, NY                                                  significant objective improvement of mean scores for skin texture,
Background: Optimal treatment parameters for fractional laser           pore size and pigmentary irregularities (P < 0.001). 57.1% of
resurfacing in darker skin types have not been clearly established.     subjects rated moderate to significant improvement and 81.9%
                                                                        were satisfied with the procedure. One case developed blisters
The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy and safety of
two different settings of a fractional nonablative laser in darkly      near the jaw area and 7.5% developed transient post-
pigmented subjects with acne scarring.                                  inflammatory hyperpigmentation.
Study: This is a prospective, split-face, randomized, controlled        Conclusion: Combining fractional laser and radiofrequency
                                                                        appears to be safe and effective for acne scars in Asians.
study involving 18 subjects aged 18–65, with Fitzpatrick skin
types IV–VI, and acne scarring on the face bilaterally. Subjects
were treated with a 1,550 nm erbium-doped fractionated laser
using two different settings, one per side of the face. Each side was
                                                                        #105
treated with 40 mJ and treatment level 4 (11% surface area
coverage) versus 40 mJ and treatment level 7 (20% surface area          THERMO-FRACTIONAL PDT FOR PERSISTENT
coverage), randomized to the left or right face. A total of four        WARTS
treatments were performed at 4-week intervals. Efficacy                  Leonardo Marini
endpoints include improvement from baseline in: quantitative            Trieste, Italy
global scarring grading system score (QGSGSS), blinded                  Background: Previous studies demonstrated the clinical efficacy
investigator global visual analog scale (VAS), and Skindex-16.          of PDT in recalcitrant warts. Both 2,940 nm Er:YAG and 10.600
Safety evaluations include development of dyspigmentation or            CO2 laser fractional ablation has shown to enhance the
scarring. Preliminary results at week 16 are presented here.            penetration of actives through the skin. The objective of this study
Results: In our preliminary analysis of six subjects who have           was to investigate the safety and efficacy of a combined thermo-
completed four treatments and were evaluated at 1 month after           fractional PDT comparing two different laser wavelenghts (2,940
the final treatment, all subjects showed improvement from                and 10.600 nm) as fractional trans-stratum corneum penetration
baseline by blinded live investigator VAS. The mean                     enhancers.
Investigator VAS was 6.0 and 3.8 for the high and low density           Study: Fifty seven recalcitrant HPV lesions belonging to 20
treatments, respectively, where 0 is ‘‘no change’’ and 10 is ‘‘like     subjects (10 females and 10 males, Fitzpatrick 2–3, 12- to 37-
normal skin.’’ The mean reduction from baseline in QGSGSS for           yeard old mean 21) were treated according to the thermo-
both high and low density treatments was 1. Two of the six              fractional PDT technique. A full field 2,940 nm Er:YAG laser
subjects and 1/6 subjects had mild hyperpigmentation and                photovaporization was performed on all lesions to eliminate
erythema bilaterally at week 16 (1 month post 4 treatments)             hypercheratosis (4 mm spot–300 microseconds–6 J/cm2 –8 Hz–
respectively.                                                           Fotona Dynamis XS). Thermotherapy was subsequently
Conclusion: The 1,550 nm erbium-doped fractional laser is               performed with three sequential passes of a long pulse 1,064 nm
efficacious and safe in the treatment of acne scarring in                Nd:YAG laser (3 mm spot, 35 milliseconds–50 J/cm2 –scanner–
darker skin types. Greater efficacy was observed with                    Fotona Dynamis XS). Thirty-two lesions were treated with
higher treatment density without an increase risk of                    2,940 nm Er:YAG fractional laser as an active trans-stratum
hyperpigmentation.                                                      corneum penetration enhancer (0.250 mm spot, 8 J/cm2,
34                      American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts
0.175 milliseconds, 10% coverage—Fotona Dynamis XS) and 25           Background: To study the efficacy and the safety of the
lesions were treated with a CO2 fractional laser (0.300 mm spot,     monochromatic excimer light (MEL) in the treatment of vitiligo.
14 W, 500–900 dwell depth—DEKA SmartXide Dot). Ten percent           To make comparison in efficacy between the two treatment
5-ALA liposome gel under polyurethane occlusion was applied on       frequencies of monochromatic excimer light in treatment of
all lesion and left for 6 hours. 635 nm LED irradiation (Omnilux)    vitiligo. To evaluate the safety of the once weekly and twice
was finally performed (4\0 –20\0 pause–14 m\0 ). Blind clinical       weekly regimens of the monochromatic excimer light in treatment
evaluation at 7–30–60–90–180 days was performed.                     of vitiligo.
Results: Both lesion grouls required an average of 1.5 treatments    Study: Eighty-eight patches from 16 patients of bilateral
to achieve complete eradication. Maximal post-op localized pain      symmetrical vitiligo were selected for the treatment with
was reported 24–48 hours after the procedure. No scars and/or        monochromatic excimer laser. Forty-four patches were treated,
infections were observed. Two percent transitory PIH was             while 44 patches on the opposite side in the same patients were
observed (two Er:YAG and two CO2 treated patients). No clinical      kept as controls. The patches were divided in two groups MEL 1
recurrences were observed after 180 days.                            group where the treatments were given once weekly and MEL 2
Conclusion: Thermo-fractional PDT appears to be a very               group where treatments were given twice weekly. A total of 24
promising combined technique to treat recalcitrant HPV               sessions were delivered with dose elevations by 100 mJ/cm2 every
infections. No significant differences were observed between          session. Assessment was done by visual analogue scores at the end
Er:YAG and CO2 fractional trans-stratum corneum penetration          of the treatments. Patient satisfaction scores were also noted.
enhancement of 5-ALA liposome gel as far as clinical results are     Results: MEL was found to be effective modality of the treatment
concerned. More studies are needed to optimize all different steps   as 61.36% of the patches achieved > 50% repigmentation in 24
of this innovative treatment approach.                               sessions. The repigmentation could be even more if the treatment
                                                                     in continued further. There was no difference found in average
#106                                                                 visual analogue scores in MEL 1 and MEL 2 groups. Patient
                                                                     satisfaction was; however, higher for the MEL 2 group than MEL
308 NM EXCIMER LASER TREATMENT OF                                    1 group. Both twice weekly and once weekly regimens were well
PALMOPLANTAR PSORIASIS                                               tolerated with no difference between them.
                                                                     Conclusion: Our study shows effectiveness of the monochromatic
David Goldberg, Nathalie Dietrich-Comte,                             excimer light in the treatment of vitiligo and it can be considered a
Mussarrat Hussain                                                    treatment option for the treatment. Also there was no difference
Skin Laser & Surgery Specialists of NY and NJ, New York, NY          found in the repigmentation achieved by once weekly or twice
Background: Palmoplantar psoriasis is difficult to treat and          weekly regimens.
often recalcitrant to traditional therapies such as topical
corticosteroids. Since the excimer laser can selectively treat       #108
psoriatic plaques with higher fluences than is tolerated with
traditional phototherapy, it could be a therapeutic modality for     USE OF COMBINATION LASERS FOR MORE
the thicker skin on the palms and soles. We undertook a study to     EFFECTIVE HAIR REMOVAL
evaluate the safety and efficacy of the 308 nm excimer for the        Dina Yaghmai, Abnoeal Bakus, Jerome Garden
treatment of psoriasis involving the hands and feet.
Study: A total of thirty male and female subjects between the        Northwestern Hospital, Chicago, IL
ages of 18–75 years with mild to severe psoriasis involving the      For many patients single laser approaches to hair removal have
                                                                     not been fully effective. Use of a given laser can result in the
palms and soles were treated. All subjects discontinued all other
treatments for 4 weeks prior to starting the study. Subjects         reduction of only hair shafts with a specific diameter or in the
received up to 16 laser treatments over the course of 3 months       miniaturization of the hair shaft, resulting in the persistence of
with a 308 nm excimer laser. Treatment parameters (400–600 mJ/       many hairs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the
                                                                     effectiveness of sequential treatments with two different lasers for
cm2) were determined by the severity of disease. Treatments were
performed biweekly. Clearance was evaluated by the PASI scale.       more improved hair removal. Fifteen subjects with skin types I–
Results: A mean number of 11 sessions (from 7 to 14) was             V, pigmented fine and coarse caliber hair, underwent a series of
provided to each subject. By the 5th treatment, all subjects         laser treatments at monthly intervals. Each of the subjects were
                                                                     treated with either the combination of 810 nm diode and 1,064 nm
showed improvement in the PASI score. At the end of treatments,
all subjects showed improvement between 50% and 100% as              Q-switched Nd:YAG or combination of the long pulsed 1,064 nm
evidenced by decreased scale, decreased erythema, and flattened       and the Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers. Sequential treatments with
                                                                     two lasers were done during the same treatments session.
plaques. No relapse was detected at 3-month post-treatment
follow-up. Relapses were seen in 60% of subjects at 6 months after   Subjects on average underwent 5–7 treatments with the use of
treatment.                                                           the combination lasers. This resulted in an increase in hair
Conclusion: The 308 nm excimer laser is a treatment option for       reduction compared to previous methods. The treatments were
                                                                     well tolerated. Combination lasers are a more effective treatment
palmar–plantar psoriasis.
                                                                     option for laser hair removal, relative to the standard single laser
                                                                     treatment approach.
#107
                                                                     #109
STUDY OF EFFICACY AND TOLERABILITY
MONOCHROMATIC EXCIMER LIGHT IN                                       CLINICAL EVALUATION OF A 800 NM
TREATMENT OF VITILIGO                                                LONG-PULSED DIODE LASER DEVICE WITH A
Niteen Dhepe, Tushar Kshirsagar, Ashok Naik,                         LARGE SPOT SIZE AND VACUUM-ASSISTED
Vaishali Phadke                                                      SUCTION FOR HAIR REMOVAL
Pune, India                                                          Omar Ibrahimi, Suzanne Kilmer
                         American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts                                                      35
UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA; Skin and Laser Center          percentage of hairs present 12 months after the final treatment
of Northern California, Sacramento, CA                                  were thinner and lighter than those present at baseline.
Background: The long-pulsed diode (800–810 nm) laser is one of          Conclusion: Self-treatment with the diode laser has a good safety
the most commonly used and effective lasers for hair removal.           profile and is an effective method for permanent hair reduction in
Limitations of currently available devices include a small              women with dark terminal hair in the upper lip.
treatment spot size, treatment-associated pain and the need for
skin cooling. Here, we evaluate the hair reduction capabilities of a
long-pulsed diode laser with a large spot size and vacuum assisted      #111
suction.
Study: A prospective, self-controlled, single center study of           BILATERAL AXILLA HAIR REMOVAL
axillary hair removal consisting of 35 subjects. The study              COMPARING A SINGLE WAVELENGTH
consisted of three treatments using a long-pulsed diode laser with      ALEXANDRITE LASER WITH COMBINED
a large spot size and vacuum assisted suction at 4- to 6-week           MULTIPLEXED ALEXANDRITE AND ND:YAG
intervals, followed by a single follow-up visit 6 months after the      LASER TREATMENT FROM A SINGLE LASER
last treatment. Hair reduction was quantified using macro hair           PLATFORM
count photographs taken at baseline, prior to each treatment and        Eric Bernstein
at the 6-month follow-up visit. The level of treatment-associated       University of Pennsylvania, Ardmore, PA
pain, treatment time and adverse events were additional study           Background: The 1,064 nm Nd:YAG has been shown to be
endpoints.                                                              effective in removing dark hair in darker skin types but can less
Results: There was statistically significant hair reduction
                                                                        effective at treating fine or lighter hair. The 755 nm alexandrite
at 6-month follow-up for 33/35 patients. Ninety-one percent of          wavelength has been shown to be clinically effective for almost all
subjects demonstrating hair reduction had hair clearance                hair types but is safest for lighter skin types. These two treatment
greater than 25%. Seventy percent of these subjects showed
                                                                        modalities were compared for effectiveness and safety in a
clearance that is equal to or greater than 50% and nine percent         bilateral comparison of axillary hair removal.
showed 75–100% clearance. The majority of subjects                      Study: Twenty-two Caucasian females with Fitzpatrick skin
reported feeling up to moderate pain during treatment without           types II–V were enrolled in this IRB-approved study. Subjects
the use of pre-treatment anesthesia or skin cooling. There was
                                                                        underwent four treatments at 4- to 6-week intervals. One axilla
one adverse event in the study unrelated to the treatment               was treated with the alexandrite laser, while the other received
protocol.                                                               treatment with multiplexed Nd:YAG/alexandrite laser. A
Conclusion: A long-pulsed diode laser device with a large spot          mathematical model was used to estimate the necessary energy
size and vacuum-assisted suction is safe and effective for the
                                                                        needed for equivalent follicle heating between the two treatment
removal of unwanted hair. Compared to other commercially                modalities. A 15 mm spot size was used delivering fluences up to
available long-pulsed diode devices, treatments are faster to           32 J/cm2. Digital photographs were taken by canfield Scientific
perform and less likely to be painful.                                  following the 3rd treatment visit, as well as 2 months and 6
                                                                        months following the final treatment.
                                                                        Results: Clearance rates as measured by blinded hair counts
#110                                                                    averaged 67–74% 4 weeks following the second treatment, 67–
                                                                        77% at 2 months following the four treatment, and 78–85% at 6
SAFETY AND EFFICACY OF A HAND-HELD DIODE                                months after the 4th treatment.
LASER FOR UPPER LIP HAIR REMOVAL                                        Conclusion: Both the alexandrite laser and the multiplexed
Brian Biesman, Whitney Morris                                           alexandrite/Nd:YAG laser modes were safe and effective for the
Nashville Centre for Laser and Facial Surgery, Nashville, TN            removal of unwanted axilla hair. The multiplexed mode achieved
                                                                        equivalent clearance to the alexandrite single wavelength mode.
Background: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of high powered
lasers for permanent hair reduction is well recognized. Hand-held
diode lasers are known to be safe and effective at achieving
permanent hair reduction in certain anatomic region but not in          #112
the upper lip. The goal of this study was to establish the safety and
efficacy of a hand-held diode laser for permanent hair reduction on      A SPLIT AXILLA COMPARISON STUDY OF
the upper lip.                                                          AXILLARY HAIR REMOVAL WITH LOW FLUENCE
Study: Fifty women (Fitzpatrick skin type II–IV) with unwanted
                                                                        HIGH REPETITION RATE 810 NM DIODE LASER
hair in the upper lip area underwent eight self-treatments at 3-        VERSUS HIGH FLUENCE LOW REPETITION RATE
week intervals using a hand-held, battery powered diode laser           1,064 NM ND:YAG LASER
(810 nm). The energy density for treatment ranged from 7 to 20 J/       Rungsima Wanitphakdeedecha,
cm2 as chosen by the subject based on comfort. Subjects were            Kanchalit Thanomkitti, Sasima Eimpunth,
followed for 12 months after last treatment. Hair counts and            Woraphong Manuskiatti
digital photographic analysis of the width and color of the hair        Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand
were performed at baseline, 1 month and 12 months after last            Background: Laser hair removal has emerged as the gold
treatment.                                                              standard to remove unwanted hair; however, it is associated with
Results: Of 50 subjects enrolled, 43 attended the 1-month follow-       pain and side effects, especially when treating patients with
up visit and 38 completed the 12-month follow-up visit.                 darker skin tone. A novel low fluence high repetition rate 810 nm
Treatments were tolerated well; the only side effect was transient      diode laser using multiple passes in constant motion technique
erythema. Reduction in dark terminal hair was statistically             has been recently introduced as the other option of hair removal
significant compared to baseline and was > 50% at 1-month                with less discomfort and fewer side effects when compared to
follow-up and > 30% at 12-month follow-up. A significant                 traditional laser hair removal. The objectives of this study were to
36                      American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts
quantitatively assess hair reduction and side effects after using     inform healthcare professionals about home-use light-based
low fluence high repetition rate 810 nm diode laser versus high        technology and influence manufacturers wishing to sell in Europe
fluence low repetition rate 1,064 nm Nd:Yag laser and to               to adopt ‘best practice’. The study considers the risks to the eyes
determine efficacy at 1- and 6-month follow-up after treatment.        and skin from optical radiation both to the consumer and persons
Study: This is a prospective single-center, bilaterally paired-,      in the vicinity of the user.
blinded-, randomized-comparison study. Fifty female volunteers        Study: The review draws upon a preliminary study by two of the
were recruited to the study. The volunteers were randomly             authors investigating the technical performance of a range of
treated with low fluence high repetition rate 810 nm diode laser on    professional and home-use devices tested with particular focus
one side of their axilla and high fluence low repetition rate          on recognized critical parameters for the safe and effective
1,064 nm Nd:YAG laser on the other side of their axilla. They         use of light-based technology in hair removal and wrinkle
received five treatments at 4 weeks interval. Axillary hair count      treatment.
and patient satisfaction rating were measured at baseline, 1-, and    Conclusion: There is an urgent need for regulation of intense
6-month follow-up after complete treatment protocol. Treatment        pulsed light and LED devices as well as lasers, which will include
time of each laser and pain score were also rated at 1st treatment.   manufacturing standards for both professional and home-use
Results: Until now, the study has not yet been completed. All         devices intended for hair removal, treatment of alopecia, wrinkle
subjects received five treatments and attended 1-month follow-up       treatment, skin tone and texture, etc.
visit. Forty-one of the 51 subjects continued with the study
protocol. Percentage of axillary hair reduction at 1-month follow-
up visit after receiving 810 nm diode and 1,064 nm Nd:YAG laser
treatment were 71.0 Æ 21.1%, and 82.3 Æ 18.0%, respectively.
There was a significant difference in hair reduction and pain score
                                                                      #114
between both laser treatment (P ¼ 0.003, and P < 0.001,               INVESTIGATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF A
respectively). However, there was no statistically significance
                                                                      MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUE FOR THE SPATIAL
difference in patient satisfaction rating and treatment time          ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF HOME-USE INTENSE
(P ¼ 0.12 and P ¼ 0.09). Side effects were mild and limited to        PULSED LIGHT SYSTEMS
transient erythema and swelling. The final results will be
presented in the meeting.
                                                                      Gareth Thomas, Caerwyn Ash,
Conclusion: Both low fluence high repetition rate 810 nm diode
                                                                      Richard Hugtenburg, Michael Kiernan
laser and high fluence low repetition rate 1,064 nm Nd:YAG laser       Godfrey Town, Swansea University; University of Wales,
are safe and effective procedures for hair removal. High fluence       Global Academy, Swansea, United Kingdom
low repetition rate 1,064 nm Nd:YAG laser is superior in hair         Background: The current annual global market for domestic
reduction. However, low fluence high repetition rate 810 nm diode      intense pulse light (IPL) hair removal has been estimated at US
laser is less painful. And long-term follow-up is needed.             $1 billion and continues to grow. It is widely recognised that there
                                                                      are five key technological parameters to consider in cutaneous
                                                                      photo therapy, namely wavelength, energy density, pulse
                                                                      duration, spot size and spatial distribution. Uneven energy
                                                                      distribution in the treatment area can result in over or under
                                                                      treatment of the treated area, thus causing dissatisfaction to the
      INTERNATIONAL                                                   patient.
                                                                      Study: This study investigates a method in measuring and
   EXPERIENCE IN LASERS                                               analysing spatial distributions of five commercially available
                                                                      home-use IPL systems as there is no quantitative method to
     IN DERMATOLOGY                                                   conduct and compare spatial profiles. Using a CCD camera and a
                                                                      phosphorescent screen to extend the pulse duration, averaged
                                                                      time frames were analysed in Matlab software where dark
                                                                      reference frames were taken to minimise noise. Normalised for
                                                                      energy, 3-D graphical images of the data are presented to show
#113                                                                  the spatial profile of five commercially available IPL systems.
                                                                      Numerical analysis of the data was completed by two methods,
GUIDELINES ON THE SAFETY OF LIGHT-BASED                               arithmetical mean roughness (Ra) and path difference (Pd) at 80%
HOME-USE DEVICES FROM THE EUROPEAN                                    and 13.5% of maximum value.
SOCIETY FOR LASER DERMATOLOGY                                         Results: One system has both the lowest Ra value on the 80%
Godfrey Town, Caerwyn Ash, Christine Dierickx,                        border and the lowest Ra value on the 13.5% border. Two systems
Merete Haedersdal, Klaus Fritz                                        have obviously poor distribution of spatial energy. Such numerical
University of Wales, Global Academy, Swansea Metropolitan             analysis provides valuable information on treatment performance
University, Swansea, United Kingdom; University Hospital              previously unseen.
Ghent, Ghent, Belgium; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston,        Conclusion: This study recorded two systems with clear uneven
MA, Copenhagen, Denmark; European Society of Laser                    distribution of energy across the treatment area. This could result
Dermatology, Landau, Germany                                          in over and/or under treatment at the claimed energy density that
Background: In the past 2 years since their first introduction,        might produce blistering, hyper pigmentation or
there has been a rapid proliferation of light-based hair removal      hypopigmentation in areas of increased fluence and paradoxical
and wrinkle treatment devices intended for home-use. In Europe,       hair growth or limited effectiveness in areas of reduced fluence.
sales already run into several tens of thousands of units with        Such clear unevenness in spatial distribution requires the
multi-national companies such as Phillips, Remington and              consumer to overlap treatment thus increasing treatment time
Alliance Boots entering the market. This review is intended to        and user dissatisfaction.
                        American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts                                                    37
#115                                                                  1,064 Nd-YAG, and non-ablative fractional laser. All of them have
                                                                      received isotretinoin therapy, during their laser treatment
OPTIMUM CHOICE OF IRRADIATION                                         sessions.
WAVELENGTH FOR SKIN COLOR                                             Results: We have up to 7 years follow-up (for some patients) none
DETERMINATION USING SKIN REFLECTANCE                                  of our patients develop hypertrophic scar or keloid. Also all the
MEASUREMENTS                                                          previous reported cases in the literature will be reviewed and
Caerwyn Ash, Stuart Jones, Godfrey Town,                              summarized.
Marc Clement, Peter Bjerring, Michael Kiernan
Swansea University; CyDen, Ltd; University of Wales,
Global Academy, Swansea, United Kingdom; Molholm Hospital,            #117
Vejle, Denmark
Background: The need for objective, non-invasive methods to
                                                                      A PROSPECTIVE PILOT STUDY OF THE
measure melanin concentration in vivo in human skin,                  ALEXANDRITE LASER ON BASAL CELL
independent of the competing chromophore, haemoglobin is much         CARCINOMAS
needed in the field of skin colour determination. The classification    Daniel I. Wasserman, Zeina Tannous,
of skin types is based on human skin reaction to ultraviolet          Gary D. Monheit
exposure and used to help predict skin response in laser/IPL          Total Skin & Beauty Dermatology Center, Birmingham, AL;
treatments. There is an ever increasing need to quantify skin         Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
colour for beauty treatments, and home use IPL/laser systems are      Background: Basal cell carcinomas (BCC) are the most common
increasingly practiced by non-medically trained personnel who         form of human cancer. Treatments include Mohs micrographic
may lack the requisite skills necessary to predict accurately, safe   surgery, excision, electrodessication and curettage, cryosurgery,
treatment parameters. To evaluate the optimum wavelength              topical immunomodulators, photodynamic therapy, and
choice to categorize skin tones into one of the six Fitzpatrick       radiotherapy. The pulsed-dye laser (PDL) (595 nm) has
groups to optimise safety in light-based skin treatments.             demonstrated considerable efficacy for superficial BCCs, however,
Study: A calibrated prototype device consisting of an optical head    is limited by an approximate penetration of 2 mm. Based on the
with four wavelengths (460, 522, 594, 617 nm), broadband              3 mm penetration and a small peak of hemoglobin absorption in
detector, microprocessor and an LCD display was used alongside a      the near infrared range, we investigated whether superficial and
commercial RGB colorimeter on the inner arm of nine subjects,         nodular basal cell carcinomas can be successfully treated using a
which typically has little UV exposure and minimal hair. To           755 nm alexandrite laser. The goal of this pilot study is to
establish the effect of haemoglobin on skin colour two addition       determine whether superficial and nodular BCCs can be
tests show the effect of oxy and deoxyhaemoglobin using induced       successfully treated using the alexandrite laser.
reduced haemoglobin and controlled erythema, were made on two         Study: Thirteen tumors, in nine subjects, less than 2 cm located
subjects.                                                             on the trunk or extremities were enrolled in this study. Each
Results: Four hundred and sixty nanometer has a clear linear          tumor was treated with the 755 nm alexandrite laser either once
relationship with skin colour when comparing against other            (N ¼ 10) or four times (N ¼ 3) at 4-week intervals. Four weeks
wavelengths in standard, under reduced haemoglobin, and               following the final treatment, all tumors were excised and
erythema conditions for a range of skin colours. At this              reviewed histologically. Additionally, pain, purpura, edema, and
wavelength absorption of melanin dominates other chromophores         blistering following treatments were measured during the study.
when comparing skin colour. Five hundred and twenty-two, 694,         Photos were taken throughout the study.
and 617 nm wavelengths showed variation practically on light          Results: All 3 tumors treated in the 4-treatment arm completely
skin tone subjects.                                                   resolved, while 4 out of 10 tumors in the single treatment arm
Conclusion: Through accurate detection of skin melanin, a novel       completely resolved. All patients experienced significant purpura
device using 460 nm may significantly decrease the risk of side        and edema with some experiencing mild blistering. Scarring was
effects by overtreatment and extend treatment to wider patient        found in only one patient, while hypopigmentation was frequently
populations with light based dermatological procedures.               present on follow-up visits.
                                                                      Conclusion: The 755 nm long-pulsed alexandrite laser appears to
                                                                      produce considerable efficacy when tumors are treated four times.
#116                                                                  Meanwhile, single treatments of tumors produced complete
                                                                      clearance in less than half of the tumors suggesting that the long-
CONCOMITANT USE OF LASER AND                                          pulsed alexandrite may be a suitable non-surgical option for the
ISOTRETINOIN, HOW SAFE?                                               treatment of BCCs. Additional studies are needed in order to
Ahmed Alissa                                                          determine ideal treatment settings and number of treatments
National Center for Vitiligo and Psoriasis, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia      required for reliable rates of complete clearance.
Background: Isotretinoin-induced keloid formation has
occasionally been reported in patients who had undergone
dermabrasion or laser treatment. According to a safe                  #118
dermatologist practice, laser should be used during or within 6–8
months after Isotretinoin; however, few recent reports suggest
                                                                      PROPOSING CONCEPT OF SELECTIVE
using isotretinoin and laser hair removal is a safe practice. It is   PHOTOTHERMOCOAGULATION AND VARIOUS
well known in laser hair removal that there is no real significant     DERMATOLOGIC INDICATIONS BY USING
epidermal damage.                                                     1,444 NM ND:YAG LASER
Study: This paper present 100 patients who underwent to laser         Kyung Goo Lee, Sang Geun Lee, Sang Min Yi,
hair removal, erbium laser, vascular laser, Q-switched                Jae Hwan Kim, Jae Eun Choi, Il-Hwan Kim
alexandrite and Q-switched 532 nm double frequency, Q-switched        Korea University Hospital, An-San Si, Korea
38                        American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts
Background: Dermatologic laser treatment is based on selective            in laser dermabrasion side as compared to UVB and topical
photothermolysis (SP) which specifically targets chromophore of            steroids alone (P < 10À4). Almost 50% of lesions achieved at least
each disease. The concept of SP became possible after the pulsed          50% of repigmentation in difficult to treat areas while only 4.2%
irradiation of laser was technically available. However, SP theory        did with topical steroids and UVB alone. No repigmentation
has certain limitations that treatment efficacy significantly                > 50% was achieved in the extremities of the fingers. A high rate
decreases when lesion’s chromophore is not clear or the leisons’s         of side effects was noted with delayed healing, pain, and two
size is too big.                                                          hypertrophic scars. The tolerance and satisfaction of the patients
Study: 1,444 nm Nd:YAG laser (AcculculptTM, Lutronic, Korea) is           were 4.2 and 4/10 in laser side and 8.4 and 3/10 in UVB and
relatively specific for fat and water and primarily indicated for          steroids alone group, respectively.
liposuction, lipo-plasty and facial lifting. Authors experienced          Conclusion: The laser dermabrasion improves the
that this laser has great effect on coagulation of target ‘‘structure’’   repigmentation rate in vitiligo patients. Despite the high rate of
such as blood vessel and water rich organelles. And also this             repigmentation in such difficult areas the global satisfaction was
infrared laser has greater lateral heat diffusion capacity than           moderate to low. The actual side effects strongly limit its use in
conventional CO2 and Erbium YAG laser which enables to stack              current practice. However, studying the mechanism of action of
more heat energy to dermal portion of skin. As this laser is pulsed       the laser dermabrasion for inducing pigmentation should provide
laser, to control amount of energy stacking is also easily possible.      interesting clues for treating vitiligo.
These findings led us to propose a new concept named ‘‘selective
photothermal-coagulation (SPTC),’’ which supplements the
limitations of SP theory mentioned above.
                                                                          #120
Results: Using this new concept, authors applied this 1,444 nm
                                                                          STUDY ABOUT EFFICACY AND SAFETY IN LASER
Nd:YAG laser for treatment of various diseases such as
                                                                          ASSISTED SWEAT GLAND REDUCTION FOR
angiokeratoma, venous malformation, pyogenic granuloma,
                                                                          AXILLARY HYPERHIDROSIS (LASR-H)
mucocele, neurofibroma and xanthelasma. Certain and
satisfactory treatment results were observed at above cases               Afschin Fatemi
without recurrence for over at least 6 months.                            S-thetic Clinic, Duesseldorf, Germany
Conclusion: This SPTC, using 1,444 nm Nd:YAG laser have few               Background: Axillary Hyperhidrosis is still a challenge, when it
advantages. First, unlike CO2 laser, bleeding is simultaneously           comes to the treatment options. Btx is efficient, but most patients
coagulated while laser irradiation which make physician able to           wish for a permanent solution and are therefore ready to undergo
precisely visualize procedure field. Second, as this beam                  surgery, it was efficient.
irradiation can be done by external handpiece, it is much simpler         Study: Three hundred seventy-five patients were treated by
than surgical procedure and easily repeatable even if the lesions         Laser Assisted Sweat Gland Reduction for Hyperhidrosis (LASR-
recur. Herein, authors propose a new concept of SPTC using                H) in tumescent local anesthesia, using a special technique.
1,444 nm Nd:YAG laser, and report our experiment of various               Histologies of the aspirate and the tissue some months after the
possible indications using SPTC theory.                                   treatment were taken. In a retrospective, quantitative study,
                                                                          patients were screened up to 18 months retrospectively about
                                                                          success by this treatment. In a prospective, qualitative study, a
                                                                          group of 20 patients had weight measurements before, 6 months
#119                                                                      and 1 year after surgery.
                                                                          Results: Out of 375 patients, less than 10% still had some
ERBIUM LASER DERMABRASION FOR TREATING
                                                                          residual sweating after the first surgery. After a touch up
VITILIGO: A COMBINATION APPROACH
                                                                          procedure, this number went down to 1%. The studies also
Thierry Passeron, Wedd Bayoumi, Florence Le Duff,                         showed, that in 90% of the patients the reduction of axillary sweat
Laura Sillard, Jean-Philippe Lacour,                                      was > 85% and it stayed like this 18 months after the surgery.
Jean-Paul Ortonne                                                         Complications were temporary in most cases, there was visible
University Hospital of Nice, Nice, France                                 necrosis in two patients.
Background: No treatment gives fully satisfactory results for             Conclusion: Laser Assisted Sweat Gland Reduction LASR-H
treating vitiligo, especially on difficult areas such as bony              using a certain technique is efficient and reliable and safe.
prominences and extremities. The objective of the study was to
evaluate in vitiligo patients, the interest of a laser dermabrasion
in addition to the association of topical steroids and UVB in             #121
difficult to treat areas.
Study: Monocentric prospective randomized trial with intra-               TREATMENT OF SEVERE OR REFRACTORY ACNE
individual comparison. Inclusion criteria: non-segmental vitiligo         WITH NON-ABLATIVE 1,450 NM DIODE LASER
with at least two symmetrical lesions of more than 4 cm2, located         Thierry Passeron, Rosalind Hughes,
on bony prominences and/or extremities. Intervention: Day 0:              Katerina Tsilika, Jean-Paul Ortonne,
Erbium laser dermabrasion on one side (randomly assigned).                Jean-Philippe Lacour
After 48 h, hydrocortisone 17-butyrate cream was applied daily 3          University Hospital of Nice, Nice, France
weeks/4 for 12 weeks, on both sides and associated with                   Background: Several laser treatments have been reported for
narrowband UVB 2 sessions/weeks for 12 weeks. A blinded                   acne but most of them studied only mild or moderate acne
evaluation was done by two independent physicians on                      patients. The objective of the study was to evaluate the long-term
standardized pictures. The criterion of success was a                     efficacy and the tolerance of the non-ablative 1,450 nm diode laser
repigmentation of at least 50% at 1 month after the end of the            alone or combined with pulse dye laser (PDL) in treating severe or
treatment.                                                                refractory acne.
Results: Eighteen patients were included; two drop off for                Study: Prospective randomized trial. Inclusion criteria: patients
personal reasons. A significant higher repigmentation was noted            with severe acne or moderate acne who resisted to topical
                         American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts                                                       39
treatment associated with oral antibiotics. Intervention: V0: PDL     Takashi Takahashi
(Vbeam, Candela1) treatment on one hemi face (randomly                Shibuya-ku, Japan
assigned) (10 mm, 10 milliseconds, 10 J/cm2, DCD 30/30). V1: 2        Background: We stared the treatment for acne scars and skin
weeks after the first PDL session 1,450 nm diode laser                 tightening for Asian patients with RF technology called as
(Smoothbeam, candela1) was done on the entire face (6 mm, 14 J/       ‘‘Insulated Micro-needling Fractional RF technology’’ since May of
cm2, DCD 40). Three sessions of diode laser were performed (one       2009 in Japan. We will report about the clinical evaluation of 150
per month). A blinded evaluation on standardized pictures was         acne scar patients.
done by an independent physician at each session and at 1, 6 and      Study: We evaluated by the photograph of baseline, 1 week after
12 months follow-up. The main criterion of evaluation was the         and 4 weeks after the treatment and the questionnaire from the
count of acne lesions. Pain and satisfaction of the patients were     patients. Some patients could be also evaluated their 3D structure
evaluated on a visual analogical scale.                               using the silicon replica method.
Results: Twenty patients were included. Four were lost in follow-     Results: One hundred forty out of the total of 150 patients were
up. The mean count of lesions were 75 before treatment, and 40,       satisfied or very much satisfied. Ten patients complained no
29 and 23 at 1, 6 and 12 months follow-up, respectively (P < .001).   change. However, in fact, 6 out of those unsatisfied 10 have shown
The mean pain during treatment was 6.9/10 and the satisfaction        a definite change by photograph. No skin burn or PIH happened in
was 6.6/10. No significant difference was observed in term of          this study.
efficacy and pain when diode and diode þ PDL laser treated sides       Conclusion: As the Insulated Micro-needling Fractional RF
were compared. Side effects were limited to three post-               technology can heat the target selectively and does not affect any
inflammatory hyperpigmentation, all in phototype IV patients.          thermal damage to the surface of the skin, the downtime is
Conclusion: The non-ablative 1,450 nm diode laser is effective in     minimized comparing with the fractional laser system. And it will
treating severe or refractory acne with an improvement                be helpful for many indications with its selectivity of the depth
remaining for at least 12 months. Adding a PDL session before         and the strength of the RF.
diode treatment is not useful. Pain during treatment and post-
inflammatory hyperpigmentation are the two main limitations of
this approach.                                                        #124
#122                                                                  LONG-TERM RESULTS OF AXILLARY HAIR
                                                                      REMOVAL WITH A CONTINUOUSLY SCANNED
FRACTIONAL ER:YAG LASER FOR ACNE SCARS                                DIODE LASER AND A SPOT-TO-SPOT SCANNED
IN SKIN OF COLOR                                                      ALEXANDRITE LASER (EPICON-STUDY)
Mukta Sachdev, Sunaina Hameed                                         Uwe Paasch, Sonja Grunewald,
Manipal Hospital; MS Skin Clinic, Bangalore, India
                                                                      Marc Oliver Bodendorf, Alexander Zygouris,
Background: Fractional photothermolysis is a new technique for
                                                                      Jan Christoph Simon
the treatment of acne scars, in which an array of microscopic         University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany
treatment zones (MTZ) is induced into the skin to stimulate a         Background: With an increasing request for permanent removal
therapeutic response deep in the dermis. Fractional ablative          of unwanted hair, new devices are generated in order to increase
lasers are more effective than non-ablative lasers, and safer than    quality and efficacy of laser epilation. A newly developed
ablative resurfacing lasers, especially in Indian skin.               continuously scanned 808 nm diode laser (Leda, Quantel Derma,
Objective: To present a pilot study on the safety and efficacy of      Germany) allows very fast treatments due to the unique
fractional ablative Erbium:YAG laser in the treatment of acne         application of the laser beam. The EpiCon-Study compared a spot-
scars. The ECCA grading system for acne scars has been                by-spot scanned alexandrite laser (‘‘Arion’’, 755 nm, Quantel
employed, in order to achieve a more standardized assessment of       Derma, Germany) with the continuously scanned diode laser for
treatment efficacy.                                                    axillary epilation (right vs. left axilla) in 31 patients (28 female, 3
Study: Thirty subjects in age group varying from 22 to 45 (mean       male). After six laser treatments with 4–6 weeks intervals a
28.05), received 4–6 treatment sessions (mean 2.93) with              significant hair reduction was found in both axillae. The linear
fractional ablative Er:YAG laser, for the correction of their acne    scanned diode laser was significantly faster ($20% of the time
scars. Pre-treatment and end of treatment ECCA scores were            consumption of the alexandrite laser), but more painful. Until now
graded using photographic analysis. Subjects were also asked to       no long-term results were available. In order to compare the long-
assess their own progress based on their before and after             term effects of a newly developed continuously scanned diode
photographs.                                                          laser (808 nm) and a spot-to-spot scanned alexandrite laser
Results: All subjects showed an improvement in their ECCA             (755 nm), we present now the data of the 18-month follow-up visit
scores. The mean score after treatment significantly reduced from      of the EpiCon-Study.
183.75 to 134.25 with P < 0.001.                                      Study: A total of 10 out of the 31 patients that completed the
Conclusion: Fractional ablative Erbium:YAG laser is a safe,           EpiCon-Study were available 18 months after the last laser
effective and promising new modality for the treatment of acne        treatment. In concordance with the evaluation during the study,
scars in skin of colour.                                              again lens-enlarged photographs of the treated areas were taken
                                                                      with a dermoscope (Trichoscan1, Foto Finder Systems GmbH,
                                                                      Germany) and hair reduction was documented. In addition,
#123                                                                  patients filled in a questionnaire regarding convenience and
                                                                      efficacy of both laser systems.
THE CLINICAL EFFICACY AND STATISTICAL                                 Results: Eighteen months after the last laser epilation both
EVALUATION OF 150 ACNE SCARS BY                                       axillae showed still a comparable, significant hair reduction.
INSULATED MICRO-NEEDLING FRACTIONAL RF                                Compared to the pre-treatment visit of the 10 available patients
TECHNOLOGY                                                            the mean axillary hair count was reduced down to 25.9%
40                       American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts
(continuously scanned 808 nm diode laser, P < 0.01) and 25.3%          Background: Melasma has been classically treated with topical
(spot-by-spot scanned alexandrite, P < 0.01). There was no             hydroquinone (HQ), but poor absorption remains a barrier to
significant difference in both axillae to the hair reduction achieved   effective treatment. The use of fractional lasers, both ablative
at the last treatment visit 18 months before. All patients were        and non-ablative, has gained popularity in recent years.
satisfied with the results, no permanent side effects were              However, the use of fractional lasers does not allow a durable
observed.                                                              effect, in contrast to continuous application of HQ. Furthermore,
Conclusion: The continuously scanned diode laser system shows          fractional therapies are accompanied by a risk of
comparable results to a spot-to-spot scanned alexandrite laser         hyperpigmentation. The use of a fractional energy in
when removing unwanted axillary hair. Both lasers removed              combination with topical HQ should improve the therapeutic
about 75% of the axillary hairs, this epilation effect is now proven   index of either alone: the fractional ablative treatment will
to last for at least 18 months.                                        offer a short-term benefit in melasma, which also creating
                                                                       temporary channels for increased HQ absorption. Conversely,
                                                                       the HQ should reduce the risk of post-treatment
#125                                                                   hyperpigmentation.
                                                                       Study: Eight patients with Fitzpatrick III–IV skin underwent a
INCREASED FORMATION OF FIBROSIS AFTER                                  single treatment with fractional radiofrequency in an open-label
TREATMENT WITH ABLATIVE VERSUS NON-                                    pilot study. Immediately after treatment all patients began daily
ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL LASER THERAPY                                      application of 2% hydroquinone. Results were monitored after 1,
Bas S. Wind, Arne A. Meesters, Marije W. Kroon,                        3, and 6 months.
Johan F. Beek, J.P. Wietze Van der Veen,                               Results: All patients tolerated the procedure well. No adverse
Allard C. Van der Wal, Jan D. Bos,                                     events were reported. Notable improvements in melasma were
Albert Wolkerstorfer                                                   appreciable at 1 month. Durable improvement was seen in all
                                                                       patients at 3 and 6 months.
Netherlands Institute for Pigment Disorders (SNIP),
Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam,           Conclusion: The combination of fractional radiofrequency and
The Netherlands                                                        topical hydroquinone provides a well-tolerated and beneficial
Background: Fractional laser therapy (FLT) has become a                approach to the treatment of melasma.
widely accepted modality for skin rejuvenation, but has also been
used in various skin disorders. Aim of this study was to compare
long-term histological effects of non-ablative and ablative FLT in
the treatment of pigment disorders.                                    #130
Study: A randomized controlled observer-blinded study was
performed in a total of 18 patients with pigment disorders. In each    A PILOT STUDY OF PULSED MAGNETIC
patient, two similar test regions were randomized to receive either    THERAPY IN BODY CONTOURING
FLT in combination with intermittent topical bleaching (to             Shlomit Halachmi, Maurice Adatto,
prevent laser-induced postinflammatory hyperpigmentation) or            Moshe Lapidoth
topical bleaching alone (to allow comparison of the regions).
                                                                       Rabin Medical Center, Petach, Tikva, Israel; SkinPulse, Geneva,
Patients with ashy dermatosis and postinflammatory                      Switzerland
hyperpigmentation were treated with non-ablative 1,550 nm FLT          Background: Pulsed magnetic field (PMF) therapy has been
(15 mJ/microbeam, 14–20% coverage), whereas patients with
                                                                       used in orthopedics and physiotherapy for over 30 years. Based on
Becker’s nevus were treated with ablative 10,600 nm FLT (10 mJ/        its demonstrated effects on angiogenesis and fibroblast
microbeam, 35–45% coverage), for a total of four to five sessions.      stimulation, it is at times applied to treatment of chronic wounds
Biopsies were obtained three months after the last laser               and post-operative healing. However, its use in dermal
treatment, and analyzed by a blinded dermatopathologist using
                                                                       stimulation for aesthetic indications has not previously been
hematoxylin and eosin stain.                                           assessed.
Results: At follow-up, dermal fibrosis was observed in four             Study: Twenty-five patients with moderate skin laxity of the
patients treated with ablative FLT. No fibrosis was observed in         abdomen or with moderate cellulite underwent a series of six to
patients treated with non-ablative FLT. Comparing both laser
                                                                       eight treatments of pulsed magnetic therapy with deep dermal
modalities, development of fibrosis was seen significantly more          heating, in a pilot, open-label, multi-center study. All patients
often in patients treated with ablative FLT (P < .05).                 signed informed consent. Magnetic pulses were administered at
Conclusion: At the used settings, ablative fractional laser
                                                                       15 Hz, 15 Gauss over a multipolar 1 MHz 5.5 cm RF handpiece.
therapy induces formation of fibrosis, whereas treatment with           Patients were assessed by photography, circumference
non-ablative fractional laser therapy does not. Whether formation      measurements, and overall improvement at 1, 3, and 6 months
of fibrosis has to be regarded as dermal remodeling or a subtle         after the completion of treatment. Analyses were made by three
subclinical form of scarring should be investigated in future
                                                                       independent observers.
research.                                                              Results: All patients completed the treatments. Patient
                                                                       satisfaction was universally good. Photographic assessments and
                                                                       overall improvement rating revealed notable improvements in
#126                                                                   skin laxity and cellulite. A trend toward circumference reduction
                                                                       was noted. No adverse events were reported.
FRACTIONAL RADIOFREQUENCY FOLLOWED BY                                  Conclusion: Pulsed magnetic field therapy is an untapped
HYDROQUINONE FOR TREATMENT OF                                          energy-based approach with demonstrated safety and
MELASMA                                                                applicability to aesthetics in general and body contouring in
Shlomit Halachmi, Moshe Lapidoth                                       particular. Additional studies are required to determine optimal
Rabin Medical Center, Petach, Tikva, Israel                            treatment protocols.
                         American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts                                                     41
#131                                                                   clinical evaluation by comparing before and after pictures as well
                                                                       as standard measurement plus an objective measurement method
RADIAL ACOUSTIC WAVES FOR THE                                          using an ultrasound imaging system.
TREATMENT OF CELLULITE: A DOUBLE                                       Study: Treatment was performed on the saddle bags areas of 14
BLINDED RANDOMIZED PROSPECTIVE STUDY                                   female patients, with the CELLACTOR1 SC1 (Storz Medical AG,
VERUM VERSUS PLACEBO                                                     ¨
                                                                       Tagerwilen, Switzerland). This device includes two applicators,
Katharina Russe-Wilflingseder, Elisabeth Russe                          the C-ACTOR and D-ACTOR. The D-ACTOR is a vibrating
Plastische Chirurgie und Laserzentrum, Innsbruck, Austria              massage system that operates by compressed air to perform pulse
                                                                       activation therapy on target muscles and tissues with acoustic
Background: Acoustic wave treatment is a new approach to
improve the appearance of cellulite. Pulses are penetrating into       radial waves. The C-ACTOR is a high intensity system with
the tissue leading to stimulation of tissue metabolism and blood       acoustic planar waves. Within 4 weeks, eight AWT1 treatment
                                                                       sessions have been performed with both applicators. With the
circulation, inducing a natural repair process with cell activation
and stem cells proliferation. It is related to extracorporeal shock    D-ACTOR 3000 pulses at energy intensity between 3 and 4 bar
wave treatment, which showed evidence of collagen remodeling           have been applied to each saddle bag area. With the C-ACTOR
within the dermis and of stimulating microcirculation in fatty         1500 pulses were used at energy between 0.45 and 1.24 mJ/mm2
                                                                       depending on sensitivity of the patient. Follow-up visits were
tissue and is concluded to have a fibrosclerosis-preventing effect.
In our previous controlled clinical study we could show the clinical   performed at 1, 4 and 12 weeks after the last treatment.
efficacy of acoustic waves for treating cellulite.                      Results: Measurements with the ultrasound system clearly
Study: Double blinded randomized prospective study was                 demonstrate a significant diminution in the subcutaneous fat
                                                                       layer thickness with an average of 1.3 mm (11.8%) at 1 FU and
performed to assess the efficacy of AWT by combining superficial
and deeper penetrating radial waves within one treatment               2.2 mm (19.7%) at 2 FU. The averaged circumference has been
session. Fifteen females included: 11 verum, 4 placebo; BMI 22.7       reduced from 59.6 cm in the beginning to 58.3 cm at 1 FU and to
                                                                       57.2 cm at 2 FU. This is a reduction by 1.3 and 2.4 cm. Patients
SD 1.7; age 42.5 SD 7.6; 8 treatments with D-Actor 200; 10.500
pulses (1/3 deep, 2/3 superficial AW) applied per side (upper-leg       satisfaction after eight treatments was very good to excellent for 9
and buttock) using maximal tolerated pressure (DI 1.4–3 bar,           of the 14 patients. There were no significant side effects observed
D20S 3–5 bar) at 12 Hz. Documentation and evaluation was done          except some minor bruising in two patients. This study, although
                                                                       performed on a small number of patients, tends to show the
before, 1 week after 7 treatment and at week 4 and 12 after last
treatment with 3D imaging system, patient’s questionnaire,             safety and efficacy of AWT1 in treating localized fat areas in
                                                                       a non-invasive way. There is also an additional benefit for
weight control, measurement of circumference of upper leg and
                                                                       patients in reducing the cellulite aspect at the same time by
standardized photography.
                                                                       using AWT1.
Results: Comparing verum versus placebo results were
significant different at baseline and 2nd follow-up shown by 3D
measurements in Sq P ¼ 0.006 (root mean square height) and Sz
P ¼ 0.021 (maximum height). Patient’s questionnaire revealed           #133
improvement in number and depth of dimples, skin firmness and
texture, little change or no change in shape of treated area and       REDUCTION IN ADIPOSE TISSUE VOLUME
reduction of circumference of the upper leg Patients’ average          USING A NEW HIGH POWER RADIOFREQUENCY
rating of treatment success stated for the verum a constant            TECHNOLOGY COMBINED WITH INFRARED
improvement at all follow-ups, for the placebo not.                    LIGHT AND MECHANICAL MANIPULATION FOR
Conclusion: The study could prove the efficacy of superficial and        BODY CONTOURING
deep radial acoustic waves in treating cellulite. No side effects      Maurice Adatto, Boris Vaynberg, Ruthie Amir
were seen.                                                             Skinpulse Dermatology & Laser Center Geneva, Switzerland;
                                                                       Syneron Medical, Yokneam Illit, Israel
                                                                       Background: A growing patient demand for a youthful skin
#132                                                                   appearance with a favorable body shape has led to the recent
                                                                       development of new non-invasive body contouring techniques. We
BODY SCULPTING WITH ACOUSTIC WAVE                                      have previously demonstrated that the combination of bi-polar
THERAPY: RANDOMIZED, CONTROLLED, STUDY                                 radiofrequency and optical energies with tissue manipulation is
ON 14 SUBJECTS                                                         an efficient reshaping modality. Here, we investigated the
Maurice Adatto, R. Adatto-Neilson, P. Novak,                           efficiency of a new high power version of this combined
A. Krotz, G. Haller                                                    technology, in terms of adipose tissue reduction and skin
Skinpulse Dermatology & Laser Center, Geneva, Switzerland;             tightening.
Storz Medical, Tagerwilen, Switzerland                                 Study: Twelve patients received one treatment per week over 6
Background: Reduction of localized adiposities by non-invasive         weeks in their abdomen/flank areas and were followed-up to 3-
means is a very frequent request among the female and male             month post-completion of the treatment protocol. This new device
population. The areas most frequently requested for loss of volume     has an increased power in the bipolar RF as this parameter seems
are abdomen, saddle bags, flanks, love handles, inner thighs and        to be the most important issue for volume reduction. Patient
inner knees. Acoustic Wave Therapy1 (AWT1) is a non-invasive           circumferences were measured and baselines to post-treatments
technique using mechanical sound waves. Its efficacy in                 comparisons were made. Diagnostic US measurements were used
improving cellulite appearance and increasing skin elasticity has      to evaluate the reduction in adipose tissue volume. Improvement
been demonstrated in previous studies. The objective of this study     in skin tightening was evaluated using a cutometer device.
is to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of AWT1, combining two        Results: We observed a gradual decline in patient circumferences
different mechanical waves during the same session, in volume          from baseline to post six treatments. The overall body shaping
reduction of saddle bags in women. To demonstrate this we used         effect was accompanied with improvement in skin tightening and
42                       American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts
was clearly noticeable in the comparison of the before and after        #135
photographs. These findings correlated with measurements of
adipose tissue volume and skin firmness/elasticity using                 EFFICACY AND PATIENT SATISFACTION OF A
diagnostic US and cutometer, respectively. The thickness of the         NEW NON-ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL LASER
fat layer showed on average a 29% reduction between baseline and        1,340 NM FOR THE FACIAL REJUVENATION IN
1-month follow-up, 93% of the subjects had a 1–60% change in fat        BRAZILIAN PATIENTS
layer thickness. Patients subjectively described comfort and            Valeria Campos, Tatiana Cordero, Juliana Jordao
satisfaction from treatment and 97% of them were satisfied with          Jundiai, Brazil; Campinas, Brazil; Curitiba, Brazil
the results at the follow-up visit.
                                                                        Background: There is a growing demand from patients for a less
Conclusion: The application of high power RF energy combined            aggressive treatment to address wrinkles and uneven texture
with IR, mechanical massage and vacuum appears to be an                 while minimizing recovery time and downtime, compared to
efficient modality for reduction in circumferences and
                                                                        ablative technologies. To determine the efficacy, safety and
improvement in skin appearance. The present study performed             patient satisfaction of a new non-ablative fractional laser
with a new device suggests that the underlying mechanism of             1,340 nm in facial skin rejuvenation in Brazilian skin types and
action is reduction in the hypodermal adipose tissue volume and         compare two laser parameters (low fluence multiple passes vs.
intensification in dermal matrix density.
                                                                        high fluence single pass).
                                                                        Study: Twenty subjects (skin phototypes II to VI) with visible
                                                                        cutaneous photodamage were treated with the new device
#134                                                                                                   ˜
                                                                        Etherea 1,340 nm (Industra, Sao Carlos, Brazil). Treatments were
                                                                        performed using the 8 mm diameter handpiece, density of
POST FACE LIFTING RF TREATMENT: CASE                                    100 MTZ/cm2 and pulse duration of 3 milliseconds. One-half of the
REPORTS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS                                           face was treated with a single pass using 110–140 mJ/MTZ, the
Hanit Brenner Lavie, Tal Nachlieli, Ruthie Amir,                        other half of the face was treated with three passes using
Eldad Moor                                                              80–110 mJ/MTZ. Patients returned every 4 weeks for a total of
                                                                        three sessions. Patients were followed-up with monthly photos
Assuta Medical Center, Haifa, Israel; Syneron Medical Ltd.,
Yokneam Illit, Israel; Ramat Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv,             and grading until 6 months after their last treatment session.
Israel                                                                  All patients were asked to fillout a ‘severity scale’ on which
                                                                        pigmentation, rhytides, skin tone/tightness, texture, and patient
Background: Optimal rejuvenation of aging face requires
multimodality intervention tailored to both anatomic and                satisfaction was noted after the last treatment. Pigmentation,
histological changes. Traditional surgical procedures, including        rhytides, skin tone/tightness, and texture were also evaluated by
face lift and forehead lift, can result in repositioning of ptotic      two physicians not involved in the study using the pictures taken
                                                                        with Canfield VISIA Complexion.
structures. However, actinic changes and wrinkles remain,
revealing patients’ true age. Dermabrasion, chemical and laser          Results: According to photo analyses at the 3-month follow-up.
peels and monopolar radio frequency have been used as a                 The Single-Pass Treated Side: 60% of patients showed
complementary treatment to incision procedures by producing a           improvement in pigmentation, 50% in skin tone/tightening and
                                                                        skin texture, and 70% in rhytides. The Three-Passes Treated Side:
more youthful and rejuvenated appearance. The purpose of this
study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of post face lift patients   70% patients showed improvement in pigmentation, 50% in skin
treated with bipolar RF technology which was delivered to the           tone/tightening and skin texture, and 60% in rhytides. According
                                                                        to the patients, 80% of patients showed improvement in
skin in a fractional manner.
Study: This was a prospective study. All patients were post a           pigmentation, 90% in skin tone/tightening and skin texture, and
traditional procedure which included a face lift with or without an     80% in rhytides. All patients were very satisfied with treatments
additional surgical treatment such as forehead lift, brow lift or       and they did not notice any difference between the two halves of
                                                                        the face. No permanent side effects or scarring were seen.
blepharoplasty. The first treatment began at 11–14 weeks post-
operation, depending on the patient’s healing period. All patients      Conclusion: A new fractionated nonablative 1,340 nm laser can
received three treatments using the high density electrode pin          safely and effectively treat photodamage in darker skin types.
array of sublative RF, at 3- to 4-week intervals. Before and after      We did not observe significant difference in the outcome after a
                                                                        low fluence multiple pass versus high fluence single pass
standardized digital photos were taken and evaluated for clinical
improvement. A questionnaire on patient’s satisfaction was given        treatment.
to each patient.
Results: According to the investigators’ assessment, measurable
clinical improvements were noticed for all parameters tested,
                                                                        #136
including wrinkles, pores, tightness, brightness and coloring. In a
similar manner, the majority of the subjects found the treatment
                                                                        A PILOT STUDY OF FRACTIONAL
efficient and saw significant improvement in the facial areas
                                                                        MICRO-PLASMA RADIOFREQUENCY FOR
treated. Patients’ satisfaction was high while complaints were
                                                                        TREATMENT OF FACIAL SCARS AND RHYTIDS
minor and included itching, prolonged redness and skin pin marks        Shlomit Halachmi, Arie Orenstein, Tania Meneghel,
(up to 72 hours).                                                       Moshe Lapidoth
Conclusion: For the last four decades face lifting has become the       Rabin Medical Center, Petach, Tikva, Israel; Tel Hashomer
most popular procedure for facial rejuvenation. Even with               Hospital, Tel Hashomer, Israel; Renaissance Medical Center,
successful resuspension of ptotic soft tissues, some wrinkles,          Sao Paulo, Brazil
textural problems and dyschromia of the skin remain. The usage          Background: Fractional ablative and non-ablative lasers have
of bipolar RF treatments to complement face lift improves the           gained popularity due to their efficacy and improved tolerability.
surgical procedure and yields harmonious facial rejuvenation            Both plasma and fractional radiofrequency (RF) have been
results.                                                                addressed as alternative methods for ablative or non-ablative
                        American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts                                                  43
energy delivery for similar indications. We report the initial      #138
experience with a fractional micro-plasma RF-based device in the
treatment of acne scars or facial rhytids.                          SEQUENTIAL PHOTOTHERMAL 1,064 ND:YAG
Study: Porcine skin models demonstrated that the depth and          AND 2,940 NM ER:YAG FRACTIONAL
diameter of fractional plasma-RF penetration depend on the RF       RESURFACING AND REMODELING VERSUS
power and pulse duration, and range from 100 to 150 mm in depth     2,940 NM ER:YAG FRACTIONAL RESURFACING
and from 80 to 120 mm in diameter. Based on the results in this     ALONE: A COMPARATIVE STUDY
model, 16 patients with facial acne scars or facial rhytids         Leonardo Marini
underwent a series of treatments at 3- to 4-week intervals.
                                                                    The Skin Doctors’ Center, Trieste, Italy
Results were monitored photographically 6 months after              Background: The main objective of this study was to assess the
treatment.                                                          clinical and histologic effects of a sequential photo-thermal
Results: Acne scars showed marked improvement after 2–4
                                                                    short þ long pulse 1,064 nm Nd:YAG followed by a fractional
treatments. Facial rhytids demonstrated reduced depth after two     2,094 nm Er:YAG according to a laser layering technique (LLT)
treatments and marked improvement after four treatments.            compared to a 2,940 nm Er:YAG fractional resurfacing in facial
Treatment was well tolerated by all participants, with transient    chrono- and photo-aged skin.
erythema and short downtime.
                                                                    Study: Two different photo-thermal laser protocols were
Conclusion: Fractional micro-plasma RF technology is a              randomly applied to facial skin of two groups (a. n.55—38–60
beneficial, low downtime, and well-tolerated modality for the        years, mean 45; b. n.45—40–62 years, mean 48) of Fitzpatrick
treatment of acne scars and facial rhytids.                         type 2–3 patients affected by photo- and chrono-aging. Group a
                                                                    was treated with a sequence of short and long 1,064 nm laser
                                                                    pulses (0.3 milliseconds–35 J/cm2—scanner-operated 3 mm spot;
                                                                    followed by 35 milliseconds–50 J/cm2—scanner-operated 3 mm
#137                                                                spot) immediately followed by two passes of fractional 2,940 nm
                                                                    Er:YAG laser resurfacing (0.250 mm spot–12 J/cm2 –
TREATMENT OF DEPRESSED ACNE SCARS                                   600 microsecond—40% coverage). Group b was treated by two
AND DEEP WRINKLES WITH A NOVEL                                      passes of 2,940 nm Er:YAG laser resurfacing with the same
MULTI-SOURCE FRACTIONAL                                             parameters. Standardized clinical photographs were taken at day
RADIOFREQUENCY DEVICE—HISTOLOGICAL                                  0–30–60–90. Three millimeter punch biopsies were performed at
AND CLINICAL RESULTS ON 50 PATIENTS WITH                            30 and 90 days on the natural crease between the cheek and ear-
LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP                                                 lobule just across treated and non-treated sites. Non-treated sites
Yoram Harth, Klaus Fritz                                            were marked in blue. All histological specimens were processed
                                                                    with standard EE. A self-evaluation clinical diary was given to all
OR Medical Center, Herzlya, Israel; University Hospital, Bern,
Switzerland                                                         patients.
Background: Acne scars are one of the most difficult disorders to    Results: Clinical pictures were blindly evaluated by two
treat in dermatology. The optimal treatment system will provide     dermatologists with a 90% of concordance. Overall clinical
                                                                    improvement was considered higher (37%) in group a
minimal downtime resurfacing for the epidermis and non-ablative
deep volumetric heating for collagen remodeling in the dermis. A    (Nd:YAG þ fractional Er:YAG) compared to group b (fractional
novel therapy system (EndyMed Ltd, Cesarea, Israel) uses phase      Er:YAG). Histologic evaluation was blindly performed by a
                                                                    dermatopathologist who confirmed a 32% higher collagen
controlled multisource RF to provide simultaneous one pulse
microfractional resurfacing with independent volumetric skin        rearrangement in the same group of patients. The majority of
tightening.                                                         Patients considered the procedures acceptable (a. 85% b. 87%).
Study: In the first stage of the study we treated in vivo animal     Patients’ perceived clinical improvement was higher (78%) in
                                                                    group a than in group b (62%). Both patient groups confirmed
skin. Skin specimens from treatment area were harvested for
histology immediately after, 3 days and 14 days after the           their willingness to repeat the procedures to progressively reach
treatment. In the clinical study, 30 subjects (Fitzpatrick’s skin   and/or maintain a good level of anti-aging effect.
types 2–5) with moderate to deep wrinkles (Fitzpatrick’s scale      Conclusion: Sequential 1,064 nm Nd:YAG and 2,940 nm Er:YAG
                                                                    photo-thermal fractional resurfacing and remodeling showed to be
> 3) and 20 subjects with depressed acne scars were enrolled.
Treatment was repeated each month up to a total of three            clinically superior to fractional 2,940 nm Er:YAG laser
treatment sessions. Patients photographs were graded                resurfacing alone according to both patients and dermatologists’
                                                                    evaluation. More studies are needed to assess different sequences
according to accepted scales by two uninvolved blinded
evaluators.                                                         of laser wavelenghts to further improve the clinical efficacy of
Results: In vivo histologies showed various degrees of ablation,    what can be described as laser layering technique (LLT)
coagulation and dermal heating according to power settings.
All treated subjects experienced mild-moderate edema and
erythema as an immediate response to treatment. Edema resolved
                                                                    #139
after up to 1-hour post-treatment and mild erythema lasted up to
2 days. Micro ablative crusts lasted up to 5 days. Significant
                                                                    COMBINED FRACTIONAL, NON-ABLATIVE
reduction in the depth of wrinkles and acne scars was noted 4
                                                                    TREATMENT OF STRIAE: CLINICAL AND
weeks after therapy with further improvement at the 3 months
                                                                    HISTOLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS
follow-up.                                                          Vic Narurkar, Christine Dierickx, Carolyn Chang,
Conclusion: Our data show the histological impact and clinical      Ava Shamban
beneficial effects of simultaneous RF fractional microablation and   Bay Area Laser Institute/CPMC, San Francisco, CA; Skin and
volumetric deep dermal heating for treatment of wrinkles and        Laser Center, Boom, Belgium; CPMC, San Francisco, CA; Laser
acne scars.                                                         Institute for Derm and European Skin Care, Santa Monica, CA
44                       American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery Abstracts
Background: The 1,540 nm laser is the first and only fractional         average. At evaluation of 6 months after treatment, group 1
ablative handpiece to receive FDA clearance for the treatment of       showed 75% and group 2 showed 60% clinical improvements. In
striae. We evaluate the effect of density and depth of treatment       evaluation of satisfaction by patients, group 1 showed higher
using the 1,540 and 1,440 nm handpieces, and three different           satisfaction degree than group 2 in both 3 and 6 months’
optics.                                                                evaluation. On histology, increased collagen production of upper
Study: Bilateral treatments were performed on thigh striae.            dermis was observed in all three patients.
Striae were trisected and treated with the 1,440 or 1,540 nm           Conclusion: Fractional Erbium doped 1,410 nm laser resurfacing
handpiece and the 10 mm (70 mJ, 100 mb/cm2), 15 mm (10 mJ,             could be one of effective and safe treatment modalities for dilated
320 mb/cm2) or XD optic (70 mJ, 25 mb/cm2). Baseline and 3-            pores in Asians. Especially, dilated pores patients with less sebum
month histology was performed on two subjects receiving                secretion showed better and longer clinical efficacy and high
1,540 nm treatment. One subject received a single high-coverage        satisfaction degree in this study.
treatment and a second subject received three treatments at
6-week intervals. Hematoxylin and eosin staining (H&E) and
elastin immunohistochemistry were performed on serial sections.
Clinical assessments using a quartile improvement scale (Grades
I to IV) and subject self-assessment data were collected from 20
subjects treated with the 1,540 nm handpiece.                            PHOTOBIOMODULATION
Results: Treatments were well-tolerated yielding only trace
erythema and transient hyperpigmentation in two subjects which
resolved. Optimal results, including significant restoration of
natural color to striae alba and a reduction in palpable depression,   #145
were obtained using the 15 mm optic for the first treatment
followed by the 10 mm optic for the remaining treatments. One          NEW TECHNIQUE FOR DELIVERING LASER
hundred percent of patients showed improvement, ranging from           ENERGY DEEPER INTO TISSUE
Grade II to Grade III. Histology demonstrates remodeling of            Sean Wang, Qun Li, Kerith Wang
collagen and elastin fibers.                                            B&W TEK, Inc., Newark, DE
Conclusion: The 1,540 and 1,440 nm handpieces can be used to
                                                                       Background: In laser therapy, it is necessary to effectively
safely