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					Driving Miss Daisy




        Drama
Vocabulary

   appalling: horrifying
   competence: state of being capable
   demolish: wreck
   derivation: origin
   dubiously: in a doubtful way
Vocabulary

   perpetual: lasting forever
   recoil: to draw back
   reprisal: retaliation
   sniping: attacking in a sly way
   upholstery: fabric on furniture
Background

   This drama, which takes place in the
    South between 1948 and 1973, is about a
    wealthy Jewish widow and the African-
    American chauffeur who works for her.
Reading a Screenplay

   When you see the movie Driving Miss Daisy, you
    will understand where the action occurs just by
    watching. In the screenplay, changes in time and
    location are written. Each new scene is marked
    by a word or phrase in capital letters that tells
    where it takes place. Since the play spans many
    years, the year, if it has changed from the
    previous scene, is named next. Read all of the
    stage directions carefully so that you can keep
    track of when and where the action occurs.
Reading a Screenplay

   When you listen to the movie, you will have no
    trouble understanding the dialect spoken by the
    actors. In the script, the author shows dialect by
    omitting letters and respelling words. If you
    come to dialect that seems confusing, try
    reading it aloud.
   For example, Hoke says, “You doan’ mean!
    Oscar say you need a driver for yo’ family. What
    I be doin’? Read the lines aloud and you will
    “hear” the meaning
Element

   Foil: is a character who provides a
    striking contrast to a main character.
    Foils help to draw attention to certain
    qualities in the main character.
Vocabulary

   Idiom
    –   What does ―you‘re a doodle‖ mean? P. 422
    –   You‘re a silly person
Cultural Sidelight

   Mah-jongg is an ancient Chinese game that
    is still played in many parts of the world. It is
    similar to rummy, except that 136 or 144 tiles
    engraved with Chinese symbols and pictures
    are used instead of cards. P. 423
Inference

   Why is Daisy reluctant to take the book and
    refuses the extra peaches and watermelon?

    –   She knows that she can‘t carry them all and walk
        home?
Character

   What is your first impression of Hoke?

    –   He is competent, experienced and resourceful, he
        speaks in an honest, straightforward manner, he
        is an independent thinker.
Review

   What is the meaning of Hoke‘s story. Why
    does he talk about wrestling hogs at this
    moment?

    –   He is indirectly comparing Daisy to a stubborn
        hog. Even if she resists him, he will persist in
        trying to get her to cooperate.
Inference

   Why do you think Daisy is so strongly against
    having a chauffeur?

    –   She says he‘ll eat all her food and run up her
        phone bill. If Daisy were really worried about
        Hoke‘s eating or phone habits, she would jusxt lay
        down the law to him and make sure her rules
        were followed. There must be another reason.
Inference

   Daisy wants to be independent. Maybe
    Daisy resists a chauffeur because she
    doesn‘t want to admit she can‘t be totally
    independent any more. She doesn‘t want to
    see herself as a helpless old woman who
    must depend on others.
Character

   What does Hoke‘s response to Daisy reveal
    about his character?

    –   He is sort of like Daisy—she won‘t talk about
        some thins and he won‘t either; Hoke can be very
        friendly but also knows when to keep his mouth
        shut; he has a strong sense of dignity.
Character

   What does Daisy‘s insistence on taking
    Highland Avenue show about her?
    –   She is a creature of habit; she does not wish to
        change her ways so late in life; she will assert her
        will in small details since she has made the
        ―major‖ concession‖ of letting Hoke drive.
Review

   Look at the stage directions. How much time
    has passed? How do you know?

    –   About two months. The story opens in August
        1948, and it is now autumn.
Review

   How does Hoke‘s idea about wealth contrast
    with Daisy‘s? P. 433 Use your Venn
    diagram to complete this question.
Review
      How does Hoke‘s idea about
      wealth contrast with Daisy‘s?


                               She says it is vulgar to display
   He would be proud of being      Wealth and she does
              rich            Not want to admit that she is rich
Evaluate

   To whom is Daisy referring when she says
    ―they all take things?‖
   Does Daisy‘s statement reflect prejudice? If
    yes, why? P. 433
Historical Sidelight

   Literacy was even more wide spread n the
    era of the play than it is today. The inability
    to read may have been the result of bad
    schools or a need to drop out of school in
    order to work. African Americans were often
    prevented from learning to read by poverty,
    segregation, and the unavailability of public
    schools.
End of part one

1.   Daisy often reacts to situations with anger
     and impatience. Why do you think she
     does this?
End of Part one

1.    Daisy often reacts to situations with anger
      and impatience. Why do you think she
      does this?
     1.   She resents having to rely on someone else to
          get around. She resents her loss of privacy and
          independence, and the constant threat of
          changes in her routine. She maintains her
          authority by getting angry She.
End of part one

   What is your opinion of how Hoke handles
    Miss Daisy?
End of part one

1.   What is your opinion of how Hoke handles
     Miss Daisy?
    Hoke deals with Daisy‘s antagonistic
     attitude with skill, patience, and
     understanding. Hoke has more patience
     with Daisy than Boolie expects; he lets
     Daisy insult him too much and allows her to
     act out her prejudice.
End of part one

   How would you describe Daisy‘s attitude
    toward Hoke in the first part of the play?
End of Part One


1.   How would you describe Daisy‘s attitude
     toward Hoke in the first part of the play?
2.   Daisy is annoyed and short-tempered with
     Hoke and is rude to him; Daisy at first
     distrusts Hoke but later softens her attitude
     toward him and allows him to help her
End of Part One

   Why do you think Daisy and Hoke have
    different attitudes about Daisy being rich?
End of Part One

   Why do you think Daisy and Hoke have
    different attitudes about Daisy being rich?
   Daisy sees her wealth in contrast with her
    youthful poverty, whereas Hoke cannot
    imagine getting past his own poverty. Daisy
    is still insecure about her wealth while Hoke
    is realistic about it.
Driving Miss Daisy




        Part 2
Review of Part I




       Driving Miss Dais
Review

   Using your Venn Diagram, find Similarities
    between the way that Florine speaks to
    Boolie and the way that Daisy speaks to
    Boolie.
Review

   Find Similarities between the way that
    Florine speaks to Boolie and the way that
    Daisy speaks to Boolie.
   Both demand his attention
   Both speak to him in a bossy way
Conflict

   Describe the conflict between Boolie and
    Florine.

   Florine is jealous of Daisy
   Boolie doesn‘t like Florine making critical
    remarks about his mother
   Florine can tell that Daisy doesn‘t like her, so
    she takes it out on Boolie.
Active Reading

   What does Daisy mean by her comment, ―If I
    had a nose like Florine‘s I wouldn‘t go around
    saying, ‗Merry Christmas?‘‖ P. 437
Active Reading

   What does Daisy mean by her comment, ―If I
    had a nose like Florine‘s I wouldn‘t go around
    saying, ‗Merry Christmas?‘‖

   She is making reference to an old stereotype
    about Jews having big noses. Daisy means
    that Florine looks and is Jewish and should
    not be celebrating a Christian holiday.
Active Reading

   Do you remember a previous time when
    Hoke made a similar comment to: ―Dat for
    him and me to know?‖ P. 438
Active Reading

   Do you remember a previous time when
    Hoke made a similar comment to: ―Dat for
    him and me to know?‖

   He said it to Daisy when she asks how much
    Boolie is paying him.
Active Reading

   What can you infer from the stage directions:
    “Daisy’s Kitchen, June 1957. Idella, in her
    eighties and looking worn, is taking fried
    chicken out of a skillet. Daisy enters.
   Two years have passed since the last scene.
    We know that Daisy is also in her eighties
    since she and Idella are the same age.
Cultural Sidelight

   The musical My Fair Lady opened in New
    York on Broadway in March 1956. As with
    many hit Broadway shows, people had to
    order tickets many months ahead of time.
    Since the time in the play is now June 1957,
    My Fair Lady has been running for fifteen
    months in New York.
Cultural Sidelight

   A Pullman Porter is a railroad car with small
    private rooms. A porter is a railraod
    employee who takes care of passengers on
    the train. For many years, most Pullman
    porters were African American.
Evaluate

   The trooper is insulting both Hoke and Daisy
    by calling them derogatory names based on
    their race and religion. How did that make
    you feel when you read those lines?
   Why do you think the author included those
    lines?
   What is your impression of the trooper when
    he says these words?
Pejorative Term

   The word ―boy‖ is a derogatory term when
    used by white people to refer to an African
    American male. It implies a superior and
    intimidating attitude on the part of the
    speaker.
Active Reading

   Why do you think Daisy nods gratefully at
    Hoke? P. 442
Active Reading

   Why do you think Daisy nods gratefully at
    Hoke?

   Daisy and Hoke shared a scary trip together
   Because he got her there safely
   Because he too is part of her family
Character

   What does Hoke‘s conversation with Boolie indicate
    about Hoke‘s character?

   He has cleverly engineered this conversation to get
    himself a raise
   Just as he has become assertive with Daisy, he is
    also more assertive with Boolie
   He is unafraid to ask for what he feels he deserves
   He knows how to negotiate.
Infer

   ―A BAPTIST CHURCH. The congregation is
    black, except for Daisy, Boolie, and Florine,
    who sit at the rear.”

   What has happened in this scene?
   Idella has died.
   Daisy’s family and Hoke are attending her
    funeral.
Active Reading

   Why is Daisy surprised to see Hoke?
   The weather is bad.
End of Part 2

   Have your feelings about Hoke or Daisy
    changed? How?
   How has Hoke and Daisy‘s relationship
    changed?
   How would you describe Boolie‘s relationship
    with his mother?
   Why do you think Daisy and Florine resent
    each other?
Driving Miss Daisy



        Part 3
Historical Sidelight

   In the fall of 1958, a temple in Atlanta was
    bombed. The playwright has taken literary
    license by setting this bombing some years
    after the actual event upon which it is based.
    Temple bombings have been a major tool of
    anti-Semitic terrorists around the world.
Cultural Sidelight

   Judaism has three main branches:
    Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform. The
    Orthodox branch adheres to all the traditional
    Jewish laws and beliefs, and the
    Conservative branch follows some of them.
    The Reform branch replaces most
    ceremonies and customs with more modern
    and personalized religious expression.
Historical Sidelight

   Hoke would have been eleven in 1899.
    After the Civil War there was a period in the
    South when blacks briefly wielded political
    power. Then a upsurge of white resentment
    against blacks resulted in violent terrorist
    acts by such groups as the Ku Klux Klan.
    Lynchings, or random killings of blacks by
    whites, became common.
Historical Sidelight

   Dr. Martin Luther King was an Atlanta
    minister who led marches and protests in the
    1950s and 1960s to gain civil rights for
    African Americans. In the play, King is being
    honored at the United Jewish Appeal.
Active Reading

   Why do you think Boolie will not go to the
    King dinner?
   He is afraid his business associates will
    disapprove.
Active Reading

   Why does Daisy assume that Hoke knows
    Dr. Martin Luther King?
   Because both Hoke and King are African
    American.
   She may think there are not many African
    Americans in Atlanta and that they all know
    each other.
Active Reading

   Why does Hoke say that things aren‘t
    changing that much?
   He thinks that Daisy didn‘t ask him to the
    dinner because he is black
   He means that even if things are changing,
    people are still prejudiced
Active Reading

   Explain what has happened to Daisy.
   Daisy is experiencing a condition that occurs
    in elderly people, when their minds suddenly
    take them back to an earlier time in their
    lives.
Climax

   Explain the significance of Daisy‘s comment:
    ―You‘re my best friend… No. Really. You
    are. You are…‖
   Daisy finally admits her feelings for Hoke
   Her character undergoes a major change at
    this point
   Admitting how she feels about Hoke shows
    how vulnerable she feels.
Cultural Sidelight

   Goodwill Industries is an organization that
    offers job training and employment to people
    with disabilities. Workers with disabilities
    repair furniture and other household items
    that have been donated to Goodwill. These
    items are then sold to the public to help
    support the organization.
Active Reading

   What significant event has happened that
    Goodwill has taken away Daisy‘s furniture?
   Daisy has moved out
   Possibly she is dead
Active Reading

   Do you remember in the beginning of the
    play when Boolie called his mother a doodle?
    Why do you think that the author has used
    the same term here?

   By using the same expression here, the
    playwright has found a subtle way to tie the
    beginning and end of the play together.

				
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