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Building Social Capital

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Building Social Capital Powered By Docstoc
					Building Social Capital
With a First Rate
Volunteer Program


Anne B. Schink, Consultant in
Volunteer Management
Training and Facilitation
Social Capital
   Robert Putnam, Bowling Alone
       Network of relationships that yield benefits to
        those who are part of the network.
       Connections among individuals create social
        networks that reinforce norms of reciprocity
        and trustworthiness
       Social capital is the key to unlocking all the
        other essential forms of capital that nonprofits
        need: financial, human, and political.
The Charismatic Organization: Strong
Core and Cycle of Growth


          Resources        Active
          Contributed     Outreach




                         Meaningful
         Grow the Core
                         Involvement
Two kinds of Social Capital

   Bonding—the links that tie a group
    together

   Bridging—the links that connect a
    group to others outside of its
    organization or network
Bonding Social Capital

Build a strong organizational core
     1.   Mission-driven motivation
     2.   Can-do culture
     3.   Data-driven decision making
     4.   Purposeful innovation
     5.   People-focused management
Bridging Social Capital

   Build a strong external network
       6. Compelling communications
       7. Active outreach
       8. Meaningful involvement
Volunteer Management

   System-centered
       Elements of Volunteer Resources
        Management Checklist
   Volunteer-centered
       Flexible
       Fast
       Friendly
       Focused
1. Mission-driven motivation

   Written statement of philosophy
    related to volunteer involvement
   Periodic needs assessment to
    determine how volunteers should be
    involved to address the mission
1. Mission-driven motivation

   Volunteer resources manager and
    fund development manager work
    closely together
   Volunteer resources manager
    involved in top-level planning
2. Can-do culture
   Organizational culture is the organization’s
    personality or character: the shared beliefs,
    values, assumptions and expectations and norms
    that shape the organization.
       Written position descriptions for volunteer roles
       Written policies and procedures for volunteer
        involvement
       Organizational budget reflects expenses related to
        volunteer involvement
       Consistent general orientation for new volunteers
       Consistent training for new volunteers regarding
        specific duties and responsibilities
3. Data-driven decision making

   Regular collection of information
    (numerical and anecdotal)
    regarding volunteer involvement
   Volunteer involvement is linked to
    organizational or program outcomes
4. Purposeful innovation
   Periodic risk management
    assessment related to volunteer
    roles
   Liability insurance coverage for
    volunteers
   Periodic assessment of volunteer
    performance
   Periodic assessments of staff
    support for volunteers
5. People-focused management

   Orientation for new paid staff about
    why and how volunteers are
    involved in the organization’s work
   Designated manager/leader for
    overseeing management of
    volunteers agency-wide
   Designated supervisors for all
    volunteer roles
5. People-focused management
   Consistent activities for recognizing
    volunteer contributions
   Consistent activities for recognizing staff
    support for volunteers
       Feedback loop from volunteer to supervisor to
        manager of volunteers.
       Informal check-ins.
       Staff support.
       Formal recognition through awards, events,
        benefits.
       Opportunities for professional growth
       Chart an advancement path.
        6. Compelling communications

   Information related to volunteer
    involvement is shared with board
    members and other stakeholders at least
    twice yearly
       Celebrate accomplishments and benchmarks
       Share the information widely
7. Active outreach
   Specific strategies for ongoing volunteer
    recruitment
       Recruitment is the third step (Susan Ellis)
            Organizational readiness
            Well designed program
       Know what you are looking for
       Target your recruitment
       Go directly to GO!
       Prepare relevant materials (organization and
        position descriptions, training requirements, and
        time commitments)
       Connect the dots. Make sure they know where to
        go, how to get to the right person, and what you
        expect from them.
8. Meaningful involvement
   Standardized screening and matching
    procedures for determining appropriate
    placement of volunteers
   Matchmaking and retaining volunteers
       Make sure you know what brings satisfaction
        to the volunteer.
       Be really clear about expectations.
       Adapt your plan to suit the individual, not the
        other way around.
       Supervision. Who is the volunteer accountable
        to?
       Ensure that this is a good fit before you hand
        off the volunteer to the supervisor.
Volunteer-Centered
Recruitment and Engagement

     Establish clear expectations both in terms of
      the work and the time involved.
     Engage in interactive interviewing. This is
      about achieving the best fit for both individual
      and organization, not squeezing a person into
      a pre-designed position.
     Define mutually satisfying outcomes.
     Conduct a thorough skills inventory. Find out
      all the skills the person has, not just the ones
      you think you are looking for. You may be
      surprised by what you find.
Volunteer-Centered
Recruitment and Engagement
   Flexible
              Flexible means that the job fits the needs of the
               volunteer, not the other way around.
   Fast
              Fast means that you need to respond quickly to
               inquiries or the person will go elsewhere.
   Friendly
              Friendly means an open and supportive
               atmosphere where the volunteer’s skills, time, and
               interests are respected and used effectively, and
               the person feels welcome in the organization.
   Focused
           •   Focused means time limited with measurable
               outcomes, deadlines, and expectations.
Resources

   Good websites for resources
       www.volunteermaine.org
       www.energizeinc.com
       www.handsonnetwork.org
       www.nationalserviceresources.org
   Contact Anne Schink:
       abschink@gwi.net
       www.absconsultingmaine.com

				
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