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					RocketSat II Systems Design Document                     6/13/07


                      Colorado Space Grant Consortium


                           RocketSat II
                     Systems Design Document



                                   Written by:
                                  Jason Farmer
                                   Riley Pack

               RSII-SYS-100.0- Systems Design Document

                                  June 13, 2007




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Revision                                                        PM         TL
 Level         Author         Date              Changes Made   Initial   Initial
            Jason Farmer
   0        and Riley Pack   6/13/07                Draft




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 i.   Abstract
       This document reviews the requirements necessary to properly create the RSII
payload; covers the systems level design process involved in creating RSII; and finally
explains the final design choice and successes / failures of the payload.


ii.   Abbreviations Used
GPS – Global Positioning System
ADC – Analog to Digital Converter
RSII – RocketSat II
UART – Universal Asynchronous Receiver and Transmitter
PCB – Printed Circuit Board




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                                               Table of Contents
       i.  Abstract ............................................................................................................... 3
       ii. Abbreviations Used ............................................................................................. 3
1.0. Mission Goals and Top Level Requirements .......................................................... 6
     1.1.1      Mission Goals ............................................................................................. 6
     1.1.2      UP Aerospace Requirements ...................................................................... 6
     1.1.3      System Requirements.................................................................................. 7
     1.1.4      Structures Requirements ............................................................................. 7
     1.1.5      Software Requirements ............................................................................... 8
        1.1.5.1 General Requirements ............................................................................. 8
        1.1.5.2 Payload Requirements ............................................................................ 8
        1.1.5.3 Data Retrieval Requirements .................................................................. 8
        1.1.5.4 Data Parsing Requirements ..................................................................... 8
     1.1.6      Payload Requirements ................................................................................ 8
        1.1.6.1 Accelerometers ....................................................................................... 8
        1.1.6.2 Camera .................................................................................................... 8
        1.1.6.3 Geiger Counter ........................................................................................ 9
        1.1.6.4 GPS ......................................................................................................... 9
        1.1.6.5 Humidistat ............................................................................................... 9
        1.1.6.6 Magnetometer ......................................................................................... 9
        1.1.6.7 Microwave Sensor .................................................................................. 9
        1.1.6.8 Pressure Sensor ..................................................................................... 10
        1.1.6.9 Strain Gauges ........................................................................................ 10
        1.1.6.10      Temperature Sensor .......................................................................... 10
2.0. Sub-System Interactions and Cross-system Requirements ................................... 11
     2.1.1      Structures Requirements for Other Subsystems ....................................... 11
3.0. Final Design .......................................................................................................... 11
  3.1      Structures .......................................................................................................... 11
  3.2      C&DH (Command and Data Handling) ........................................................... 12
  3.3      Software ............................................................................................................ 12
     3.3.1      Payload Software ...................................................................................... 12
     3.3.2      Data Sampling ........................................................................................... 12
     3.3.3      Startup Sequence ....................................................................................... 12
     3.3.4      Data Retrieval Software ............................................................................ 12
     3.3.5      Data Parsing Software............................................................................... 13
  3.4      Payload .............................................................................................................. 13
     3.4.1      Accelerometers ......................................................................................... 13
     3.4.2      Camera ...................................................................................................... 13
     3.4.3      Geiger Counter .......................................................................................... 13
     3.4.4      GPS ........................................................................................................... 14
     3.4.5      Humidistat ................................................................................................. 14
     3.4.6      Magnetometer ........................................................................................... 14
     3.4.7      Microwave Sensor .................................................................................... 14
     3.4.8      Pressure Sensors........................................................................................ 14
     3.4.9      Strain Gauges ............................................................................................ 15

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    3.4.10  Temperature Sensor .................................................................................. 15
4.0. Performance Analysis and Flight Data ................................................................. 15
5.0. Appendix ............................................................................................................... 15




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1.0. Mission Goals and Top Level Requirements
  1.1.1       Mission Goals
         RocketSat II (RSII) is a larger and more involved version of RocketSat I (RSI).
 Essentially, it is a canister structure with height 10” and diameter 10” comprised of
 “stacks” (6 spaced plates) of variant versions of RSI payloads. The objective for the
 mission is to include as many different levels of payloads as possible, to develop the
 program as a sustainable educational opportunity, and to complete construction and
 verification in time for an October 2006 launch date.
         The payload will fly in the same rocket as RSI: the Up Aerospace manufactured
 SpaceLoft XLTM. For this mission, however, there is a small airframe access window
 to the outside of the rocket, which will allow for imaging of the exterior of the rocket or
 the earth, or for experiment access to the vacuum environment of outer space or the thin
 upper atmosphere of earth.
         One of the levels of the payload will consist of a plate (plate 1) containing the
 same hardware as RSI, to continue to prove its feasibility and successes. The
 remaining levels (plates 2-6) will be open to various scientific experiments, which may
 or may not include sensors like those on RSI. The central level (plate 3) where the
 airframe access is located accommodates a camera, due most likely, somewhere
 between four and six levels will be included in RSII.
         Each level will incorporate environment sensors, much like the ones flown on
 RSI: accelerometers (possibly triple axis, given the advancement of technology since
 the design of RSI), a temperature sensor, and a pressure sensor. Preliminary research
 has been done on the possibility of flying an RF intensity sensor, which would measure
 radio and microwave frequency intensity from 3 MHz to 5 GHz.
         Regardless of the specific scientific experiments to be flown on RSII, the main
 mission objective is to prove the feasibility of the “shuttle” system of payload stacking,
 and to show that the structural soundness of the assembly will be able to support future
 launches with educational payloads. As a sustainable and repeatable program,
 RocketSat will demonstrate how payload construction will take place, and how future
 launches will occur.

  1.1.2       UP Aerospace Requirements
      The cylinder shell shall not be altered from original specifications.
      The holding structure shall be independent of the provided cylinder and will only
       interface with the top and bottom cylinder plates.
      There should be a minimum of four mounting holes, at least one-inch apart, to
       support the allowed payload weight. Support system bolts shall be no smaller than
       ¼ inch diameter.
      Only the top and bottom of the cylinder maybe altered and no object shall
       protrude more than .190 inches above either surface.
      The center of mass of the payload shall be within 1 inch of the center of the
       cylinder relative to the top and bottom plates (along the z axis). The center shall
       also be no more than .1 inch radially from center of plate in the x and y axes
       (relative to cylinder shell.).

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      The shell shall have a FOS of at least 2 (experiencing less than 20,000 PSI.)
      The entire payload shall be less than 7.5 lbs (excluding provided cylinder.)

       Max g load: 18.9 g during peak acceleration (first 13.5 seconds of flight)
       Atmosphere reentry deceleration: 5.25 g peak at 150,000 feet
       Max shock: 60 g for .25 seconds at vehicle touchdown
       Spin rate: 6 Hz at motor burnout (T +13.5 seconds)
       Temperature: 80-120 F typical; 150 F at maximum

   1.1.3       System Requirements
    All components of the payload shall comply with the following requirements to
ensure the success of the mission:
         The entire mass of the payload, not including the UP Aerospace canister,
            shall not exceed 7.5 pounds.
         The entire payload shall fit securely in the provided canister
         The payload shall not emit RF frequencies that could interfere with the
            tracking of the rocket
         The payload shall activate passively from the acceleration forces of the
            rocket’s launch. The project manager shall review all requests for separate
            activation procedures, such as timed activation.
         The rocket shall be ready to fly no later than April 24, 2007

   1.1.4       Structures Requirements
          The structure shall be less than 5 lbs.
          The plates shall interface with the structure with the capability for multiple
           configurations.
          The diameter of the holding structure shall be no larger than 9.75 inches and
           the height shall be no larger than 8.5 inches.
          All plates must meet the safety inspection of the Structure’s Team and not be
           detrimental to the internal structure: all cuts and pillar attachments must meet
           Structure’s approval.
          Each plate is allotted approximately 70.6 square inches of mounting space in
           the form of a 9.5 inch diameter circle.
          Each plate is allotted 1.18 inches in vertical height. Parts can be mounted
           through plates for more room, but – as stated above – approval is needed.
          Each plate is allowed 1 lb of experimental attachments.
          Macrolon is easily machined and countersunk with patience and heat control.
           Mounting is simple but, on the other hand, it cannot be laser-cut. Plan
           experiments accordingly.
          While the center of gravity can meet the above UP aerospace requirements by
           being balanced across the payload, it is the preference of the structure that
           mass be evenly distributed across each plate (meaning each plate’s CG is
           within the x and y axis tolerances) to do so.



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   1.1.5       Software Requirements
    1.1.5.1 General Requirements
        The software must provide data sampling and storage, retrieval, and parsing
functionality. The data sampling and storage software includes the payload software, the
retrieval software is includes the level shifter software, and the parsing software is a pc
based application.

    1.1.5.2 Payload Requirements
        The payload software must support the operation of the experimental payload.
This includes a startup sequence to bring a camera and a gps computer into a record state,
and flight code to sample and store data from the payload sensors.

    1.1.5.3 Data Retrieval Requirements
The data retrieval software must provides a means to retrieve data from the flight
EEPROMS. The software must also allows a user to erase the EEPROMS.

    1.1.5.4 Data Parsing Requirements
     The data parsing software must parse the binary data captured from the
EEPROMS into a usable format for analysis.

   1.1.6       Payload Requirements
    1.1.6.1 Accelerometers
     The accelerometers provide crucial data on the conditions during flight, and shall
 meet the following requirements:
   Accelerometers shall measure data in the range of 0g to 20g, if not higher to
       account for landing forces
   Accelerometers shall have low power usage to extend battery life and allow for
       other experiments
   Accelerometers shall measure values on all three axes
   Accelerometers shall be firmly mounted to prevent erroneous data

    1.1.6.2     Camera
      In order to provide adequate visual data, the camera shall comply with the
 following standards:
    Camera shall record video at 30 fps or better
    Camera shall be anchored to the structure in a suitable manner such that the
        effective vibration caused by the rocket flight is at a minimum
    Camera shall be oriented vertically or horizontally along the y- or x- axes,
        respectively
    Camera shall use it’s own on board power system consisting of a Li-ION battery
    Camera shall record prior to liftoff if possible
    Camera shall be able to record longer then 90 minutes

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      Camera shall record data onto a digital medium
      Camera shall use external memory of 1 GB or greater
      Camera shall be able to automatically or manually adjust to changing light
       conditions
      Camera shall be easily integrated to
      Camera shall be in an environment above 30° C during the flight

    1.1.6.3    Geiger Counter
    The Geiger counter must meet the following requirements in order to adequately
 measure cosmic radiation:
   Geiger counter shall accurately register alpha, beta, and gamma particles
   Geiger counter shall be oriented toward the access panel if possible
   Geiger counter shall not cause coronal arcing or affect the electrical properties of
      any other payload
   Geiger counter shall be able to survive low pressure

    1.1.6.4    GPS
    The GPS computer must meet the following requirements:
    GPS shall provide an interface to the AVR board so that it can be activated
     remotely by the main C&DH system
    GPS shall record data on the ground in the minute before flight as well as the
     entire duration of the flight

    1.1.6.5    Humidistat
     The RSII humidistat has several requirements as follows:
     Humidistat shall be easily built from supplied parts
     Humidistat shall have a resolution of at least 1 sample per .2 seconds
     Humidistat shall update itself as frequently as possible
     Humidistat shall be able to measure humidity from a range of 0% humidity to
       50% humidity or better

    1.1.6.6    Magnetometer
     The magnetometer shall meet the following requirements:
     Magnetometer shall measure weak magnetic fluctuations as the rocket travels
       through the atmosphere.
     Magnetometer shall have a resolution of at least .1 seconds or better
     Magnetometer shall be able to measure strength on 3 axes
     Magnetometer data shall be able to tell the orientation of the rocket by the
       strength of the magnetic field at that time

    1.1.6.7    Microwave Sensor
     The microwave sensor shall meet the following requirements:
     Microwave sensor shall be able to detect a large portion of the microwave
       spectrum

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       Microwave sensor shall have a resolution of at least 1 sample per .1 seconds
       Microwave sensor shall be easily built or taken from a pre existing instrument
       Microwave sensor shall display voltages between 1 and 5 volts
       Microwave sensor shall be sensitive enough to sense radiation through the flight
        structure.

    1.1.6.8    Pressure Sensor
     The two pressure sensors on RSII are required to do the following to provide
 accurate and useful data:
     Pressure sensors shall measure absolute pressure data and be able to register low
       pressures at high altitudes.
     Pressure sensors shall be polled every .05 seconds or better for greatest data
     Pressure sensors shall automatically update upon a change in pressure
     Pressure sensors shall be able to survive low pressure for around 2 minutes
       without a failure of the sensor
     Pressure sensors shall not be isolated in any way but rather open to the
       surroundings as much as possible

    1.1.6.9    Strain Gauges
     The strain gauges on RSII shall meet the following requirements:
     Strain gauges shall have a minimum resolution of 1 sample per .05 seconds
     Strain gauges shall cover the maximum area possible while still meeting the
       above resolution requirement
     Strain gauges shall be able to discern the difference of a small amount force
       applied to any one area
     Strain gauges shall be able to adhere to any surface and remain upon that surface
       so that when the surface changes, so does the sensor

    1.1.6.10 Temperature Sensor
     Due to extreme environmental conditions, the following is required for the
 temperature sensor on RSII:
     Temperature sensor shall measure temperatures between -40°C and 100°C
     Temperature sensor shall be polled approximately ever .3 seconds or better
     Temperature sensor shall be located where radiant heat from another experiment
       shall not affect the data
     Temperature sensor shall be located where temperature data is the greatest
       interest to flight data (this may or may not be next to an opening)
     Temperature sensor shall be able to survive extreme temperatures ranging from
       -30° C to above 150° C.




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2.0. Sub-System Interactions and Cross-system Requirements
  2.1.1       Structures Requirements for Other Subsystems
      All plates shall meet the safety inspection of the Structure's Team and not be
       detrimental to the internal structure: all cuts and pillar attachments shall meet
       Structure's approval.
      Each plate shall be allotted approximately 70.6 square inches of mounting space
       in the form of a 9.5 inch diameter circle.
      Each plate shall be allotted 1.18 inches in vertical height. Parts can be mounted
       through plates for more room, but – as stated above – approval is needed.
      Each plate shall be allowed 1 lb of experimental attachments.
      Macrolon is easily machined and countersunk with patience and heat control.
       Mounting is simple but, on the other hand, it cannot be laser-cut. Experiments
       shall be planned accordingly
      The center of gravity of each plate shall be within the x- and y-axis tolerances set
       forth by UP Aerospace.

3.0. Final Design

                          Figure 1 – Rocket Sat Exploded Assembly




 3.1    Structures
     In picking the final structural design for construction and testing, numerous design
   factors were considered. There were three major categories of design analysis. First,
   the method of restraint for the overall structure within the PTS-10 cylinder was
   analyzed. Next, the system of support for hardware, the plates, was analyzed.
   Finally, the materials to be used for the structure were analyzed. This whole process

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   spanned four months utilizing computer aided design, calculations, and finite element
   analysis to determine a practical design. Solidworks was used extensively throughout
   the design process.

 3.2     C&DH (Command and Data Handling)
               RSII consists of two separate systems, which are entirely electrically
       insulated from each other. The first is RSX, which is essentially a version of RSI
       redesigned to use the AVR microcontroller. The second is RS2, which includes
       several entirely different experiments. The flight was also intended to include an
       exact replica of RSI, which was cut when UP Aerospace decreased their mass
       allowance.
               RSX and RS2 each have custom-designed PCBs which include the
       majority of circuitry as well as headers to any components too large to fit.

 3.3     Software

  3.3.1       Payload Software
  3.3.2       Data Sampling
        The payload software uses a timing interrupt to record flight data at constant
intervals. A single timer is used to sample all the sensors attached to the AVR. Due to
hardware limitations samples sensors at different rates. The AVR samples directly
connected sensors, such as the pressure and magnetometer sensors, 2 times for every
three sample cycles. The third sample cycle is used to sample the external ADC
connected to the strain gages. Each ADC sample is used to sample only one of the strain
gages. As each sensor is sampled the data is written directly to the external EEPROMS.
The data sampling code begins when the g-switch is triggered, and continues until the
EEPROMS have been filled.

  3.3.3       Startup Sequence
        The RocketSat II provides a startup sequence to activate the camera and GPS, and
move the camera and GPS into a record state. The sequence also provides a LED
indicator of the payload's state before launch. The sequence can accommodate any
camera state at AVR power on, but is limited to only powering the GPS. After GPS
power is applied the GPS system is self-contained, and cannot be de-activated externally.
When the sequence has completed the AVR waits for the g-switch to trigger to indicate
T-0:00. At g-switch trigger the sequence finishes any remaining events as quickly as
possible. After completion the code transitions to data sampling code.

  3.3.4       Data Retrieval Software
      RocketSat II's data retrieval software consists of AVR software to extract data
from EEPROMS, and send the data to a UART connection. This software runs on the
RocketSat level shifter PCB, and contains provisions for reading and erasing several



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types and sizes of EEPROMS. Read and erase operations are provided for the 512 and
1025 series of EEPROMS from Microchip.

   3.3.5       Data Parsing Software
         The RocketSat II data parsing software provides functionality to parse a binary
data file from the RocketSat II EEPROMS into a usable format for data analysis. The
software takes a binary data file as an input, and provides a comma separated values,
.csv. file as an output. The parsing software also performs conversions that would not be
easy to make in Excel.

 3.4     Payload

   3.4.1       Accelerometers
      To measure acceleration along the three principle axes, four different types of
 devices have been chosen, all made by Analog Devices: the ADXL103 low range single
 axis accelerometer, ADXL203 low range dual axis accelerometer, ADXL78 high range
 single axis accelerometer, and ADXL278 high range dual axis accelerometer. The two
 ranges allow for precise data in sub-2g environments while still registering values of up
 to ±35g during events such as launch and landing.
      These devices fit the requirements for the system well, as they are extremely small
 and lightweight, run on less than 3 mA, and offer a wide range of data when combined.
 On RSII, the sensors are aligned so that the dual axis accelerometers measure the x- and
 y-axis accelerations, while the single axis sensor measures the vertical.

   3.4.2        Camera
       The Aiptek MPVR digital camera is a commercial video recorder that can be
  modified to meet the above camera requirements. It records at 30 frames per second
  (fps) at 640 x 480 VGA resolution. It records on an external SD memory card, which
  allows for large amounts of data storage. With a 2 GB SD card, it is possible to record
  over 90 minutes of footage, which will help mitigate the chance that a launch delay
  would cause a loss of camera data. The camera is turned on and instructed to record
  using the AVR microcontroller 25 minutes after the flight switch is activated. This will
  allow for between five and thirty-five minutes of data before launch, which will
  eliminate loss of data due to a premature launch (See C&DH Design Document (Doc
  #RSII-CDH-100.x) for interfacing details and Software Design Document (Doc #RSII-
  CDH-100.x) for timing).
         In order to decrease the mass of the payload to bring it within the allotted amount,
unused parts of the camera have been removed. The flash for the built-in still camera is
unnecessary, as is the LCD screen. The camera is completely controlled by the AVR, so
the LCD and flash waste both mass and power.

   3.4.3        Geiger Counter
     The Geiger counter kit from Quality Kits, part #K2645, detects radiation in various
 ranges and outputs a TTL (Transistor Transistor Logic) pulse when radiation is
 detected. The charged Geiger-Muller tube will be oriented toward the window if
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 feasible, and it will interface with the command and data handling AVR microcontroller
 to record radiation data. This radiation data will be compared with an altitude to
 effectively build a radiation profile for future RocketSat missions.

  3.4.4       GPS
      The GPS system is a PC-based architecture consisting of an operating system,
 receiver software, antenna, and hardware platform. The hardware platform is a VIA
 based nano-itx PC with the VIA coldfire CPU. The permanent storage is provided by
 two four gigabyte USB flash drives. The antenna connects via a USB connection to the
 system. The system samples GPS data from the antenna over a 22-23 minute period,
 and shutdown without any external input. From power-on to power-off the GPS system
 is completed autonomous.

  3.4.5        Humidistat
      RocketSat II’s humidity sensor (part number HS1101 from Humirel) has been
 chosen for its resistance to extremes in temperature (-40°C to +100°C), high stability,
 and relatively inexpensive price (under $10). Furthermore, the sensor does not require
 calibration to specific circuitry or conditions. The individual sensor is more desirable
 than a board due to concerns about the board’s stability and the relative ease of
 fabricating a superior board in house. Humidity is measured as a logarithmic function
 of capacitance with relative humidity given by 2.56 * ln ( C ) – 163 with capacitance in
 pF.

  3.4.6        Magnetometer
      The HMC2003 is a lightweight sensor for measuring magnetic fields. It will be
 used to measure fluctuations in the ambient magnetic field based on altitude. The
 sensor has been chosen for its high sensitivity to weak magnetic fluctuations, its
 reliability under extreme conditions (operating temperature range of -40°C to 85°C),
 and its relatively low cost (under $200). The magnetic field is measured along three
 axes, with a variable voltage corresponding to a change in field strength. 1 gauss
 corresponds to 1 V (.5 to 4.5 V output range).

  3.4.7        Microwave Sensor
     The microwave sensor chosen for the RocketSat II payload is the Microwave
 Leakage Meter by Less EMF Inc. It is calibrated at 2450 MHz, which covers
 frequencies in the microwave S Band. It is easily interfaced with and outputs voltages
 corresponding to concentrations between 0 and 9.99 mW/cm2. The device outputs a
 continuous voltage that is proportional to the amount of microwave radiation present.

  3.4.8       Pressure Sensors
      The RSII payload features two pressure sensors: a SX15AD2 from Honeywell,
 which will be mounted on the main RSII AVR board, and a MPX5100 Integrated
 Silicon Pressure Sensor by Freescale Semiconductor, which will be installed on the
 secondary AVR board, called RSX. The main PCB sensor has been chosen for its wide

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 temperature operating range and ability to sense pressures between 0 and 15 psi (0 and
 1.02 atm). This will allow for an accurate pressure profile of the atmosphere as the
 rocket travels through it. The RSX pressure sensor has been selected for its relatively
 high accuracy of 97.5% or better and data range of 2.18 to 16.68 psi (.15 to 1.13 atm).
 While this range does not cover the upper reaches of the atmosphere, the sensor will
 allow for a more accurate profile of the sections that are within its range.

  3.4.9         Strain Gauges
      The original design for strain gauges on the RSII payload included seven 120 Ohm
 resistors that change their resistance when bent. The number of gauges had to be
 reduced to two in order to allow for a fast enough sample rate due to a slower-than-
 expected conversion time on the analog to digital converter. Each gauge will measure
 the stress placed on the third plate to help with future structural designs for the project.

  3.4.10        Temperature Sensor
      The LM-50C Temperature Sensor from National Semiconductor features a data
 range of -40°C to 125°C. It is accurate to within 4°C at any temperature, and 3°C at
 room temperature. It provides a low-current (less than 130 μA) temperature sensor that
 will give an accurate temperature profile of the payload. Note that this may not be the
 actual temperature at a specific elevation, as surface friction along the rocket will cause
 the payload to heat up.

4.0. Performance Analysis and Flight Data
The performance Analysis and Flight Data Analysis are covered in each subsystem
design document and in the Flight Analysis Document:

                     Structures Design Doc:          RSII-STR-100.0
                     Software Design Doc:            RSII-SFT-100.0
                     CDH Design Doc:                 RSII-CDH-100.1
                     Payload Design Doc:             RSII-PLD-100.1
                     Flight Analysis:                RSII-SYS-700.2


5.0. Appendix




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