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Emergency Management and Homeland Security - Download Now DOC

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					 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

            Emergency Management and Homeland Security
                     Articles of Interest 7-27-07
(The articles, reports and additional information contained in this edition were collected from 7-20
                                               to 7-27)

 The information posted below does not necessarily represent the opinions of the editor of this
document or IAEM. This publication is meant simply to distribute and make available information
                     relevant to the Emergency Management profession.

          “I know where I will be at the end of the world, in the EOC!”
                                          Steve Detwiler

                                   U.S. News Reports
Emergency Management and Homeland Security
Traffic Camera Images Accessible to First Responders in Conn.
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/127450

Battening Down the Hatches
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/127294

Poll: More coastal residents would not evacuate for hurricane
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/weather/orl-bk-
coastal072407,0,1889077.story?coll=orl_tab01_layout

Missouri Receives $17 million Grant to Enhance Emergency Coordination
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/127642

Senate Dems Dare Bush to Veto Homeland Security Spending Bill
http://www.govexec.com/dailyfed/0707/072407cdpm1.htm


Senate approves more money for border control
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070726/pl_nm/usa_immigration_dc

Rendell appoints new director of PA emergency response
http://www.yorkdispatch.com/pennsylvania/ci_6430812

Governor's Homeland Security Advisor plans department overhaul (Colorado)
http://www.9news.com/rss/article.aspx?storyid=74068

Inside the Capitol (Pennsylvania)
http://www.pennlive.com/news/patriotnews/index.ssf?/base/news/1185414930112420.xml&coll=1

Ritter about-face on emergency management chief (Colorado)
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/local/article/0,1299,DRMN_15_5642510,00.html

http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/local/article/0,1299,DRMN_15_5643987,00.html


Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work        1
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

First responders to get more credentials
http://www.fcw.com/article103288-07-20-07-Web

County Officials: Gas stations must comply with generator law (Florida)
http://www.bonitanews.com/news/2007/jul/21/county_officials_gas_stations_must_comply_gener
ato/?latest

Trial begins in alleged teen rape: Ex-Quincy emergency deputy director faces charges of
molesting boys in response team (Massachusetts)
http://ledger.southofboston.com/articles/2007/07/21/news/news14.txt

Sigonella revamping Navy course
http://www.estripes.com/article.asp?section=104&article=47564

Is the shore prepared? (New Jersey)
http://www.app.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070722/NEWS/707220386

Former emergency management director pleads not guilty to murder (Kentucky)
http://www.wave3.com/global/story.asp?s=6827673

LAPD counterterrorism efforts ignites debate (California)
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-terror24jul24,1,1121051.story?coll=la-headlines-
california

California Governor Schwarzenegger Praises Angora Fire Report
http://www.krnv.com/Global/story.asp?S=6839367

Cardin Supports Former Md. Official For FEMA Post
http://wjz.com/local/local_story_206110801.html

Bill for FEMA waster disputed
http://www.ajc.com/services/content/business/stories/2007/07/24/lipsey_0725.html?cxtype=rss&c
xsvc=7&cxcat=6

PODS hope Portable Emergency Shelters catch on
http://www.wlox.com/Global/story.asp?S=6839746

Mayor returns to city hall (New York City, NY)
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/24/nyregion/24mbrfs-mayor.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Survey of U.S. Government Agencies Reveals Telework as Essential to Continuity of Operations
and Emergency Preparedness
http://biz.yahoo.com/bw/070723/20070723005337.html?.v=1

Memtechs Incorporated Announces Release of FileoDex, its Disaster Preparedness Software
Package for Individuals and Households
http://www.prweb.com/releases/disaster_preparedness/software/prweb542399.htm

New Duval emergency phone system can reach 60,000 homes in an hour (Florida)
http://www.jacksonville.com/tu-online/stories/072507/met_186729193.shtml



Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work     2
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Preparing Packaging for a Pandemic
http://www.devicelink.com/pmpn/archive/07/07/014.html

New Nevada Homeland Security Chief Named
http://www.lasvegasnow.com/global/story.asp?s=6838633

Homeland Security urged to weigh all options for consolidating offices
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=37572&sid=60

Guard control limits criticized (Maine)
http://www.bangordailynews.com/news/t/news.aspx?articleid=152235&zoneid=500

Security experts: Terrorist warning shows new maturity at TSA
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/nationworld/chi-ap-wi-
airportterrorwarn,0,2655377.story?coll=orl_tab01_layout

Congress sends 9/11 bill to Bush
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070727/ap_on_go_co/homeland_security




July 21, 2007
DHS Nears Release on Revised National Response Plan
By Eileen Sullivan, CQ Staff

After months of working groups, meetings and deliberations on rewriting the National Response
Plan in as simple terms as possible, the Department of Homeland Security is close to releasing
the revised document, which may even come with a new name: the National Response
Framework.

The document is the country’s blueprint for disaster response, but after Hurricane Katrina in 2005,
officials from across the country called for extensive changes, saying it was too large (more than
400 pages), misunderstood, ignored and laden with government jargon.

The goal is for the final version to be no more than 100 pages and written in plain English,
according to the department. Several drafts have since emerged, but they continue to be sent
back to the drawing board.

―It’s highly impenetrable and difficult to understand by people who speak regular English,‖ DHS
Deputy Secretary Michael P. Jackson told the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental
Affairs Committee in May. He said the condensed document will provide a better training manual
for local, state and federal officials and will offer a clearer understanding of their roles in
emergency management.

Jackson is overseeing a team of writers from the department, the Federal Emergency
Management Agency and the White House Homeland Security Council, DHS spokeswoman
Laura Keehner said. Several sources have said Jackson has even taken to rewriting portions of it
himself, though Keehner would not confirm that.



Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work        3
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

―This is such an important document that the secretary had asked the deputy secretary to provide
strategic direction and leadership over this project,‖ Keehner said.

The name change is not yet a done deal either. But after Katrina, officials said calling the
document a plan may not have been the right choice of words, as it is more of a guide or
framework for responding to disasters at all levels of government. The department has missed
two deadlines it set for itself this summer to complete the revisions. But Keehner said the end is
near, at which point it will be sent out to stakeholders for comment.

The president called for the creation of a National Response Plan in February 2003, as the Sept.
11 terrorist attacks shed light on the need for a coordinated response plan for the entire nation,
not just the federal government. The NRP essentially consolidated the existing federal plans,
such as the Federal Response Plan, the Interagency Domestic Terrorism Concept of Operations
Plan, the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan and the National Contingency Plan.
Initially, the department outsourced the draft of the plan to the Rand Corp. But the first product
met such opposition from state and local officials that the department rewrote it. The first final
version was published in January 2005. Katrina, which struck nearly nine months later, was the
first time it was used in a real-life disaster. In May 2006, the department published another
version, which included revisions made right after Katrina.

Since 2003, state and local officials have said they are not included enough in the writing
process. Four years and several drafts later, not much has changed.

This latest rewrite is being done in a ―vacuum,‖ said one emergency management official who
requested anonymity. ―There has been no input sought from the state and local stakeholders
during this rewrite period,‖ the official said.

Keehner said that was not the case.

―Our stakeholders — state, federal and local partners — are all very much involved in this
process,‖ she said. ―We want to make sure that we get this document right.‖




July 23, 2007
Disaster Response Coordination Positions Bypass FEMA
By Eileen Sullivan, CQ Staff

Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff has made assignments to controversial federal
disaster response positions and did not place the Federal Emergency Management Agency in
charge of coordinating these officials. As he did in 2006, he pre-assigned principal and deputy
principal federal officials, as well as federal coordinating officers in five regions across the country
for the 2007 hurricane season.

In a July 16 letter to Gov. Kathleen Babineaux Blanco, D-La., Chertoff instructed her to contact
the National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD) should she have questions or
comments. NPPD is the newest division in the department which oversees cybersecurity,
telecommunications, critical infrastructure and a major immigrant tracking system.



Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work            4
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

The move has lawmakers and emergency management officials concerned. ―Congress intended
for FEMA to always act as the states’ contact for disaster preparedness and response issues,‖
Rep. David E. Price, D-N.C., wrote in a July 20 letter to Chertoff. Price heads the House
Homeland Security Appropriations Subcommittee. ―I urge you to clarify this aspect of FEMA’s role
with the state governors.‖

In his letter to Blanco, Chertoff explained the roles of three relevant officials this way:

• The principal federal official (PFO) is Chertoff’s representative in the field during a disaster and
helps ensure smooth coordination among the other senior officials.

• The deputy PFO assists the PFO.

• The federal coordinating officer (FCO), appointed by the FEMA administrator, is responsible for
committing and coordinating federal resources to support state and local needs.

The importance of solid and sound coordination among federal, state and local officials in the
planning and response stages of disasters is among the many lessons imparted by Hurricane
Katrina. The PFO position was created after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and has been a point of
controversy and confusion among all players involved in disaster response. Repeated requests to
abolish this position — which many say only creates more bureaucracy — have been ignored.
Taking matters into their own hands, House lawmakers decided not to fund the positions in the
department’s fiscal 2008 appropriations bill (HR 2638). Lawmakers and emergency management
officials say the PFO position only muddies the role of the federal coordinating officer — a FEMA
official whom state and local agencies are used to working with in disasters.

In the response to Hurricane Katrina, the PFO and FCO duality ―led to ambiguities of authority
and responsibility which often severely hampered response as well as recovery efforts,‖ Larry E.
Naake, executive director of the National Association of Counties, and Michael Selves, president
of the International Association of Emergency Managers, wrote in a May 15 letter to leaders of
both the House and Senate Homeland Security Appropriations subcommittees. ―DHS’s insistence
on inserting a non-statutory, redundant and very confusing additional level of federal
representation is causing serious problems.‖

In an interview with Congressional Quarterly on Monday, Selves said the decision to place the
coordination responsibility in the National Protection and Programs Directorate is troubling. ―I’m at
a loss to understand why that was done that way,‖ he said.

Because the secretary created the pre-designated PFO program, Chertoff is allowed to task
responsibilities to the division of his choice, according to FEMA.

―He has tasked the National Protection and Programs Division to coordinate this program for the
time being,‖ FEMA spokesman Aaron Walker wrote in an e-mail to Congressional Quarterly.
―Future decisions on the PFO and the program responsibilities are under consideration as part of
the rewrite of the National Response Plan.‖ The NRP is the country’s blueprint for disaster
response.




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work               5
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Campus Safety and Security
Student threatened 'murderous rampage,' police say (Illinois)
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/07/25/student.arrested.ap/index.html

Quick fix for bombs near school demanded (Florida)
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/local/orange/orl-
bomb2607jul26,0,6987180.story?coll=orl_tab01_layout

Boy to stand trial for killing principal (Wisconsin)
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070726/ap_on_re_us/school_shooting

Professors in Colorado Receive Death Threats for Teaching Evolution
http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2007/07/professors-in-c.html




Va. Tech Panel Lacks Full Picture on Cho
Decisions Were Made Without Treatment Plan

By Brigid Schulte
Washington Post Staff Writer
Sunday, July 22, 2007; C01

After two months of public hearings by the state panel investigating the Virginia Tech massacre,
one thing has emerged most clearly: The state's system of dealing with the mentally ill is in
almost desperate need of repair.

Even with expanded powers granted by the governor that gave the panel access to confidential
medical, psychological and academic records, and even with additional records made available
after Seung Hui Cho's parents waived their right to privacy, panel members said they still do not
have a complete picture of how the system handled Cho. So much information was missing,
incomplete or destroyed, they said.

Although there is no way to know whether proper treatment in 2005 would have prevented the
April 16 attack that left 33 dead, including Cho, testimony before the panel has indicated that
mental health officials who at first claimed no knowledge of Cho nor responsibility for him had
been sent reports about him.

Even so, the panel learned that the mental health professional responsible for assessing Cho
made decisions without all the facts, because psychological reports and a treatment plan had not
been written. It's unclear if they ever were.

Aradhana A. "Bela" Sood, the panel member heading up the mental health inquiry, said in an
interview that the system, with its vague laws and lack of funding, resources and staffing, was to
blame for much of the breakdown in the Cho case. "You can't blame the people; they are not bad,
they are not evil . . . they were part of the system," she said. "And with the system we have right
now, we are very lucky that we don't have more things like this happening. It's a national
tragedy."


Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work          6
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Gov. Timothy M. Kaine (D) created the panel after Cho's rampage on the Blacksburg campus. In
addition to Cho's interaction with the state mental health system, the panel is looking into
university security issues, gun laws and the police's and university's actions in response to
shootings. The report also will examine how the university and state reacted after the shootings.

Much of the mental health testimony centered on what could have or should have happened in
Cho's case after a special justice ordered him to receive outpatient treatment in 2005. But the key
question, officials said, is why very little of that actually did happen. Sources who have seen
Cho's medical records have said that Cho never received the ordered treatment. Testimony
before the panel has referred only to Cho's vague "interaction" with Virginia Tech's Cook
Counseling Center.

Mental health experts said that outpatient treatment orders in Virginia are in force for 180 days
and are generally intensive. "True treatment is going to extend for a minimum of three months
and generally last a year in order to bring about some sort of therapeutic resolution," said David
Bice, a special justice in Lynchburg who presides over commitment hearings. The sources who
have seen Cho's records said that did not happen in his case.

Also still unknown in the Cho case is whether any treatment plan, as required by law, was written
for him, what agency should have been monitoring that treatment and why it didn't, according to
the testimony.

State law says that local community services boards are required to oversee cases such as
Cho's. In Blacksburg, that would fall on the New River Valley Community Services Board. But Les
Saltzberg, the agency's director until resigning last month, said the board was not informed about
Cho's commitment order. "The code does say that the [board] is supposed to do a treatment
plan," Saltzberg said. "But there's no way we could have done one, because we were never
contacted."

Kaine's panel is scheduled to meet again in closed session Tuesday to try to figure out what went
wrong. "These are the confusing issues being looked at," Sood said.

Cho's strange behavior -- referring to himself as "?," talking about an imaginary twin brother and
his violent writing -- had brought him to the attention of campus officials. But in December 2005,
he entered the mental health system when a female student contacted the university to report
that Cho was harassing her. Campus police visited Cho to warn him to stop. The next day, Cho
indicated to a roommate that he might as well kill himself, and the roommate's father, fearing Cho
was suicidal, contacted the police.

That night, a licensed social worker from the community services board examined Cho and
determined that he was "mentally ill and in need of hospitalization." A magistrate ordered him
temporarily detained, and he was taken to Carilion St. Albans, a psychiatric hospital, and
admitted.

The next day, an independent examiner spent no more than 15 minutes with Cho, according to
testimony, and did not consult with hospital doctors before determining that he was mentally ill but
not dangerous enough to warrant involuntary commitment. The examiner did not review Cho's
psychological evaluation or discharge plan because hospital staff hadn't written them yet.

Testimony and documents submitted to the panel indicate that a hospital clerk then called Virginia
Tech's Cook Counseling Center to make an appointment for Cho, even before a special justice
Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work 7
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

had begun a hearing to determine if he needed to be hospitalized, ordered into outpatient
treatment or released. No treatment plan had been written when that call was made, according to
testimony. When Cook Counseling Center officials insisted that Cho himself make the
appointment, the clerk simply handed Cho the phone. Cho made an appointment for 3 p.m. that
day, one hour after he was released on Dec. 14, 2005.

It's unclear whether Cho kept that appointment, because the director of Cook Counseling Center,
citing privacy laws, has declined to discuss the specifics of Cho's case, even in testimony before
the panel. Chris Flynn, the director, has maintained from the start, however, that the center does
not accept patients who have been ordered into involuntary treatment because it only treats
willing patients. He said in an interview soon after the shootings that the center was not notified of
Cho's release. He said he was "not sure of who got notified under that court order." He added
that Cho was referred to a public facility off campus.

Likewise, Saltzberg said in April that the community services board was not informed about Cho
and the court order.

But the panel discovered that a Carilion St. Albans clerk had faxed information about Cho to the
board and to Cook Counseling Center shortly after a special justice overruled the independent
examiner, found Cho a danger to himself and ordered him to get involuntary outpatient treatment,
according to a 33-page report by the Office of Inspector General for the state's mental health
department and presented to the panel.

"We were told he was released, and that was it. That's the only piece of paper I've seen,"
Saltzberg said. "We were not aware that he was on an outpatient commitment order."

Community services board workers had stopped going to commitment hearings, as they had in
the past, because of budget constraints, Saltzberg said.

Sood said that panel members cannot talk publicly about some of the records because of privacy
laws but that they will put all they have gleaned into the panel's written report, to be released next
month. Hoping to allay fears expressed by victims' families that the investigation will be too
general and broad, she said she has examined more than "two feet of paper" and is taking a
"very detailed" look into Cho's experience in the mental health system.

Richard J. Bonnie, who is heading up a separate state commission investigating mental health
reform in Virginia, testified before the Virginia Tech panel recently that the Cho case highlights
the desperate need to make clear who is responsible for making sure that mentally ill people who
are ordered by a court to get involuntary outpatient treatment -- as Cho was -- actually get that
treatment.

His commission interviewed more than 200 people involved in the system and found that contrary
to what the law calls for, most local areas have come up with their own procedures and rely
mostly on informal working relationships that have emerged over the years. "One finding that
clearly emerged was the perception that . . . nobody is in charge," he said. "Which explains why
[outpatient commitment] varies so widely in this state and why things can fall through the cracks."




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work           8
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Special Needs
For additional articles on this topic feel free to visit:
http://www.eadassociates.com/news.html or
http://www.nod.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=Page.viewPage&pageID=11

N/A




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work    9
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Hazard Research and News

NYC blast could cost businesses millions
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070720/ap_on_re_us/manhattan_explosion

Some Manhattan streets reopen as steam pipe cleanup continues (New York)
http://www.thejournalnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070720/NEWS05/707200423

Frozen zone shrinks further nearly a week after Manhattan steam pipe explosion (New York)
http://www.thejournalnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070724/NEWS01/707240398

Security Chief Downplays Steam Pipes as Terror Threat (New York)
http://www.nysun.com/article/59057

Sun finally out after heavy rain floods Texas
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/07/21/texas.flood.ap/index.html

Idaho wildfires threaten Air Force training range
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/07/23/wildfires.ap/index.html

AirTran seeks fellow passengers of teen with meningitis
http://www.cnn.com/2007/HEALTH/07/23/airtran.meningitis.ap/index.html

Conflict grows over Griffith recovery plan (California)
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-griffith24jul24,0,5608550.story?coll=la-home-center

NTSB report: Right wing snapped before plane crashed in Sanford neighborhood (Florida)
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/local/seminole/orl-bk-
ntsbreport07242007,0,278414.story?coll=orl_tab01_layout

Bush warns anew of terror threat
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070724/ap_on_go_pr_wh/bush

TSA: Items Resembling IEDs Seized At Lindbergh Field (California)
http://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/13747170/detail.html

No charges for doctor in Katrina hospital deaths
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/law/07/24/katrina.doctor/index.html

$110,000 reward offered in attempted bombing of UCLA doctor's car
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-animal25jul25,0,2359246.story?coll=la-home-center

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-fbi25jul25,1,1103632.story?coll=la-headlines-california

No injuries in blast at UCLA building (California)
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-ex-explosion25jul26,1,6288182.story?coll=la-headlines-
california

Lightning a deadly threat (Florida)
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/localnews/content/local_news/epaper/2007/07/25/0725lightning.h
tml


Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work    10
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Gas tanks explode in Dallas (Texas)
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/07/25/dallas.blasts.ap/index.html

CSB Investigative Team Heading to Major Gas Cylinder Explosion Site in Dallas, Texas
http://www.csb.gov/index.cfm?folder=news_releases&page=news&NEWS_ID=388

CSB Chairman Merritt Describes the Lessons from Five Years of Board Investigations to Senate
Committee, Urges Additional Resources and Clearer Authorities for Federal Safety Efforts
http://www.chemsafety.gov/index.cfm?folder=news_releases&page=news&NEWS_ID=384

What Would A $500 Billion Hurricane Do To Premiums (Florida)
http://www.pensacolanewsjournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070713/OPINION/70713032
8/1020

Determining the Effects of a Possible New York Quake
http://www.dailyprincetonian.com/archives/2001/02/07/page3/#2255

Estimating Earthquake Losses for the Greater New York City Area
http://www.nycem.org/techdocs/EstEQlossNYC/EstEQlossNYC.pdf

Blunt Awards $2.9 Million for Interoperable Communications Equipment (Missouri)
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/127770

TB patient released from hospital
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070726/ap_on_re_us/tuberculosis_infection

California reclassifies many fire hazard zones
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-fire26jul26,1,6995033.story

Wildfire burning its way through Utah
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/07/20/wildfires.ap/index.html

U.S. Agencies Probe Botulism Poisoning
http://www.physorg.com/news104130773.html

Calif. nuclear site to undergo study
http://www.physorg.com/news104156627.html

La Nina pattern likely to play havoc with world's weather: UN
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070720/sc_afp/unweatherclimateninawmo_070720170622;_ylt=A
vuH2oSgo9JX_ZgOWqwlt5DPOrgF

Hawaii braces for Tropical Depression
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/07/20/storm/main3080068.shtml

Heavy rain floods Texas
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/07/21/texas.flood.ap/index.html

Poisoned pair ask who targeted them and why
http://www.latimes.com/la-me-russians22jul22,0,3301797.story?coll=la-home-center

Idaho wildfires threaten thousands of homes
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/07/22/wildfires.ap/index.html
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       they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


Pilot dies helping crews fight wildfires blazing across the West (California)
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/07/23/wildfires.crash.ap/index.html

FEMA Continues To Address Formaldehyde Concerns
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=37949

Statement of Administrator R. David Paulison on Formaldehyde in FEMA travel trailers
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=38019

A sickening situation
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/editorial/4995969.html

Oklahoma Emergency Management demands environmental testing of units
http://www.miaminewsrecord.com/articles/2007/07/23/news/news6.txt

Nerve gas antidote made by goats
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/6912807.stm

Researchers Hack into IPhone Via Web
http://www.redorbit.com/news/technology/1009407/researchers_hack_into_iphone_via_web/inde
x.html

Sea wall stops, yet makes, waves (California)
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-breakwater24jul24,1,2152513.story?coll=la-headlines-
california

Wildfires threaten homes in Montana
http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1012617/wildfires_threaten_homes_in_montana/index.htm
l

Blast at space tourism test site (California)
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/6918540.stm

http://www.latimes.com/la-me-mojave28jul28,0,4510052.story?coll=la-home-center

Titanic site protection sought by Congress
http://www.livescience.com/history/070726_titanic_legislation.html

Air Force mechanic threatens to blow up Utah air force base, kill hostages
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/nationworld/orl-bk-
airforcethreat072507,0,632636.story?coll=orl_tab01_layout

Worst of Atlantic hurricane season still to come
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070725/sc_nm/weather_hurricanes_dc

Forecaster cuts 2007 hurricane outlook
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070724/sc_nm/weather_hurricanes_forecasts_dc;_ylt=AjF4305m
YR5fKaQuQt3apbkhANEA

Nuclear Mishap or Meltdown?: It's All a Matter of Degree
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?articleID=FD9E82DA-E7F2-99DF-
3889FDE5D7101770&chanID=sa003
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                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


Air Controllers Warn Of Safety Risks
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/07/24/travel/main3093632.shtml

Japan quake not seen slowing U.S. nuclear revival
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070720/sc_nm/utilities_japanquake_us_dc;_ylt=AvAf4YWnj1F6Y
wJt0rdWfSUhANEA




Hurricane flags are making a comeback

The boxy red and black banners will signal the imminent arrival of a storm.

Robert Nolin

South Florida Sun-Sentinel

July 16, 2007

You haven't seen them for almost two decades -- except perhaps in nautical-themed bars or
fluttering outside shutter businesses -- and they're not a sight you're keen to see anyway.

But hurricane flags are making a comeback, through renewed government use and an increase in
sales on the private market.

The boxy red flags with the black square will once again fly from South Florida Coast Guard
stations when a hurricane comes barreling in, a symbol of renewed efforts by the Guard to cast
itself as the watchdog for local boaters.

After using them for more than 100 years, the National Weather Service furled the flags in 1989,
deferring to more-immediate means to warn of approaching storms such as radio and TV.

"It was recognized that in a day when technology ruled, there are many different ways to get
important weather information to mariners," Greg Romano of the National Weather Service said
from his Washington, D.C., office.

Colorful and quaint, the flags harken to the 1800s as an offshoot of weather-alert flags for
farmers. But they are less than highly efficient when it comes to urgent storm warnings: You have
to be within view to receive their message. And these days, you would have to be living in a cave
not to know when a hurricane is threatening.

The flags are being distributed to the 20 Coast Guard stations in the 7th District, which includes
Florida, Georgia and South Carolina, including six Guard stations from Key West to West Palm
Beach, said Petty Officer Dana Warr.

"A lot of our stations are right on major waterways," Warr said. "If you're leaving Port Everglades,
you'll see the flag flying at Station Fort Lauderdale."

Other districts along the East Coast will be resurrecting the flags, but it's in South Florida where
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they may be run up the flagpole most.

Though the flags' effectiveness is limited, the Coast Guard is relying on the maritime tradition to
serve as a public-relations tool. "We're re-establishing the program to reaffirm to the community
the Coast Guard's role as experts concerning local boating matters," Warr said. "We want to
establish ourselves with the boating community in providing information."

Hurricane flags are also enjoying a renaissance at hotels, bars and rental properties -- the
primary purchasers of the flags, according to Kerry McCoy with FlagandBanner, a Little Rock,
Ark., firm that has been manufacturing and selling flags for more than 30 years.

"In the last few years, the sales have probably gone up 90 percent," she said. "I used to sell three
or four a year; now I sell at least 25."

Many of the flags are purchased by small businesses along the Gulf of Mexico, and McCoy
attributes the spike to the recent flurry of hurricanes there and in Florida. "Every time you turn
around you've got a storm," she said.

The origin of the flags and their design stumps even expert vexillologists, or those who study
flags. "Who chose the original ones and why they were chosen, I don't know offhand," said
Whitney Smith, founder of the Flag Research Center in Winchester, Mass., and a national flag
expert.

"Buried in the National Archives you've probably got a memo outlining the process," said Joseph
McMillan, an Alexandria, Va., flag researcher. Weather flags originally were used to warn farmers
in the late 19th century, he said. Large flags, some 6 feet by 8 feet, were hung outside post
offices to forecast cold spells, rain or wind.

Along the coasts, McMillan said, the military's signal service had stations to observe passing
ships. The stations communicated with the ships by signal flag and telegraphed a vessel's
progress to ports and shipping firms. McMillan's research led him to a 1883 government booklet
outlining the stations' signal codes for storms, including today's storm warning: a square black
inset in a square red flag.

In 1898, President McKinley ordered the Weather Bureau, the precursor of the National Weather
Service, to establish a hurricane-warning network, which apparently adopted the signal station's
hurricane flag.

Its design likely was a matter of selecting highly recognizable shapes and colors. "They're just
distinct, clearly visible geometric forms," McMillan said, "probably chosen because these
particular designs weren't already part of another signal code at the time."




Don't tell tornadoes it's really hurricane season (Florida)
Twisters trespass on Central Florida's summers, presenting new problems.
Katie Fretland
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Sentinel Staff Writer
July 26, 2007
Florida is in the midst of hurricane season, but 911 dispatchers in Central Florida can attest that
it's also a time for tornadoes.

Tornadoes bring different challenges in warning residents, officials said Wednesday, a day after
funnel clouds and waterspouts were reported in Lake and Orange counties during a fierce storm.

"It's huge; it's getting bigger -- it looks like it's come all the way down to the ground," a Clermont
man told a Lake County Sheriff's Office dispatcher Tuesday.

Another caller reported seeing a tornado "definitely on the ground -- oh, wow."

Tuesday night's funnel clouds caused no damage -- a far cry from the devastation caused by
tornadoes in February that killed 21 people in Lake County and caused millions of dollars in
damage. But they were a reminder once again of the need to be prepared in case of a natural
disaster -- and not just hurricanes.

"For hurricanes, we have plenty of warning," said Anthony Reynes, a meteorologist with the
National Weather Service in Ruskin. "We have time to prepare, while for severe thunderstorms
and tornadoes, it is a matter of minutes."

Today, the need for disaster preparedness will be front and center in Central Florida.

In Orlando, Gov. Charlie Crist and Craig Fugate, director of the state Division of Emergency
Management, are to be on hand for the opening of a 200,000-square-foot warehouse that will be
used to stockpile water, food, tarps, medicine, plastic sheeting and generator cables, among
other items, for recovery from natural disasters.

"This is going to greatly enhance our capability as a state to respond to large-scale events,"
division spokesman Mike Stone said. "If we need to get emergency commodities to an area that
has been devastated, we know exactly where we are going for our first truckloads. We won't have
to wait for anyone else."

In Lake County, emergency-management officials will have a briefing to inform senior leaders
with the county and Lake's cities about their responsibilities during a disaster.

Jerry Smith, director of the Lake County Emergency Management Division, said residents should
have a disaster plan, three to five days' worth of water and nonperishable food, at least a two-
week supply of medications and a flashlight.

Smith and other emergency managers stress the importance of weather radios. Weather radios in
some places sounded alerts Tuesday night about a storm system that caused small tornadoes
spinning 60 to 70 mph to touch down briefly in Ferndale and Groveland about 7:30 p.m.,
according to the National Weather Service.

Mike Trew, 29, of Winter Garden stopped to take photos of two waterspouts on the southern edge
of Lake Apopka. Standing on a fishing dock during the height of the storm, Oakland police Sgt.
Renee Kelley saw a funnel cloud snake across the lake.

"Mother Nature is always surprising, but to see that . . . it was awesome," Kelley said
Wednesday.
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Levees & Understanding Your Flood Risk

By Al Goodman

As a professional floodplain manager, it is my role to work with the public, private, state and
federal sectors to mitigate flood damages within Mississippi.

Many people don't realize that the entire state is actually a mapped flood zone. Every acre is
zoned according to its flood risk: low, moderate and high with only the high risk zones requiring
flood insurance if a federally backed loan is involved. Our state has 5.2 million acres of high risk
flood zones, not counting the areas protected by certified levees. Mississippi has approximately
665 miles of major levees, which are generally located in our western border counties.

All levees are constructed to provide a specific level of protection, such as the so called 100-year
or 500-year flood. The 500-year flood level plus the additional freeboard height is considered a
minimum protection standard for levees protecting urban areas. If a flood occurs that exceeds
that design, the levee will be overtopped or otherwise fail from saturation, leakage, etc. When this
happens, the results are catastrophic. And since our state can be impacted by earthquakes that
increase the inherent risk of areas protected by levees, residents protected by levees must
understand their risk, no matter how remote. Although the probability of a levee failure is low, the
consequence to public safety and property loss is high.
Behind levees, we are concerned with residual risk, which is that portion of risk remaining after
the security measures of a levee have been applied.

Remapping Mississippi's Flood Maps

The state and federal governments are in the process of remapping and updating all of our
communities' flood maps, with a projected completion date of 2010. Part of that program consists
of mapping levees.

Both accredited levees which are shown as providing 1-percent annual chance flood protection,
also known as 100-year protection, and levees that meet provisional accreditation requirements
will be depicted on the community maps. This means that the areas protected by the levee will
be indicated by a, "Shaded X Zone," which is a moderate risk zone. Additionally, a note will be
displayed on the map to inform the public of their flood risk and indicates options for them to
mitigate that risk.

The information on the maps is necessary for the public so they can make an informed decision
concerning their own personal safety and the financial safety of their property. Corporate
managers understand the type of insurance required that is commensurate with residual risk
behind levees.
The note's new language also alerts the small business owner of the need for insurance, if
business interruption should occur.

Who pays after a levee failure?

The question of who pays after a levee failure often arises.

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Strict liability for damage caused by the failure of a water control structure is a general rule of law
in the United States. The standards used by U.S. courts to assess liability for damage due to the
failure of a flood control structures has consistently moved towards a form of strict liability of
owners of water control structures that cause harm to others, even if the owner utilized utmost
care. In 2003, the state of California was found liable for approximately $460 million in damages
for a levee break on the Yuba River in 1986. The court ruled that when a public entity operates a
flood control system built by someone else, it accepts liability as if it had planned and built the
system itself.

In 2006, California began a $4.1 billion bond referendum process to upgrade the state's levees.
Gov. Schwarzenegger proposed prohibiting local governments from permitting any new
development in the areas protected by levees until the level of protection can be raised or even
doubled. This extraordinary action is due to the fact that many of California's levees do not meet
a minimal 100-year/1 percent chance level of flood protection.

Additionally, court cases from levee failures pending in Louisiana are estimated to total $277
billion in sought damages. Fortunately, Mississippi does not appear to be in such dire straits with
its levees.

We live in a state that has much to offer to individuals, families and businesses. I urge my fellow
citizens to take personal responsibility for their safety and the safety of their property.

Please purchase flood insurance, become familiar with your risk, establish emergency action
plans and plan to take care of yourself and your family for at least five days. Personal safety and
welfare are ultimately an individual's responsibility.

For more information on flood insurance, go to www.floodsmart.gov or call 888-379-9531.


###

Goodman serves as the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency's Floodplain Management
bureau director and as the National Flood Insurance Program state coordinator. He can be
reached at 601-933-6884 or by email at agoodman@mema.ms.gov.




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July 24, 2007
New Orleans Recovery Is Slowed by Closed Hospitals
By LESLIE EATON

NEW ORLEANS — At the tip of Bayou St. John in the Mid-City neighborhood here, the brown
and white bulk of Lindy Boggs Medical Center looms behind a chain-link fence. Nineteen people
died at the medical center after Hurricane Katrina, and now the hospital itself is dead, sold to
developers who plan to replace it with a shopping mall.

On the surrounding streets — Bienville and Canal and Jefferson Davis — lies the wreckage of a
once-bustling medical corridor. Doctors’ offices sit empty behind five-foot-high water marks, and
nearby clinics wait to be demolished. In back of one medical building, a gaping refrigerator still
holds jars of mayonnaise and Mt. Olive Dill Relish.

Harder to see, but just as tangible, people here say, are the other ripple effects of the flood and
the closed hospital: workers displaced, houses for sale and, of course, patients forced to seek
health care many miles away. If they have returned to New Orleans at all, that is, given the grave
wounds to the health care system.

―I’ve been telling people, don’t bring your parents back if they are sick,‖ said Dr. David A. Myers,
an internist who lived and worked in Mid-City before the flood and has moved his home and
practice to the suburbs.

Of all the factors blocking the economic revival of New Orleans, the shattered health care system
may be the most important — and perhaps the most intractable.

Except for tourism and retailing, health care was the city’s biggest private employer, and it paid
much higher wages than hotels or stores. But there are now 16,800 fewer medical jobs than
before the storm, down 27 percent, in part because nurses and other workers are in short supply.

Only one of the city’s seven general hospitals is operating at its pre-hurricane level; two more are
partially open, and four remain closed. The number of hospital beds in New Orleans has dropped
by two-thirds. In the suburbs, half a dozen hospitals in adjacent Jefferson Parish are open — but
are packed.

Fixing the city’s health care system ―is critical both for the short and the long term,‖ said Andy
Kopplin, executive director of the Louisiana Recovery Authority. ―Short-term, having confidence
that the health care residents need will be available and accessible is vital for folks who are
returning,‖ Mr. Kopplin said. ―Long-term, it’s important for employers — and health care is a huge
business in New Orleans."

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Studies suggest that hundreds of doctors never returned. And some of those who did, especially
specialists and young physicians, are leaving, said Dr. Ricardo Febry, president of the Orleans
Parish Medical Society, which has lost more than 200 of its 650 members. The exodus has ―been
a steady trickle,‖ Dr. Febry said.

The city’s mortality rate appears to have risen sharply in 2006, although state and local officials
disagree about the level and persistence of the increase.

With the stress of life in the flood-ravaged city, the limited health care and insurance, the lingering
mold and the discomfort of living in trailers, doctors report that the patients they see are often far
sicker than those they treated before the storm. And even residents with health insurance can
have a difficult time finding someone to treat them.

Government officials and civic leaders are floating plans for the future of the city’s medical
system, for a state-of-the-art hospital, for a cutting-edge system to cover the uninsured, even for
a ―bio-innovation center‖ that would be an engine for economic growth. The question is what will
happen in the meantime, which is likely to be many years long.

―We have to find a way to survive to that point, to provide care, or our city will collapse,‖ said John
J. Finn, president of the Metropolitan Hospital Council of New Orleans.

Waiting for Care

The problems with health care hit hardest on the poor and the newly uninsured, but they also
affect doctors and patients, politicians and entrepreneurs, the displaced and the returned — and
everyone at any level who has the misfortune to turn up in a jam-packed emergency room.

Consider the case of Bernadine R. Fields, 50, who learned firsthand how far people have to go
for major medical care. A supervisor of city 911 dispatchers, Ms. Fields was among the many laid
off after the storm.

The money she had saved for her retirement went for repairs to her house in New Orleans East.
By last July, she could no longer afford the $367 a month it cost to continue her health insurance,
or all the medicines she needed to treat her high blood pressure, or the $250 it would cost to see
a doctor.

So she kept ending up in one of the few open emergency rooms, waiting for hours. After one of
these episodes in April, she was told she needed transfusions to treat anemia — but there was
not a bed available in New Orleans for an uninsured patient.

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Ms. Fields finally got the treatment she needed — but only after an ambulance took her to the
state-run hospital in Baton Rouge, 80 miles from her home and family. She stayed there four
days.

―I devoted 15 years of my life to serving the public,‖ she said, ―and when I need to be served,
there is no one to count on.‖

Ms. Fields’s neighborhood in the eastern section of the city, like other stretches of town, cannot
recover unless medical care becomes available there, officials say, and neither can large sections
of the economy. Doctors and hospitals, though, are reluctant to return unless the population does.

―I’m just hoping and praying nobody dies,‖ said Frederick C. Young Jr., president of the Methodist
Health System Foundation, which is working with the city to try to reopen a hospital there.

The sharp contraction in the health care industry has economic effects, too, for coffee shops and
florists and medical-supply companies. Marshall F. Gerson, whose family has owned the Ellgee
Uniform Shop downtown for almost 70 years, said sales of scrubs and other medical uniforms
had fallen to about half their pre-storm level.

―At this time of day when times were good, it was bustle-bustle here,‖ said Mr. Gerson, 63,
standing in his shop late one recent afternoon. Now, ―the foot traffic is almost nil.‖

By working harder and selling more industrial and restaurant uniforms, Mr. Gerson has kept his
business going but, he said, ―I’m not a happy person when I get home.‖

An Era’s End

The future of Mr. Gerson’s shop — and in many ways the future of health care in New Orleans —
is bound up in the thorny question of what if anything will replace the hospital known as Big
Charity.

Since it opened in 1939, Charity Hospital’s imposing building downtown has provided basically all
the medical care — emergency, acute and basic — for the city’s poor, and served as a training
ground for generations of doctors.

Despite some community protests, Louisiana State University, which ran the hospital, closed it
permanently after the storm, saying it was too damaged by basement flooding. The state plans to
replace it with a $1.2 billion complex that officials believe will attract insured patients as well as
the poor, will also care for veterans and will serve as an economic catalyst for the city. But the


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hospital’s future is now the subject of a debate about the best use of federal health care dollars,
even after the state agreed to pay $300 million to get the project off the ground.

The federal government would prefer that the state build a small hospital and use its federal
dollars to buy private insurance for the poor. Dr. Frederick P. Cerise, the secretary of Louisiana’s
Department of Health and Hospitals, said that plan would help less than half of the uninsured.

On a positive note, the city’s trauma center, which treats gunshot wounds and other serious
emergencies, reopened in February at University Hospital downtown, which like Charity is part of
the Medical Center of Louisiana at New Orleans. But the number of beds at University remains
limited, and the building is so outdated that it will eventually have to be replaced, said Dr. Cathi
Fontenot, the medical director.

In the meantime, the sick have to go somewhere. Often, that somewhere is Ochsner Medical
Center, a huge private hospital complex in the western suburb of Metairie that looks like a mall,
with a computerized grand piano that entertains patrons in a sunny atrium.

Before Hurricane Katrina, patients waited just 20 minutes to be seen, said Dr. Joseph Guarisco,
chairman of emergency services at Ochsner, and surveys found that 99 percent were satisfied
with their care.

After the storm, the number of people coming to the emergency room jumped, on some days
reaching nearly twice the pre-hurricane volume. The number of psychiatric patients soared.

The uninsured, who had made up a small percentage of emergency patients at Ochsner, began
accounting for more than a quarter of emergency room patients. Waiting times routinely topped
an hour. The patient satisfaction rate fell to 34 percent.

This year, Dr. Guarisco reorganized the emergency room and cut the waiting time back to about
20 minutes.

But the other problems remain. ―The hospital, post-Katrina, struggled financially,‖ Dr. Guarisco
said, ―and it still struggles to this day.‖

Bad Time for a Fracture

No one thinks that emergency rooms are a good way to provide basic everyday health care, but
government efforts to attract doctors and to open more neighborhood clinics have gotten off to a
slow start.


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Volunteers and nonprofit groups are trying to fill the breach, treating thousands of patients a
month in more than a dozen low-cost clinics in the city. In many ways, the clinics have been a
success for their patients, as they are elsewhere in the country, but they represent just a drop in
the city’s ocean of medical need, health officials say.

Some were open before the storm but have expanded; others are new, like the Common Ground
Health Clinic, which provides free medical care four days a week in an old corner store in the
Algiers neighborhood, across the Mississippi from the French Quarter. People wait outside in the
heat for the clinic to open, and it is always jammed.

One recent Tuesday, the patients included a city employee with a neck problem, a college
student with uncontrolled menstrual bleeding, a bartender with high blood pressure and
glaucoma, and Nellie M. Lindsey, 54, a scrap hauler who was suffering from what she called
―cancer stones.‖

Before the storm, Ms. Lindsey said, she would have sought treatment at Charity, but she is so
happy with the Common Ground clinic — despite the long waits — that she took her adult sons
and daughter there for checkups.

Most of the people who come to the clinic hold at least one job, and many are working two, said
Anne Mulle, a family nurse practitioner who came from California after the storm to help and
ended up staying.

In addition to longstanding problems like hypertension, diabetes and heart disease, most patients
have anxiety, depression and stress, which are even harder to treat, the clinic staff says.

―We can take the health piece off your worry list,‖ said Dr. Ravi Vadlamudi, a Tulane University
doctor who serves as the clinic’s volunteer medical director. ―But we can’t get you a better job
market or housing market; we can’t do anything about the schools; we can’t do much with police
problems. I can’t do anything about most of what bothers you.‖

For patients who need more complicated care, including mammograms, stress tests and vision
treatments, the clinic can make referrals to St. Thomas Community Health Center, which Dr.
Donald T. Erwin founded in 1987. The fact that clinics are now collaborating — and recently
qualified for federal financing — is a new and welcome development in what can seem like a
bleak medical landscape, Dr. Erwin said.

Another change he has seen, he said, is that even people with insurance are having a hard time
finding doctors, getting tests and continuing prescriptions, so are turning up at his clinic, where
they now make up about a quarter of the patients.
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―Before the storm?‖ Dr. Erwin continued, and held a thumb and forefinger together to make a
zero.

Counseling and mental health treatment are notoriously hard to find in New Orleans these days,
and doctors say this is an especially bad time to break a leg, given the shortage of orthopedists.

Even patients with the means to pay and doctors who have returned can face long waits for
treatment. Dr. Myers, the internist who used to practice in Mid-City, said recently that a new
patient would probably have to wait two months for an appointment, though he would find a way
to get existing patients in sooner. He estimates that 80 percent of those patients have returned.

Dr. Myers said he had been trying for months to lure another doctor to the area to join his
practice.

―This is a great opportunity for people who have courage,‖ he said.

So far, he has found no takers.




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Other
Riverside County drops manslaughter case against firefighter (California)
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-firefighter26jul26,1,1135016.story?coll=la-headlines-
california

Number of environmental cops decreasing
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070726/ap_on_go_ca_st_pe/green_cops

Abandoned puppy who became 9/11 rescue dog dies of cancer
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/07/26/attacks.rescue.dog.ap/index.html

OSHA faults Forest Service in deaths of 5 Firefighters
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-wildfire20jul20,1,6598532.story?coll=la-headlines-
california

Top cellist, 59, becomes paramedic
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070721/ap_en_mu/siren_call

Giuliani's mayoral record is complicated
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070722/ap_on_el_pr/giuliani_mayoral_record

EU, US to make GPS and Galileo satellite networks compatible
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070726/pl_afp/euussatellitegps_070726161814;_ylt=AuGqRlKnn
WwKHTVDPR09vjzPOrgF

Pentagon asks web for space power input
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/space/2007-07-25-pentagon-space-power_N.htm

Recent FCC Ruling Cause for Alarm Says Group
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/127886



Lower taxes might cost you (Florida)

After a cut in property taxes, cities and counties consider higher fees.

John Kennedy, Tallahassee Bureau Chief

July 21, 2007

Cities and counties across Florida are tightening their belts as they face a state-ordered cut in
property-tax collections ranging as high as 9 percent this year.

But local governments are finding other ways to tap into residents' wallets.

Scores are slapping higher fees on everything from water, sewer and fire protection to burial
plots, overdue library books, admission to parks and pools, and garbage pickup.

The fee increases threaten to erase some or all of the initial savings in property taxes, which
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lawmakers put at $174 for the average homeowner this year.

"It certainly is an attempt to circumvent the will of the Legislature to reduce property taxes," said
House Rules Chairman David Rivera, R-Miami. "I can only hope that the public will remember
these fee increases when it comes time to re-elect these local officials."

In Central Florida, most cities and counties have opted to freeze hiring and reduce services,
rather than propose new or higher fees.

One exception, Lake County, is proposing increasing some fire-rescue fees by about 15 percent,
from $171 to $197, and raising garbage assessments in unincorporated areas by $26, to $200
annually.

Last month, Kissimmee city commissioners more than doubled a stormwater-utility fee, from $3 to
$6.50 a month, and created a new fire-protection fee expected to cost homeowners $5.30 a
month and businesses even more. The result: Homeowners would pay $105.60 more next year
than they do now.

Winter Park is considering a fire-service fee, as well as a 12 percent increase in its stormwater-
utility fee. Mount Dora may raise charges for burial spaces at the city's Pine Forest Cemetery.

And in Oviedo, fees charged for development applications and building permits tripled after a city
analysis found charges weren't covering costs.

"The development service-fee analysis was something we had been thinking about," City
Manager Gerald Seber said. "But property-tax reform certainly provided us the incentives to get
off our duffs."

'Will of the people'

But most Orlando-area governments seem wary of a voting public already angry about tax bills.

"We're just cutting," Orange County Mayor Rich Crotty said. "My view is that's what the
Legislature thinks is the will of the people, and that's what they shall have.

"We're not going there -- yet," Crotty said about fee increases.

He added, however, that if a January ballot initiative that creates a new super-sized homestead
exemption is approved, Orange County's tax loss could be large enough to spark fee increases
for local services.

Jacksonville Mayor John Peyton topped all Florida communities considering fee increases by
proposing a $26.5 million package of new fees for next year, including charges for residential
garbage pickup and water treatment as well as a surcharge on electricity provided by a city-
owned utility.

Some Jacksonville homeowners are likely to pay more in fees than what they will save on
property-tax bills next year, officials acknowledged.

"Property-tax revenue used to pay for a lot of these services in Jacksonville," said John Wayne
Smith, a lobbyist for the Florida League of Cities. "When the tax money isn't there, and people
want the services, they're going to feel the pinch."

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Fewer services, higher fees

Across Florida, the story this summer is much the same, with cities and counties unveiling budget
plans that eliminate some programs while increasing fees for many of the surviving services.

Charlotte County is considering tripling road and drainage fees. Broward County is looking to
increase the cost of going to parks on weekends, returning overdue library books and even
adopting stray pets.

The city of North Miami Beach is proposing to boost the cost of using three municipal swimming
pools. Hollywood is planning higher fees for recreational programs.

A push by many counties to increase impact fees assessed on new-home construction is drawing
the wrath of the Florida Home Builders Association. Impact fees can add thousands of dollars to
the price of a home and usually are passed on to buyers.

Counties levy these charges to offset the cost of new roads, utilities and other services tied to
construction, and the builders' group anticipates that governments will turn to them more
frequently as tax dollars dry up.

The association earlier threatened to stop campaign contributions to incumbents who refused to
endorse legislation capping impact fees, a move that drew angry reactions from lawmakers.

The association has since dropped the threat but remains committed to capping fees. "There
really is an avalanche of impact fees out there now," said Edie Ousley, an association
spokeswoman.

The builders say Alachua and Lake counties are considering impact-fee increases of up to 400
percent, while Collier County, which already charges $30,000 on a new home, is considering
going even higher.

Rubio: Fees are fair

House Speaker Marco Rubio, R-West Miami, who led the charge to cut property taxes this year,
said fee increases are more fair -- and more visible -- than taking advantage of soaring real-
estate prices to collect more property taxes, as cities and counties have done during the past few
years.

"Fees are clear; they're not hidden," Rubio said. "If you don't like that city and county officials are
raising them, you can vote them out of office on Election Day."




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work           26
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Fitter to fight fires (Florida)

"Personally, physically and mentally, I feel wonderful. I know I will feel even better once I achieve
my goal." Firefighter Scott Cooper

Amy L. Edwards, Sentinel Staff Writer

July 21, 2007

At 330 pounds, Scott Cooper admits he wasn't in the best shape last year when he joined the
Polk County Fire Department.

Cooper didn't want fellow firefighters to worry about him while they battle blazes -- wondering if
he could keep pace.

"I didn't feel I was doing the best job that I could," he said.

Cooper, who works out of a station near Poinciana, and about two dozen fellow Polk firefighters
decided to do something about their health -- they are holding a contest to see who can lose the
most body fat.

Already, Cooper, 39, has shed 50 pounds.

While the contest is friendly -- participants are donating money to charity and only competing for
bragging rights -- they know there is much more at stake.

More firefighters die from heart disease than from burns or smoke inhalation, according to a
national study published this year.

Between their fast-food eating habits and lack of exercise regimes -- the same study found more
than 70 percent of the nation's fire departments don't have programs to promote fitness and
health -- some firefighters pack on the pounds throughout their careers.

Within the next year, Polk County will join a movement among the industry and require firefighters
to participate in an exercise regime and undergo an annual fitness review.

"The better shape we're in, obviously the longer and safer our people will be able to work before
they get exhausted," said Lt. Ken Jolly, a trainer with the Fire Department who recently shed 30
pounds.

"If you're 30, 40, 50 pounds overweight, that's just that much more to carry."

For many years, the National Fire Protection Association has made a push to improve firefighters'
safety, and that includes physical fitness, said Mike Linkins, Polk County deputy fire chief.

"There's been this holistic approach to the welfare of the firefighter, from stress management,
nutrition, fitness," Linkins said.

As part of its new health initiative, Polk County purchased exercise equipment for most of its
stations and offered training on healthy eating habits.

While 24 of the county's nearly 200 firefighters signed up for the friendly competition, many more
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staffers are making the effort to shed pounds, Battalion Chief Kevin Giliam said.

"They started exercising, working out and losing weight before the contest began," he said.
"We're doing pretty well."

Cooper was one of those who began to lose weight before the contest started but estimates he
has shed 30 pounds during the competition.

He exercises at least three days a week and is eating healthier by cutting out sugars and sodas
and by eating food low in carbohydrates.

"It's given me a lot more energy. I can fight fires a lot longer and a lot harder," Cooper said. "I'm
able to do simple tasks a lot easier. Personally, physically and mentally, I feel wonderful. I know I
will feel even better once I achieve my goal."

Fitness programs, already required of Orange and Seminole County firefighters, are also
encouraged by the International Association of Fire Fighters.

"We have to make this part of our training on an everyday basis," said Pat Morrison, health and
safety director for the IAFF.

"You need a certain amount of aerobic activity," Morrison said. "You don't get that just by showing
up and not working out."




Wireless Spectrum for Safety Hits Roadblocks
Nextel Co-Founder Hopes for Agreement With FCC

By Kim Hart
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, July 23, 2007; D01

Morgan O'Brien has made his career out of slicing up chunks of airwaves and stitching them back
together.

In the 1980s and 1990s, the District lawyer wove a national wireless network called Nextel by
combining radio frequencies reserved for truckers and taxi drivers. He then swapped those
airwaves for more desirable ones before selling the company to Sprint for $35 billion in 2005.

His latest endeavor as an airwaves broker, however, has run into daunting obstacles from
Congress, federal regulators and deep-pocketed competitors.

O'Brien, who walked away from Nextel shortly before the merger with Sprint was completed,
formed a small firm in McLean, Cyren Call, around his vision for a new communications network
for police and firefighters.

His plan hinged on setting aside a huge heap of airwaves for public safety. Cyren Call would
make money by helping to oversee construction of the network. Those same airwaves -- also
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coveted by the nation's wireless carriers -- will be auctioned by the Federal Communications
Commission in January.

This year, O'Brien asked Congress to set aside those airwaves, which are about to be vacated by
television broadcasters, but was shot down. The FCC, not wanting to delay the auction, which is
expected to raise $15 billion, also dismissed his proposal.

"I knew it wouldn't be a popular idea," he said. "Any steam we had built for a change before
Congress went right out the window."

Those early defeats put O'Brien on the fringe of the debate swirling around the fate of the
spectrum, but they have not stopped him from intensely lobbying FCC officials and public safety
leaders. The silver-haired, self-made millionaire known for shaking up the wireless industry has
become a somewhat controversial character in the auction.

From a small McLean office, he leads 20 people, including his three co-founders: Tom Sidman,
former Nextel general counsel; Keith Kaczmarek, a wireless entrepreneur; and John Melcher, a
public safety consultant. Cyren Call received $6 million in funding from several venture capital
firms, including New Enterprise Associates in Baltimore and Columbia Capital in Alexandria.

O'Brien became sympathetic to the plight of police chiefs and firefighters in 2003, when Nextel's
signals began to interfere with their radios and walkie-talkies. He visited officials across the
country and eventually moved his company's network to other airwaves. In the process, he
noticed that first responders relied on a patchwork of outdated networks that don't overlap or
communicate with one another.

"You literally have people standing next to each other in a burning building who can't talk to each
other because their devices aren't compatible," he said. "An average teenager has access to a
wireless device that has far more capacity than any public safety responder in this country. That's
absurd."

The alliances he formed at Nextel have served him well. Many public safety officials credit
O'Brien for calling attention to the need for an interoperable network, although a few observers
have questioned his profit motive.

"That was very expensive for his company, but he still saw the need to fix it," said Charles
Werner, fire chief in Charlottesville, and a vice president of the Virginia Fire Chiefs Association.
"Obviously he's very well-off, so I don't know that money is the driving factor. I think he truly
believes this makes sense."

After his initial rejection of O'Brien's plan, FCC Chairman Kevin J. Martin proposed pairing a
portion of the airwaves soon to be auctioned with half of those already set aside for public safety.
The highest commercial bidder would help pay for the national emergency communications
network and, in return, be allowed to use excess capacity to sell broadband services to
consumers.

The winning company would have to agree to meet specific requirements, such as reaching 99
percent of the U.S. population within 10 years and building strict network security.



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O'Brien supports Martin's latest proposal, even though it offers much less spectrum to first
responders than he had sought.

"It's not ideal, but it's close enough to the real world we all live in," he said.

The compromise still presents a business opportunity for Cyren Call. Nine groups of police,
firefighters and other first responders this month formed the Public Safety Spectrum Trust, a
nonprofit organization that hopes to be awarded the national license to operate the shared
network. Harlin McEwen, who did consulting work for O'Brien during the Nextel spectrum swap, is
the group's president.

After the auction, O'Brien wants the public safety community to hire Cyren Call to negotiate the
build-out agreement with the company that buys the spectrum.

That arrangement would allow O'Brien to collect sizeable fees without having to invest a
corresponding amount of his money toward building the network, said Jon Peha, associate
director of the Center for Wireless and Broadband Networking at Carnegie Mellon University.

"There's not a huge financial risk for him in this, but it could potentially make him a lot of money,"
he said.

Others say that O'Brien is a shrewd businessman and lobbyist and that his new plan shows his
ability to roll with the punches.

"He's got a knack for making lemonade out of lemons," said Rick Joyce, head of Venable law
firm's Communications Group, who worked for O'Brien in his first law firm job. He's gone back to
the drawing board and found a proposal that fits with the FCC's rules."

However, some question the feasibility of an "arranged marriage" between first responders and
commercial interests. Strict requirements surrounding the spectrum will decrease the number of
bidders, wireless carriers say. But public safety experts argue that a shortage of such
specifications would render the network worthless.

Wireless carriers AT&T and Verizon Wireless, which both want a piece of the spectrum to roll out
services on their networks, say public safety groups didn't need any more spectrum, because a
portion had already been earmarked for their use.

But Reed Hundt, a former FCC chairman, thought O'Brien's plan made sense and formed his own
group around the idea for a public safety network. He asked O'Brien to join.

But Hundt's vision, embodied in a well-funded firm called Frontline Wireless, would also require
the shared network be open to all wireless devices and services, a concept O'Brien feared would
hinder competition. O'Brien chose to stay on his own course.

"At the end of this, it could be Reed Hundt sitting across the table from Morgan O'Brien
negotiating the shared agreement," said Gerard J. Waldron, Frontline's attorney.

Meanwhile, Cyren Call faces stiff competition from other systems integrators, cell tower operators
and investment firms that also want to supervise the network's construction.

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                                  distributes this document.
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                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

But if Cyren Call isn't chosen, O'Brien said, he'll go back to the drawing board.

"We're going to be part of this process in one way or another," he said. "I'm too enamored with it
to walk away."




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                            International News Stories
Civil Preparedness
Simple Sun-Cookers take off in Darfur
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/07/26/world/main3100044.shtml

Red Cross needs more volunteers (Philippines)
http://www.manilatimes.net/national/2007/july/20/yehey/top_stories/20070720top7.html

US bending rules on Colombia terror?
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-chiquita22jul22,0,186594.story?coll=la-
home-center

Coop: Having a say on Civil Defense (New Zealand)
http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/PA0707/S00434.htm

Australia to push global satellite forest fire tracking system
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070723/sc_afp/australiaenvironment_070723162418;_ylt=AlA19.c
NE6MlQpDddM8Q7HjPOrgF




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                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Hazard Research and News

Torrential rain causes chaos in Britain
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070720/sc_afp/britainweather_070720222453;_ylt=Ah3aWeIo.Gfo
ApTioZ2hdS3POrgF

Fears rise for UK flood victims
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/europe/07/23/britain.floods.reut/index.html

Floods strike Britain; Thames rising
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070723/ap_on_re_eu/britain_flooding

Floods leave 350,000 without water (United Kingdom)
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/europe/07/24/britain.floods.ap/index.html

UK flood victims line up for water
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/europe/07/25/britain.floods/index.html

Two dead after flooding accident (United Kingdom)
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/6916774.stm

Emergency water supplies run low (United Kingdom)
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/6916665.stm

Health fears triggered by contaminated flood waters (United Kingdom)
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070726/hl_afp/britainfloods

Floods prompt biggest peacetime rescue for Britain's RAF
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070722/sc_afp/britainweathermilitary_070722223030

More rains forecast as England, Wales see wettest months since 1766
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070726/wl_uk_afp/britainfloods_070726174533;_ylt=AtiYZUjsDU
FJSroMsfiM9xPPOrgF

UK forecasts to zoom in on towns
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/6917519.stm

Brazil's Lula criticized for handling of air crash
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070720/wl_nm/brazil_crash_dc

Brazil's aviation radar goes dark
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/americas/07/21/brazil.aviation.ap/index.html

European heat wave death toll hits 35
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070724/ap_on_re_eu/europe_heat_wave

Powerful quake rocks eastern Indonesia
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070726/ap_on_re_as/indonesia_quake

Sudan ordered to pay $8 million to Cole victims' families
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/law/07/25/cole.lawsuit.ap/index.html

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     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Terror Support Falls in Muslim Countries
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/4ed6c870-3a1b-11dc-9d73-0000779fd2ac.html

U.N.: Eritrea has armed Islamic fighters (Africa)
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070726/ap_on_re_af/un_somalia

Central and Southern Europe sizzling
http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1007348/central_and_southern_europe_sizzling/index.htm
l

16,000 checked in Ukraine after accident
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070720/ap_on_re_eu/ukraine_contamination

Italy holds 3 on terror charges
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/europe/07/21/italy.terrorism.ap/index.html

Death toll in China flooding rises as nation braces for more
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070721/sc_afp/chinaweatherflood_070721185205;_ylt=AhuYfJDk
BDkJknMXYWoZF7_POrgF

Greece battles 63 forest fires
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070722/sc_afp/greeceweatherfire_070722230430;_ylt=Ajjdafbo.Ff
6L7BFEif3gU7POrgF


Tech to buy Japan time to brace for quakes
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19872616/

Russia prepares for volcano eruption
http://www.physorg.com/news104429412.html

Looming drought may bring water, power outages to Philippines
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070726/sc_afp/philippinesweather_070726162042;_ylt=AlttQwHt7
U6xLT9njsyHjDzPOrgF

Southern Europe braces for more fires as arson suspected
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070726/wl_afp/europeheatwavefires_070726195429;_ylt=AhB.Zv
THMa2OQlLMevhRgSLPOrgF

3 feared dead in Greek forest fires
http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1013960/3_feared_dead_in_greek_forest_fires/index.html

Temperatures reach 113 degrees in Athens
http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1012620/temperatures_reach_113_f_in_athens/index.html

Major quake likely in Middle East, study finds
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2007/07/070726-lebanon-quake.html

Ethiopia evicts Red Cross from volatile region
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070725/wl_afp/ethiopiaunrestrebelsrelief_070725100433



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     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Russia to use satellites to defend vast forests
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070725/sc_nm/russia_forest_dc;_ylt=ArLZddDvFmZwKFYHGmA
7QDghANEA

Heatwave turns southeastern Europe into tinderbox as fires rage
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070725/wl_afp/europeheatwavefires_070725195813

Bus crash kills 26 pilgrims in France
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/europe/07/22/poland.france.reut/index.html

Gel promises heavy metal clean-up
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/6917753.stm




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work    35
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

International Affairs
Marine loses rank for role in killing Iraqi civilian
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/meast/07/20/Iraq.Hamdaniya/index.html

Iraq official casts doubt on takeover
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070720/ap_on_re_mi_ea/iraq

Military talks between Koreas break down
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070726/ap_on_re_as/koreas_military_talks

Pakistan test fires nuclear-capable missile
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/asiapcf/07/26/pakistan.missile.test.reut/index.html

UN Mideast envoy warns of Gaza collapse
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070726/ap_on_re_mi_ea/un_gaza

Iraqi government in deepest crisis
http://news.yahoo.com/s/csm/20070727/wl_csm/ogrind



The True Meaning of Islam

Let me start with the traditional greeting of Islam: peace be upon you.

I welcome the opportunity to engage in this conversation, and I am glad to think global readers
are interested in Islam, a religion shared and cherished by millions of men and women around the
world. I hope that this exercise challenges perceptions that Muslims are somehow
different…strange…a breed apart. The other.

All faith, after all, is based on an intensely personal, private relationship with God. And I believe
that if we are to build true understanding among and within our societies, we must approach each
other as fellow human beings, not representatives of one religion or another.

Perhaps that is why I have never been preoccupied with defining ―the true meaning‖ of Islam. To
me, Islam is an amalgam of virtues that guides my interactions with the world. I know deep down,
as I have read and been taught by the Holy Qur’an, the teachings of the Prophet (PBUH), that it is
good to give, to empathize, to be patient, to be compassionate. These virtues do not have
ineffable meaning, but offer a sense of morality – a way to be, and a way to behave, as a member
of the human family.

Looking back, I learned how to be a Muslim at an early age – not as something separate from
daily life, but as something intrinsic to it. I think of my parents’ warmth and love; how they helped
me, my brother and sister learn to share; and how they taught us to value honesty, humility,
charity, and forgiveness. Now a mother myself, I know in my heart that meaning is being made
when my children raise their arms for a hug; when we give of ourselves to those less fortunate;
when we are reminded, during Ramadan, of the hunger and thirst of those in need.

I cherish these experiences not only because they make me a better Muslim, but because they
make me a better person – more grateful, more connected, more aware. And yes, I offer my
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 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

thanks to God on a prayer mat facing Mecca. But I hope that readers seeking to understand ―the
true meaning of Islam‖ will not only focus on how Muslims worship but also on who we are:
mothers, fathers, spouses, students, neighbors, friends. People who smile with pride at their
child’s first step; laugh with friends over the old times; worry about exam results; cry at the sight
of our children in pain. People just like you.

Her Majesty Queen Rania Al Abdullah of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan is a global advocate
of inter-cultural dialogue. She is on the Board of Directors of several international organizations
such as the World Economic Forum (WEF); the United Nations Foundation; International Youth
Foundation (IYF); and the Foundation for International Community Assistance (FINCA); and the
GAVI Fund, a nonprofit organization that seeks to provide children in the poorest countries of the
world with access to life-saving vaccines. She has also been appointed as WHO Patron for
Violence Prevention in the Eastern Mediterranean Region and UNICEF's first Eminent Advocate
for Children.




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work         37
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

        Global Warming News Articles (U.S. and International)

How changing climate is creating a butterfly effect
http://news.scotsman.com/scitech.cfm?id=1139162007

Cornfields May Affect Weather Patterns
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/07/23/tech/main3087397.shtml

Humans 'affect global rainfall'
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/6912527.stm

Climate change to dominate APEC summit
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070725/ap_on_sc/apec_climate_change;_ylt=AqlQDyCOTxA7bvA
FlC2OEzNvieAA

Is extreme weather due to climate change?
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/6915309.stm

Ozone has 'strong climate effect'
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/6916162.stm

Climate Change-Continent gets Ready (Africa)
http://allafrica.com/stories/200707231863.html

Floods force many to face climate change reality (Germany)
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070722/sc_nm/europe_floods_dc;_ylt=At62XmTNiDLkSwuJMBN
XNNUhANEA



States Should Take Lead on Climate Change, Governors Say at National Meeting in Mich.

By John Flesher
Associated Press
Saturday, July 21, 2007; 8:10 PM

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) -- States should develop creative approaches to climate change,
just as they have with challenges such as health care, despite their different economic interests,
governors said Saturday.

"No individual state is going to solve the climate change problem, but we can do our part,"
Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty said. "In the absence of national or international consensus or
progress, we have the opportunity to show the way."

Talks on state-level climate policy were planned for the annual National Governors Association
meeting this weekend at a resort on Lake Michigan, where receding water levels have touched off
debate over the effects of global warming on the Great Lakes.

Stephen Johnson, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, and the European
Union's environmental affairs counselor joined the discussion. The EPA has clashed with some

Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work       38
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

states that are pushing for greater authority to regulate greenhouse gases, particularly automobile
exhaust emissions.

"With the states taking action, even if you don't have 100 percent of America, you can have 40 or
50 percent or more, and that's a good start," Pennsylvania Gov. Edward Rendell said. "We can't
just wait around for the federal government."

Pawlenty, a Republican beginning a yearlong term Monday as chairman of the governors
association, said states should redouble efforts to limit carbon emissions and develop renewable
energy sources.

Such initiatives would benefit the environment while creating jobs and making the nation more
competitive, he said.

"The false premise of some of the critics is that you'll wreck the economy," Pawlenty told The
Associated Press. "I suggest if you do this correctly, it will be a boost to the economy."

Aside from improving national security by reducing dependence on foreign oil, a clean-energy
strategy would spur investment in ethanol and biodiesel plants, wind turbines, hydrogen fuel cells,
energy-efficient construction, and other technology, he said.

States can move more quickly than Washington to experiment with policies encouraging such
technology, Pawlenty said. "Hopefully we can demonstrate that they work and entice the federal
government to embrace them and even make them applicable internationally," he said.

Pawlenty acknowledged his party has "catching up to do" on climate change, but he noted that
some of the most outspoken governors on the issue are fellow Republicans.

Arnold Schwarzenegger of California is threatening to the sue the EPA for the right to exceed
federal greenhouse gas standards. A dozen other states want the same authority. In Florida,
Republican Gov. Charlie Crist signed orders this month requiring state agencies to conserve
energy and power companies to use more renewable resources.

While endorsing the idea of fighting climate change, several governors made clear at a news
conference that statewide economic needs would influence their approaches.

Democratic Gov. Jennifer Granholm of Michigan, where the domestic auto industry is battling
congressional efforts to toughen fuel economy standards, said success would come only when all
countries -- such as rapidly developing China -- are playing by the same rules.

Joe Manchin III, the Democratic governor of West Virginia, said the nation could not afford to stop
using the coal his state produces, even though it's a leading source of greenhouse gases.
Americans are on a pace to double coal consumption by 2030, he said.

"It can't be one energy pitted against the other," Manchin said. "Whether it's natural gas or oil or
coal or wind or solar or whatever, it's going to take every bit of this mix to make this country
energy independent."




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work         39
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                                          Reports
IntelCenter Analytical Reports & Charts
http://www.intelcenter.com/reports-charts.html

National Transportation Safety Board Preliminary Report on Sanford Aircraft Crash (Florida)
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/media/acrobat/2007-07/31394208.pdf

Congressional Research Service, Critical Infrastructure: The National Asset Database
http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/homesec/RL33648.pdf

Government Accountability Office, Cyber Crime: Public and Private Entities Face Challenges in
Addressing Cyber Threats
http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d07705.pdf

New York City Emergency Response Task Force, Enhancing New York City's Emergency
Preparedness: A Report to Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg
http://www.nyc.gov/html/om/pdf/em_task_force_final_10_28_03.pdf

Congressional Research Service, Chemical Facility Security: Regulation and Issues for Congress
http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/homesec/RL33847.pdf

U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board, After Katrina: Precautions Needed During
Oil and Chemical Facility Startup
http://www.csb.gov/safety_publications/docs/CSBKatrinaSafetyBulletin.pdf

U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board, The 600K Report: Commercial Chemical
Incidents in the United States 1987-1996 (Baseline Study Special Congressional Summary)
http://www.mapcruzin.com/download/600k_sum.pdf

New York City Area Consortium for Earthquake Loss Mitigation, Earthquake Risks and Mitigation
in the New York, New Jersey, Connecticut Region (Summary Report, 1999-2003)
http://www.nycem.org/techdocs/FinalReport/03-SP02p.pdf

Earthquake Loss Estimation for the New York City Area (NYCEM 2nd Year Technical Report,
1999-2000)
http://www.nycem.org/techdocs/lossEstYr2/default.asp

Government Accountability Office, Influenza Pandemic: DOD Combatant Commands'
Preparedness Efforts Could Benefit from More Clearly Defined Roles, Resources, and Risk
Mitigation
http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d07696.pdf

Congressional Research Service, Pipeline Safety and Security: Federal Programs
http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/homesec/RL33347.pdf

U.S. Forest Service, Angora Fire Burn Area Emergency Response report
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/ltbmu/documents/angora-fire/Angora_full_report_geology_risks.pdf




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work    40
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                                   Additional Information

SOS- Live Earth Concert
http://www.liveearth.org/news.php

National Interagency Fire Center
http://www.nifc.gov/

CDF Firefighters (California)
http://www.cdf-firefighters.org/

California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CALFire)
http://www.fire.ca.gov/

Funding Available to Strengthen Volunteer Management
http://www.americorps.org/about/newsroom/releases_detail.asp?tbl_pr_id=768

http://www.nationalservice.gov/for_organizations/funding/nofa.asp

Scenario Earthquakes for Urban Areas along the Atlantic Seaboard of the United States
http://www.nycem.org/techdocs/EconCons/default.asp

New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Earthquake Loss Estimation Study for New
Jersey: Geologic Component
http://www.njgeology.org/enviroed/hazus.htm

New York City Area Consortium for Earthquake Loss Mitigation, Scenario Earthquakes for Urban
Areas along the Atlantic Seaboard of the United States -- Scenario Events: Historical Examples,
Global Analogs and Hypothetical Scenarios
http://www.nycem.org/techdocs/EconCons/Scenarios.asp

Environmental Protection Agency, General Guidance on Risk Management Programs for
Chemical Accident Prevention
http://yosemite.epa.gov/oswer/ceppoweb.nsf/content/EPAguidance.htm#General

Environmental Protection Agency, Preparing and Submitting Your RMP [Risk Management Plan]
http://yosemite.epa.gov/oswer/ceppoweb.nsf/content/RMPsubmission.htm

The Right-To-Know Network Website
http://www.rtknet.org/

U. S. Chemical Safety Board, Testimony of Carolyn W. Merritt, Chairman and Chief Executive
Officer, U.S. Chemical Safety Board before the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and
Public Works, Subcommittee on Transportation Safety, Infrastructure
http://www.csb.gov/news_releases/docs/MerrittSenateEPW7-10-07Written.pdf

U.S. Department of Defense, Joint Chiefs of Staff, Homeland Defense
http://www.fas.org/irp/doddir/dod/jp3_27.pdf

National Research Council, Protecting Building Occupants and Operations from Biological and
Chemical Airborne Threats -- A Framework for Decision Making
http://books.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=11965
Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work    41
       they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


EIIP, Children and Disasters: Preparedness, Response and Recovery Transcript
http://www.emforum.org/vforum/lc070725.htm

The direct link to the Word version is: ftp://www.emforum.org/pub/eiip/lc070725.doc

Pennsylvania Emergency Preparedness Guide
http://www.dsf.health.state.pa.us/health/lib/health/EmergencyPrepGuide/EmergencyPrepGuide-
english.pdf

American Medical Association and American Public Health Association, Improving Health System
Preparedness for Terrorism and Mass Casualty Events: An Action Brief
http://www.ama-assn.org/ama1/pub/upload/mm/415/final_action_brief.pdf

Emergency Management Ontario, Emergency Preparedness Guide for People with Disabilities /
Special Needs
http://www.mcscs.jus.gov.on.ca/english/publications/comm_safety/6350_EMO_V2.pdf

Photos: Crist tours emergency response center (Florida)
http://blogs.orlandosentinel.com/news_politics/2007/07/photos-gov-cris.html

Let’s get Ready Sydney (Australia)
http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/getreadysydney/workinginthecity/readytest.asp?id=2

House Committee on Homeland Security, Disaster Declarations: Where is FEMA in a Time of
Need? (Hearing)
http://homeland.house.gov/hearings/index.asp?ID=22

House Committee on Homeland Security, Reforming FEMA: Are We Making Progress?
(Hearing)
http://homeland.house.gov/hearings/index.asp?ID=12

House Committee on Homeland Security, The Role of the Department of Homeland Security in
Gulf Coast Rebuilding and Recovery Efforts (Hearing)
http://homeland.house.gov/hearings/index.asp?ID=51

The conference Report for ―Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of
2007‖ is available at the link below:
http://www.rules.house.gov/110/text/110_hr1cr.pdf


Emergency Management Standards Public Comment Period Ending Soon
The deadline for EMAP’s public comment period for the Emergency Management Standards by
EMAP is fast approaching. These standards are written to serve as a set of standards defining a
quality emergency management program to be a tool for strategic planning and improvement
efforts. The closing date for public comments/proposals is July 31, 2007. EMAP encourages all
stakeholders to provide inputs, comments, or proposals to these standards. To view the
standards and instructions for submitting comments, visit the EMAP website at
www.emaponline.org/?341

If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to contact the EMAP office at (859) 244-
8242 or emap@csg.org

Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work    42
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


Around the World Today 24/07/07 (Provided by Arthur Rabjohn)
ROME: A plane fighting one of the fires raging across Italy amid a heat wave crashed Monday in
a central region, killing one crew member and seriously injuring the other one, officials said.
The Canadair plane crashed in the Abruzzo region, where soaring temperatures and winds
fanned several blazes, the Civil Protection Department said. The injured one was hospitalized in
serious condition.The heat wave gripping Italy peaked with 40 degrees Celsius (104 Fahrenheit)
in the southern city in Bari, while many other cities registered temperatures in the late 30s
degrees Celsius (100s F).The heat is expected to continue at least through midweek.

GREECE - A firefighting plane smashed into a hillside on a southern Greek island Monday, killing
both crew members, as the country struggles to contain wildfires amid sweltering heat. The CL-
415 tanker was flying through thick smoke to douse a fire outside the resort of Stira, on Evia
island, when it crashed, sending wreckage across an area over 100 meters.

BULGARIA: battled forest fires over the weekend. Temperatures up to 42°C hampered firefighting
efforts. All three countries requested international assistance.

UNITED KINGDOM: The UK is suffering its worst flooding for nearly 60 years as rising waters
made thousands homeless and plunged entire towns under water. Nine severe flood warnings
remained in force, large parts of southern England were under water and river levels were still
rising. More than 2,000 people spent Sunday night in emergency shelters and the Royal Air Force
and coastguard helicopters were called in over the weekend to airlift hundreds to safety in one of
Britain's largest peacetime rescue operations.

GERMANY: Germany has been hit by severe storms, heavy rains and flooding over the weekend
with at least one person drowned and 10 people injured. The southern state of Bavaria declared a
state of emergency in several regions, some of which were submerged under 1.5 meters of
water. Flooding cut off rail and road traffic in some locations for several hours. Hundreds of
motorists stranded by flooding water had to be rescued by firefighters. Severe storms also raged
across the state of Thuringia and caused substantial damages. Roads were flooded, trees felled
and cellars flooded. German weather service has warned of continuing bad weather in the
coming days.

CHINA: An earthquake in a northwest region of China destroyed 2,100 houses and left 8,000
people homeless, Xinhua news agency said Sunday.

CHINA: Storms are expected to batter large swathes of China again on Monday after floods,
landslides and lightning killed more than 150 people last week alone.

INDONESIA: At least seven people have been killed and many thousands forced to flee their
homes because of floods and landslides on the island of Sulawesi. Dozens of people are
reportedly still missing. Rescue efforts have been hampered by difficulties in accessing the
remote areas as well as the continuing bad weather and rising water levels.




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work     43
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                                       Contributions
The following individuals or groups contribute to the Emergency Management and Homeland
Security Articles of Interest.

Regular Contributors
    International Association of Emergency Managers
    National Emergency Management Association
    Florida Emergency Preparedness Association
    Emergency Management Institute, Higher Education Program
    King County, WA Office of Emergency Management
    Montgomery County, PA Department of Public Safety
    Natural Hazards Observer Newsletter
    U.S. Department of Homeland Security
    Interagency Coordinating Council on Emergency Preparedness and Individuals with
       Disabilities
    National Organization on Disabilities, Emergency Preparedness Initiative
    EAD & Associates, LLC
    Emergency Information Infrastructure Project
    Nena Wiley
    Dave Freeman
    Gregory Banner
    Arthur Rabjohn
    Martha Braddock

Guest Contributors
    Bill Firestone
    Rodney Lynn
    Tim Davis

Special Thanks
I’d also liked to thank the following companies and organizations that post the Articles of Interest
to their websites:
      Pearce Global Partners (http://pearceglobalpartners.com/NewsArticles.html)
      California Emergency Services Association, Southern Chapter
          (http://cesa.net/aoi.cfm?color=st)




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work        44
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.