Current Culinary and Foodservice Trends Opportunities for the

Document Sample
Current Culinary and Foodservice Trends Opportunities for the Powered By Docstoc
					Current Culinary and Foodservice Trends 
Opportunities for the Fruit & Vegetable Industry
Amy Myrdal Miller, MS, RD 
Program Director for Strategic Initiatives 
The Culinary Institute of America at Greystone
Napa Valley,  California
The Culinary Institute of America
              • A non‐profit culinary college
              • Established in 1946 at Yale 
                University campus
              • Four campuses
                 –   Hyde Park, New York (opened in 1972)
                 –   Napa Valley (opened in 1995)
                 –   San Antonio, Texas (opened in 2008)
                 –   Singapore (opened in 2009)
              • Programs include certificate, 
                associate’s, and bachelor’s degree 
                programs; moving towards 
                master’s programs
The Culinary Institute of America
The Culinary Institute of America



World Flavors     Sustainability



  Health &       Democratization 
  Wellness        of Good Food
    Culinary Mega Trends




Health &            World 
Wellness            Flavors
        Culinary Mega Trends




 Health &             World 
 Wellness             Flavors
Plant‐Based Diets   Plant‐Based Diets
Culinary Mega Trends..and Growing Trends

                        Quality




     Health &                        World 
     Wellness                        Flavors
    Plant‐Based Diets              Plant‐Based Diets


                        Sustain‐
                         ability
A Snap Shot of 2010 Trends
              National Restaurant Association 
                  2010 Restaurant Trends

1. Locally grown fruits, vegetables, meat, 
    seafood
2. Sustainability
3. Mini‐desserts
4. Locally produced wine
5. Locally produced beer
6. Nutritious kids’ meals
7. Half‐portions
8. Farm‐branded ingredients
9. Gluten‐free/food allergy conscious meals
10. Sustainable seafood
          Six Culinary and Foodservice Trends: 
      Opportunities for the Fruit & Vegetable Industry


• Sustainability: The Greening of American 
  Foodservice
• Sourcing “Local” Products: Challenges and 
  Opportunities
• Sodium: Blood Pressure versus Regulatory Pressure
• Street Foods: Creating Culinary Adventure and 
  Quality at the Right Price Point
• Sauces: Accessible World Flavors for Any Operation
• Salads: The New American Salad Bar
   Six Culinary and Foodservice Trends with 
Opportunities for the Fruit & Vegetable Industry

•   Sustainability
•   Sourcing “Local” Products
•   Sodium
•   Street Foods
•   Sauces
•   Salads
                       Sustainability
   Sustainability is defined as meeting present needs without 
compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs.
Sustainability: Consumer Views vs. Operator Views
            $ustainability


“When it comes to sustainability 
in foodservice, you’ve got to ‘go 
   green’ or [you’ll] go away.”
   Michael Goldstein, Compass Group North America
                     How are volume foodservice operations 
                        addressing sustainability issues?

1. Sustainable Sourcing
     –      Establishing sustainable food sourcing policies (76%)
     –      Sourcing sustainable seafood (72%)
     –      Sourcing more “local” products (68%)
2. Conserving Energy & Water
     –      Installing energy efficient equipment (65%)
     –      Installing energy efficient lighting (56%)
     –      Installing dish and ware washing equipment that uses less water (48%)
3. Managing Food Waste
     –      composting (64%)
     –      reducing post‐consumer food waste (60%)
     –      reducing pre‐consumer food waste (56%)

Source: 2009 Foodservice Sustainability Survey, The Culinary Institute of America
The Biggest Sustainability Issue Facing Chefs Today: 
          Sourcing Sustainable Seafood
Meat Free Meals as a Sustainability Strategy
          Six Culinary and Foodservice Trends: 
       Opportunities for the Fruit & Vegetable Industry


•   Sustainability
•   Sourcing “Local” Products
•   Sodium
•   Street Foods
•   Sauces
•   Salads
        How Do Consumers Define “Local”? 

                  Food that travels 
                 less than 500‐200‐
                100 miles from field 
                       to plate
Food grown                                Food grown or 
 in my own                              produced within my 
   garden                                   home state


                                                          Food grown 
       Food  purchased at                               within my region 
         a local farmers’                                of the country
             market
How  Do Volume Foodservice Operators Define “Local”?

 Chipotle is purchasing at least 25% of 
one produce item for each of its stores 
  from small to mid‐size farm located 
     within 200 miles of the store.
                                           Sourced from within  
 Sourced from within                         the region (i.e., 
   100 miles of an                           from the Pacific 
   operating unit                               Northwest


                Sourced from within                                Sourced from 
                  500 miles of an                                  within the U.S.
                  operating unit
                                             Yale University is attempting to 
                                             source all products from within 
                                             100 miles, including contracting 
        Bon Appetit Management                with local chicken farms and 
     Company encourages individual                local food processors.
      operating units to purchase as 
     much as possible from within 200 
       miles of each operating unit.
                 Challenges Volume Foodservice Operators Face 
                              with Local Sourcing

• Adequate Supply
   – ”We try to source as many locally grown products as 
     possible, but most farms just do not have enough for our 
     demand.”
• Consistent Packaging
   – ”Many of the local growers don’t have consistent packaging. 
     Some sell by the pound, some by the bushel. Case size and 
     box sizes do not match each other.”
• Food Safety
   – “We have very strict food safety terms for all suppliers. Small, 
     local producers often don’t want to deal with the time and 
     expense required to meet our standards.”
Source: 2009 Sustainability Survey, The Culinary Institute of America
Fresh. Local. Seasonal. Pleasurable.

                   “Today’s culinary trends are 
                   retro…this is what we did in 
                  the past when chefs relied on 
                  local markets because we did 
                  not have the luxury of today’s 
                    transportation system. We 
                   are going back to our roots 
                     and the foundation of our 
                      craft that made it more 
                           pleasurable.”

                          Michael Ty, CEC, AAC
                       American Culinary Federation 
                           National President 
          Six Culinary and Foodservice Trends: 
       Opportunities for the Fruit & Vegetable Industry


•   Sustainability
•   Sourcing Local Products
•   Sodium
•   Street Foods
•   Sauces
•   Salads
         The Current Science, Policy, and Regulatory 
            Environment is Getting Interesting…

• Institute of Medicine Committee on 
  Strategies to Reduce Sodium Intake
• Institute of Medicine Committee on 
  Achieving Blood Pressure Control
• 2010 U.S. Dietary Guidelines Committee
• Health Canada’s Multi‐Stakeholder 
  Working Group on Dietary Sodium 
  Reduction
• Institute of Medicine Committee on 
  Front of Package Labeling
    New York Putting Pressure on Restaurants
•   Health Department Announces Proposed Targets for Voluntary Salt Reduction in 
    Packaged and Restaurant Foods
    Benchmarks for different food categories reflect months of consultation between health experts and industry 
    leaders. Partnership led by New York City could have national impact over next five years.

       January 11, 2010 – The National Salt Reduction Initiative, a New York City‐led partnership of cities, states and national health 
    organizations, today unveiled its proposed targets to guide a voluntary reduction of salt levels in packaged and restaurant foods. 
    Americans consume roughly twice the recommended limit of salt each day – causing widespread high blood pressure and placing 
    millions at risk of heart attack and stroke – in ways that they cannot control on their own. Only 11% of the sodium in Americans’
    diets comes from their own saltshakers; nearly 80% is added to foods before they are sold. Through a year of technical 
    consultation with food industry leaders, the National Salt Reduction Initiative has developed specific targets to help companies
    reduce the salt levels in 61 categories of packaged food and 25 classes of restaurant food. Some popular products already meet 
    these targets – a clear indication that food companies can substantially lower sodium levels while still offering foods that 
    consumers enjoy.
     The restaurant industry feels like 
the Salt Police are everywhere these days.
                                 Sodium in the U.S. Diet




SOURCE: Mattes RD, Donnelly D. Relative contributions of dietary sodium sources. J Am Coll Nutr. 1991 Aug;10(4):383‐93.
                         Sources of Sodium in the American Diet 
                                 Based on Food Groups




SOURCE: Albertson, AM and Holschuh, NM. Sodium consumption and food sources in the United States: Results from NHANES 2003‐04. 
The FASEB Journal. 2008;22:875.3
What do these foods have in common?




      UMAMI!
          Six Culinary and Foodservice Trends: 
       Opportunities for the Fruit & Vegetable Industry


•   Sustainability
•   Sourcing Local Products
•   Sodium
•   Street Foods
•   Sauces
•   Salads
    Drivers of Interest in Culinary Adventure
•   Changes in American Dining Scene: In 1970s dining in a “Chinese” restaurant 
    was unusual/exotic. Today consumers can choose from Thai, Korean, 
    Japanese, Vietnamese, Mongolian, Szechuan…
•   Frequency of Restaurant Dining: 1 of 4 meals eaten away from home (NRA)
•   Food Spending: nearly half (47%) of food dollar spent on foods prepared 
    away‐from‐home (Technomic)
•   School Foodservice: nearly all public schools serve tacos, burritos, and 
    quesadillas; 2 out of 3 serve sushi, stir‐fries, and egg rolls (NPD, 2007)
•   College Dining: Asian noodle bars, Indian home cooking stations, sushi bars, 
    vegetarian entrees now commonplace
•   Corporate Dining: Google (Mountain View, CA) now has 18 unique 
    restaurants on campus
•   Current Economy: increasing interest in and availability of world street 
    foods…
World Street Food Cooks: “One‐Hit Wonders”
Hey! Where are we going?
  Seeking Culinary Adventure: The Rise of Street Food

“Luxury may now be finding your favorite taco            “If you want to be rich in 
truck in the same location two days in a row.”       Singapore, open a hawker stall.”
         Jonathan Gold, remark made at the               K.F. Seetoh, remark made at the 
        2009 CIA Worlds of Flavor Conference           2009 CIA Worlds of Flavor Conference

“We must be doing something right. Why else            “Tapas is essentially street food 
 would 1200 people wait three hours in a line               with a roof over it.”
     after midnight to get a few tacos?”
                                                          Gerry Dawes, remark made at the 
           Roy Choi, remark made at the                 2009 CIA Worlds of Flavor Conference
        2009 CIA Worlds of Flavor Conference
                                               “When I was working for Hilton, it was all 
 “Street food offers new ways to interact       about emulsions. Now on the streets of 
 with food and the people who make it.”              LA, it’s all about emotions.”

        Ruth Reichl, remark made at the                 Roy Choi, remark made at the 
      2009 CIA Worlds of Flavor Conference           2009 CIA Worlds of Flavor Conference
             The Casualization of American Dining:
              Bringing Street Food to Restaurants

2009 Notable Restaurant Openings
• Rick Bayless, XOCO, Chicago
• Susan Feniger, STREET, Los Angeles
               Roy Choi & Kogi BBQ




“Make sure every
 bite has love.”
   Roy Choi
“Kogi would be nothing without social media.”
          Six Culinary and Foodservice Trends: 
       Opportunities for the Fruit & Vegetable Industry


•   Sustainability
•   Sourcing Local Products
•   Sodium
•   Street Foods
•   Sauces
•   Salads
              Fruit & Vegetable‐Rich Sauces are 
              a Great Gateway to World Flavors

• Asian
   – Indian fruit and vegetable 
     chutneys and curry sauces with 
     a base of tomatoes and onions
• Latin American
   – Mexican sauces including salsas, 
     moles, pipians, roasted pepper 
     vinaigrettes
   – Peruvian chile‐based sauces
• Mediterranean
   – Spanish and Italian nut‐based 
     sauces made with vegetables, 
     herbs, olive oil, and nuts
Sauce Success Story
          Six Culinary and Foodservice Trends: 
       Opportunities for the Fruit & Vegetable Industry


•   Sustainability
•   Sourcing Local Products
•   Sodium
•   Street Foods
•   Sauces
•   Salads
         The New American Salad Bar

• A shift from making your own to tasting the world
• More use of grilled vegetables, dried fruit, whole 
  grains, legumes
• Greater variety of greens, herbs, other vegetables
• Dressed salads versus adding your own dressing
Can We Double Fruit & Vegetable Consumption in the U.S.?
        NRA‐PMA‐IFDA Research Findings

•   Restaurant operators see fresh fruits and vegetables as 
    a way to differentiate themselves from the 
    competition. 
     – 72% said emphasizing fresh fruits and vegetables in their 
       marketing efforts drives more customers to their 
       restaurant. 
     – 46% said they look for fresh fruits and vegetables items 
       that their customers can not buy at their supermarket, 
       including 78% of fine dining operators.


•   Chefs are looking for greater variety and more menu 
    R&D assistance.
     – 67% of restaurant operators said they wish they had more 
       options regarding fresh fruits and vegetables selections.
     – 60% of operators said they wish there was more 
       information on how to incorporate fresh fruits and 
       vegetables on their menu.
      NRA‐PMA‐IFDA Research Findings

• Foodservice fruit and vegetable usage is 
  likely to grow.
   – 41%  expect to serve more fresh fruits and 
     vegetables in the next two years.
   – 56% said they expect to serve about the same 
     amount.
• Restaurant operators prefer domestic and 
  local sourcing.
   – 77% saying they prefer to purchase 
     domestically grown fresh fruits and vegetables.
   – 56% of survey respondents serve locally‐
     sourced fruits and vegetables in their 
     restaurants.
      NRA‐PMA‐IFDA Research Findings

• Food safety remains a top 
  priority for restaurant operators. 
   – 89% of operators said they are 
     willing to pay more for their fresh 
     fruits and vegetables if their safety is 
     guaranteed
   – 76% of operators said they are 
     willing to pay more for fresh fruits 
     and vegetables if they are traceable 
     all the way up the supply chain.  
Fruits & Vegetables Can Address Today’s Trends

                         Health & Wellness
                         World Flavors
                         Sustainability
                         Sourcing Local Products
                         Sodium
                         Street Food
                         Sauces
                         Salads
Fruits, Vegetables, and Major Public Health Issues

Public Health Issue   Nutrition Strategies    Culinary Strategies
OBESITY               Reduce caloric intake    Reformulate
                                               Reduce portion sizes
                                               Offer more portion size options
                                               Use more fruits and vegetables

METABOLIC SYNDROME Improve carbohydrate         Use more sources of healthy carbohydrates, 
                                              including whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and 
PRE‐DIABETES       quality                    legumes
TYPE 2 DIABETES    Reduce dietary               Provide alternatives to sugar‐sweetened 
                                              beverages, like aqua frescas, fruit teas, etc.
                   glycemic load
CARDIOVASCULAR        Improve fat quality       Eliminate sources of trans fat
                                                Reduce saturated fat
DISEASE                                         Use healthy fats & oils
                                                Increase use of ingredients that contain healthy 
                                              fats & oils (e.g., nuts, seeds, avocados)


HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE   Reduce sodium             Reduce use of salts
                                                Use alternative flavoring 
                                              strategies/ingredients/techniques
                                                Reduce portion size
                                                 Increase use of  low/no sodium ingredients like 
                                              fruits and vegetables
Current Culinary and Foodservice Trends 
Opportunities for the Fruit & Vegetable Industry
Amy Myrdal Miller, MS, RD 
Program Director for Strategic Initiatives 
The Culinary Institute of America at Greystone
Napa Valley,  California

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:7
posted:7/14/2011
language:English
pages:58