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					                                            Credit Repair
From your credit report, you will send a dispute letter to each credit bureau. Each letter must be sent
―certified return receipt‖ through the US Postal Service. This is very important as the bureaus have 30
days to get back to you regarding your dispute. The post marked date on your return receipt sets day
one.

There are three major credit bureaus:

   1) Trans Union
   2) Equifax
   3) Experian (used to be TRW)

You must dispute each negative reporting just as it is reported on each credit report. One of the bureaus
will take some numbers from your account and mix the numbers up. Thus, they have their own way of
reporting your credit on the report. You need to address each account correctly or they will not
―investigate‖ your dispute.

Follow the attached examples. They have been proven successful.

In 30 days you will get an updated report form each bureau that you disputed. The updated report will
designate which accounts have been corrected or removed from your report.

It is possible that some accounts that you dispute will come back on your updated report as valid. So,
you do the drill all over again. Send your dispute letter out again with only the remaining negative
accounts. Be sure to always send the dispute letter ―certified return receipt.‖

The best time to dispute your credit report is Dec. 15. Due to the holiday schedule there is not as many
staff to fulfill your dispute, both at the agencies and the credit companies. If you miss the December
window, go ahead and dispute your credit reports when you can, then again in December to take off
whatever is left. Memorial and Labor Day weeks are other good times to do this.

What happens when you dispute something: the credit bureau receives your dispute letter. They must
send your dispute to the actual reporting creditor. The credit reporting creditor must get their response
(―yes, this is valid‖) back to the credit bureau in time for the credit bureau to respond to you within 30
days. When the credit reporting creditor does not get their responses back to the credit bureau in time,
the negative reporting will come off your credit report.

With the economy as it is, many credit reporting agencies do not have the personnel to respond to your
dispute (and are much busier thanks to the law being passed allowing everyone free access to their credit
reports once a year from each agency). The result is the derogatory account is removed from your credit
report.

All credit reporting stays on your credit report (unless you get it removed) for 7 years. Do not trust that
your account will be removed automatically in 7 years. If 7 years have passed since the account was
created, and the account is still showing up on your report, dispute it as ―too old‖ and it will come off.

If you file bankruptcy the credit lines involved in the bankruptcy will stay on your credit report for 10
years. All accounts in a bankruptcy will be flagged with bankruptcy.
Additionally, if you make a deal on a bad debt with a creditor the clock starts all over with a fresh 7
years.

Once you get your credit report looking good and clean, get out of debt!! Your credit score will go up
immensely with no debt.

The only debt you want on your credit report is mortgage. All revolving credit and installment credit
(with balances) lower your credit score.

The very highest credit score is 850.
Excellent credit is 750 and higher.
Good credit is 680 to 749.
OK credit is 620 to 679.
Bad credit is anything lower than 610.

If you want to buy a house you need at least a 620 to get a decent loan.

Good luck!!

Be persistent...

(P.S. Additional credit repair from various online resources at the end of this added 2/23/07)
Experian
PO Box 2002
Allen, TX 75013 (address verified 9/19/07)

(UPDATE 2/23/07, TrueCredit.com isn’t showing an address for Experian, though I verified it
elsewhere. Truecredit says only the web address is available, which is:
http://www.experian.com/disputes/index.html)

December 8, 2007

My name is _____________. There is incorrect information on my credit report. This is a letter to
dispute each of these items. They are violating my fair credit rights and I demand each of them be
removed immediately. Please send me an updated credit report by the required 30 days. Please provide
me with all of the contact names and information where investigations were made. Thank you.

Name:
Address:                             At this address ___ years
Mailing Address:
Previous Address:
Date of Birth:
SSN:
Employer:
Phone number:

Accounts in dispute:

   1. Account number and name just as it reads on your report
      This is a credit card I have had for many years. It has never been late. My credit report states that
      I have been late 4 times in the last 24 months. This is violating my fair credit rights and I demand
      the lates be removed.
   2. Account number and name just as it reads on your report
      I have no idea what this is. This is incorrect reporting and I demand that it be removed from my
      credit report. It is violating my fair credit rights.
   3. Account number and name just as it reads on your report
      This is another credit card I have had for many years. I have never been late on this credit card.
      Once again this is violating my fair credit rights and I demand these lates be removed from my
      credit report.
   4. Account number and name just as it reads on your report
      This is another credit card I have had for many years. There has never been a late payment on
      this account. Again, my fair credit rights are being violated and this incorrect information must
      be removed from my credit report.
   5. Account number and name just as it reads on your report
      I closed this account. I was never late on this account. The incorrect reporting of this account is
      violating my fair credit rights and I demand it be removed from my credit report.

Respectfully,
Your signature
Your typed name
TransUnion
P.O. Box 2000
Chester, PA 19022-2000 (verified 9/19/07)

December 8, 2007

My name is _____________. There is incorrect information on my credit report. This is a letter to
dispute each of these items. They are violating my fair credit rights and I demand each of them be
removed immediately. Please send me an updated credit report by the required 30 days. Please provide
me with all of the contact names and information where investigations were made. Thank you.

Name:
Address:                             At this address ___ years
Mailing Address:
Previous Address:
Date of Birth:
SSN:
Employer:
Phone number:

Accounts in dispute:

   1. Account number and name just as it reads on your report
      This is a credit card I have had for many years. It has never been late. My credit report states that
      I have been late 4 times in the last 24 months. This is violating my fair credit rights and I demand
      the lates be removed.
   2. Account number and name just as it reads on your report
      I closed this account. I was never late on this account. The incorrect reporting of this account is
      violating my fair credit rights and I demand it be removed from my credit report.
   3. Account number and name just as it reads on your report
      I have no idea what this is. This is incorrect reporting and I demand it be removed from my
      credit report. It is violating my credit rights.
   4. Account number and name just as it reads on your report
      Again, I have no idea what this is. It is violating my credit rights, and I demand it be removed
      from my credit report.
   5. Account number and name just as it reads on your report
      This is another credit card I have had for many years. There have never been late payments on
      this account. The incorrect reporting of this account is violating my fair credit rights and I
      demand it be removed from my credit report.
   6. Account number and name just as it reads on your report
      The account from some lending institution that was my old mortgage has been paid in full. The
      account is reported as open and this too is a violation of my fair credit rights. Correct this
      account on my updated credit report. Balance owing must state zero.

Respectfully,


Your signature
Your typed name
Equifax Credit Info
PO Box 740241
Atlanta, GA 30374 (address verified 9/19/07)

December 8, 2007

My name is _____________. There is incorrect information on my credit report. This is a letter to
dispute each of these items. They are violating my fair credit rights and I demand each of them be
removed immediately. Please send me an updated credit report by the required 30 days. Please provide
me with all of the contact names and information where investigations were made. Thank you.

Name:
Address:                             At this address ___ years
Mailing Address:
Previous Address:
Date of Birth:
SSN:
Employer:
Phone number:

Accounts in dispute:

   1. Account number and name just as it reads on your report
      This account is reported twice on my credit report. It is an active line of credit wit no current
      year-to-date reporting. Please correct this to one active account as the duplication violates my
      fair credit reporting rights.
   2. Account number and name just as it reads on your report
      I closed this account. I was never late on this account. The incorrect reporting of this account is
      violating my fair credit rights and I demand it be removed from my credit report.
   3. Account number and name just as it reads on your report
      I have no idea what this is. This is incorrect reporting and I demand it be removed from my
      credit report. It is violating my credit rights.
   4. Account number and name just as it reads on your report
      I have no idea what this is. I only have one line of credit with Bank One and it has never been
      late. This reporting is violating my credit rights, and I demand it be removed from my credit
      report.

Respectfully,


Your signature
Your typed name
UPDATE: 2/23/07

1) Good info from
2) Credit repair info from TrueCredit.com (members section)


                                 1) Good Repair Info online
   From here: http://www.oskie.com/raise_credit_score_fast_quickly_free.htm

       What is the average credit score or Beacon Fico Emperica score? Learn about how credit scores
       are figured, how to increase a credit score and what are the ways a person can get credit score
       online.

       Credit scores are complex algorithms used figure scores by the 3 Majors Credit Reporting
       Bureaus. These scores are named differently but use the same model figure.
       Transunion uses the Empirica Score
       Equifax        uses the Beacon Score
       Experian      uses the Fair Issac or FICO Score
       Most Beacon Fico or Emperica Credit Scores range from 350 to 850 and all three use similar
       scoring factors.

       I should know my score at all 3 bureaus. 720 721 722 723 724 and 725 plus is considered an
       almost perfect credit score, 640 - 719 is a good average American credit score. A credit score of
       639 or less is figured to be less or below average and any score less than a 575 is figured as a
       very bad credit score.

       The new and not yet commonly used Vantage score or vantage credit score was designed
       primarily to make these complicated scores easy to understand. Vantage scores are figured like
       school grades. 60 or less is F for failing, 61 - 70 is a D for below average, 71 - 80 is C for
       average, 81 - 90 is a B for above average and a 91 - 100 is A for close to perfect or perfect.
       The best reasons for credit scores to go from great or perfect to good or average and all the way
       to bad or visa versa are:
       Bankruptcies, Judgments, Collections, Liens, Charge offs, 30 late marks, to many inquiries and
       sometimes having a report that shows I am 1 day late on a current open credit card or loan. The
       most common and easy to change credit score problem is owing more than 80% of my high
       credit limit.
       Credit bureau scores are different because most creditors do not report to all 3 bureaus and some
       creditors do not report at all unless I stop making payments. Cell phone carriers, hospitals,
       utilities, collection agencies, many small banks, some local finance companies and most if not all
       tote your note car lots routinely report only bad credit.
       Credit scoring is not a measure of a borrower's income, assets, or bank account. Scores are
       based solely on the data within the credit report.
      What good is a credit report with no score? Not very much at all I say. When I get my 3 credit
       reports I get all 3 scores too.
                                   2) TrueCredit Repair Info
I signed up for my credit reports at TrueCredit (http://www.truecredit.com) and they gave these
instructions and example letter to send in (I’m also copying all of the credit repair info they have, in case
you want to read it). The main difference is that they say to first contact your creditors, then TrueCredit
for advice, and THEN the credit reporting agencies.

The class I went to specifically said the opposite… NOT to contact your creditors directly, as they’re
practiced at making you think there’s nothing you can change. Contacting the credit reporting agencies
(the people that don’t know your monthly habits first hand), who then have to contact each company for
you, then hear back from them, THEN get back to you in 30 days or less… that’s the key. I also don’t
send in any proof of anything (that I wasn’t late, whatever) and put the burden of proof on them…
though if you have the proof, do send it in.

Also, TrueCredit lists web addresses for your disputes, which I’ve included at the top of each letter,
though I’d still send in a physical (certified, return receipt) copy just to get the 30-day clock officially
ticking.

So, below we have (from TrueCredit):
~ their example letter
~ 5 steps to a higher score
~ The do’s and don’ts of closing old accounts
~ Top 5 credit misconceptions

Good luck!
______________________________________________________________________

Follow this example to write your own letter of dispute. [According to TrueCredit.com]

[Date]
[Your Name]
[Your Address]
[Your City, State, Zip Code]
Dispute Department
[Name of Credit Reporting Agency]
[Address]
[City, State, Zip Code]
Dear Sir or Madam:
I am writing to dispute information on my credit report. The items I wish to dispute are listed below and
also highlighted on the attached copy of my credit report.

[List the items that you feel are inaccurate including the type of accounts, names of the financial
institutions, and full or partial account numbers. Include what changes you feel should be made.]

Enclosed are copies of [payment records, credit report, letters from the creditor, court documents, etc.]
supporting my dispute. Thank you for investigating this matter.

Sincerely,
[Signature]
[Your full name]
[Date of birth]
[Social Security number]
Enclosures: (List what documents are enclosed with your letter)

The guide to disputing
If inaccurate information appears on your credit report, you have the right under the Fair Credit
Reporting Act (FCRA) to dispute the information.

What to do:
Your first step is to correctly identify the inaccurate information on your credit report. Look closely at
your personal data, account information and payment history. Review our online Expiration Guide to see
when your negative records are scheduled to be removed.

You should begin the dispute process by contacting the creditor responsible for the inaccuracy. You can
find the contact information for each of your creditors on your credit report. Your financial institutions
will be able to correct most minor inaccuracies over the phone.

You can also contact a TrueCredit customer service representative to discuss your concerns. Because
TrueCredit is not a credit bureau, we cannot correct the inaccuracy for you. However, we are happy to
discuss your credit report and answer any questions you may have.

To dispute inaccurate information directly with the credit reporting agencies, you must explain the
inaccuracies in writing. You can view a sample letter online here. Include copies of documents that
support your position. You should also include a copy of your credit report, and mark the items in
question.

In your letter, be sure to include:

     Your full name
     Your complete mailing address
     Your date of birth
     Your Social Security number
     The name and account number of the creditor and item in question (Partial account numbers as
      listed on your credit report are accepted)
     The reason for your disagreement with the disputed item—be specific
     Your signature

Send your information online or by certified mail and save the receipts. Keep copies of your dispute
letter and all enclosures. This information should be filed away to document your communication with
your creditors and the credit reporting agencies.
Please note:
This letter doesn't guarantee that the changes will be made on your credit report—it just ensures that
they will investigate your credit report. If changes are made, you will be contacted by the credit
consumer reporting agencies, usually within 30 days.


                                      5 steps to a higher score
Self improvement is a great thing. Becoming a better public speaker can earn you a promotion. Going to
the gym regularly can help you lose a few pounds. Best of all, improving your credit scores can save you
hundreds or even thousands on life's big purchases. Improving your credit is not hard, it just takes time
and little knowledge about the credit scoring system.

While each person's individual credit profile can be improved in its own way, there are five basic things
that everyone can do to give their credit scores a boost:

     Be punctual – Pay all your bills on time each month. Late payments, collections, and bankruptcies
      have the greatest negative effect on your credit scores.

     Check your credit reports regularly and take the necessary steps to remove inaccuracies –
      Don’t let your credit health suffer due to inaccurate information. If you find an inaccuracy on your
      credit report contact the creditor associated with the account or the credit reporting agencies to
      correct it immediately.

     Manage your debts – Keep your credit card account balances below 35% of your available credit
      limits. For instance, if you have a credit card with a $1,000 limit, you should try to keep the balance
      owed below $350.

     Give yourself time – Time is one of the most significant factors that can improve your credit score.
      Establish a long history of paying your bills on time and using credit responsibly. You may also
      want to keep the oldest account on your credit report open in order to lengthen your period of active
      credit use.

     Avoid excessive inquiries – A large number of inquiries occurred over a short period of time may
      be interpreted as a sign that you are opening numerous credit accounts due to financial difficulties
      or overextending yourself by taking on more debt than you can easily repay. Apply for new credit
      in moderation.


                        The do’s and don’ts of closing old accounts
  Closing old and unused credit accounts on your credit reports can help you avoid unnecessary fees
  and guard against identity theft. It can also cause your credit score to drop if you are not careful. Here
  are a few do’s and don’ts for closing those dormant accounts:

  DO…

     Consider closing unused and idle accounts. These accounts could be charging you unnecessary fees
      and are often targets for identity thieves. Close the accounts with annual fees or the highest interest
      rates first.
     Check your credit report online to see the status of your accounts. Look for late payments, high
      balances and signs of identity theft. As a bonus, checking your credit report can save you some
      research time by providing you with contact information for each of your creditors.
     Be aware that you can cancel accounts that have an active balance. You can ask your creditor to
      close the account to new charges and continue paying down the balance each month. This may be a
      good way for heavy credit users to prevent new spending while they are reducing their balances but
      watch out for hidden fees.
   Keep four to six credit accounts open. This will keep your credit score and debt balances healthy.
    Signs of active and responsible credit use are viewed positively by creditors.
   Designate one card for regular use and try to pay the balance in-full each month. Reserve the other
    cards for emergencies only so that you are not tempted to overspend.

DON’T…

   Don’t close the oldest account on your credit report. This could cause your credit history to appear
    shorter and could harm your credit score.
   Don’t just throw away old cards and expect your accounts to close automatically. The safest way to
    close an account is to send a certified letter to the customer service department of the credit
    company. You should receive an account closing confirmation letter in 10 days.
   You shouldn’t be pressured to cancel several accounts all at once. Gradually paying down and
    closing accounts may be the best plan if you are unsure about the impact on your credit score or the
    amount of debt you need to carry. If you want to cancel numerous credit accounts, spacing the
    closures over time will reduce the chance of attracting negative suspicion from potential creditors.
   Avoid over-consolidating balances onto one card. If your credit balances rise to above 35% of your
    available limits, you may see a drop in your credit score.
   Don’t forget to check your credit report for updates and errors after you close your credit accounts.
    Wait 30-60 days for the creditor to report the closed account and the credit reporting agencies to
    update your records. While the accounts and their payment histories will stay on your report for 7
    or more years, they should be marked as ―closed.‖


                                 Top 5 credit misconceptions
We have all heard the rumors…from neighbors, relatives or friends. There are a wide variety of myths
floating around about what you should and shouldn’t do to improve your credit reports and credit
scores. The buck stops here! TrueCredit has exposed these urban legends to provide you and your
informers with the truth about credit:

     1. Your score will drop if you check your credit – Fortunately, this one is definitely not true.
        Checking your own report and score is counted as a "soft inquiry" and doesn't harm your
        credit at all. Only "hard inquiries" from a lender or creditor, made when you apply for credit,
        can bring your credit score down a few points. Worried about damaging your credit while
        shopping around for a loan? Multiple inquiries for the same purpose within a short amount of
        time (a few weeks) are grouped together into a less damaging period of inquiry.

     2. Closing old accounts will improve your credit score – To close or not to close, that is the
        question. Many people advocate closing old and inactive accounts as a way for improving
        your credit. In most cases, closing accounts will actually have the opposite effect. Canceling
        old credit accounts can lower your credit score by making your credit history appear shorter.
        Think twice before closing the oldest account on your credit report. If you want to reduce your
        levels of available credit, ask for your credit limits to be lowered or close newer accounts
        instead.

     3. Once you pay off a negative record, it is removed from your credit report – Negative
        records such as collection accounts, bankruptcies and late payments will remain on your credit
        report for 7-10 years. Paying off the account before the end of the set term doesn’t remove it
           from your credit report, but will cause the account to be marked as ―paid.‖ It is still a good
           idea to pay your debts, it can improve your credit score, but the major improvement will come
           when the record expires.

      4. Being a co-signer doesn’t make you responsible for the account – When you open a joint
         account or co-sign on a loan, you are taking on legal responsibility for the account. Any
         activity on these shared accounts, good or bad, will show up on both people’s credit reports. If
         you co-sign for a friend’s auto loan and they don’t make the payments, your credit profile will
         be hurt by their actions and visa versa. The only way to stop this double reporting is to
         refinance the loan or to have the creditor officially remove you from the account.

      5. Paying off a debt will add 50 points to your credit score – Your credit score is calculated
         using a complex algorithm that takes into account hundreds of factors and values. It is very
         hard to predict how many points you can gain by changing one factor. For a person with a
         high credit score, just one late payment can cause a significant drop. If a person has a low
         credit score, it may not cause a large drop at all. There is no magic way to improve your credit
         score, just keep paying your bills on time, reducing your debts and removing negative
         inaccuracies from your credit report. Good financial behavior and time are the two most
         important factors for your credit score.


  --------------------

  And because you wanted even ANOTHER dispute letter example:

  http://www.debt-n-credit-letters.com/Report-Dispute/credit-report-dispute-letter-1.html


Your Full Name
Current Address
Current Phone Number

Attention: {insert credit reporting agency name}
{add CRA address here}

Dear {credit reporting agency}

This letter is a formal request to correct inaccurate information contained in my credit file. The item(s)
listed below is/are completely (insert appropriate word(s) {inaccurate, incorrect, incomplete, erroneous,
misleading, outdated} ). I have enclosed a copy of the credit report your organization provided to me on
{insert date of report here} and circled in red the item(s) in question.

Line Item: {insert name of creditor, account number or line item number)

Item Description: (this info is found on your credit report)

Requested Correction: (describe exactly what you want. If you want an item deleted say so and explain
why. If you want an item corrected or updated, provide the correct information such as names, dates,
amounts and so forth and any evidence to support your claim).
In accordance with the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), I respectfully request you investigate
my claim and, if after your investigation, you find my claim to be valid and accurate, I request that you
immediately {delete, update, correct} the item.

Furthermore, I request that you supply a corrected copy of my credit profile to me and all creditors who
have received a copy within the last 6 months, or the last 2 years for employment purposes.
Additionally, please provide me with the name, address, and telephone number of each credit grantor or
other subscriber that you provided a copy of my credit report too within the past six months.

If your investigation shows the information to be accurate, I respectfully request that you forward to me
a description of the procedure used to determine the accuracy and completeness of the item in question
within 15 days of the completion of your re-investigation as required by the Fair Credit Reporting Act.

I thank you for your consideration and cooperation. If you have any questions concerning this matter I
can be reached at (insert daytime phone number including area code).

Sincerely,


Signature
Printed Name

				
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