Group's Definition of Parent Involvement by wulinqing

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									        Six Types
            of
   Parent Involvement

         Norma H. Gomez,
Parent/Family Involvement Coordinator


San Diego County Office of Education
Definition of Parent Involvement


Parent involvement is the support
and participation of parents at home,
in the community, and at the school
site that directly and positively affect
the educational performance of all
children.


                                           1
Definition of Parent Involvement



Parent involvement is most successful
when it is viewed, practiced, and
promoted as a partnership between
the home and school.




                                        2
 Definition of Parent Involvement


Effective partnerships are characterized
by:
    • Mutual trust and respect
    • Two-way collaboration and support
    • Equality in the relationship



                                           3
      Definition of Parent Involvement


The school must provide leadership and
assume responsibility for encouraging
active involvement, using strategies that
meet the individual needs of all families
within the community.

Adapted from: California Strategic Plan for Parental Involvement in Education. California
Department of Education 1992; and Building School-Family Partnerships for Learning. By Oliver
C. Moles and Diane D’Angelo, US Department of Education, 1993.


                                                                                                4
Benefits of Parent Involvement -
     Based on Research

Students

    Positive attitude toward school
    Higher achievement in reading
    Higher quality homework
    Positive perception of home-school
     connection


                                          5
Benefits of Parent Involvement -
     Based on Research

Parents

 An understanding of how schools work
 Learning of strategies to help their children
  be successful in school
 Confidence in helping their children learn
 Positive views of teachers and the school

                                                  6
Benefits of Parent Involvement -
     Based on Research

Teachers/Schools

 Higher morale
 Improvement in student achievement
 Parental and community support for the
  school


                                           7
 Research Findings on Parent
        Involvement

FACTORS over which parents have
control:
 1. Absenteeism
 2. Reading at home/Doing homework
 3. Watching television




                                     8
     Research Findings on Parent
            Involvement

What families DO to help their children
learn is more important than:
 The family’s income level
 The parents’ educational level
 Whether the child is in high school or
  preschool

Source: Strong Families, Strong Schools.
        US Department of Education, 1994
                                           9
 EDUCATION EQUITY - META
Vol 13 No.1   Multicultural Education, Training and Advocacy, Inc.   Spring 2003
Self-Study for School Staff and Families

Assessing Implementation of Six Types of
Parent Involvement

Based on Joyce Epstein’s Typology



                                       Revised March 2000
                                    By Jennifer A. Bell, Ph.D.


PARENT INVOLVEMENT - STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT
                                                                 11
                Assignment

I. Issues or challenges

   Identify one issue or challenge to effective
    parent involvement in your school that you
    would like to solve or address.




                                                   12
      Questions to Ask Yourself

Think about:
 Am I accurately defining the problem. Do I
  need more information about the challenge,
  issue, or problem?

 How much time do I wish to invest in trying to
  resolve the issue or challenge?

 What specific outcome or result do I want to
  achieve?
                                                   13
      Questions to Ask Yourself


 How many students, families, parents will
  benefit from the resolution of the problem?

 In what specific ways will they benefit?

 How will I benefit as a community liaison?

 What kinds of resources will I need to resolve
  the problem, issue or challenge?

                                                   14
             Assignment

II. PLAN OF ACTION
  • Develop a plan to address the issue,
    challenge or problem.

  • Be specific in identifying the problem.

  • Use the worksheet to record the details of
    your plan.
                                                 15
      Questions to Ask Yourself

Reflect on:
 What parents, communities or others need to
  do to help resolve the issue, problem or
  challenge?

 What I, the community liaison, need to do?

 What students need to do?

 What the school and/or principal need to do (if
  anything)?
                                                    16
        Questions to Ask Yourself

Ask yourself:

 How will I know that the plan I came up with is
  effective:
   (a) in meeting my goals for parent involvement?
   (b) in meeting the needs of families and communities?


 What will I do if I try something and it doesn’t
  work?

                                                           17
ACTION PLAN



WORKSHEET
Examples for One-Year Action Plan


        Family and
   Community Involvement
      to Help Reach
    Results for Reading


                                    19
               Types 1 & 2

Type 1
   Family room or parent center with information
    and activities on reading


Type 2
   Parent-teacher-student conference on reading
    goals and progress


                                                    20
               Types 3 & 4

Type 3
   Reading-partner volunteers


Type 4
   Interactive reading homework - reading aloud,
    listening to reading, going over vocabulary,
    spelling, and other reading-related skills


                                                    21
                Type 5

Type 5
   PTA/PTO support for reading in small
    grants to library and to classroom
    teachers for reading books and
    involvement activities




                                           22
                              Type 6


Type 6
   Partners for obtaining books for
    classrooms, library, children at home


 Epstein, J. L., Sanders, M. G., Salinas, K. C., & Simon, B. S. (2nd edition, forthcoming).
 School, Family, and Community Partnerships: Your Handbook for Action. Thousand Oaks
 Ca: Corwin Press.


                                                                                              23
How might the six types of
  involvement help your
  school reach it’s goals?


                         24
      Norma H. Gómez
Parent/Family Involvement Coordinator

San Diego County Office Of Education
        6401 Linda Vista Rd.
        San Diego, CA 92154

        Office: 858-292-3657
          Fax: 858-268-1638

      email: ngomez@sdcoe.net
                                        25
  Comprehensive Home-School
         Partnership

The three levels and six types of
parent involvement in education

A comprehensive, well-planned home-
school partnership includes Joyce
Epstein’s six types of parent involvement
in education and reflects three general
levels of participation
                                            26
                                                                             San Diego City Schools

                                                   School             Parent Involvement and Support Unity

                                               Management
                         Level III                 (Type 5)
                                            School Governance,
                                         Leadership and advocacy
                                       Improve School Effectiveness

                                        Active Daily Participation
             Level II                 (Type 3) Volunteering in Schools
                                    (Type 6) Community Linked Services
                                           Improves School Climate

                               Broad Participation and General Support
                                     (Type 6) Community-Linked Services
Level I                              (Type 4) Learning Activities at home
                             (Type 2) Two-way Home-to-School Communication
                          (Type 1) Parenting Skills to meet basic family obligations
                                        Improves Student Achievement
Pyramid Chart adapted from James P. Corner’s School development Program
                                                                                                       27
Excerpted from: teamwork makes the Dream Work: A Staff Resource Book for Developing Home-School Partnerships

								
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