City of Salem Latino Outreach

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City of Salem Latino Outreach Powered By Docstoc
					                    2010

City of Salem Latino Outreach




                    J. Graber, Daniel Green, Kenny McDonald,
                    Jeremy McPherson, Sheila Vineyard-Clough,
                    & Gina Williams

                    University of Oregon
                    Sustainable Cities Initiative
                    11/29/2010
Contents
Background………………………..……………………………………………………………………………………………………..3
       - Sustainable Cities……………………………………………….…………………………………………………….3
       - Salem…………..………………..…………………………………………………………………………………………3
       - Latino Community…………………………………………………………………………………………………….3
                    o Latino Population Percentage by Neighborhood Association……….…3-4
       - Current Outreach Efforts…………………………………….………..………………………………………….4

Primary Research……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….4

Situation Analysis……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………4-5
        - SWOT Analysis……………………………………………………………………………………………….…………5

Problem……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..5

Defined Goals…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………5-6
       - Goal 1………………………………………………………………………………………………………….……….….6
             o SWOT Analysis………………………………...………………………………………………………..6-7
             o Objectives……………………………………………………………………………………………………..7
             o Strategies………………………………………………………………………………………………………7
             o Tactics……………………………………………………………………………..……………………………7
       - Goal 2……………………………………………………………………………………………….………………………7
             o SWOT Analysis………………………………...……………………………..…………………………7-8
             o Objectives……………………………………………………………………………………………………..8
             o Strategies………………………………………………………………………………………………………8
             o Tactics…………………………………………………………..…………………………………………..8-9
       - Goal 3……………………………………………………………………………….………………………………………9
             o Objectives……………………………………………………………………………………………………..9
             o Strategies………………………………………………………………………………………………………9
             o Tactics……………………………………………………………..……………………………………………9

Themes Uncovered From Research……….………………………………………………………………………..……9-11

Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….11

Appendices A-D…………………………………………………………………………………………..………………………12-24




                                                                                Page 2
Background
In partnership with the University of Oregon’s School of Journalism and the Sustainable Cities
Initiative, the City of Salem is developing plans to increase civic engagement with key
populations of residents. This plan will examine the Latino population and how the city can
build a stronger connection with this growing segment.

Sustainable Cities
The University of Oregon’s Sustainable City Program is a partnership with one Oregon city per
year where a number of courses from across the University focus on assisting that city with its
growth and sustainability goals. The current project with Salem includes students studying
architecture, arts and administration, planning, public policy and management, law, business
management and communications.

Salem
The city of Salem is the capital of Oregon and was founded in 1842. It is largely located in
Marion County though the northwestern corner of town is located in Polk County. The
Willamette River, which serves as the boundary between the two counties, bisects the city’s
western side. Salem is approximately 47 miles south of Portland, along Interstate 5, and is more
than 48 square-miles in size.

Its population is approximately 157,000, with a growth rate of about 1.3 percent annually.
Approximately 50.6 percent of the population is male, while 48.4 percent is female. The median
age is 34.6, and the median household income is $43,095.

Roughly one in every five jobs in Marion and Polk counties is in government. Other major
industries in the area include agriculture, food processing, education and wood products
manufacturing. Approximately 84.6 percent of Salem residents identify themselves as
Caucasian. Latinos are the largest minority at approximately 17.9 percent, concentrated largely
in the north- and southeast corners of the city. Native Americans are 3 percent and Asians
make up approximately 2.6 percent of the population.

Latino Community
According to the 2000 Census, 14.6% of Salem residents are of Latino or Latino origin. This is a
much larger percentage than the rest of the state, which is at 8.0%.

Below are the listed the neighborhood associations with the highest percentage of Latino
residents. These Latino residents are more likely to reside inside the city limits.
Latino Population Percentage By Neighborhood Association
Highland                                                         33.2%
Northgate                                                        32.2%
SE Salem                                                         28.7%
Lansing                                                          26.8%
NE Salem                                                         26.8%


                                                                                           Page 3
East Lancaster                                                  26.3%
North Lancaster                                                 24.2%
Neighborhood Totals:                                            14.4%
Inner City Neighborhood Totals:                                 14.7%
Outside City Totals:                                             5.7%

Current Outreach Efforts
City officials have identified the Latino community as an audience that has been under-served
by the city. Most Latino outreach is currently conducted by a member of the Police
Department. Angie Hedrick facilitates monthly presentations on police and related topics as
well as responding to requests for presentations and information. In the past weekly radio
spots were produced on local Latino stations, but a budgetary deficiency has made this
broadcast outreach unsustainable. Hedrick is also a co-chair of the Latino Human Services
Council and makes an effort to be involved in local issues.

In addition to Hedrick and the Police Department’s efforts, a variety of written efforts have also
been implemented. Some Neighborhood Newsletters are printed in Spanish. Police media
releases are also translated and sent to Latino media in the Willamette Valley. Since 2008 the
City has conducted Spanish-speaking forums as part of the overall outreach plan for developing
and approving the City’s budget. Public Works also does periodic public service announcements
on Spanish radio stations in Woodburn and Salem. In addition, there is also an online survey
regarding energy efficiency on the City of Salem website that is available in Spanish and Russian
as well as English.

Primary Research
In an effort to better understand the communication barriers facing the Latino population of
Salem and to provide city officials with direct feedback, our team conducted a series of
interviews with key stakeholders in the Latino community. All interview subjects were selected
based on their strong ties to the Latino community and represent a variety of professional
backgrounds (entrepreneurs, church leaders, education, legal services, media, etc). All
interviews initially focused on the topic of communication between the Latino community and
the city, with each subject providing different feedback based on his or her own experience.
The resulting qualitative data has been incorporated throughout the objectives, strategies, and
tactics in this communications plan.

Sample questions and highlights from our interviews have been included in both the Appendix
and the accompanying power point presentation.

Situation Analysis
A recent study entitled “Context Matters: Latino Immigrant Civic Engagement in Nine U.S.
Cities” (pdf) released by the Woodrow Wilson International Center For Scholars, discusses the
political organization of Latino immigrants in the U.S., starting with the May 1, 2006, protests
and marches for immigration rights and reforms. The study posits that the nationwide protest


                                                                                           Page 4
shows that civic participation by Latino immigrants is growing and was made possible by “years
of quiet community organizing and coalition-building.”

What does all of this mean? Latinos are interested in becoming engaged in their communities
and local governments. How do we engage them? According to a study by the New Organizing
Institute1, Latinos were just as likely as Caucasians to respond to traditional tactics such as
direct mail, canvassing and phone calls.

The answer could simply be that the City of Salem needs to engage Latinos throughout the
community the same way that they engage non-Latinos – with meetings, town halls and
newsletters. The main difference would be in that the City needs to reach out in Spanish and
go where Latinos live and work.
Strengths (internal)                         Weaknesses (internal)
     Already have Hedrick as unofficial         Main spokesperson to Latino community is
       Latino spokesperson, who is an              a member of the Police Department, which
       engaged member of the Latino                may cause unease among immigrants.
       community.                                Lack of Spanish speaking employees in
     Several established (if                      positions of authority in Salem offices.
       unorganized) outreach efforts that        The concept of “Different governments
       can be easily expanded upon.                offer different services” is a difficult one to
     Well established neighborhood                convey and for public to understand –
       associations.                               either English or Spanish speaking.

Opportunities (external)                        Threats (external)
    Any expansion on currently                     Very limited budget will limit new
      fragmented outreach should be                    programs.
      an improvement.                               Some members of the Latino community
    Creating alliances with religious                 would rather remain “invisible.”
      and business leaders in the Latino            Increased attention upsets other minority
      community could improve                          groups
      services and outreach.

Problem
In initial conversations, the City of Salem has expressed concern that its Latino constituents are
not engaged in local government and are unaware of critical city services available to them.

Goals
After meeting with city officials and interviewing key stakeholders in the Latino community, our
team has developed three key goals. Each goal is supported by a series of objectives, strategies,
and tactics which were developed through a combination of feedback from our primary


1
    http://neworganizing.com/resources-tools/Latino-research/

                                                                                            Page 5
research and ideas based on group members various experience working in communications.

Goal 1
Increase communication and foster interaction between Salem municipal officials and
members of Latino community inside the city limits.

Strengths (internal)                            Weaknesses (internal)
     The City of Salem has many                   Issues/hot topics of interest to the
       excellent programs and services               general population may not be relevant
       available to all citizens                     to the Latino population
     Healthy, robust city government              Lack of diversity at public meetings
     Salem offers a high quality of life for      Minorities are underrepresented at all
       all citizens                                  levels of City government
     City officials want to encourage             Spanish language translation of
       diversity at all levels of public             materials/website/social media &
       involvement                                   interpretation at meetings is likely critical
     City is currently in the hiring process        to the effort but may be expensive and
       for an “Intergovernmental Relations           time consuming
       and Civic Engagement Manager”               City outreach efforts to the Latino
                                                     community are limited
                                                   There is no “liaison” to provide a direct
                                                     link between Latino citizens and city
                                                     government
                                                   Lack of diversity amongst Salem’s elected
                                                     officials

Opportunities (external)                        Threats (external)
    The Latino community, including the            “Why bother, they won’t listen”
      business community, is currently                 mentality.
      quite active and engaged on a                 General distrust of government/authority
      variety of grassroots and political              amongst the Latino population, especially
      issues                                           youth.
    Volunteers and/or nonprofit                    Minority citizens are less likely to
      organizations may be able to                     participate in public meetings
      provide translation services                  Typically “the same people” always
    Research shows that minority                      participate
      groups respond positively to                  Disconnect between Latino community
      targeted outreach/participation                  leaders and city officials
      efforts
    Hiring a bilingual Civic Engagement
      Manager with ties to the Latino
      community could prove highly



                                                                                           Page 6
       beneficial to this effort

Objectives:
    Develop an open dialogue with leaders in the Latino community
    Clarify to the Latino community that their participation in city planning is welcome
    Emphasize that Latino involvement will only advance prosperity within the community
    Define which issues the Latino community is concerned with
    Define who the leaders in the Latino community are
           o Priests, business owners, teachers, coaches, attorneys (immigration?)

Strategies:
     Have leaders in the Latino community promote the idea that interaction between
       constituents and Salem officials is good for all parties.
     Have Salem leaders reach out to Latino community leaders

Tactics:
    Develop and distribute bilingual collateral in high-traffic areas
            o Churches, restaurants, schools, government offices
    Conduct interviews with leaders of Latino Chamber of Commerce
    Conduct interviews with Salem leaders
    Conduct a preliminary meeting between Salem city officials and the Latino community
        to determine Latino turnout

Goal 2
Create awareness within the Latino community about the city of Salem’s public services
including:
     Library
     Senior centers
     Parks and Recreation
     Utilities (especially water since it is city-operated)
     Emergency services
     Neighborhood associations



Strengths (internal)                               Weaknesses (internal)
     Content is easily accessible on Residents       Website only offers Google
       section of website (English)                     Translate option, not fully
     Some sites already offer Spanish language         translated to Spanish, nor are key
       options (library catalog)                        sections in Spanish
     Salem magazine, Images, publishes much          Bilingual resources in the city are
       of this information                              scarce for an
     Neighborhood association structure allows         awareness/translation project
       for customized information delivery to         Translation may need to occur in



                                                                                         Page 7
          each area                                             several media (web, print, etc)
         Latino populations are concentrated in               Any updates would need to be
          several areas, giving the city a good                 made in two places (minimum)
          opportunity to reach a large percentage of            with collateral in English and
          the group while minimizing money and                  Spanish, which would require more
          resources that would be needed if a                   time and resources for the city.
          citywide campaign was launched

Opportunities (external)                                 Threats (external)
    Starting from scratch, so making an effort              Poor or automatic translation could
      will go a long way towards showing the                    be detrimental to message and
      Latino population that the City                           audience trust
      understands their needs                                Translated information is not the
    Increase the number of bilingual city                      most important information for the
      employees by carefully selecting hires                    Latino population
    Generate feedback and interaction from                  Added expense to already tight
      this group                                                budgets
    Reach residents who may not be legal                    Information does not make it to
      citizens, but are still in need of city services          the intended audience
      (water, parks, emergency, etc)                         Wrong medium for distribution
    Build foundation of trust, which will help                 (web vs. print)
      support efforts of Goal 1

Objectives
    Communicate important city services information to Salem Latino population
    Prioritize information that is most important as initial focus

Strategies
     Publicize information in at least two formats to increase potential penetration
     Include both legal and non-legal residents in campaign
     Separate the awareness campaign from the civic engagement campaign so residents
       understand that this is purely informational

Tactics
         Use technology to maximize efficiency whenever possible (eg - create pdf’s of print
          material that can also be posted online)
         Create Spanish language version of the Residents webpage
         Distribute materials to heavily trafficked buildings in key neighborhoods (community
          centers, grocery stores, gas stations)
         Work with neighborhood association leaders to determine the most important
          information
         Track the response rate of mediums to determine future strategies



                                                                                            Page 8
       Use existing communication channels to promote these new services and save money
        (eg – promote new web resources on bottom of water bills that are mailed to residents)

Goal 3
Develop a civic engagement framework, based on research with Latino community members,
which can be applied by the city to future communication strategies.

Objectives
    Identify a 10-step process that is versatile and can be used as a planning tool by the city
       with future Latino communication efforts
    Keep goals 1 and 2 in mind as framework is being developed

Strategies
     Identify similar projects completed by other cities
     Interview key Latino community members for information to support the document

Tactics
During our research we identified a 10-step process for conducting a civic outreach program. A
very similar document2 was created by the Portland Development Commission in July, 2008.
We have used this document as a template for SCI, modifying it slightly to make it more
relevant to the city of Salem. (See Appendix D)

Themes uncovered from stakeholder research and suggestions
City purpose
     Make it clear the city’s intent in seeking input is strictly for civic purposes only and
       information will not be used for any other reason.
     Make it clear that participation is essential to the Latino population.

City messages
     “Make it meaningful, make it personal.” People will respond to direct, personal
       outreach. Because the city is essentially starting from scratch in its outreach to the
       Latino community, the more personal and targeted the approach, the better at this
       point.

Latino culture
     Not all Latinos can be grouped into one “constituency.” There are several layers to the
       Latino community.
     Keep in mind the Metro Latino Chamber and the Latino Business Alliance are aligned
       with liberal causes that the traditional Chambers tend to oppose.
     Ensure city programs include Latino-oriented events.
     Ensure events are family-oriented, so everyone can come.
2
 The original document can be viewed online at: www.pdc.us/pdf/public-participation/public-
participation-plans/public-participation-manual.pdf

                                                                                                 Page 9
      Develop culturally specific programs – encourage and empower the micro-businesses.
      Latin American countries are more socialist and don't have a strong tradition of public
       involvement. The people are used to the government making decisions and taking care
       social needs. This might explain why attendance is low at neighborhood meetings.
      “They don’t want to be invisible, they want to be included. When you don’t go out of
       your way to include someone, they’re intimidated. Of course they’re not trying to
       attend any meetings or reach out, they don’t feel like they’re wanted.”
      Ensure that the city’s workforce acknowledges the culture and value system of the
       growing Latino community.

Communication techniques
    Direct, word for word, translation does not work. Written materials should be bi-lingual.
    Start slowly, rather than creating a high profile outreach program.
    Do not only target Latinos in an outreach program. Make Latinos one portion of the
     larger constituency any program is trying to reach.
    Disseminate information through churches.
    Disseminate information through youth sports leagues.
    Schedule regular city council meetings in schools within predominately Latino
     communities.
    Post newsletters, handbooks and other literature encouraging Latinos to get involved in
     municipal affairs at state and federal offices Latinos frequently.
    Create public service announcements and press releases in Spanish.
    Many of these people come from cultures that rely heavily on oral tradition.
     Therefore...simplify, simplify simplify and then tell them what you told them.
    Chemeketa Community College is a good example of a Salem institution that has done a
     good job of reaching out to Latino citizens and youth with a fully translated website and
     special targeted programming.
    Distribute info to employees of small business at their respective worksites.

Education/Schools
    When the entire family creates a vested interest in education, the whole family
       succeeds.
    Disseminate information and create a presence on the Chemeketa Community College
       campus.
    Create a remedial program for parents to learn basic skills, such as market place
       arithmetic, literacy, and computer skills. Without these programs, learning obstacles
       make it hard for Latino parents to promote education to their kids.
    Work through established programs that Salem-Keizer School District is already tied
       into: The “Ready to Learn, Ready to Work,” program coordinated by the Salem Area
       Chamber of Commerce and the Community Outreach/Speaker’s bureau coordinated by
       the Salem-Keizer Educational Foundation.



                                                                                       Page 10
      Distribute info to school aged children about municipal issues, as they often serve as
       interpreters for non-English speaking parents.

Recommendations to the city (based from interviews)
    A partnership between the city’s Parks and Recreation Department and local soccer
     leagues (which are popular among Latinos) can foster a sense of enfranchisement in the
     municipal government.
    Provide opportunities for Latino artists to display their work.
    Create a volunteer commission to make recommended changes and evaluate the
     success of the city’s efforts.
    Print “Good Neighbor Handbook” in Spanish. This book welcomes new residents to
     town, includes phone numbers to city departments and local utilities, as well as city
     ordinances.
    Give preference to bilingual candidates for new hires.
    Print Community Block Grant Funds information in Spanish – including programs like
     HOME, which provides money to rehabilitate homes.
    Translate the city’s Web site – community events calendar — into Spanish.
    Work through two established programs that the District is already tied into: The “Ready
     to Learn, Ready to Work” program coordinated by the Salem Area Chamber of
     Commerce and the community outreach/speaker’s bureau coordinated by the Salem-
     Keizer Educational Foundation.
    Latinos often use mobile devices instead of computers. Create smartphone application,
     specifically for Latinos, with a calendar of events and possibly contacts for different
     services.

Conclusion
Meaningful public outreach to under-served population need not take the form of social
innovation, just cleaver, efficient and sincere communications that account for and capitalize
on social differences. Leveraging the potential for becoming stakeholders in civic governance
starts with opportunities for success. These opportunities come through education, fairness
and trust. However, trust is not easily achieved, yet easily diminished the perception of fairness
is arbitrary. True empowerment of the citizenry comes through their education, both
elementary and in current events.

Clearly each of us understands better when issues are elucidated plainly and would be more
interested in participating when it affects us directly. Would the Latino population in Salem
react differently if the language barrier was somehow removed? Cultural differences in the
way the population reacts to government may be a much larger obstacle than simply
translating civic dictum. Latinos need more help to encourage their participation in the
process. They need to feel empowered and know that their voice is heard before dialogue
starts in earnest.




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Appendix A - Sources interviewed
Rolando Moreno                       Salam Noor
St. Joseph Church                    Assistant Superintendent
721 Chemeketa St. NE                 Salem-Keizer School District
Salem, Oregon 97301                  2450 Lancaster Dr. NE
503-581-1623                         Salem, Oregon 97305
                                     503-399-3000
Pietro Ferrari
Executive Director                   Teuat V. Norman
Hacienda Community Development       Hecht & Norman, LLP
Corporation                          2365 Liberty St. NE
5136 NE 42nd Ave.                    Salem, OR 97301
Portland, OR 97218                   503-363-9903
503-595-2111
                                     Shawna Jantz
Denise Mellene                       City of Austin
Communications Director              2006 E. Fourth St.
City of Pasco                        Austin, Texas 78702
Third Floor                          512-974-2000
525 N. Third Ave
Pasco, WA 99301                      George Puentes
                                     2000 Northeast Alberta St.
Deacon Jose Roman Mendez, pastoral   Portland, OR 97211-5848
associate                            503-459-4247
St. Vincent DePaul
1015 Columbia St. NE                 Miguel Flores
Salem, OR 97301                      Account Executive
(503) 363-4589                       El Rey Radio
                                     6400 SE Lake Rd., Suite 350
                                     Portland OR 97222

                                     Jason C. McBride
                                     Law Office of Jason McBride
                                     503-362-8985
                                     1880 Lancaster Drive NE, Suite 123
                                     Salem, Oregon 9730




                                                                          Page 12
Appendix B - Latino Community Resources

The Latin-American Newspaper of Oregon
7112 N.E. Sandy Blvd, Portland, OR 97213
503-493-1106, www.ellatinodehoy.com

El Latino News, newspaper
503-228-3139, www.ElLatinoNews.com

The Latino PR Blog, www.Latinoprblog.com/upcoming-industry-events/Latino-pr-firm-izo-inc-
co-hosting-oregons-Latino-heritage-month-kick-off-event.html

Center for Diversity & Multicultural Affairs
3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Rd Portland, OR 97239-3098
503-494-5657, www.ohsu.edu/xd/education/student-services/education-diversity

Governor Ted Kulongoski's Office of Affirmative Action
155 Cottage St NE, Salem, OR 97301
503-378-3506

Salem-Keizer Public Schools
2450 Lancaster Dr. NE, Salem, Oregon 97305
503-399-3000, www.salkeiz.k12.or.us

United Farm Workers Union, union, 220 SW 11th St.
Hermiston, Ore. 97838
541 564-2717, www.ufw.org

Latino Metropolitan Chamber
333 SW 5th Avenue, Suite 100 Portland, OR 97204
503-222-0280, www.hmccoregon.com

Salem members of the HMC:
Adams, Day and Hill, bilingual accident attorneys
339 Washington Street Southeast Salem, Oregon 97302
503-399-2667

Applied Growth Transitions, business management consulting
PO Box 7547, Salem, OR 97303
760-504-9542

CFP Inc., employee benefits
PO Box 12888, Salem, OR 97309


                                                                                    Page 13
503-588-2988, www.cfpinc.net

Don Pancho Authentic Mexican Food, Inc,
3060 Industrial Way NE, Salem, OR 97303
503-370-9710, www.donpancho.com

Five Stars International, Ltd, management consulting
770 Glen Creek Rd. NW, Salem, OR 97304
503-510-1165, www.FiveStarsIntl.com

Interface Network, diversity training and technical assistance consulting firm
161 High SE Ste 230, Salem, OR 97301
503-365-0088

Neighbor to Neighbor, mediation service
1655 Capital St NE #12, Salem, OR 97304
503-585-0651

Willamette Education Services District Migrant Program Region 16, education agency
2611 Pringle Rd SE, Salem, OR 97302
503-588-5361 www.wesd.org

St. Joseph’s
721 Chemeketa St NE, Salem
(503) 581-1623, www.stjosephchurch.com

Queen of Peace
4227 Lone Oak Rd SE, Salem
(503) 362-3443, www.queenofpeacesalem.org

St. Vincent DePaul (both a church and school)
1015 Columbia St NE, Salem
(503) 363-8457, www.stvincentsalem.org




                                                                                     Page 14
Appendix C – Primary Research/Community Leader Interview Highlights
Interview Focus Questions:
        1. What are the specific communication roadblocks the Latino community faces when
               dealing with the City?
        2. What needs to be done to better address the issues facing the Latino community?
        3. How can the lines of communication be opened up and who are the best people to
               disseminate information from those conversations?

Interview Subjects:

Rolando Moreno
St. Joseph Church
721 Chemeketa St. NE
Salem, Oregon 97301
503-581-1623

Mr. Moreno suggested SCI reach out to Chemeketa Community College to develop a clear line
of communication with the Latino community.

Deacon Jose Roman Mendez,
Pastoral Associate
Saint Vincent de Paul Parish
1010 Columbia Street, N.E.
Salem, Oregon 97301-7265
(503) 363-4589

Deacon Mendez says we should focus our efforts at the schools. He says most of the students
are sources of information for parents in the Latino community. And, anything we distribute
needs to be bi-lingual.

Deacon Mendez went on to say that when the City wants to communicate with the Latino
community, they could get greater turnout and buy-in if they began by talking about jobs.
I know it's not within the SCI, but Deacon Mendez said it's important.

He suggested the City reach out to small businesses. Not just the owners, but the employees
through the actual places of work to create a wider degree of understanding about what's going
on.

Teuta V. Normam
HECHT & NORMAN, LLP
2365 Liberty St. NE
Salem, OR 97301
503-363-9903


                                                                                       Page 15
Teuta said SCI should make obvious Salem's intent and that it doesn't want to deport anybody
and that it is important to make it clear that communications indicate that participation is
essential so that the Latino voice is heard.

In regards to advertising, she said word of mouth is the best method for her business. She does
use other channels, but only to supplement word of mouth. When asked if she'd be willing to
help disseminate SCI's message she said no, but added that once something is established she'd
be willing to reevaluate.

Pietro Ferrari,
Executive Director
Hacienda CDC

Hacienda is a group that advocates, develops affordable housing for and speaks to Latinos in an
effort to build greener and affordable communities. Mr. Ferrari made the following points:

• In building community, and by extension getting them out of isolation, develop culturally
specific programs. By example, he realized the community makes great tamales...therefore
empower the community to market those tamales and make money....make plain the way to
legitimate business and cut through red tape. They started selling at farmers markets and now
some are starting catering businesses. By embracing their potential for micro-enterprise this
population is inspired, has a dog in the fight and more engaged in the community.

• Education is a huge hurdle. If they are coming from out of the rural parts of Latin America,
even adults may have a 3-4th grade education. If straight translating things didn't work before,
and now trans-litterating information to Spanish might still be to daunting if the information is
too complex. Many of these people come from cultures that rely heavily on oral tradition.
Therefore...simplify, simplify simplify and then tell them what you told them.

• When faced with a 50% drop out rate, Hacienda started after school programs for kids to get
help on homework. Additionally, the organization started remedial programs for parents to
learn basic skills. Market place arithmetic, literacy, computer skills. Without these programs,
learning obstacles make it hard to promote education to their kids and are daunting to learn
alone. When the entire family creates a vested interest in education, the whole family
succeeds. Latin American countries are more socialist and don't have a strong tradition of
public involvement. The people are used to the government making decisions and taking care
social needs. This might explain why attendance is low at neighborhood meetings.

•Affluent Hispanics are not very philanthropic. Because they have pulled themselves up by their
own bootstraps, they expect others should, too turning them into super conservatives. While
they may be interested in public involvement that impacts their business, they might not be
interested in a general social good. Ferrari hope that this is a generational issue and younger up



                                                                                          Page 16
and comers will be different. Ferrari suggests that partnering on community events is
worthwhile.

George Puentes
President & CEO
Don Pancho Mexican Foods

Don Pancho (Puentes Brothers Inc.) is the largest Hispanic-Owned business in Salem, the
second largest in Oregon and one of the top 250 in the United States. The family-owned
business was founded in Salem in 1979 by George Puentes and his brother in honor of their
father. The brothers are third generation Latinos. George is very active on numerous boards
and commissions, not only locally, but nationwide. He is now semi-retired but remains as
President & CEO of the company. He has served as chair of the Salem Chamber of Commerce
Board as well as on the Salem City Council. He is a conservative business man, very well
connected, and supports the Salem community through corporate sponsorships, scholarships,
and personal community involvement.

George offered a very candid view of city government and presented a variety of ideas for
outreach to the Hispanic community.

• As a third-generation Latino in Salem, Mr. Puentes cautions that not all Latinos can be
grouped into one “constituency.” There are several layers to the Latino community – it is not a
one-size-fits-all situation.

• In George’s experience, the City of Salem has done little to no direct, personal outreach to the
Latino community. The city should begin working slowly with schools, youth sports leagues,
churches, Chemeketa Community College, etc. to provide new, meaningful programs for
citizens and especially youth. He said this outreach should extend to the general population,
while keeping Latino citizens in mind.

• Direct translation does not work. “The outreach must be more personalized.” Chemeketa
Community College is a good example of a Salem institution that has done a good job of
reaching out to Latino citizens and youth with a fully translated website and special targeted
programming.

•Mr. Puentes specifically suggested that the City of Salem should work with existing soccer
leagues through the City’s Parks & Rec department, which he said currently lacks meaningful
outreach to the Latino community. Soccer is big in Salem and presents an obvious "in" for the
City to make progress. "Soccer unites" in George’s view. When asked, George said he believes
community forums are a waste of time. He also believes citizens would respond much more
positively to regular city council meetings moved to their neighborhoods on a monthly basis,
with interpreters. "Get out of city hall." He said the meetings could be held at a local school or
church. He also recommended holding city council meetings at Chemeketa from time-to-time


                                                                                            Page 17
and work with instructors to give students extra credit for attending a city meeting to
encourage youth involvement.

• Don Pancho offers scholarships through Chemeketa. George had good things to say about the
college. The student population at Chemeketa is about 11 percent Hispanic, according to
current statistics.

• The one thing George kept going back to is, “Make it meaningful, make it personal.” People
will respond to direct, personal outreach. Because the city is essentially starting from scratch in
its outreach to the Hispanic community, George said the more personal and targeted the
approach, the better at this point.

• George is politically conservative and concerned with issues of importance to business. He
said the Hispanic business community is somewhat divided into conservative and liberal camps.
The Metro Hispanic Chamber and the Latino Business Alliance, for example, are aligned with
liberal causes that the traditional Chambers tend to oppose.

• In general terms, George said Latinos, even business owners, just don’t have civic
engagement on their radar at all. He said they are concerned with making a living, sometimes
dealing with language barriers, etc. and are fairly tolerant of “whatever local government
throws at them.” They are striving to “make it work” at whatever the cost. That’s why the city’s
outreach must be targeted and personal.

Salam Noor
Assistant Superintendent
Salem-Keizer School District
503-399-3002

With 36 % of its student population categorized as Hispanic, (10 % other ethnic groups and 54
% white) the Salem-Keizer School District has many Title 1 schools, which means there are well-
established programs and funding in place that specifically reach out to Latino students and
their families.

In regards to coordination with the City, Mr. Noor recommended working through two
established programs that the District is already tied into: The “Ready to Learn, Ready to Work”
program coordinated by the Salem Area Chamber of Commerce and the community
outreach/speaker’s bureau coordinated by the Salem-Keizer Educational Foundation.

Every school has either a career counselor/workplace coordinator/volunteer coordinator
assigned to these community outreach programs. Mr. Noor said the City would have
opportunities to contribute through one or both of them.
Program Information:
Ready to Learn, Ready to Work: http://workandlearnnow.com/web/


                                                                                            Page 18
Salem-Keizer Education Foundation: http://www.skeducationfoundation.org/home/

Salem-Keizer Title 1 Schools 2010-2011 (See District Demographic Snapshot
Attached).
Elementary Schools

Auburn                             Highland                           Richmond
Bush                               Hoover                             Scott*
Eyre                               Keizer                             Swegle
Four Corners                       Kennedy                            Washington**
Grant                              Lake Labish                        Weddle
Hallman**                          Lamb                               Yoshikai
Hayesville                         Middle Grove

Middle Schools
Claggett Creek**
Houck**
Parrish**
Stephens**
Waldo**
High Schools
McKay**
North
*TAS school
** School Improvement Status

Miguel Flores
Account Executive
El Rey Radio 93.1 FM
(owned by Salem Communications)

Miguel Flores previously worked at KNSD and has been working at El Rey for about 3 ½ years.

Miguel suggests that the Latino community feels underserved. When we mentioned Courtney’s
comment about Latinos wanting to be invisible, he disagreed.

“They don’t want to be invisible, they want to be included. When you don’t go out of your way
to include someone, they’re intimidated. Of course they’re not trying to attend any meetings or
reach out, they don’t feel like they’re wanted.”

Miguel used the example of the Oregon State Fair. He said they purchased a small amount of
radio advertising to publicize the fair on El Rey but were disappointed with the Latino turnout.
Miguel said he wasn’t surprised because there was nothing at the Fair that was specifically for


                                                                                          Page 19
Latinos – no music acts, foods, etc. He thought that if they went beyond just translating the
English language ad into Spanish and actually tried to create some special events for Latinos,
more would have come.

Miguel stressed to me that many Latinos work Monday through Saturday. The only day they
have to really relax and spend time with their families is on Sunday. We asked if he thought it
would be effective to try to reach out to people at or after church and he thought that was an
excellent idea. To have a meeting or give out information directly after church would be good –
they’re already there and no one is asking them to go out of their way to somewhere else.

Of course, Miguel said the best way to reach Latinos was through TV and radio. We explained to
him that the City of Salem does not have budget for a media campaign. He said that El Rey has
run some PSAs in the past and that they might be open to that. He did mention that both OSHA
(Occupational Safety and Health Administration) and WIC (Women, Infants, Children) had
advertised on El Rey to reach the Latino community because these organization felt they were
not reaching them in other ways. He also mentioned they advertised on the local Univision
affiliate and Telemundo as well.

Miguel was of the opinion that the best way to reach Latinos was through events or gatherings
that involved the whole family. He did mention that when El Rey first started in 2007 they tried
doing concerts in Portland but quickly stopped – the turnout wasn’t good. He said the last event
that El Rey did in Salem (where the majority of their events are now hold, followed by
Woodburn), over 17k people showed up. In my opinion, the City of Salem should get a booth or
just send people to the next El Rey event. Not all of the people there will be residents of Salem,
but it’s likely that the majority will be.

Miguel also mentioned that Latinos are big mobile device users. He emphasized that most
Latinos don’t have jobs where they’re in front of computers all day and that their ‘computer’ is
their mobile device. He said that Verizon, AT&T and Cricket are three of the largest advertisers
on the station. He said that his contacts with each of these companies confirmed to him that
Latinos are big mobile device users. Our first thought was an iPhone/Android app that the City
of Salem could create specifically for Latinos -with a calendar of events and possibly contacts
for different services. We don’t think that it would be the centerpiece of our campaign but it
could certainly be a tactic.

What we got from the conversation with Miguel is that the City of Salem needs to go where the
Latinos are – not the inverse.

Denise Mellene
Communications Director
City of Pasco
525 N. Third Ave
Pasco, WA 99301


                                                                                          Page 20
Ms. Mellene said the city of Pasco has never run a concerted Latino outreach program, but did
talk about what the city has done.

One of the most successful tactics has been printing a “Good Neighbor Handbook” in Spanish.
The book includes the city ordinances as well as contact information for the various city
departments. Similarly, the city also prints community block grant information, like HOME,
which provides money to rehabilitate homes, in Spanish. She noted that translating the city’s
Web site has proven difficult and too costly to do properly. However, key sections, such as
community calendars can be translated with little cost.

Regarding translation, Ms. Mellene said hiring Bilingual employees increases the city’s ability to
conduct day-to-day business with non-English speaking Latinos.

Mellene noted that many Latinos frequently have more contact with state and federal agencies
than they do with the city. Therefore, it is important to distribute information, translated into
Spanish, in state and federal agency offices. Educating employees in those offices about city
services could be helpful because they can then refer Latinos to those programs.

She also noted it is important to educate school children about city services and projects
because they frequently act as translators for their parents.

However, the single most important factor stressed by Mellene was that outreach is best
handled by a community member willing to be a liaison between the city and the Latino
community.




                                                                                          Page 21
Appendix D – Civic Outreach 10 Step Process

1. Describe the Project
Provide a project description and background to lay the foundation for a successful and
achievable public participation process. Include the timeline, geographic area, staff and budget
limitations of the overall project. This information will be used to explain the project to those
persons subsequently engaged in public participation activities. The description also
communicates the boundaries of public participation in planning, program development or
decision processes.

2. Assess Level of Public Concern or Interest
Assess the degree to which the public considers the issue significant. The public will become
involved according to its perception of the seriousness of the issue. Therefore, it is important to
anticipate the public’s level of interest or concern regarding a project or program.

3. Determine Level of Public Participation Needed
Plan for the appropriate level of public participation. The four levels of public participation are:

       1. Public Information
       2. Public Input
       3. Public Involvement
       4. Public Collaboration.

Each of these levels serves a different purpose with a different outcome. A public participation
plan will almost always require more than one level of participation.

4. Identify Public Participation Goals
Define goals. Refer to the “Promise to the Public” column in the public participation spectrum
as you refine your goals. Here are questions to consider as you develop various goals:
Could this be an opportunity to:
     Create a better project?
     Incorporate other community or city goals into the project?
     Benefit from public input, involvement or buy-in regarding the project?
     Collaborate with other overlapping local taxing districts or city councilors?
     Raise visibility of city services in the community?
     Enhance specific project milestones or decision processes?
     Promote positive news coverage of city programs and/or projects?
     Strengthen or repair public trust?

5. Identify Stakeholders
Identify stakeholders and what level of public outreach is needed:

      Create a demographic profile of the project area


                                                                                             Page 22
      Poll key members of the community to determine who they think should be included in
       the project
      Locate where community groups and organizations gather
      Research the public participation history of the project area
      Establish neighborhood coalition offices
      Distribute info through neighborhood newsletters
      Interview local advocacy groups, associations and organizations (Salem area Chamber of
       Commerce)
      Interview staff from other city bureaus working in project area
      Identify and characterize individuals and groups to be included in the process
      Determine advocacy groups, (e.g., affordable housing, watershed councils, land use
       groups)
      Determine business or industry groups that would benefit from program, (e.g.,
       chambers of commerce, business associations)
      Develop communication with church groups and social service providers
      Develop collateral to be distributed at educational institutions, (e.g., K-12, public
       schools, community colleges)
      Identify Interested groups/individuals not directly affected
      Identify cultural groups, (e.g., age, language, custom, religion)
      Determine overlapping taxing districts

6. Select Tools
Different public participation goals typically require different tools and approaches.
Here are some things to keep in mind:
     Large public meetings can be valuable ways to generate ideas, but poor vehicles to
        statistically quantify public opinion or strategize next steps.
     A neighborhood meeting is a valuable way to get insight into the viewpoint of
        neighborhood leaders, but if the issue at hand affects a few specific neighborhoods,
        door-to-door contact with residents in those specific areas may be a better approach.
     Open houses may encourage general public feedback on a project, but it is not as
        helpful if the need is informed and experienced input related to the specific project at
        hand.

7. Create a Schedule
Include a detailed timeline of the planning, program development and decision making
processes as well as the public participation activities within that process. Public information
and input need to be scheduled early enough to provide the public adequate opportunity to
influence the decision.

8. Identify Roles and Responsibilities
Identify everyone who has a role and/or responsibility in the planning, program development or
decision making process. Most importantly, identify an overall public participation manager
responsible for tracking progress and completing each activity. Clearly identify who your


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ultimate decision makers are with regard to the project. This will be beneficial to have these
determinations prior to the development of public information materials and making
presentations to stakeholders, who will want to know how, when and by whom the decision is
going to be made.

9. Gather and Distribute Input and Results
If your public participation goals include public input, involvement or collaboration, you have
the added responsibility of disseminating the public’s input to decision makers and back to the
public at large. This “feedback loop” is necessary to demonstrate to the public that their time
and effort has been well invested and their comments and concerns have been understood and
accurately communicated to decision makers. It shows the public how their input has been
translated and has influenced the project, policy or program.

10. Evaluate Effectiveness
Evaluation should be an explicit part of the design for any public participation activity or plan.
Too often, evaluation is ignored or begun too late to help improve the project.




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