Joint Security Cooperation Education and Training by gdf57j

VIEWS: 69 PAGES: 336

									         Army Regulation 12–15
         SECNAVINST 4950.4B
         AFI 16–105




         Security Assistance and International
         Logistics



         Joint Security
         Cooperation
         Education and
         Training




         Headquarters
         Departments of the Army,
         the Navy,
         and the Air Force
         Washington, DC
         3 January 2011



UNCLASSIFIED
    SUMMARY of CHANGE
AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105
Joint Security Cooperation Education and Training

This major revision, dated 3 January 2011--

o   Changes the title of the regulation from Joint Security Assistance Training
    to Joint Security Cooperation Education and Training (cover).

o   Adds the Regional Defense Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program as one of
    the training programs managed under the Security Cooperation Education and
    Training Program (para 1-5b(13)).

o   Moves HQDA security cooperation responsibility from Deputy Under Secretary of
    the Army (International Affairs) to Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army
    for Defense Exports and Cooperation (para 2-15b).

o   Adds policy for medical requirements and healthcare (chap 8).
Headquarters                                                                                  *Army Regulation 12–15
Departments of the Army,                                                                      *SECNAVINST 4950.4B
the Navy,                                                                                     *AFI 16–105
and the Air Force
Washington, DC
3 January 2011
                                                                             Effective 3 February 2011
                                   Security Assistance and International Logistics


                          Joint Security Cooperation Education and Training




History. This publication is a major           proponent has the authority to approve ex-     Suite 8200, 1777 North Kent Street, Suite
revision.                                      ceptions or waivers to this regulation that    8200, Arlington, VA 22209.
Summary. This regulation revises sev-          are consistent with controlling law and
                                               regulations. The proponent may delegate        Suggested improvements. Users are
eral regulations that cover the education                                                     invited to send comments and suggested
and training of foreign personnel, and im-     this approval authority, in writing, to a
                                               division chief within the proponent            improvements on DA Form 2028 (Recom-
plements DOD 5105.38–M. It prescribes
                                               agency or its direct reporting unit or field   mended Changes to Publications and
policies, responsibilities, procedures, and
administration for the education and train-    operating agency, in the grade of colonel      Blank Forms) directly to the Assistant
ing of international military students by      or the civilian equivalent. Activities may     Secretary of the Army Acquisition, Logis-
the Departments of the Army, the Navy,         request a waiver to this regulation by pro-    tics, and Technology (SAAL–NP), 1777
and the Air Force as authorized by the         viding justification that includes a full      North Kent Street, Suite 8200, Arlington,
U.S. security assistance legislation. This     analysis of the expected benefits and must     VA 22209. Navy, Marine Corps, and
regulation deals specifically with training    include formal review by the activity’s        Coast Guard users should send comments
under the International Military Education     senior legal officer. All waiver requests      directly to Navy IPO (02C2T), 2521
and Training Program, the Foreign Mili-        will be endorsed by the commander or           South Clark Street, Suite 800, Arlington,
tary Sales Program, and related programs;      senior leader of the requesting activity
                                                                                              VA 22202–3528. Air Force users should
and contains instructions on the U.S. Field    and forwarded through their higher head-
                                               quarters to the policy proponent. Refer to     send comments directly to the Secretary
Program.                                                                                      of the Air Force/International Affairs,
                                               AR 25–30 for specific guidance.
Applicability. This regulation applies to                                                     1080 Pentagon, Washington, DC
the active Army, the Army National             Army internal control process. This            20330–1080.
Guard/Army National Guard of the United        regulation contains internal controls and
States, and the U.S. Army Reserve, unless      provides an Internal Control Evaluation        Distribution. This publication is availa-
otherwise stated. It also applies to the Re-   for use in evaluating key internal controls    ble in electronic media only and is in-
serve Components of the Army, the Navy,        (see appendix C).                              tended for command levels D and E for
the Air Force, the Marine Corps, the Air       Supplementation. Supplementation of            the active Army, the Army National
National Guard, the Coast Guard, and           this regulation and establishment of com-      Guard/Army National Guard of the United
DOD agencies.                                  mand and local forms are prohibited with-      States, and the U.S. Army Reserve; Navy:
Proponent and exception authority.             out prior approval from the Assistant          SNDL–Parts I (less 29N); and Air Force:
The proponent of this regulation is the        Secretary of the Army for Acquisition,         F.
Assistant Secretary of the Army for Ac-        Logistics, and Technology (SAAL–NP),
quisition, Logistics, and Technology. The




*This regulation supersedes AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4A/AFI 16–105, dated 5 June 2000.

                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                                 i

                                                  UNCLASSIFIED
Contents   (Listed by paragraph and page number)


Chapter 1
Introduction, page 1
Purpose • 1–1, page 1
References • 1–2, page 1
Explanation of abbreviations and terms • 1–3, page 1
Responsibilities • 1–4, page 1
Security Cooperation Education and Training Program • 1–5, page 1
Objectives of the Security Cooperation Education and Training Program • 1–6, page 2

Chapter 2
Responsibilities, page 2

Section I
General, page 2
Purpose • 2–1, page 2
Secretary of State • 2–2, page 2
Secretary of Defense • 2–3, page 2
Under Secretary of Defense for Policy • 2–4, page 2
Assistant Secretary of Defense (International Security Affairs) • 2–5, page 2
Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense (Partnership Strategy and Stability Operations) • 2–6, page 3
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Special Operations/Low Intensity Conflict) • 2–7, page 3
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Strategy and Threat Reduction) • 2–8, page 3
Director, Defense Security Cooperation Agency • 2–9, page 3
Director, Defense Finance and Accounting Service • 2–10, page 3
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff • 2–11, page 3
Commanders of combatant commands • 2–12, page 3
Commanders of component commands • 2–13, page 4
Chiefs of security cooperation organizations • 2–14, page 4

Section II
Department of the Army, page 5
Assistant Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology) • 2–15, page 5
Deputy Chief of Staff, G–3/5/7 • 2–16, page 7
Deputy Chief of Staff, G–1 • 2–17, page 7
Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management and Comptroller) • 2–18, page 7
Deputy Chief of Staff, G–2 • 2–19, page 7
Commanding General, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command • 2–20, page 8
Commanding general, U.S. Army Materiel Command • 2–21, page 9
The Surgeon General • 2–22, page 9
Heads of other Army commands and U.S. Army staff agencies • 2–23, page 9
Commandant, Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation • 2–24, page 10
Overseas Army commanders • 2–25, page 10

Section III
Department of the Navy (U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Coast Guard), page 10
Secretary of the Navy • 2–26, page 10
Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development, and Acquisition • 2–27, page 10
Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for International Programs/Director of Navy International Programs • 2–28,
  page 10
Chief of Naval Operations • 2–29, page 11
Commandant of the Marine Corps • 2–30, page 11
Commanding General, Training and Education Command • 2–31, page 11
Commander, Marine Corps Systems Command • 2–32, page 13


ii                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Contents—Continued

Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard, International Affairs • 2–33, page 13
Assistant Secretary of the Navy Financial Management and Comptroller • 2–34, page 14
Navy Surgeon General • 2–35, page 14
Commanders of Naval Systems Commands • 2–36, page 14
Fleet commanders • 2–37, page 15
Naval Education and Training Center • 2–38, page 15
Commanding Officer, Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity • 2–39, page 15

Section IV
Department of the Air Force, page 16
General • 2–40, page 16
Deputy Under Secretary of the Air Force, International Affairs • 2–41, page 16
Director of Budget Investment • 2–42, page 17
Deputy Chief of Staff, Manpower and Personnel • 2–43, page 17
Heads of other Air staff organizations • 2–44, page 17
Commanders of major commands • 2–45, page 17

Chapter 3
Planning and Programming, page 18

Section I
Planning, page 18
Purpose • 3–1, page 18
Requirements • 3–2, page 18
International military education and training • 3–3, page 19
Expanded international military education and training • 3–4, page 19
Foreign Military Sales Program • 3–5, page 19
Other security cooperation education and training programs • 3–6, page 20
General constraints • 3–7, page 22
Total package approach • 3–8, page 23
References used for security cooperation education and training • 3–9, page 26

Section II
Programming, page 27
Programming cycle • 3–10, page 27
Programming procedures • 3–11, page 28
Distributive/distance learning • 3–12, page 30
Civilian international military students • 3–13, page 30
Education and training provided by contractors or at civilian institutions • 3–14, page 31
Letters of offer and acceptance for the sale of U.S. military training • 3–15, page 33
Letters of offer and acceptance for training • 3–16, page 33
Letters of offer and acceptance amendments • 3–17, page 34
Letters of offer and acceptance modifications • 3–18, page 34
Foreign military sales price increases • 3–19, page 34
Liability for damages • 3–20, page 34

Section III
Training Support (Other Media), page 34
General • 3–21, page 34
English language training media • 3–22, page 34
Constraints • 3–23, page 35

Section IV
Department of the Army, page 35
Training references • 3–24, page 35
General course prerequisites, training requirements, and standards • 3–25, page 36


                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                   iii
Contents—Continued

Special courses • 3–26, page 36
Senior professional military education • 3–27, page 36
Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation • 3–28, page 37
On-the-job training and observer training • 3–29, page 37
Limitations of on-the-job training and observer training • 3–30, page 37
Administration of on-the-job training and observer training • 3–31, page 38
Contractor provided training • 3–32, page 38
Distributed learning • 3–33, page 38
Training literature • 3–34, page 39
Programming cycle • 3–35, page 39
Letter of offer and acceptance functions • 3–36, page 39
Blanket order foreign military cases • 3–37, page 40

Section V
Department of the Navy (U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Coast Guard), page 40
Acceptance of training • 3–38, page 40
Programming training under foreign military sales • 3–39, page 40
Course prerequisites and standards • 3–40, page 40
Military information/controlled unclassified information • 3–41, page 41
Additional training requests for International military student after arrival in the United States • 3–42, page 41
Training at nonmilitary institutions • 3–43, page 41
Contracting for foreign military sale training • 3–44, page 41
Professional military education • 3–45, page 41
Accompaniment by dependents • 3–46, page 43
Visiting individuals or units • 3–47, page 43
Ship transfer, overhaul, and refresher training • 3–48, page 43
On-the-job training or observership training • 3–49, page 44
Distributive/distance learning • 3–50, page 45
Correspondence or self-study courses • 3–51, page 46
Commanding officer, Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical Training School • 3–52, page 47

Section VI
Department of the Air Force (Planning and Programming General), page 47
Training standards • 3–53, page 47
Military assistance articles and services list items • 3–54, page 48
Classified training • 3–55, page 48
International military student training • 3–56, page 48
United States Air Force training of non-Ministry of Defense personnel • 3–57, page 48
Contractor training • 3–58, page 48
Foreign military sales training programs • 3–59, page 48
Implementation of Foreign military sales training cases • 3–60, page 48
Medical requirements • 3–61, page 49
International military student selection • 3–62, page 49
Correspondence courses • 3–63, page 49
Professional military education correspondence courses • 3–64, page 49
Professional Military Education Seminar Program • 3–65, page 49
Publications • 3–66, page 50
Training aids • 3–67, page 50
Training films and film strips • 3–68, page 50
Scheduling and implementation • 3–69, page 50
Acceptance of training • 3–70, page 50
Familiarization and qualification training • 3–71, page 50
Documentation for familiarization and qualification training • 3–72, page 51
Air Force Institute of Technology programs • 3–73, page 51
Air Force institute of technology short courses • 3–74, page 52


iv                          AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Contents—Continued

Air Force institute of technology eligibility for attendance • 3–75, page 52
Inter-American Air Force academy • 3–76, page 52
Letter of offer and acceptance notes • 3–77, page 53
Blanket order foreign military sales training cases • 3–78, page 53
Security Cooperation Education and Training Working Groups • 3–79, page 53

Chapter 4
Security Cooperation Education and Training Teams, page 53

Section I
General, page 53
Purpose/Introduction • 4–1, page 53
Command relationships • 4–2, page 54
Constraints • 4–3, page 54
Selection of personnel • 4–4, page 55

Section II
Types of Teams, page 55
Extended training service specialist • 4–5, page 55
Contract field services • 4–6, page 55
Mobile education team/mobile training team • 4–7, page 56
Technical assistance field team • 4–8, page 60
Technical assistance team • 4–9, page 61
Survey teams • 4–10, page 61
Combatant commander initiatives • 4–11, page 61
Military-to-military contacts and comparable activities • 4–12, page 61
Joint combined exchange training • 4–13, page 61

Section III
Programming Guidance Programming, page 61
Guidance • 4–14, page 61
Extended training service specialist • 4–15, page 62
Contract field services • 4–16, page 62
Mobile education team/Mobile training team • 4–17, page 62
Other security cooperation teams • 4–18, page 63
Requests for teams • 4–19, page 64

Section IV
Quality of Life and Mission Sustainment Items, page 64
Definition • 4–20, page 64
Mission sustainment items • 4–21, page 65
Funding • 4–22, page 65
Fairness and uniform standards • 4–23, page 65
Inventory control • 4–24, page 65
Roles • 4–25, page 65

Section V
Department of the Army, page 68
Programming security assistance teams under U.S. grant funded programs • 4–26, page 68
Funding security assistance training under U.S. grant funded programs • 4–27, page 68
Programming security assistance training under foreign military sales • 4–28, page 68
Funding security assistance training under foreign military sales • 4–29, page 68
Security assistance team identification • 4–30, page 68
Temporary duty security assistance team request and authorized use • 4–31, page 69
The permanent change of station security assistance team request and authorized use • 4–32, page 69
Extensions • 4–33, page 70


                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                   v
Contents—Continued

Correspondence • 4–34, page 70
Country or area clearances • 4–35, page 70
Passports and visas • 4–36, page 71
Temporary duty orders • 4–37, page 71
Team assembly • 4–38, page 71
Arrival or departure notice • 4–39, page 71
Personnel evaluation reports • 4–40, page 71
After action report • 4–41, page 71
Flight physicals for U.S. Army security assistance team members • 4–42, page 71

Section VI
Department of the Navy (U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Coast Guard), page 72
Mobile education teams • 4–43, page 72
U.S. Navy teams • 4–44, page 75
Ship transfer mobile training teams • 4–45, page 75
Marine corps teams • 4–46, page 76
Coast Guard exportable maritime teams • 4–47, page 77

Section VII
Department of the Air Force, page 78
Air Force security assistance teams and mobile training teams • 4–48, page 78
Mobile training team call-up • 4–49, page 79
Field training detachments • 4–50, page 79
Ferry crews • 4–51, page 79
Extensions • 4–52, page 79
Restrictions • 4–53, page 79
Substitutions • 4–54, page 79
Team after action report • 4–55, page 79
Contractor field services/Air Force engineering and technical services/language training detachments • 4–56, page 80
Team preparation • 4–57, page 80
Disclosure review • 4–58, page 80
Air Force security assistance training, extended training service specialist & long-term deployment budget call
  • 4–59, page 80

Chapter 5
English Language Training (Policy, Planning, Programming, and Implementing English language
 training), page 81

Section I
General, page 81
Requirements • 5–1, page 81
Guidance and functions • 5–2, page 99
Technical control of in-country and CONUS English Language Training Program • 5–3, page 100

Section II
Security Assistance Program Services and Training, page 101
Services • 5–4, page 101
General English language training • 5–5, page 101
Specialized English training • 5–6, page 101
Additional special language training • 5–7, page 102
Forfeiture charge • 5–8, page 102
Minimum entry score and waiver policy • 5–9, page 102
Objective of English comprehension level scoring • 5–10, page 102

Section III
Tests, page 102


vi                          AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Contents—Continued

Test types and formats • 5–11, page 102
Test score validity and reliability • 5–12, page 103

Section IV
Department of the Army, page 104
Minimum entry score and waiver policy • 5–13, page 104
Establishing English comprehension levels • 5–14, page 104
English language refresher program • 5–15, page 105
Required in-country English comprehension level testing • 5–16, page 105

Section V
Department of the Navy (U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Coast Guard), page 105
English language training actions required • 5–17, page 105
Establishing the English comprehension level scores • 5–18, page 105
Minimum English comprehension level • 5–19, page 105
Waivers of English comprehension level requirements for Department of the Navy courses • 5–20, page 106

Section VI
Department of the Air Force, page 106
Continental United States English language training • 5–21, page 106
Language training detachment manpower requirements packages • 5–22, page 106

Chapter 6
Financial Management, page 106

Section I
General, page 106
Purpose • 6–1, page 106
Tuition pricing • 6–2, page 106
Forfeiture charge • 6–3, page 106

Section II
International Military Education and Training, page 107
General • 6–4, page 107
Funding • 6–5, page 108

Section III
Foreign Military Sales Training, page 108
General • 6–6, page 108
Funding • 6–7, page 108

Section IV
Counter-Drug Training Support, page 108
General • 6–8, page 108
Funding • 6–9, page 108

Section V
International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement, page 109
General • 6–10, page 109
Funding • 6–11, page 109

Section VI
Regional Defense Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program, page 109
General • 6–12, page 109
Funding • 6–13, page 109




                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                       vii
Contents—Continued

Section VII
Other Security Cooperation Education and Training Programs, page 109
Presidential drawdown authority (see Foreign Assistance Act, Section 506) • 6–14, page 109
Exchange Training • 6–15, page 109

Section VIII
Department of the Army, page 110
Recycle charge • 6–16, page 110
International military education and training funding • 6–17, page 110
Foreign military sales funding • 6–18, page 110
Section 1004 - Counter-drug training support funding • 6–19, page 110
International narcotics control and law enforcement funding • 6–20, page 110
Regional Defense Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program funding • 6–21, page 110
Presidential drawdown authority funding • 6–22, page 110
Exchange training funding • 6–23, page 111
Section 1206 funding • 6–24, page 111

Section IX
Department of the Navy (U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Coast Guard), page 111
International military education and training funding • 6–25, page 111
Foreign military sales funding • 6–26, page 111
Regional defense combating terrorism fellowship program funding • 6–27, page 111
Counter-narcotics program • 6–28, page 111
Export control/border security, Georgian border security and law enforcement and similar programs • 6–29,
  page 111
Forfeiture fee • 6–30, page 112

Section X
Department of the Air Force, page 112
Financial management • 6–31, page 112
Forfeiture charges and adjustments • 6–32, page 113
Transportation allowances • 6–33, page 113
Living allowances • 6–34, page 113
Subsistence • 6–35, page 113
Housing security assistance training program and other cooperative programs personnel • 6–36, page 113
Budget and funding • 6–37, page 113
Costing • 6–38, page 114
Accounting and finance • 6–39, page 114

Chapter 7
Travel/Transportation, Quarters, Meals, and Living Allowance, page 114

Section I
Travel and/or Transportation, page 114
Scheduling International Military Student travel • 7–1, page 114
Excess baggage • 7–2, page 114
Disposition of unauthorized excess baggage when travel/transportation is funded by the U.S. Government Training
  Program • 7–3, page 115
Arrival notification for all international military students regardless of funding source • 7–4, page 115
Continental United States travel • 7–5, page 116
Travel by privately-owned vehicle when travel and/or transportation is funded by a U.S. Government Program • 7–6,
  page 119
Arranging return transportation when travel/transportation is funded by a United States Government program • 7–7,
  page 119




viii                       AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Contents—Continued

Section II
Quarters and Meals, page 120
Quarters and meals • 7–8, page 120
Messing • 7–9, page 121

Section III
Living Allowance, page 121
Requirements • 7–10, page 121
Funding guidance • 7–11, page 121
Restrictions • 7–12, page 122
Advance • 7–13, page 123

Section IV
Department of the Army, page 123
Baggage allowance • 7–14, page 123
Retainable instructional material • 7–15, page 123
Quarters • 7–16, page 123
Subsistence • 7–17, page 124

Section V
Department of the Navy (U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Coast Guard), page 124
Round trip tickets when travel/transportation is funded by a U.S. funded training Program • 7–18, page 124
Quarters when living allowance is funded by a United States funded program. • 7–19, page 124
Travel and living allowance payments - Coast Guard • 7–20, page 124

Section VI
Department of the Air Force, page 124
Air Force travel information for international military student officers • 7–21, page 124
Tickets • 7–22, page 124
Air Force International Military Education and Training travel payment • 7–23, page 125
Air Force retainable instructional materials • 7–24, page 125
Billeting service charges • 7–25, page 125
Supplemental payment • 7–26, page 125
Family housing • 7–27, page 125
Reimbursement for temporary duty to international military students • 7–28, page 125
Subsistence • 7–29, page 125
International military student paydays • 7–30, page 125

Chapter 8
Medical Requirements and Healthcare, page 125

Section I
General, page 126
Purpose • 8–1, page 126
Responsibilities • 8–2, page 126
Medical requirements • 8–3, page 126
Pregnancy Policy • 8–4, page 128
Course related medical requirements • 8–5, page 128
Medical eligibility • 8–6, page 129
Healthcare coverage • 8–7, page 130
Security assistance teams • 8–8, page 130
Hospitalization and disposition • 8–9, page 130
Medical reports and health records • 8–10, page 131
Subsistence while hospitalized • 8–11, page 131
Emergency healthcare • 8–12, page 131
Waivers • 8–13, page 131


                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                           ix
Contents—Continued

Constraints • 8–14, page 132
Medical screening, urinalysis, blood screening, and mandatory drug testing programs in CONUS • 8–15, page 132
Reimbursements • 8–16, page 133
Air evacuation • 8–17, page 133

Section II
Department of the Army, page 134
References • 8–18, page 134
Filing for healthcare reimbursement • 8–19, page 134
Medical reports • 8–20, page 134
Unique examination requirements • 8–21, page 134

Section III
Department of the Navy (United States Navy, United States Marine Corps, and the United States Coast Guard),
  page 135
References • 8–22, page 135
Ship transfers and foreign vessel overhaul • 8–23, page 135
High risk training • 8–24, page 135
Hospitalization/serious medical incident notification procedures • 8–25, page 136
Waiver request • 8–26, page 137
Reimbursement procedures • 8–27, page 137

Section IV
Department of the Air Force, page 137
References (http://www.e-publishing.af.mil) • 8–28, page 137
Billing procedures • 8–29, page 137
Medical reports • 8–30, page 137
Physical standard requirements • 8–31, page 138
Unique examination requirements • 8–32, page 138

Chapter 9
Invitational Travel Orders, page 140

Section I
Preparation and Use, page 140
Purpose • 9–1, page 140
Basic document • 9–2, page 140
Format • 9–3, page 140
Original invitational travel order and copies • 9–4, page 156
Distribution • 9–5, page 157
Amendments • 9–6, page 157
Endorsements • 9–7, page 157
Authorized training • 9–8, page 158
Security and screening of student • 9–9, page 158
Appropriation citation • 9–10, page 158
Dependents • 9–11, page 158
Medical care • 9–12, page 158

Section II
Department of the Army, page 158
General • 9–13, page 158
Distribution • 9–14, page 159

Section III
Department of the Navy (U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Coast Guard), page 159
Invitational travel orders authority • 9–15, page 159


x                          AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Contents—Continued

Distribution • 9–16, page 160

Section IV
Invitational Travel Orders (Department of the Air Force), page 160
General • 9–17, page 160
Invitational travel orders amendments • 9–18, page 160
Distribution • 9–19, page 160

Chapter 10
International Military Student Administration, page 160

Section I
General, page 160
Scope • 10–1, page 160
Responsibilities to international military student • 10–2, page 161
Unauthorized commitments • 10–3, page 161
Channels of communication, international military student officer Web, and correspondence • 10–4, page 161

Section II
Responsibilities, page 161
Security cooperation officer • 10–5, page 161
International military student officer • 10–6, page 161
Country liaison officer • 10–7, page 162

Section III
Predeparture, page 163
International military student screening, passports, visas, and Department of Defense foreign visit system • 10–8,
  page 163
In-country predeparture briefing • 10–9, page 164
International military student arrival arrangements • 10–10, page 168
Biographical data • 10–11, page 169

Section IV
International Military Student Arrival, page 169
Reporting to training installation • 10–12, page 169
Training installation briefing • 10–13, page 169
Legal status and claims • 10–14, page 170
Alien registration • 10–15, page 170
Family members • 10–16, page 171
Identification cards • 10–17, page 171
Mail • 10–18, page 171
Public affairs • 10–19, page 171

Section V
Military Matters, page 172
Warrant officers, midshipmen, and cadets • 10–20, page 172
Clothing, uniforms, and equipment • 10–21, page 172
Laundry • 10–22, page 172
Grooming standards • 10–23, page 173
Name tags • 10–24, page 173

Section VI
Academic Matters, page 173
Officer and enlisted courses • 10–25, page 173
Physical training • 10–26, page 173
Graduation, diplomas, certificates of attendance, and awards • 10–27, page 173


                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                             xi
Contents—Continued

Academic reports • 10–28, page 174
Reporting of international military student academic problems • 10–29, page 177

Section VII
Money Matters, page 178
Commissary and exchange privileges • 10–30, page 178
Indebtedness • 10–31, page 178
Off-duty employment • 10–32, page 178
Public benefits • 10–33, page 178
Purchase and possession of firearms • 10–34, page 179
Purchase and use of privately-owned vehicles • 10–35, page 179
Purchase of duty-free and tax-exempt articles and liquor • 10–36, page 179

Section VIII
Leave, Holidays, and Temporary Duty, page 179
Leave and holidays • 10–37, page 179
Temporary duty • 10–38, page 180

Section IX
Security, page 180
International military student security clearance • 10–39, page 180
Disclosure of classified military information and controlled unclassified information • 10–40, page 181
Restricted courses • 10–41, page 181
Release of instructional related material • 10–42, page 181

Section X
Special Circumstances, page 181
Marriage • 10–43, page 181
Political asylum • 10–44, page 182
Disciplinary action • 10–45, page 182
Sexual harassment laws and policy and fraternization • 10–46, page 182
Unauthorized absence • 10–47, page 183
Casualty report, death, and disposition of remains • 10–48, page 184
Reporting of international military student special circumstances • 10–49, page 185

Section XI
International Military Student Departure, page 185
Departure to the next training installation • 10–50, page 185
Departure from final training installation • 10–51, page 186
Retainable instructional materials • 10–52, page 186
In-country debriefings • 10–53, page 186
Follow-up on graduates • 10–54, page 186

Section II
Department of the Army, page 187
International military student officer • 10–55, page 187
Channels of communication and correspondence • 10–56, page 188
Arrival and departure arrangements • 10–57, page 188
Biographical data • 10–58, page 189
Legal status and claims • 10–59, page 189
Family members • 10–60, page 189
Commissary and exchange privileges • 10–61, page 190
Clothing, uniforms, and equipment • 10–62, page 190
Rank insignia • 10–63, page 190
Grooming standards • 10–64, page 190
Disclosure of classified military information and controlled unclassified information • 10–65, page 191


xii                        AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Contents—Continued

Graduation, diplomas, certificates of attendance, and awards/badges • 10–66, page 191
Physical training • 10–67, page 191
Serious incident reporting • 10–68, page 191
Disciplinary actions • 10–69, page 191
Casualty report, death and disposition of remains • 10–70, page 192
School crests • 10–71, page 192
Academic reports • 10–72, page 193
Public affairs • 10–73, page 193
Visits (see para 12–3 for foreign personnel not enrolled in a training program) • 10–74, page 193
Release of maps • 10–75, page 193

Section III
Department of the Navy (U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Coast Guard) (Student Administration), page 193
International military student officer • 10–76, page 193
Correspondence procedures • 10–77, page 194
Family members • 10–78, page 194
Student control number assignment procedures • 10–79, page 194
Public affairs and information • 10–80, page 194
Visits • 10–81, page 195
Shipyard training • 10–82, page 195
Distributive/distance learning • 10–83, page 195
Contractor training • 10–84, page 196
On the job training • 10–85, page 196
Department of the Navy foreign disclosure policy • 10–86, page 197
Classified training • 10–87, page 197
Release of course catalogs • 10–88, page 198
Release of international military student training notes • 10–89, page 198
Incident reporting • 10–90, page 198
Unauthorized absence • 10–91, page 198
Decedent affairs • 10–92, page 199
Disenrollment • 10–93, page 199
Political asylum • 10–94, page 200
Termination of training and security cooperation education and training program records disposition • 10–95,
  page 200

Section IV
Department of the Air Force, page 200
International military student administration • 10–96, page 200
U.S. Air Force standards • 10–97, page 201
Responsibilities of country liaison officers • 10–98, page 201
Designation and duties of international military student officers • 10–99, page 201
Clothing and equipment • 10–100, page 204
Deceased international military students • 10–101, page 204
Family members • 10–102, page 204
Channels of communication for reporting IMS issues/incidents • 10–103, page 204
Disposition of international military students • 10–104, page 205
Flying in United States Air Force aircraft • 10–105, page 205
Graduation • 10–106, page 206
Laundry service • 10–107, page 206
Name tags and rank insignia • 10–108, page 206
Quarters • 10–109, page 206
Temporary duty • 10–110, page 206
Unauthorized absence • 10–111, page 207
Disclosure considerations • 10–112, page 207
Medical and dental care • 10–113, page 207


                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                        xiii
Contents—Continued

Hospitalization or casualties • 10–114, page 207
Air evacuation • 10–115, page 208
Holidays • 10–116, page 208
International military student officer handbook • 10–117, page 208
Security assistance training program and other cooperative programs disclosure guidance • 10–118, page 208

Chapter 11
U.S. Field Studies Program for International Military and Civilian Students and Military Sponsored
 Visitors, page 209

Section I
Policies, Goal, and Objective, page 209
Field studies program policy • 11–1, page 209
Field studies program goal and specific objective • 11–2, page 210

Section II
Field Studies Program Responsibilities, page 211
Defense Security Cooperation Agency • 11–3, page 211
Under Secretary of Defense • 11–4, page 211
Military services • 11–5, page 211
Combatant commanders • 11–6, page 211

Section III
Field Studies Program Planning Considerations, page 211
Place of field studies program in the Security Cooperation Education and Training Program • 11–7, page 211
Types of field studies program events • 11–8, page 211
Travel and transportation • 11–9, page 212
Family members in the field studies program • 11–10, page 212

Section IV
Developing the Field Studies Program Plan, page 212
Developing the annual field studies program plan • 11–11, page 212
Field studies program event escorts • 11–12, page 213
Planning and conducting individual field studies program events • 11–13, page 213

Section V
Field Studies Program Funding, page 214
Source of funding • 11–14, page 214
Funding field studies program activities • 11–15, page 214
Funding constraints • 11–16, page 214
Use of field studies program funds • 11–17, page 214
Extraordinary expenses • 11–18, page 215

Section VI
Other Field Studies Program Considerations, page 215
Field Studies Program support mementos • 11–19, page 215
Reporting requirements • 11–20, page 216

Section VII
Department of the Army, page 216
Purpose • 11–21, page 216
Minimum requirements • 11–22, page 216
Responsibilities • 11–23, page 216
Factors for an effective field studies program • 11–24, page 217
Examples of field studies program events • 11–25, page 218
Planning • 11–26, page 220


xiv                        AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Contents—Continued

Field studies program event execution • 11–27, page 221
Reporting • 11–28, page 222
Source of Field Studies Program funding • 11–29, page 222
Use of Field Studies Program funds • 11–30, page 222
Funding of Security Assistance Training Field Activity-managed Washington, DC field trip • 11–31, page 223

Section VIII
Department of the Navy (United States Navy, United States Marine Corps) (Field Studies Program), page 223
Responsibilities for funding the Field Studies Program • 11–32, page 223
Designation of international military student officer • 11–33, page 224
Source of funding • 11–34, page 224
Submission of annual data requirements • 11–35, page 224
Funding field studies program events • 11–36, page 224
Disbursing funds • 11–37, page 225

Section IX
The U.S. Coast Guard (Field Studies Program), page 225
Responsibilities for the Field Studies Program • 11–38, page 225
Designation of international military student officer • 11–39, page 225
Source of funding • 11–40, page 225
Submission of annual requirements • 11–41, page 225
Funding field studies program events • 11–42, page 225

Section X
Department of the Air Force (Field Studies Program), page 226
Management of the Field Studies Program • 11–43, page 226
Funding field studies program activities • 11–44, page 226
Field Studies Program participation • 11–45, page 226
Data card • 11–46, page 226
Plaques and mementos • 11–47, page 227
Quarterly report • 11–48, page 227
Use of field studies program funds • 11–49, page 227
International military student officer workshop • 11–50, page 227
Implementing Washington, DC, tours • 11–51, page 227
Accountability • 11–52, page 227

Chapter 12
Orientation Tours, page 228

Section I
General, page 228
Objectives • 12–1, page 228
Types of orientation tours • 12–2, page 228
Other visits • 12–3, page 228
Programming and implementation • 12–4, page 228
Restrictions and limitations • 12–5, page 229
Biographical data • 12–6, page 229
Invitational travel orders • 12–7, page 229
Pre-departure briefing • 12–8, page 229
Baggage • 12–9, page 230
Field Studies Program activities • 12–10, page 230
United States escorts • 12–11, page 230

Section II
Programming, page 230
Orientation tours • 12–12, page 230


                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                          xv
Contents—Continued

Distinguished visitor orientation tour • 12–13, page 231
Procedures for requesting orientation tours • 12–14, page 231

Section III
Department of the Army (National Defense University), page 232
Letter of offer and acceptance pricing • 12–15, page 232
Responsibilities for orientation tours • 12–16, page 232
Other visits • 12–17, page 232
Biographical data • 12–18, page 233
Invitational travel orders • 12–19, page 233
Travel • 12–20, page 233
Tour reports • 12–21, page 233
International military education and training orientation tour funding • 12–22, page 233
Foreign military sales orientation tour funding • 12–23, page 233

Section IV
Orientation Tours (Department of the Navy (U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Coast Guard), page 233
Procedures for requesting orientation tours • 12–24, page 233
Limitations • 12–25, page 233
Restrictions • 12–26, page 233
Publicity • 12–27, page 234

Section V
Orientation Tours (Department of the Air Force), page 234
General • 12–28, page 234
Orientation tour implementation • 12–29, page 234
Escort officer functions • 12–30, page 234
Completion of orientation tours • 12–31, page 235
Distinguished visitor implementation • 12–32, page 235

Chapter 13
Exchange Training, page 235

Section I
General, page 235
Exchange of professional military education • 13–1, page 235
Unit exchanges • 13–2, page 239
Exchange of flight training • 13–3, page 243

Section II
Department of the Army, page 244
Professional military education exchanges • 13–4, page 244
Unit exchanges • 13–5, page 254

Section III
Exchange Training (Department of the Navy (U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Coast Guard), page 255
United States Navy exchanges • 13–6, page 255
U.S. Marine Corps professional military education exchanges • 13–7, page 256
Requests for a United States Coast Guard unit exchange • 13–8, page 256
Reporting requirements for international agreements • 13–9, page 257

Section IV
Department of the Air Force (Unit Exchanges), page 283
Flight training exchanges • 13–10, page 283
Professional military education exchanges • 13–11, page 283



xvi                         AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Contents—Continued

Unit exchanges • 13–12, page 285

Appendixes
A.   References, page 288
B.   Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation, page 298
C.   Internal Control Evaluation, page 301

Table List

Table 3–1: Implementing agency for DOD schools, page 29
Table 7–1: Daily supplemental living allowance for international military students under security cooperation
 programs, page 117
Table 7–2: Army courses in the senior PME category authorized 200 pounds of RIM, page 123
Table 8–1: Immunizations, page 127
Table 8–2: International military student medical benefits and eligibility, page 138
Table 8–3: Authorized dependents medical benefits and eligibility, page 139
Table 8–4: Communicable diseases of public significance, page 139
Table 9–1: Air Force distribution guide for invitational travel order, page 160
Table 11–1: Minimum requirements, page 216
Table 11–2: Responsibilities, page 217
Table 11–3: Annual Field Studies Program planning, page 220
Table 11–4: Washington, DC field trip planning, page 221
Table 11–5: Field Studies Program event execution, page 222

Figure List

Figure   3–1:   Sample training plan checklist for new equipment-total package approach, page 25
Figure   3–1:   Sample training plan checklist for new equipment-total package approach–Continued, page 26
Figure   3–2:   Sample format for an OJT, observation, or familiarization training request, page 28
Figure   3–3:   Sample format of checklist for contractor training, page 32
Figure   4–1:   Format for submitting request for Mobile Education Team, page 57
Figure   4–1:   Format for submitting request for Mobile Education Team–Continued, page 58
Figure   4–2:   Format for security assistance team request/call-up, page 59
Figure   4–2:   Format for security assistance team request/call-up–Continued, page 60
Figure   4–3:   Format for after actions report for teams, page 67
Figure   4–3:   Format for after actions report for teams–Continued, page 68
Figure   5–1:   Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Speaking, page 82
Figure   5–1:   Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Speaking, page 83
Figure   5–1:   Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Speaking–Continued, page 84
Figure   5–1:   Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Speaking–Continued, page 85
Figure   5–1:   Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Speaking–Continued, page 86
Figure   5–2:   Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Listening, page 87
Figure   5–2:   Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Listening–Continued, page 88
Figure   5–2:   Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Listening–Continued, page 89
Figure   5–2:   Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Listening–Continued, page 90
Figure   5–3:   Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Reading, page 91
Figure   5–3:   Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Reading–Continued, page 92
Figure   5–3:   Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Reading–Continued, page 93
Figure   5–3:   Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Reading–Continued, page 94
Figure   5–4:   Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Writing, page 95
Figure   5–4:   Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Writing–Continued, page 96
Figure   5–4:   Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Writing–Continued, page 97
Figure   5–4:   Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Writing–Continued, page 98
Figure   9–1:   Invitational travel order, page 141
Figure   9–1:   Invitational travel order–Continued, page 142


                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                        xvii
Contents—Continued

Figure 9–1: Invitational travel order–Continued, page 143
Figure 9–1: Invitational travel order–Continued, page 144
Figure 9–1: Invitational travel order–Continued, page 145
Figure 9–1: Invitational travel order–Continued, page 146
Figure 9–1: Invitational travel order–Continued, page 147
Figure 9–2: Sample Training Management System generated ITO for IMET-funded training, page 148
Figure 9–2: Sample Training Management System generated ITO for IMET-funded training–Continued, page 149
Figure 9–2: Sample Training Management System generated ITO for IMET-funded training–Continued, page 150
Figure 9–2: Sample Training Management System generated ITO for IMET-funded training–Continued, page 151
Figure 9–3: Sample Training Management System generated amendment for ITO, page 151
Figure 9–4: Sample endorsement for ITO, page 152
Figure 9–5: Sample Training Management System Generated ITO for FMS-funded Training, page 153
Figure 9–5: Sample Training Management System Generated ITO for FMS-funded Training–Continued, page 154
Figure 9–5: Sample Training Management System Generated ITO for FMS-funded Training–Continued, page 155
Figure 9–6: Sample Training Management System Generated Amendment for ITO in figure 9–5, page 156
Figure 10–1: Sample of DD 2496 International Student Academic Report, page 1, page 175
Figure 10–2: General instructions for DD Form 2496 completion, page 176
Figure 10–2: General instructions for DD Form 2496 completion–Continued, page 177
Figure 13–1: Memorandum of agreement between the United States Department of Defense and the Ministry of
  Defense of (Country) Regarding the Exchange of Professional Military Education, page 245
Figure 13–1: Memorandum of agreement between the United States Department of Defense and the Ministry of
  Defense of (Country) Regarding the Exchange of Professional Military Education–Continued, page 246
Figure 13–1: Memorandum of agreement between the United States Department of Defense and the Ministry of
  Defense of (Country) Regarding the Exchange of Professional Military Education–Continued, page 247
Figure 13–1: Memorandum of agreement between the United States Department of Defense and the Ministry of
  Defense of (Country) Regarding the Exchange of Professional Military Education–Continued, page 248
Figure 13–1: Memorandum of agreement between the United States Department of Defense and the Ministry of
  Defense of (Country) Regarding the Exchange of Professional Military Education–Continued, page 249
Figure 13–1: Memorandum of agreement between the United States Department of Defense and the Ministry of
  Defense of (Country) Regarding the Exchange of Professional Military Education–Continued, page 250
Figure 13–1: Memorandum of agreement between the United States Department of Defense and the Ministry of
  Defense of (Country) Regarding the Exchange of Professional Military Education–Continued, page 251
Figure 13–1: Memorandum of agreement between the United States Department of Defense and the Ministry of
  Defense of (Country) Regarding the Exchange of Professional Military Education–Continued, page 252
Figure 13–1: Memorandum of agreement between the United States Department of Defense and the Ministry of
  Defense of (Country) Regarding the Exchange of Professional Military Education–Continued, page 253
Figure 13–2: Memorandum of agreement between DOD & MIN of Defense Service appendix, page 258
Figure 13–2: Memorandum of agreement between DOD & MIN of Defense Service appendix–Continued, page 259
Figure 13–3: Memorandum of agreement on the Exchange of Units between the United States (Military Department)
  and the (Country) Military Department), page 260
Figure 13–3: Memorandum of agreement on the Exchange of Units between the United States (Military Department)
  and the (Country) Military Department)–Continued, page 261
Figure 13–3: Memorandum of agreement on the Exchange of Units between the United States (Military Department)
  and the (Country) Military Department)–Continued, page 262
Figure 13–3: Memorandum of agreement on the Exchange of Units between the United States (Military Department)
  and the (Country) Military Department)–Continued, page 263
Figure 13–3: Memorandum of agreement on the Exchange of Units between the United States (Military Department)
  and the (Country) Military Department)–Continued, page 264
Figure 13–3: Memorandum of agreement on the Exchange of Units between the United States (Military Department)
  and the (Country) Military Department)–Continued, page 265
Figure 13–3: Memorandum of agreement on the Exchange of Units between the United States (Military Department)
  and the (Country) Military Department)–Continued, page 266
Figure 13–4: Memorandum of agreement on the Bilateral Exchange of Units between the United States (Military
  Department) and the ((Country Name) Military Department), page 267
Figure 13–4: Memorandum of agreement on the Bilateral Exchange of Units between the United States (Military
  Department) and the ((Country Name) Military Department)–Continued, page 268


xviii                     AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Contents—Continued

Figure 13–4: Memorandum of agreement on the Bilateral Exchange of Units between the United States (Military
  Department) and the ((Country Name) Military Department)–Continued, page 269
Figure 13–4: Memorandum of agreement on the Bilateral Exchange of Units between the United States (Military
  Department) and the ((Country Name) Military Department)–Continued, page 270
Figure 13–4: Memorandum of agreement on the Bilateral Exchange of Units between the United States (Military
  Department) and the ((Country Name) Military Department)–Continued, page 271
Figure 13–4: Memorandum of agreement on the Bilateral Exchange of Units between the United States (Military
  Department) and the ((Country Name) Military Department)–Continued, page 272
Figure 13–4: Memorandum of agreement on the Bilateral Exchange of Units between the United States (Military
  Department) and the ((Country Name) Military Department)–Continued, page 273
Figure 13–5: Memorandum of agreement between the Department of Defense of the United States of America and
  the Ministry of Defense of (Country Name) regarding the Exchange of Flight Training, page 274
Figure 13–5: Memorandum of agreement between the Department of Defense of the United States of America and
  the Ministry of Defense of (Country Name) regarding the Exchange of Flight Training–Continued, page 275
Figure 13–5: Agreement Between The Department of Defense Of The United States Of America And The Ministry
  Of Defense Of (Country Name) Regarding The Exchange Of Flight Training–Continued, page 276
Figure 13–5: Agreement Between The Department of Defense Of The United States Of America And The Ministry
  Of Defense Of (Country Name) Regarding The Exchange Of Flight Training–Continued, page 277
Figure 13–5: Memorandum of agreement between the Department of Defense of the United States of America and
  the Ministry of Defense of (Country Name) regarding the Exchange of Flight Training–Continued, page 278
Figure 13–5: Memorandum of agreement between the Department of Defense of the United States of America and
  the Ministry Of Defense of (Country Name) regarding the Exchange of Flight Training–Continued, page 279
Figure 13–5: Memorandum of agreement between the Department of Defense of the United States of America and
  the Ministry of Defense of (Country Name) regarding the Exchange of Flight Training–Continued, page 280
Figure 13–5: Memorandum of agreement between the Department of Defense of the United States of America and
  the Ministry of Defense of (Country Name) regarding the Exchange of Flight Training–Continued, page 281
Figure 13–5: Memorandum of agreement between the Department of Defense of the United States of America and
  the Ministry of Defense of (Country Name) regarding the Exchange of Flight Training–Continued, page 282
Figure 13–5: Memorandum of agreement between the Department of Defense of the United States of America and
  the Ministry of Defense of (Country Name) regarding the Exchange of Flight Training–Continued, page 283

Glossary




                          AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                       xix
Chapter 1
Introduction
1–1. Purpose
The Joint Security Cooperation Education and Training regulation prescribes policies, procedures, and responsibilities
for training international personnel in the categories described, below. Also, it applies to the entire security cooperation
education and training process from congressional and State or Defense Department authorization, through the
country’s identification (ID) of its training needs, through the programming and financial management process, and
through all aspects of education and training. It applies to—
   a. Training formulated under the Security Cooperation Education and Training Program (SCETP).
   b. Individual training attachment of international personnel on temporary duty (TDY).
   c. Orientations and observer visits by international military personnel performed at no expense to the U.S.
Government.

1–2. References
Required and related publications and prescribed and referenced forms are listed in appendix A.

1–3. Explanation of abbreviations and terms
Abbreviations and special terms used in this regulation are explained in the glossary.

1–4. Responsibilities
Responsibilities are listed in chapter 2.

1–5. Security Cooperation Education and Training Program
The SCETP consists of U.S. military education and training conducted by DOD for international personnel from
eligible countries in order to effectively advance U.S. security interests and build defense partnerships for the future.
This education and training is conducted within the continental United States (CONUS), primarily at military training
facilities, and outside the continental United States (OCONUS) by mobile education or training teams and at selected
U.S. facilities overseas. The SCETP is described in DOD 5105.38–M, C10.5–C10.7, and in paragraphs 3–3 through
3–6 in this regulation. The SCETP includes—
   a. Major training programs.
   (1) International Military Education and Training (IMET) is authorized by the Foreign Assistance Act (FAA) of
1961, as amended. The IMET includes education and training for which military departments (MILDEPs) are reim-
bursed from foreign assistance appropriations.
   (2) Foreign military sales (FMS) is authorized by the Arms Export Control Act (AECA), as amended. The FMS
covers the sale of defense articles, services, and training to eligible foreign governments and international organiza-
tions. These sales are reimbursed to the MILDEPs as required by law.
   b. Other training programs.
   (1) African Contingency Operations Training and Assistance.
   (2) Aviation Leadership Program.
   (3) Bilateral or regional cooperation programs.
   (4) Combatant commander initiative funds.
   (5) Disaster Response (Humanitarian Assistance).
   (6) Drawdowns of training.
   (7) Enhanced international peacekeeping capabilities.
   (8) Exchanges (professional military education (PME), exchange of training and related support, and flight training
exchanges).
   (9) International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement.
   (10) Joint combined exchange training (JCET).
   (11) Mine action.
   (12) Regional Centers for Security Studies.
   (a) Africa Center for Strategic Studies.
   (b) Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies.
   (c) Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies.
   (d) Marshall Center.
   (e) Near East South Asia Center for Strategic Studies.
   (13) Regional Defense Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP).
   (14) Section 1004–Counter-Drug Training Support.
   (15) Service Academy Programs.


                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                     1
    (a) Cadet Semester Exchange Abroad Program.
    (b) Military Services Academies International Student Program.
    (16) United States Coast Guard (USCG) Academy Foreign Cadet Program.
    (17) USCG Caribbean Support Tender.
    (18) National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency International Program.

1–6. Objectives of the Security Cooperation Education and Training Program
The objectives of the SCETP are to—
   a. Assist the foreign country in developing expertise and systems needed for effective management and operation of
its defense establishment.
   b. Foster the foreign country’s development of its own professional and technical training capability.
   c. Promote U.S. military rapport with the armed forces of foreign countries to operate in peacekeeping missions and
in coalition environments.
   d. Promote better understanding of the United States, its people, political system, institutions, democratic values, and
way of life.
   e. Increase the international military student (IMS) awareness of the U.S. commitment to the basic principles of
internationally recognized human rights.
   f. Develop skills needed for effective operation and maintenance of equipment acquired from the United States.



Chapter 2
Responsibilities

Section I
General

2–1. Purpose
This chapter outlines the responsibilities of the various departments, organizations, and elements involved in security
cooperation education and training, planning, management, and execution.

2–2. Secretary of State
The Secretary of State is responsible for continuous supervision and general direction of security assistance programs.
This includes determining whether (and when) there will be a program or sale for a particular country or activity (to
include IMET) and, if so, its size and scope. It also includes the determination of budget requests and allocation of
funds for military assistance. The Department of State (DOS) prepares the Security Cooperation Organization Mission
Performance Plan.

2–3. Secretary of Defense
The SECDEF establishes military requirements and implements programs to transfer defense articles and Services to
eligible foreign countries and international organizations. Within DOD, the principal planning agencies for security
cooperation are the Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA), the commanders of combatant commands, the joint
staff, the Security Cooperation Office, the MILDEP, and Service international organizations. Department of Defense
Directive (DODD) 5132.03 establishes policies and assigns DOD responsibilities relating to security cooperation.

2–4. Under Secretary of Defense for Policy
Under direction of the SECDEF, the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy (USD(P)) is the principal staff assistant and
advisor to the SECDEF and Deputy Secretary of Defense for all matters concerning the formation of national security
and defense policy and the integration and oversight of DOD policy and plans to achieve national security objectives.
USD(P) is the SECDEF’s principal security cooperation representative. USD(P) Assistant Secretaries with regional
responsibilities coordinate on security cooperation matters that directly affect their regions.

2–5. Assistant Secretary of Defense (International Security Affairs)
The ASD (ISA) under the authority, direction, and control of the USD(P) is responsible for supervising security
assistance programs with all foreign governments, with the exception of those of the New Independent States of the
former Soviet Union. This office is concerned with much more than just security assistance and includes a specific
DOD agency that interprets executive policy and develops Defense Department security assistance policies and
programs. The ASD (ISA) designated the DSCA, to administer and supervise the execution of all security cooperation
programs for the DOD.




2                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
2–6. Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense (Partnership Strategy and Stability Operations)
Under the authority, direction, and control of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Global Security Affairs) and the
USD(P) are responsible for providing security cooperation policy guidance in close collaboration with the regional
Deputy Assistant Secretaries of Defense (Policy). Under the direction of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Global
Security Affairs), the DSCA administers and supervises the execution of many security cooperation programs for the
DOD.

2–7. Assistant Secretary of Defense (Special Operations/Low Intensity Conflict)
The Assistant Secretary of Defense (Special Operations/Low Intensity Conflict) is the principal staff assistant and
civilian advisor to the USD(P) and the Secretary of Defense on Special Operations and Combating Terrorism. The
office of the Assistant SECDEF (Special Operations/Low Intensity Conflict) runs the Regional Defense Counterter-
rorism Fellowship Program.

2–8. Assistant Secretary of Defense (Strategy and Threat Reduction)
The Assistant SECDEF (Strategy and Threat Reduction) is the principal staff assistant and advisor to the USD(P) and
the principal staff assistant to the Secretary and Deputy Secretary of Defense on national security and defense strategy
and the forces and contingency plans necessary to implement defense strategy. This office is responsible for the
publication of security cooperation guidance.

2–9. Director, Defense Security Cooperation Agency
Under the direction of the USD(P), Director, DSCA directs, administers, and supervises the execution (to include
closure) of all security assistance programs for DOD. The Director, DSCA is the DOD focal point for government arms
transfers, budgets, legislative, projections, forecasting, and other security assistance matters (including IMET). The
Director, DSCA conducts international logistics and sales negotiations with foreign countries, provides financial
management, develops and implements security assistance policies, and assists U.S. industry in exporting military
equipment and services. All authorities conferred on the SECDEF by the FAA and AECA pertaining to security
assistance and all authorities under those acts delegated by the President to the SECDEF are redelegated to the
Director, DSCA. The Director, DSCA is not in the Security Cooperation Organization direct chain of command, but
funds Security Cooperation Organization program management. The Director, DSCA provides USD(P) staff support for
security assistance matters. The Director, DSCA also provides management oversight to a number of DOD schools that
provide security cooperation education and training both to the community itself and to international customers. These
include the Defense Institute for Security Assistance Management (DISAM) and the Defense Institute for International
Legal Studies. In addition to these institutions, there are a number of other DOD schools that fall under the
implementing agency of one of the MILDEPS that also provide education and training to international students. These
include the Defense Language Institute English Language Center (DLIELC) and the Defense Resources Management
Institute (DRMI).

2–10. Director, Defense Finance and Accounting Service
The Director, Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) performs accounting, billing, disbursing, and collecting
functions for the Security Cooperation Program. The DFAS also issues accounting procedures. The Defense Finance
and Accounting Service–Denver (DFAS–DE) is the primary office for security cooperation funding accountability.

2–11. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) consists of the Chairman, the Vice Chairman, the Chief of Staff of
the Army, the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), the Chief of Staff of the Air Force, and the Commandant of the
Marine Corps (CMC). The Joint Staff has the responsibility for the unified strategic direction of the combatant forces,
their operation under unified command, and their integration into an efficient team of land, naval, and air forces.

2–12. Commanders of combatant commands
   a. The commanders of combatant commands have security cooperation responsibilities that include correlation of
programs with regional plans, military advice, command, and support of the Security Cooperation Organization, and
supervision of budgets. They provide military assessments and Security Cooperation Program impacts within their
respective areas of responsibility to the CJCS.
   b. In accordance with DOD security cooperation guidance, each geographic commander of combatant commands
develops and publishes a Theater Security Cooperation Plan (TSCP) that outlines security cooperation efforts within
their assigned area of responsibility. These plans address all aspects of security cooperation including education and
training.
   c. The COCOMs conduct initiatives that include joint exercises (including activities in participating foreign coun-
tries), and humanitarian and civil assistance to military and related civilian personnel of foreign countries. These
initiatives are an important part of the commanders of combatant commands TSCPs.
   d. Military personnel assigned to Security Cooperation Organization within a geographic area are in the chain of


                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  3
command personnel. The commander (CDR) of a commanders of combatant commands rates Security Cooperation
Organization personnel, provides technical assistance, and administrative support, allocate funds made available by
DSCA and supervises the preparation and execution of Security Cooperation Organization budgets. The commanders of
combatant commands commander commands and supervises the Security Cooperation Organization in matters that are
not functions or responsibilities of the Chief of the U.S. Diplomatic Mission.
  e. Geographic commanders of combatant commands include the Africa Command (AFRICOM), Central Command
(CENTCOM), European Command, Northern Command, Pacific Command, and Southern Command.

2–13. Commanders of component commands
As directed by their commanders of combatant commands and commanders of Service component commands—
   a. Provide input into the development of the commanders of combatant commands TSCP.
   (1) Ensure that their Service capabilities are considered in the development of the TSCP.
   (2) Coordinate their Service’s participation in their commanders of combatant commands TSCP Regional Working
Groups. Service participants may include, but are not limited to—
   (a) Component representatives.
   (b) Service headquarters representatives.
   (c) Service security cooperation education and training execution agencies.
   (3) Participate in other security cooperation conferences sponsored by their commanders of combatant commands.
   (4) Recommend priorities for country invitations to Service PME courses.
   b. Execute designated portions of their commanders of combatant commands’s TSCP within capabilities and
resources.
   (1) Coordinate, plan, and execute assigned commanders of combatant commands initiatives that can be supported
from assigned component resources.
   (2) For those commanders of combatant commands initiatives that cannot be supported from assigned component
resources, formally forward or coordinate formal forwarding of request for support (resources) via the appropriate chain
of command to their Service headquarters.
   (3) Provide personnel to deploy to countries in support of security cooperation missions when tasked by appropriate
authority.
   c. In coordination with their Service security cooperation education and training execution agency, they will
maintain situational awareness of all Service security cooperation education or training assistance teams and personnel
deployed within their commanders of combatant commands’ geographic region.

2–14. Chiefs of security cooperation organizations
   a. The FAA authorizes the President to assign U.S. personnel overseas to manage security cooperation programs
administered by DOD. The generic term Security Cooperation Organization encompasses all DOD elements, regardless
of actual title, located in a foreign country to carry out security cooperation management functions. The programs
include grant military assistance, IMET, FMS, and other security cooperation programs.
   b. The Security Cooperation Organization personnel serve under the direction and supervision of the Chief of the
U.S. Diplomatic Mission to ensure that DOD security cooperation management responsibilities are properly executed.
The commanders of combatant commands command and supervise the Security Cooperation Organization in matters
that are not Chief of the U.S. Diplomatic Mission functions, including the provision of technical assistance and
administrative support. The Security Cooperation Organization Chief ensures that all Security Cooperation Organiza-
tion activities are fully coordinated with the Chief of the U.S. Diplomatic Mission.
   c. The SCOs communicate directly with DSCA, MILDEP, and Service security cooperation elements and activities
as appropriate and provide information copies of communications of record to the commanders of combatant com-
mands for evaluation and comment as specified by the commanders of combatant commands.
   d. The Security Cooperation Organization personnel perform the following security cooperation functions:
   (1) Security cooperation program management and oversight.
   (a) Assist foreign countries in—
   1. Planning and programming security cooperation education and training requirements.
   2. Submitting requirements to appropriate agencies.
   3. Administering approved programs in country.
   (b) Make recommendations concerning security cooperation education and training for their host country, assist in
development of security cooperation education and training programs, and submit appropriate program data.
   (c) Observe and report on the use of IMS trained under security cooperation.
   (d) Assist in the selection of IMS and ensure that IMS meet security, medical, English language, and technical
requirements for security cooperation education and training provided.
   (e) Ensure all IMS are briefed before their departure from the home country, to include information on required



4                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
physical fitness participation and level of fitness, swimming requirements, clothing, and equipment that must be
brought with the student, and other information peculiar to the student’s course of training.
   (f) Prepare necessary administrative documents related to education and training as required within this regulation.
   (g) To the maximum extent possible, obtain returning IMS feedback concerning the education or training and
support provided.
   (h) Provide appropriate IMS records to the initial training installation.
   (i) Release information in the IMS education/training and medical records to country personnel when appropriate.
However, records should be screened carefully to ensure that information of a sensitive nature is removed.
   (j) Provide administrative support for and country team supervisory control of deployed security cooperation
education or training teams in host country.
   (2) General advisory and training assistance. The Security Cooperation Organization personnel may provide advi-
sory and training assistance to the host country military establishment; however, this assistance must be minimal and
cannot interfere with the Security Cooperation Organization performance of security cooperation management
responsibilities.
   (3) Administrative support. The Security Cooperation Organization can provide normal administrative support for
personnel assigned in country to perform non-security cooperation functions so long as such support does not reach a
level that would require additional administrative personnel.
   (4) U.S. Defense Representative. When designated as the U.S. Defense Representative (USDR), the Security
Cooperation Organization Chief complies with Department of Defense instruction (DODI) 5105.57.
   (5) Safeguarding classified material. The Security Cooperation Organization safeguards U.S. security-cooperation
related classified information located in foreign countries. Except for classified information authorized for release to a
foreign government or international organization and under the control of that government or organization, the retention
of U.S. classified material is authorized only if it is necessary to satisfy U.S. Government (USG) mission requirements.

Section II
Department of the Army

2–15. Assistant Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology)
   a. The Assistant Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology) (ASA (ALT)), acts for the
Secretary of the Army and will—
   (1) Serve as the organization responsible for all Department of the Army (DA) matters and policy related to
acquisition, logistics, technology, procurement, the industrial base, and security cooperation (security assistance and
armaments cooperation).
   (2) Serve as the organization responsible for resourcing and overseeing the development, coordination, and imple-
mentation of policy and programs, associated with the Army’s security cooperation activities (FMS, foreign military
training, allocation of excess defense articles to foreign countries, armaments cooperation, technology transfer, direct
commercial sales, and munitions case processing).
   b. Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Defense Exports and Cooperation. The Deputy Assistant Secretary of
the Army for Defense Exports and Cooperation (DASA (DE&C)) discharges ASA (ALT) responsibilities for Security
Cooperation activities. The DASA (DE&C) is the U.S. Army lead for Security Assistance exports, technology transfer,
armaments cooperation, and for equipping and training our international partners. The DASA (DE&C) also manages,
leads, directs policy, resources, and strategy for the conduct of the Army’s global security cooperation programs with
direct tasking authority over the Army’s designated lead commands for the execution of their delegated security
cooperation responsibilities. Regarding security assistance/international training and Security Assistance Teams (SAT),
DASA (DE&C) will—
   (1) Develop, coordinate, and promulgate Armywide Secretary of the Army policy, including the development of
Army input to specific country security cooperation (SC) programs in support of the Headquarters, Department of the
Army (HQDA) missions.
   (2) Exercise policy responsibility for security cooperation team under the IMET; FMS; foreign military financing
(FMF), and other applicable authority as directed by DOD.
   (3) Receive, staff, and serve as final HQDA decision authority for resourcing requests for Army SAT from
authorized command and agencies.
   (4) For approved SAT requests, coordinate with the Deputy Chief of Staff, G–3/5/7 (DCS, G–3/5/7) for tasking
responsible Army agencies and commands for execution.
   (5) Return disapproved requests to the requesting command or agency.
   (6) Be the final decision authority on discrepancies that occurs between the Training and Doctrine Command
(TRADOC) and Army Materiel Command (AMC) on contractor issues.
   c. Commanding General, Training and Doctrine Command. The CG, TRADOC will—




                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                   5
   (1) Serve as the Army lead command for the operation, development, offer and execution of Security Cooperation
training letters of offer and acceptance (LOA) which are also called cases).
   (2) Serve as the Army lead for the management and mission execution of HQDA-approved SATs.
   (3) Task TRADOC, CONUS, Army commands (ACOMs) (less United States Army Special Operations Command
(USASOC)), and other direct reporting units (DRUs) to provide personnel, supplies and equipment to countries and/or
to task training support materiel, program of instruction, and foreign disclosure in accordance with HQDA taskings.
   (4) Provide centralized financial management and distribution of FMS and IMET program training funds for all
operating agencies and training providers.
   (5) As required, provide case/program funding to commanders of combatant commands or Army service component
commands (ASCCs) that resource SAT from their internal assets.
   (6) Maintain security cooperation training execution data sufficient to reply to standard requests for information
(RFI).
   (7) Maintain a capability to contract Army SAT.
   (8) Comply with HQDA tasking suspenses and requirements.
   d. Commanding General, U.S. Army Materiel Command. The CG, AMC will—
   (1) Serve as the Army lead for the operation and execution of Security Cooperation materiel LOA.
   (2) Coordinate and advise TRADOC for training request to support U.S. Army-procured equipment.
   (3) Serve as the Army central manager for all approved Army SC cases and exercises sole source approval for
contracted Army SC training requirements.
   (4) Develop, plan, deploy, and support all new equipment training, quality assurance teams, calibration teams, repair
and return teams.
   (5) Coordinate all Army SAT requirements with TRADOC during LOA development, except as listed in paragraph
(4), above.
   (6) Before conducting training, provide Air Worthiness assessment and certification for SC flight training when host
nation aircraft will be flown by U.S. DOD/contractor personnel. Provide funding by case or other Government sources.
   (7) Provide timely response, and comply with tasking suspense and requirements from DCS, G–3/5/7 designated
SAT lead. If unable to support OCONUS SAT missions under this regulation, must respond to lead agent by
memorandum over a general officer signature.
   (8) Comply with HQDA tasking suspense and requirements.
   e. Deputy Chief of Staff, G–3/5/7. The DCS, G–3/5/7 will—
   (1) Receive, assess, and provide DCS, G–3/5/7 position for Army SAT requests.
   (2) Task HQDA, ACOMs, and DRUs, as appropriate, for the sourcing and support to TRADOC for execution of
approved Army SAT, at the request of DASA (DE&C).
   (3) Coordinate temporary tour of active duty (TTAD) funding for non-FMS (cash) SAT, for HQDA-approved
Reserve Component and National Guard sourced teams.
   f. Deputy Chief of Staff, G–1. The DCS, G–1 will—
   (1) Participate in the HQDA review and approval process for Army SAT requests.
   (2) Provide guidance throughout the Army on the availability and provision of military (except Army Medical
Department officers) and DOD civilians to support permanent change of station (PCS) SAT.
   (3) Comply with HQDA tasking suspense and requirements.
   g. Chief, Army Reserve. The Chief, Army Reserve will—
   (1) Identify and activate United States Army Reserve (USAR) Soldiers to execute SAT missions in accordance with
AR 135–210, as directed by DCS, G–3/5/7.
   (2) Coordinate with TRADOC G–3/Security Assistance Training Field Activity (SATFA) and other Army agencies
to fund TTAD and travel costs.
   (3) Comply with HQDA tasking suspense and requirements.
   h. Chief, National Guard Bureau. The Chief, National Guard Bureau will—
   (1) Identify and activate National Guard Soldiers to execute SAT mission in accordance with AR 135–210, as
directed by DCS, G–3/5/7.
   (2) Coordinate with TRADOC G–3/SATFA and other Army agencies to fund TTAD and travel costs.
   (3) Comply with HQDA tasking suspense and requirements.
   i. The Surgeon General. The Surgeon General will—
   (1) Participate in the HQDA review and approval process for Army medical SAT requests.
   (2) Assist and provide guidance to TRADOC regarding HQDA-approved medical team missions, composition, and
training support requirements based on the SAT request.
   (3) Comply with HQDA tasking suspense and requirements.
   j. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) is the overall supervisor and coordinate
for all engineering activities associated with, and in support of, assigned security cooperation programs and projects.


6                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   k. Army service component commands. Army service component commands (ASCC) will—
   (1) Receive, review, and assess requests for Army SAT and recommend to the commanders of combatant commands
approval, disapproval, or execution within ASCC assets.
   (2) Coordinate any requirements external to the ASCC, if the commanders of combatant commands approves
internal ASCC execution. Coordinate with the Security Cooperation Organization and TRADOC, for external funding.
   (3) Be responsible for all team preparation, pre-deployment, team support, and redeployment requirements, for
ASCC-executed teams.
   l. Other Army commands, Army staff agencies, and direct reporting units. Other ACOMs, Army staff agencies, and
DRU, for DCS, G–3/5/7 designated SAT lead tasking, will—
   (1) Provide military and Department of the Army (DA) civilian SAT members who meet qualifications specified in
the taskings, and afford them sufficient time, guidance, and support to prepare for their OCONUS missions.
   (2) Comply with HQDA tasking suspenses and requirements.

2–16. Deputy Chief of Staff, G–3/5/7
The DCS, G–3/5/7 will—
   a. Support DASA (DE&C) in reconciling Army Security Cooperation Program issues and foreign requests for
defense articles and services with the U.S. Strategic Plan and policy objectives.
   b. Program IMET and FMS CONUS training requirements in the Army Program for Individual Training; task Army
trainers to accomplish the training.
   c. Serve as the DA proponent for unit exchange training.
   d. Serve as the DA proponent for the Professional Military Exchange Program.
   e. Coordinate with the U.S. Army Staff and develop priorities for seat allocation which establishes international
participation at the U.S. Army War College (AWC), intermediate level education (ILE), and United States Army
Sergeants Major Academy (USASMA) in accordance with the U.S. Army Security Cooperation Strategy (USASCS).
   f. Coordinate with the ACOMs and the commanders of combatant commands Security Cooperation Training
Program managers and provide recommendations to the Chief of Staff, Army (CSA) for foreign military attendees to
the AWC. Generate the invitation letters and provide them to the country counterparts.
   g. Coordinate with the ASCCs and the commanders of combatant commands\Security Cooperation Training Pro-
gram managers and provide recommendations to the CSA for foreign military attendees ILE and USASMA. Generate
and send out a message inviting the recommended countries.
   h. Resolve foreign training problems between two or more ACOMs, or between the TRADOC, and foreign
government representatives.

2–17. Deputy Chief of Staff, G–1
The DCS, G–1 will recommend policies to procure, distribute, manage, retain, and separate U.S. military and civilian
personnel in support of security cooperation.

2–18. Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management and Comptroller)
The Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management and Comptroller) will—
  a. Establish financial management procedures for SC programs within the framework of requirements prescribed by
higher authority.
  b. Establish and issue policy, principles, and systems for financing, funding, accounting, and financial reporting for
FMS, IMET, and related programs.
  c. Make and issue uniform policy and principles for use in setting up and maintaining uniform application of pricing
and cost criteria. These criteria are for sales of defense articles, services, and training furnished to foreign governments
and international organizations under IMET, FMS, and related programs.
  d. Receive IMET funds from DSCA.

2–19. Deputy Chief of Staff, G–2
The DCS, G–2, as the principal disclosure authority for the Army, exercises executive level oversight of foreign
disclosure activities across the Army. AR 380–10 provides Army policy with regard to the disclosure of classified
military information (CMI) and controlled unclassified information (CUI) to foreign nationals. This regulation also
assigns responsibilities with respect to the sharing of information and control of foreign visitors, liaison officers,
exchange personnel, cooperative program personnel, and other representatives of foreign governments or international
organizations. The DCS, G–2 will—
   a. Approve disclosure of CMI to foreign governments for the following:
   (1) Sale, grant, or loan of equipment.
   (2) Training of IMS.
   (3) Tours and visits.



                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                     7
   (4) Requests for documentary data.
   (5) Foreign representatives accredited to DA.
   b. Process exceptions to the National Disclosure Policy (NDP).
   c. Monitor unit exchanges and advise the Army staff and major subordinate commands (MSCs) on security
implications.
   d. Oversee and monitor all intelligence related SC missions.
   e. Coordinate with SATFA in performing scheduling, administrative and protocol functions for Washington, DC
field trips for selected IMS.

2–20. Commanding General, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command
   a. The CG, TRADOC is the implementing agent for development and implementation of the Security Cooperation
Training Program and related training programs under the DOS and Defense. TRADOC is responsible for the central
financial management and distribution of decentralized IMET and FMS training funds for all operating agencies as
required by HQDA. The CG, TRADOC will oversee, through the Commander, United States Army Combined Arms
Center, the operation of the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation (WHINSEC). The CG, TRADOC
operates and administers the Security Cooperation Training Program through the DCS, G–3/5/7. The Director, Security
Assistance Training Directorate is dual-hatted as Director, SATFA. The Director, SATFA, will—
   (1) Implement, supervise, and administer the Army Security Cooperation Training Program within established
policies, directives and guidance provided by DOD and DA.
   (2) Review international training requirements, determine which agencies will fulfill the requirements, and identify
costs of the training programs involved. Maintain training requirements via the Standardized Training List (STL).
   (3) Expedite training requirements for approved programs.
   (4) Task lateral U.S. Army CONUS commands and coordinate with U.S. Army overseas commands on Security
Cooperation Training Program requirements.
   (5) Develop training plans to support equipment purchases or transfer; ensure training is provided under the total
package approach (TPA) by coordinating with U.S. Army Security Assistance Command (USASAC); develop special
unique training to support international customers.
   (6) Provide guidance and task U.S. Army Security Assistance Training Management Organization (SATMO) for
OCONUS SAT.
   (7) Manage all SAT FMS cases in the Defense Security Assistance Management System (DSAMS) to include those
for OCONUS SAT, except for those listed in paragraph 2–14d(4).
   (8) Act as point of contact with all foreign attaches, Security Cooperation Organization, and U.S. country represent-
atives for established SCETP to include—
   (a) Program changes.
   (b) IMS disposition.
   (c) IMS administrative and personal problems.
   (d) Serious incident reporting.
   (9) Develop and maintain information to evaluate the magnitude, trends, and effects of SCETP.
   (10) Develop TRADOC course costs for inclusion in the Training Military Articles and Services Listing; consolidate
other MSCs tuition data, and include in the Training Military Articles and Service List.
   (11) Act as the U.S. Army IMET appropriation manager. Prepare and submit to DSCA the Army requirement for,
and administer, nonregional IMET funds (N6A and N7B) and country IMET funds (N7B) designated for CONUS
orientation tour (OT) escort officers.
   (12) Serve as financial point of contact for distribution/management, billing, collection, and reimbursement of the
Army SCETP.
   (13) Review and approve all CONUS Army Field Studies Program plans, budgets, and reimbursements.
   (14) Determine releasability of country requests for training, in coordination with DCS, G–2.
   (15) Develop and maintain the U.S. Army Secretary of the Army Training Web site and Secretary of the Army
training resource material for international military student officer (IMSO) personnel.
   (16) Program necessary changes to IMET Program received from SCOs and submit them to DSCA via the Security
Assistance Network (SAN) Web.
   (17) Support DA and represent TRADOC at OCONUS and CONUS international military training workshop and
conferences. Project out-year SC training requirements, reserving wholesale seats in Army courses in anticipation of
demand.
   (18) Plan, coordinate and fund Washington, DC field trip.
   (19) Ensure that an IMSO is appointed on every Army installation where IMS are trained. The IMSO will perform
IMS administrative functions, monitor training and plan, and implement the Field Studies Program.
   (20) Develop temporary living allowance (TLA) estimates for the IMET Program. Provide fund cites for inclusion in
the invitational travel order (ITO). Perform TLA accounting for all Army-sponsored international students.


8                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   b. The Commander, U.S. John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and School, as delegated by CG, TRADOC
through Commander, USASOC, will provide administrative support (facilities, training, legal, awards, and so forth), for
SATMO. The SATMO will—
   (1) Serve as the TRADOC implementing agency (IA) for the OCONUS portion of the TRADOC SC training
mission.
   (2) Task lateral CONUS commands and other U.S. Army CONUS activities to field training teams or to provide
training support material for teams, as required.
   (3) Coordinate with other MILDEP, DA, overseas commands, and OCONUS SC elements on training team matters.
   (4) Maintain direct communication with and conduct liaison visits to CONUS and OCONUS United States SC
agencies, to include commanders of combatant commands/component command Headquarters (HQ), MSCs, civil
government agencies, nongovernment civilian activities, and other TRADOC elements.
   (5) Develop, plan for, and deploy OCONUS SAT except for quality assurance team, new equipment training,
calibration, repair, return, and non-standard items, which are managed by the AMC.
   (6) Coordinate requirements for OCONUS teams among security assistance elements. SATMO in conjunction with
SATFA, manages financial transactions associated with team deployments.
   (7) Coordinate responses to requests received from Security Cooperation Organization or foreign countries for
training literature, programs of instruction, lesson plans, and other training materials.
   (8) Provide representation at CONUS and OCONUS international military training conferences.
   (9) Maintain central training records and status of requests and monitor training completed in relation to forecasts.

2–21. Commanding general, U.S. Army Materiel Command
The CG, AMC, will—
   a. Serve as the DA implementing agent for the operation of approved materiel FMS/Foreign Military Financing
Program cases. The SC implementing agent responsibilities are discharged primarily through USASAC. AMC responsi-
bilities are in AR 12–1.
   b. Coordinate the releasability of materiel, publications, training aids, and training devices.
   c. Ensure foreign disclosure guidance on materiel items is provided to TRADOC, foreign disclosure officer (FDO),
in sufficient detail to support training course development for foreign government trainees, as required.

2–22. The Surgeon General
The Surgeon General directs, controls and oversees all Army medical training. The Office of the Surgeon General
International Programs will—
   a. Receive and process all U.S. Army Medical Department (AMEDD) international training requirements via
SATFA.
   b. Represent The Surgeon General at Security Cooperation Education and Training Working Group meetings;
review all foreign country medical training requirements for CONUS command (to include Alaska and Hawaii)
AMEDD activities; determine the AMEDD capability and which AMEDD activity will fulfill the requirement; ensure
compliance with DA and DOD policies and directives.
   c. Develop and refine the AMEDD training program, allocate AMEDD quotas, develop individual medical observer
training (OBT) and on-the-job-training (OJT) programs, develop course costs, as appropriate, and advise SATFA for
inclusion in the Training Military Articles and Service List, and approve English Comprehension Level (ECL) waivers
for AMEDD training.
   d. Act as the point of contact between SATFA and AMEDD activities for all AMEDD training matters to include—
   (1) Program changes.
   (2) IMS disposition.
   (3) IMS administrative and personal problems that will affect student status.
   (4) Serious incident reporting.
   e. Serve as the point of contact for all Army activities for student and Family member healthcare issues.

2–23. Heads of other Army commands and U.S. Army staff agencies
Based on guidance furnished by HQDA, heads of other MSCs, and Army staff agencies, within their respective
functional areas, will—
   a. Support and supervise the administration and training of IMS, including—
   (1) Upon formal tasking, provide training, including OBT and OJT as required to support the SCETP.
   (2) Administer SCETP funds and submit financial and training reports according to governing regulations and
standing operating procedures.
   (3) Monitor the progress of training and the welfare of IMS to include administration of the Field Studies Program.
   (4) Conduct training in cultural awareness of personnel responsible for administration and training of IMS.
   (5) Participate as required in OT at Army Service schools and installations under their jurisdiction.


                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  9
  b. Develop course costs as appropriate and advise SATFA for inclusion in the Training Military Articles and Service
List.
  c. Review, process, and forward proposed unit exchange programs annually to HQDA (DAMO–TRF), 450 Army
Pentagon, Washington, DC 20130–0450, for Chief of Staff approval.

2–24. Commandant, Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation
   a. The Commandant, WHINSEC operates a DOD school under the executive agency leadership of the U.S. Army.
Title 10, United States Code (10 USC), charges WHINSEC to—
   (1) Provide professional education and training, primarily in the Spanish language, to military, law enforcement, and
civilian personnel of the Western Hemisphere within the context of the democratic principles of the Organization of
American States.
   (2) Foster mutual knowledge, transparency, confidence, and cooperation among the participating nations.
   (3) Promote democratic values, respect for human rights, and knowledge and understanding of U.S. customs and
traditions.
   b. Commandant, WHINSEC supports a federal advisory committee called the Board of Visitors, which maintains
independent review, observation, and recommendations regarding operations of the institute. It was chartered in
accordance with the law that established WHINSEC.
   c. To enhance the mission of WHINSEC, the Commandant will—
   (1) Develop and manage a Guest Instructor Program.
   (2) Develop and manage a Fellows Program.
   (3) Recognize leaders in the promotion of democracy and human rights throughout the Western Hemisphere through
an annual Lecture Series and Awards Program.
   (4) Develop and manage an intern program to involve U.S. university students in hemispheric relations through an
understanding of the value of security cooperation.
   (5) Hire Title 10, USC, civilian professors to develop courses and instruct at WHINSEC as an adjunct campus of
U.S. Army Command and General Staff College.
   (6) Conduct conferences, seminars and symposia to enrich the curriculum and expand student learning.
   (7) Develop and conduct relevant courses that meet the challenges of the 21st Century in the primary languages of
the hemisphere.

2–25. Overseas Army commanders
Overseas Army commanders will conduct IMS training programs in accordance with policies and regulations pre-
scribed by their unified commander, using this regulation as a guide.

Section III
Department of the Navy (U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Coast Guard)

2–26. Secretary of the Navy
The Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) is responsible for the overall policy direction, coordination, planning, program-
ming, and supervision of security cooperation matters for the Department of Navy (DON).

2–27. Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development, and Acquisition
The responsibilities of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development, and Acquisition include the
development of policy and provision of management oversight for the DON international research, development, and
acquisition efforts.

2–28. Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for International Programs/Director of Navy
International Programs
The Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for International Programs (DASN/International Program)/Director of
Navy International Programs Office (IPO) Navy is a dual hatted-position. As the DASN/International Program,
formulates and manages international policy for the ASN (RDA). As the Director, Navy IPO has overall responsibility
for development of policy, implementation, and management oversight of the SCETP. In addition, Navy IPO imple-
ments and manages approved DON SCETP and is the implementing agent for DON SCETP matters with foreign
countries. The Director, Navy IPO, will—
   a. Establish implementation policies governing DON training furnished under SC to international students.
   b. Implement and direct execution of approved programs according to policies, instructions, and procedures estab-
lished by or on behalf of Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA).
   c. Monitor execution of the DON SCETP.
   d. Coordinate with Commandant, USCG International Affairs (G–CI) and other U.S. Government agencies on
matters relating to DON SCETP.


10                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   e. Negotiate LOAs with foreign governments and monitor FMS training cases. Coordinate all LOAs to ensure
adherence to congressional, DOD and DON policies.
   f. Establish policies relating to financial management of DON SCETP. Coordinate with the Office of the Secretary
of Defense (OSD) on financial issues relating to DON SCETP.
   g. Establish English language proficiency levels required for Naval Command College, Naval Staff College, Naval
Postgraduate School (NPS), and Systems Commands (SYSCOMs). Approve ECL and rank waivers for Naval Com-
mand College and Naval Staff College, and SYSCOMs.
   h. Authorize disclosure and releasability for USN/USCG SC training with classified military information and
controlled unclassified information.
   i. Establish policy for, implement, and supervise execution of the DON portion of the Field Studies Program and
extraordinary expense (N6) and supervise execution. Review and approve command Field Studies Program for Naval
Command College and Naval Staff College, Naval Postgraduate School, and SYSCOMs.
   j. Prepare SECNAV instructions pertaining to DON SC matters.
   k. Coordinate the DON portion of SCETWGs.
   l. Coordinate medical waivers for international students attending U.S. Navy courses.
   m. Coordinate, as appropriate, Secretary of the Army sponsored distinguished visitor orientation tour within CONUS
foreign CNO or higher level visits involving DOD (OSD/DSCA) SECNAV, CNO, and U.S. Navy commands and
activities.

2–29. Chief of Naval Operations
The Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) will—
   a. Provide guidance on the strategic role that international training and education plays in the overall defense
strategy of the U.S. Navy.
   b. Ensure that U.S. Navy major claimants execute the Navy portion of DON SCETP in accordance with appropriate
SECNAV policies and procedures.
   c. Ensure foreign training requirements are included in development of the U.S. Navy Training Plan. This includes
the requirements from other services for international training.
   d. Ensure that international training is considered and identified as appropriate in the development of Navy Training
Plans for weapons systems and equipment.
   e. Coordinate ship transfer, overhaul, and refresher training portion of U.S. Navy SCETP.
   f. Manage and allocate international quotas for Naval Command College and Naval Staff College, and issue
invitations to countries selected for attendance.
   g. Execute the PME and unit training and related support exchange programs for the U.S. Navy. Manage the U.S.
Navy PME and staff the U.S. Navy Service Appendix to the DOD PME Exchange Agreements (see fig 13–2) for
signature within U.S. Navy Education and Training chain of command and foreign embassies.
   h. Provide political-military guidance as necessary to Navy IPO to resolve distribution of limited training quotas.

2–30. Commandant of the Marine Corps
The CMC will implement the Marine Corps portion of the DON SCETP. The Commandant’s implementing agent for
all security cooperation is the Deputy Commandant, Plans, Policies, and Operations. This responsibility is executed by
the International Issues Branch of the Strategy and Plans Division (Code: PLU).

2–31. Commanding General, Training and Education Command
The Commandant’s responsibility for the management and implementation of the Marine Corps portion of the DON
SCETP is executed by the Commanding general, Training and Education Command (CG, TECOM). This is accom-
plished through the Director, Security Cooperation Education and Training Center. Director, Security Cooperation
Education and Training Center will—
   a. Plan, coordinate, administer, and track Marine Corps security cooperation education and training programs for
international students.
   (1) Serve as the focal point for all Marine Corps security cooperation education and training matters, coordinating as
required with customer country representatives, Security Cooperation Organization, DOD office, and staff agencies,
other government departments and agencies, the geographic commanders of combatant commands, and their security
cooperation offices and agencies, and other Marine Corps commands, activities, or staff agencies relating to the United
States Marine Corp (USMC) SCETP.
   (2) In coordination with Security Cooperation Organization or other security cooperation personnel assigned to the
U.S. Country Team within a customer country, Deputy Commandant, Plans, Policy and Operations and the appropriate
Marine Component Command, review country requests for Marine Corps education and training and determine
suitability, availability, and supportability.




                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  11
   (3) Represent the Marine Corps at the various commanders of combatant commands SCETWGs by coordinating
participation by personnel from Marine Component Commands and other Marine Corps personnel, as required.
   (4) In coordination with the appropriate Marine Component Command, participate in the various commanders of
combatant commands TSCP regional working groups.
   (5) Participate in other DOD, commanders of combatant commands, MILDEP, or Military Service sponsored
security cooperation conferences, workshops, or meetings, as required.
   (6) In coordination with Marine Corps Systems Command, develop training plans to support equipment, or weapons
systems purchases, or transfer ensuring training is provided under the TPA.
   (7) In coordination with Deputy Commandant, Plans, Policy and Operations, establish appropriate policies and
procedures for the execution of the USMC SCETP.
   (a) Develop USMC SCETP course costs for the military articles and services list (MASL).
   (b) Establish prerequisites for international students attending Marine Corps education and training. Prerequisites
include, but are not limited to, ECL and oral proficiency interview (OPI) requirements, rank requirements, physical
fitness (to include swimming qualification) requirements and education or training that must be completed prior to
enrollment.
   (c) Approval authority for customer country requests for waivers for established prerequisites.
   (8) Manage and administer USMC SCETP in accordance with established law, regulations, policies and procedures.
   (a) Determine international requirements for Marine Corps education and training, including requirements requested
through other Services, and coordinate inclusion of these requirements in the development of the Marine Corps
Training Input Plan; serve as sponsor and quota manager for international quotas for Marine Corps education and
training.
   (b) On behalf of the commandant, issue invitations to countries selected for attendance at Command and Staff
College and other designated professional military education schools.
   (c) Ensure all Marine Corps commands and activities providing education and training to international students
appoint an IMSO to coordinate the education and training of internationals at their command or activity. Conduct direct
liaison with TECOM elements and their designated IMSO, as well as other Marine Corps commands and activities and
their designated IMSO, to provide guidance and direction on the execution of security cooperation education and
training.
   (d) Conduct the Marine Corps portion of the DON IMSO Workshop and coordinate Marine Corps IMSO
participation.
   (e) Coordinate with Marine Corps Systems Command (International Programs) to ensure the contractor provided
training for international is administered and reported in accordance with current regulations, policies, and procedures
governing such training.
   (f) Ensure that all Marine Corps commands and activities providing education or training to international military
students submit all required reports documenting the education or training presented.
   (g) Coordinate with Deputy Commandant, Plans, Policy and Operations on disclosure and releasability of Marine
Corps CMI and CUI associated with the provision of security cooperation education and training; coordinate annual
disclosure review of currently approved course containing CMI and CUI.
   (h) Develop, maintain, and promulgate the Marine Corps Security Cooperation Education and Training Desktop
Guide, and other informational publications as required; develop and maintain an appropriate site on the world wide
web for Marine Corps security cooperation education and training information.
   (9) Under the FMS Program, act as case administering office (CAO) for FMS cases that support deployed Marine
Corps training assistance teams or personnel as well as other FMS training related cases as designated by Navy IPO.
   (a) Develop price and availability data, or LOA data for FMS cases involving Marine Corps education and training.
   (b) Coordinate with Navy IPO on CAO matters.
   (c) Coordinate with Navy IPO and Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity (Naval
Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity) on FMS cases written by that field activity that include
Marine Corps education and training.
   (d) Coordinate with Marine Corps Systems Command (International Programs) on FMS cases written by that
Command that includes Marine Corps education and training.
   (e) Coordinate all LOA, regardless of CAO, that include Marine Corps education and training.
   (f) In coordination with the appropriate CAO, maintain program management, to include fiscal control, of all FMS
cases that have a preponderance of Marine Corps education and training.
   (10) Coordinate, as appropriate, Secretary of the Army sponsored within CONUS, foreign CNO, or higher level
visits involving Marine Corps commands, or activities, as required.
   (11) In coordination with Deputy Commandant, Plans, Policy and Operations, coordinate provision of Marine Corps
education or training under Presidential drawdown authority.
   (12) In coordination with Deputy Commandant, Plans, Policy and Operations, negotiate and execute Marine Corps
annex to DOD Professional Military Education Exchange Program.


12                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   (13) Coordinate the Marine Corps Professional Military Education Exchange Program and staff the service appendix
to the DOD PME Exchange Agreements (see fig 13–2) for signature.
   b. Plan, prepare, deploy, sustain, and redeploy Marine Corps security cooperation teams and personnel to execute
advisory, education, or training missions not executed by Marine Corps component commands. Direct liaison is
authorized for all phases of planning, deployment, sustainment, and redeployment.
   (1) Upon receipt of a validated request for the deployment of Marine Corps security cooperation teams or personnel
from D/C PP&O, to include identification of and sourcing of personnel to be deployed, initiate planning for
deployment.
   (a) Conduct/validate mission analysis.
   (b) Conduct pre-deployment site survey.
   (c) Prepare budget and support requirements and coordinate receipt of funding.
   (d) Coordinate approval of deployment plan, as required.
   (e) Verify vetting of personnel to be trained.
   (2) Upon identification of personnel, prepare, and deploy team/personnel.
   (a) Coordinate all administrative actions, as required.
   (b) Coordinate all support/logistical actions, as required.
   (c) Coordinate all fiscal/financial actions, as required.
   (d) Prescribe, coordinate, and provide, or coordinate provision of, all required pre-deployment training assuring that
all external requirements are met.
   (e) Deploy team/personnel in accordance with approved deployment plan.
   (3) Upon deployment, coordinate sustainment of team/personnel, as required.
   (4) Upon completion of mission, or as otherwise directed, coordinate redeployment of team/personnel.
   (a) Ensure all administrative actions are concluded, as required.
   (b) Ensure all support/logistical actions are concluded, as required.
   (c) Ensure all fiscal/financial actions are concluded, as required.
   (d) Ensure all reporting requirements are met.
   c. Serve as financial point of contact for billing, collecting, and reimbursement of Marine Corps security cooperation
education and training.
   d. In coordination with Deputy Commandant, Plans, Policy and Operations and Deputy Commandant for Manpower
and Reserve Affairs, as required, prescribe and coordinate required training for all Marine Corps personnel involved in
the management or execution of security cooperation.
   (1) Manage and allocate Marine Corps quotas for the DISAM.
   (2) Manage the DON International Affairs Workforce Education, Training, and Certification Program for all Marine
Corps personnel, military and civilian, involved in the management of security cooperation education and training.
   e. Provide a link to governmental and nongovernmental organizations in support of Marine Corps efforts in
Humanitarian Assistance and Civil Military Operations.

2–32. Commander, Marine Corps Systems Command
The Commander, Marine Corps Systems Command serves as the Commandant’s principal agent for acquisition and
sustainment of systems and equipment used by Marine Corps Operating Forces to accomplish their warfighting
mission. The execution of those functions relating to international programs is the responsibility of Director, Interna-
tional Program. Director, International Program plans, coordinates, implements, and executes all Marine Corps related
SC acquisition and logistics matters as well as certain cooperative programs. Director, International Program acts as
office of primary responsibility (OPR) for unilateral or combined exercises involving USMC installations, facilities, or
personnel where the costs are captured via FMS. Director, International Program is the SYSCOM Security Cooperation
Office (SSCO) for all Maine Corps acquisition, logistics support, and exercise related FMS cases. In support of
SCETP, Director, International Program will—
   a. Carryout OJT, contractor training, factory training, and nonstandard training provided in support of Marine Corps
acquisition, or logistics FMS cases.
   b. Direct the project management effort for the integration of training and material in major weapons systems
transfers and, in concert with Security Cooperation Education and Training Center for Marine Corps weapons systems,
integrate initial and life cycle training requirements to support the TPA in material transfers.
   c. For contractor provided training, ensure that the applicable statement of work (SOW) provides students scheduled
for such training the same basic student support afforded IMS attending education or training at a U.S. Service school
and that all required reports are submitted as required by this regulation.

2–33. Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard, International Affairs
The Coast Guard, even though not part of the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy, is one of the five
Armed Forces as reflected in the Foreign Assistance Act and the Arms Export Control Act. As such, the Coast Guard


                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  13
plays an important role in the SCETP and holds a unique place in the Department of the Navy (DON) SCETP. The
International Affairs (G–CI) Staff is responsible for the management and direction of overall USCG participation in the
SCETP, as well as, international training and technical assistance activities. The SCETP responsibilities include—
   a. Formulation of USCG SCETP strategy, policy, and procedures for execution and financial management of the
USCG SCETP.
   b. Coordination of USCG personnel assigned to Security Cooperation Organization staffs.
   c. Correlation of training and technical assistance requirements of foreign nations to the capabilities of USCG
activities.
   d. Coordination and liaison with the military services and other DOD agencies, Department of State, SC organiza-
tions, international organizations, and all components of the USCG.
   e. Coordinate disclosure and releasability of USCG training and training materials prior to responding to foreign
request.
   f. Evaluate, approve and assign all requests for USCG security assistance training teams, assessment teams, training
surveys and maritime advisors.
   g. Conduct and coordinate SC-sponsored OT, unit exchanges and visits involving USCG commands and activities.
   h. Program and manage USCG international training within the DON standardized training list (STL).
   i. Management, planning, scheduling, and allocation of international training quotas.
   j. Coordination of LOA relating to USCG training.
   k. Development of price and availability data, formulate procedures for and conduct course costing and coordinate
financial procedures for reimbursable billings.
   l. Establishment of ECL required for all USCG international training, and approves ECL waivers for USCG
international training.
   m. Provide USCG portion of the MASL in the DON Programming Guide.
   n. Develop, maintain, and promulgate the USCG International Training Handbook and the USCG International
Military Student Officer (IMSO) Guide.
   o. Conduct the USCG portion of Security Cooperation Education and Training Working Group and participate in
other conferences or workshops related to SCETP issues.
   p. Coordination of IMSO assignments and provision of IMSO and IMS administrative policy and guidance.
   q. Develop procedures for and administer the USCG Field Studies Program including review and approval of USCG
Field Studies Program budgets and plans.

2–34. Assistant Secretary of the Navy Financial Management and Comptroller
The SECNAV Financial Management and Comptroller will—
   a. Establish financial management procedures for DON SC programs within the framework of requirements pre-
scribed by higher authority.
   b. Establish and promulgate principles and systems for financing, funding, accounting, and financial reporting for
FMS and FMF (to include IMET and Expanded International Military Education and Training (E–IMET)).
   c. Make and issue uniform procedures for setting up and maintaining uniform application of pricing and cost criteria
for sales of defense articles and services including training courses provided under FMF and FMS.
   d. Receive DON FMS and military assistance program (MAP) administrative funds from DSCA and allocate to the
appropriate users.

2–35. Navy Surgeon General
  a. Receive and coordinate the medical and dental training portion of USN Security Cooperation Education and
Training.
  b. Coordinate request of medical waivers.
  c. Provide resource information, guidance, and assistance in repatriating deceased IMS.

2–36. Commanders of Naval Systems Commands
Commanders of Naval Systems Commands (SYSCOMS) will—
   a. Carryout OJT, contractor training, factory training, and nonstandard training provided by the SYSCOMS and any
formal courses provided at the Naval Sea Systems Command, Naval Air Systems Command, Naval Supply Systems
Command (NAVSUP), and Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command activities.
   b. Direct the project management effort for the integration of training and material in major weapons systems
transfers and, in concert with the Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, (for Navy weapons
systems) or the Security Cooperation Education and Training Center (for Marine Corps weapons systems) integrate
initial and life cycle training requirements to support the TPA in material transfers.
   c. Ensure that subordinate activities appoint an IMSO. The IMSO will monitor and coordinate activities for the IMS’
training including implementation of the Field Studies Program. IMSO will be assigned for a minimum of 2 years,


14                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
when possible, and will receive the necessary training to perform this important function. Training of U.S. Navy IMSO
will be coordinated with NETSAFA, training of USMC IMSO will be coordinated by Director, Security Cooperation
Education and Training Center.
  d. Ensure that subordinate activities provide foreign trainee status reports for all SCETP training conducted.

2–37. Fleet commanders
The Commander, United States Fleet Forces Command and Commander, Pacific Fleet (COMPACFLT), will—
  a. Carry out the fleet SC Program provided in connection with assigned units, ships, and aircraft.
  b. Carry out fleet training for IMS.
  c. Provide price and availability for training at subordinate commands when tasked by competent authority.
  d. Provide mobile training team (MTT) and Extended training service specialist (ETSS) as required when tasked by
competent authority.
  e. Ensure that subordinate commands appoint an IMSO. The IMSO will monitor and coordinate activities for the
IMS training, including implementation of the Field Studies Program. IMSO will be assigned for a minimum of 2
years, when possible, and will receive the necessary training to perform this important function. Training of command
IMSO will be coordinated with NETSAFA.

2–38. Naval Education and Training Center
The Naval Education Training Center will—
  a. Serve as a U.S. Navy systems command for SC education and training.
  b. Conduct formal schools training for IMS in Naval Education and Training Command schools.
  c. Provide MTT and ETSS as required when tasked by competent authority.
  d. Ensure that the Naval Education Training Center appoint an IMSO. The IMSO will monitor and coordinate
activities for the IMS training, including implementation of the Field Studies Program. IMSO will be assigned for a
minimum of 2 years, when possible.
  e. Execute, operate, and administer designated portions of SCETP through the Commanding Officer, NETSAFA.

2–39. Commanding Officer, Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity
The Commanding Officer, NETSAFA, will—
   a. Function as Naval Education Training Center implementing agent for execution of the USN SCETP according to
appropriate SECNAV policies.
   b. Function as CAO and case manager for all DON FMS training cases unless otherwise directed by Navy IPO.
   c. Function as fund administrator for the DON IMET/E–IMET and Regional Defense Counterterrorism Fellowship
Program including management of medical funds and payment of medical bills.
   d. Function as the administrative and automatic data processing support activity for the execution of DON SCETP.
Coordinate provision of this support with Navy IPO, CG, Security Cooperation Education and Training Center Marine
Corps Combat Development Command (MCCDC), USCG (GC–I), and appropriate U.S. Navy major claimants, and
MILDEP SCETP organizations. Coordinate the release of data contained in the DON database and upload information
to the SAN IMSO/Security Cooperation Organization Training Web site.
   e. Establish procedures for the execution of U.S. Navy’s SCETP.
   f. Prepare and submit data required by Navy IPO for preparation of LOAs for all DON sponsored SC education and
training.
   g. Develop training plans for the support for U.S. Navy equipment sales in concert with Navy IPO and the
appropriate SYSCOM, and warfare sponsor. Ensure that training plans are coordinated with Navy IPO for disclosure
and releasability of U.S. Navy education and training materials prior to making commitments or programming training.
Ensure that training is time-phased with equipment delivery schedules for a TPA.
   h. Review requested U.S. Navy SC education and training to determine the appropriateness of the request and
availability of training. Determine annual and out-year IMS education and training requirements and coordinate with
Bureau of Naval Personnel (BUPERS) and warfare sponsors for quotas in U.S. Navy Training Operations Plans and/or
schools. Act as the quota allocation authority for all U.S. Navy IMS quotas.
   i. Perform the financial management functions necessary to the administration of FMS training cases and necessary
to the financial integrity of case closure including management of medical lines and payment of medical bills, when
applicable.
   j. Formulate course-costing procedures according to Assistant Secretaryof the Navy (Financial Management and
Comptroller) guidance.
   k. Develop, maintain, and promulgate the USN SC International Military Student Officer (IMSO) Guide.
   l. Participate in conferences or workshops sponsored by DON, other military Services or combatant commands
where education and training issues are involved.




                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                               15
   m. Review, coordinate and implement the deployment of U.S. Navy MTT, Mobile Education Team, ETSS, and
training surveys.
   n. Coordinate the establishment of English language proficiency levels required for all categories of U.S. Navy SC
education and training.
   o. Develop procedures for and administer the Naval Education Training Center Field Studies Program and extraordi-
nary expenses (EE) (N3/8) as they pertain to the SCETP. Review and approve Naval Education Training Center
activities Field Studies Program plans.
   p. Conduct liaison with Naval Education Training Center units and designated IMSO, as well as elements and IMSO
of other U.S. Navy activities, to provide guidance to and respond to queries regarding SCETP.
   q. Coordinate foreign training spaces in the Naval Command College, Naval Staff College with (N52), and Navy
IPO (02C2T). Provide quota management of IMS at NPS and Defense Resource Management Institute.
   r. Approve ECL rank waivers for U.S. Navy SC education and training, coordinating with Navy IPO (02C2T).
   s. Review initial IMET, E–IMET, Regional Defense Counterterrorism Fellowship Program and FMS foreign country
education and training request and program changes for U.S. Navy SC education and training. Consolidate all DON
programming inputs for submission to DSCA and copy to Navy IPO (02C2T).
   t. Host the DON SCETP IMSO workshop for Navy IPO. Coordinate the IMSO workshop agenda, schedule, format,
and so forth, with Navy IPO, Security Cooperation Education and Training Center, Coast Guard (G–CI), and
appropriate U.S. Navy major claimants.
   u. Ensure that Naval Education Training Center activities provide commencement and completion reports through
the SAN Web, provide academic evaluations, and other required reports for all SC education and training conducted.
   v. Coordinate IMSO and SCETP for the U.S. Navy.
   w. Coordinate SCETP-sponsored and funded orientation visits to and within CONUS for which the U.S. Navy is the
implementing agent, not including foreign CNO or higher level visits.
   x. Develop, coordinate, submit, and distribute the DON portion of the DOD Training MASL according to the
Security Assistance Management Manual (SAMM).
   y. Provide annual USN DISAM quota requirement data to Navy IPO.

Section IV
Department of the Air Force

2–40. General
Guidance in this regulation applies to all international personnel attending United States Air Force (USAF) training and
educational institutions (to include USAFA).

2–41. Deputy Under Secretary of the Air Force, International Affairs
The Deputy Under Secretary of the Air Force, International Affairs (SAF), and Deputy Under Secretary of the Air
Force, Security Assistance Policy and Education and Training Division is responsible for the policy direction,
integration, guidance, management, and supervision of international programs and activities affiliated with the Depart-
ment of the Air Force. The responsibilities for international training programs include the following:
   a. Develop, coordinate, and issue AFwide SC training policy and procedures. Act as point of contact on all SCETP
and other cooperative programs policy and procedural matters.
   b. Direct implementation of approved programs in accordance with policies, instructions, and procedures established
by or on behalf of DSCA. Act as the principal Air Staff representative and focal point within the Air Staff for the
SCETP and other cooperative programs.
   c. Monitor the execution of approved training programs.
   d. Comment on and make recommendations to the USAF position on international training programs that affect
United States Air Force (USAF) resources.
   e. Prepare a memorandum of understandings (MOUs) and/or memorandum of agreements (MOAs) as/if required for
SCETP and other cooperative programs (SAF/International Affairs regional divisions).
   f. Act as Air Staff focal point for policy matters involving the Inter-American Air Forces Academy (IAAFA) Deputy
Under Secretary of the Air Force, International Affairs, Americas Division.
   g. Provide HQ USAF representation at Security Assistance Training conferences and meetings.
   h. Provide Air Force policy and procedures for the DOD Field Studies Program, Deputy Under Secretary of the Air
Force, International Affairs Airmen Division.
   i. Correlate costing information and guidance with the Secretary of the Air Force, Budget Management and
Execution Security Assistance Division relating to IMET and FMS security assistance training.
   j. Serve as the AF focal point for PME and unit exchange training.
   k. Process self-invited visit requests and approve visits to USAF installations proposed under orientation training
tours.


16                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   l. Advise Major Army Command (USAF) (MAJCOM) on technology transfer and information disclosure implica-
tions inherent in proposed SCETP and other cooperative programs.
   m. Approve requests to disclose classified and controlled unclassified training and training materials provided to
foreign personnel under SCETP and other cooperative programs.

2–42. Director of Budget Investment
The Director of Budget Investment (SAF/Budget Management and Execution Security Assistance Division) will—
   a. Establish policies and procedures relating to financial management of the USAF SCETP and other cooperative
programs.
   b. Validate training tuition rates for security assistance training requirements.
   c. Coordinate with OSD on financial issues relating to AF SCETP and other cooperative programs.
   d. Establish and direct implementation of financial policies and procedures used by the USAF to manage and control
SCETP and other cooperative programs.
   e. Coordinate all training LOA for PCS teams, for joint and dedicated training programs, and all LOA on which the
FMS Administrative Surcharge is waived to ensure adherence to congressional, DOD, and AF policies.
   f. Evaluate the DOD Field Studies Program costs to determine the amount to be included in Air Force tuition rates
for creation of a Field Studies Program fund.
   g. Establish reporting systems to ensure that all appropriate training costs are identified and billed.

2–43. Deputy Chief of Staff, Manpower and Personnel
The Deputy Chief of Staff, Manpower and Personnel (AF/A1) is overall responsible for all AF education and training
programs. The responsibilities for international training programs include the following:
  a. The Director, Force Development, Deputy Chief of Staff, Manpower and Personnel (AF/A1D) will—
  (1) Be the AF Senior Language Authority.
  (2) Have the DLIELC Executive Agent responsibilities on behalf of the Air Force.
  (3) Establish the Air Force policy for PME, developmental education programs, and technical training.
  b. The Director, Force Management, Deputy Chief of Staff, Manpower and Personnel (AF/A1P) acts as the focal
point for submission of approved requests into the Planning, Programming, Budgeting and Execution System.

2–44. Heads of other Air staff organizations
Heads of these organizations will serve as functional proponents for unit exchanges and other security assistance
programs within their respective functional areas.

2–45. Commanders of major commands
   a. All commanders of MAJCOM will—
   (1) As available, provide training to support the SCETP and other cooperative programs, as required.
   (2) Ensure that current security assistance training capabilities are accurately reflected in applicable programming
documents.
   (3) Assist Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron in developing and reviewing training programs.
   (4) Implement approved and funded IMET and FMS programs as requested by HQ SAF/International Affairs or the
Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron.
   (5) Submit financial and training reports.
   (6) Monitor the progress of training and the welfare of IMS.
   (7) Ensure compliance with Field Studies Program, chapter 11, and support actions necessary to ensure effectiveness
of the Field Studies Program at pertinent installations within the command.
   (8) Process, implement, and report on unit exchange programs once approval is received from SAF/International
Affairs.
   b. The following commands have these additional responsibilities:
   (1) The AETC/International Affairs has oversight of the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron and
functional oversight of AETC’ international training and education providers. The AETC/International Affairs is the
focal point for all international training and education action items, projects, policy implementation, and procedures for,
or impacting the command, or the command’s international training, and education implementing agency
responsibilities.
   (2) The Commander of Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron, the central management agency for
USAF-sponsored security assistance training, will—
   (a) Serve as training consultant to SAF/International Affairs and AETC/International Affairs.
   (b) Prepare price and availability (P&A), LOA data, and FMS planning directives (2061s). Prepare and negotiate
LOA (“T” cases) for training.
   (c) Furnish planning, programming, funding, and implementation guidance to security assistance agencies worldwide


                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                   17
based on established DOD and HQ USAF policies, including guidance to International Military Student Officers
(IMSO) in CONUS.
   (d) Provide the necessary administrative support for country liaison officers (CLO).
   (e) Determine the suitability and staff availability of training with the appropriate MAJCOM and develop training
schedules as requested by SAF/International Affairs.
   (f) Implement and manage approved and funded SCETP and other cooperative programs.
   (g) Negotiate contracts for security assistance-sponsored formal and OJT to be conducted in CONUS or overseas.
   (h) Maintain and update the AF training MASL.
   (i) Manage and administer the Field Studies Program for AF based on established DOD and HQ USAF policies;
provide guidance to all participating agencies, approve funding of routine Field Studies Program, and extraordinary
expenses; budget for and host an IMSO Workshop.
   (j) Provide quarterly and annual update and input to programmed flying training and programmed technical training
documentation for SCETP and other cooperative programs requirements.
   (k) Provide administrative assistance pertaining to IMS transportation.
   (l) Administer and account for SCETP and other cooperative programs funds allocated for the training, administra-
tion, and support of IMS and for MTT, ETSS, language training detachments (LTD), and technical assistance field
teams (TAFT) provided from resources.
   (m) Maintain data on IMET and FMS training programs implemented in CONUS or overseas, security assistance
training teams and TAFT.
   (n) Implement and react to N90 English Language Training ((ELT) books/maps/pubs) requirements approved and
funded under IMET.
   (3) The Commander of the Materiel Command will—
   (a) Establish charges for Depot Maintenance Industrial Funding training.
   (b) Procure N90 items approved and funded under IMET that are not available from DLIELC resources.



Chapter 3
Planning and Programming

Section I
Planning

3–1. Purpose
This chapter delineates the policies and procedures to be followed for the planning and programming of the Security
Cooperation Education and Training Programs. Training may include formal and informal training, exchange training,
correspondence courses, and distance learning. Training may also include team training, which is discussed in chapter
4.

3–2. Requirements
   a. Training assistance will be provided in response to specific requests presented through appropriate channels by an
authorized representative of the foreign government or international organization concerned. The Security Cooperation
Organization may advise the foreign country on needed training that is available from U.S. sources but must ensure
that no U.S. commitment is made or implied by such recommendations. Training of IMS in Military Service schools
should not have a significant adverse effect on the combat readiness of the Armed Forces of the United States.
   b. Where practical, the foreign government will assist in supervising and administering its training program.
   c. Foreign countries authorized participation in SCETP through IMET are to be encouraged to participate in cost
sharing to pay travel and living allowances to IMS and use IMET to cover only tuition costs. This will allow countries
to maximize training opportunities.
   d. Consideration should be given to the quantity and complexity of equipment in country, the level of education, and
the technical aptitude of foreign country military organization to assimilate and maintain modern equipment. Equip-
ment specific training should not be requested unless the Security Cooperation Organization can verify that the
equipment is in the respective country’s inventory or a letter of request has been submitted to either SATFA or
USASAC.
   e. Training in support of an initial system sale will be included in a LOA (see para 3–5, below) written and
administered by the MILDEP preparing the system sale LOA, regardless of the MILDEP providing the training. This
MILDEP will not commit the resources of another MILDEP without prior staffing and approval. For follow-on and
annual training requirements, training will be included in the program of and administered by the Military Service
providing the training.



18                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
3–3. International military education and training
The United States may provide International Military Education and Training (IMET) funds to foreign governments to
train and professionalize their militaries. The Department of State has overall responsibility for the IMET program.
Congress appropriates IMET funds each year and country allocations are documented in the Congressional Budget
Justification Foreign Operations. Based on Congressional guidance and DOS approved country allocations, DSCA
(Business Operations/Comptroller and Policy, Plans, and Programs Directorates) manages and issues the IMET funds
to the MILDEP, who disperses the funds to individual countries and/or schools.
   a. The training must support U.S.-approved programs, plans, and objectives for the country concerned.
   b. The country must make optimum use of personnel previously trained under SCETP.
   c. The country must make maximum use of its own training resources.
   d. Emphasis must be placed on the training of instructor and career personnel.
   e. Training must be in skills where actual deficiencies exist and to further overall objectives; the ability to meet the
requirement must be clearly beyond the capability of the country.
   f. Training requiring a policy waiver from DSCA or another type of waiver will be approved on a case-by-case
basis.
   g. The IMET programs are developed and funded on an annual basis, so the start date of the course (or initial course
if they are attending multiple courses) will determine the program year. The IMET students beginning training in the
CONUS from 1 October of a fiscal year (FY) through 31 December of the following calendar year may be included in
one annual program. A 5th quarter concept was developed to maximize utilization of IMET funds between countries at
the end of each FY and to advantage 1st quarter training opportunities.
   h. All requirements for OT, MTTS, and ETSS personnel will be programmed on the basis of the U.S. FY (1
October/30 September) and not implemented under the 5th quarter concept. Noncontract OCONUS teams must return
to CONUS no later than (NLT) 30 September.
   i. Contract field services (CFS) may be programmed on a 1–year basis for total man-months, including costs,
regardless of whether the duration extends into the next FY; however, justification must be forwarded and approval
received from DSCA before programming.
   j. The IMET training will not be programmed to support FMS equipment purchase unless specifically identified as
part of the FMS agreement or approved by DSCA.
   k. Training benefits must warrant the high cost of the travel involved. When overseas transportation costs to and
from the United States are borne by the IMET program, training in the United States will be arranged only when the
total training in formal school courses or in a combination of formal school and OJT is a minimum of 5 weeks
exclusive of ELT. An exception to policy must be obtained by the Security Cooperation Organization from DSCA for
training of less than 5 weeks. All training at the WHINSEC and the IAAFA is exempt from the 5–week minimum
duration.

3–4. Expanded international military education and training
The E–IMET Program is part of the IMET Program. Under E–IMET, personnel are trained in managing and
administering military establishments and budgets, in promoting civilian control of the military, and in creating and
maintaining effective military justice systems and military codes of conduct, in accordance with internationally
recognized human rights.
   a. The E–IMET training is exempt from the 5–week minimum duration.
   b. Civilians who work in the country’s Ministry of Defense (MOD), civilian personnel of ministries other than the
MOD, legislators and individuals who are not members of the Government may be trained under the E–IMET Program
if the military education and training would contribute to the E–IMET objectives.
   c. Training of defense civilians for the express purpose of teaching, developing, or managing in-country English
language training programs (ELTP) is also authorized.
   d. Defense civilians in Counter Narcotics related positions may also be trained under the E–IMET Program.
   e. Maritime law enforcement and other maritime skills training for agencies which are nondefense, or agencies
which perform a maritime law enforcement mission, and other maritime skills training provided to a country which
does not have a standing armed forces is authorized.
   f. Courses may be evaluated by DSCA and be added to the list of approved E–IMET courses if they meet
established criteria. Courses currently designated as approved E–IMET courses must be reviewed and recertified every
five years if 100 percent E–IMET and taught at 100 percent E–IMET schools; and every 3 years if not 100 percent
E–IMET.
   g. Military members of foreign governments may also participate in training courses designated as E–IMET.

3–5. Foreign Military Sales Program
  a. The FMS Program is that part of Security Cooperation authorized by the AECA and is conducted using formal
contracts or agreements between the USG and an authorized foreign purchaser. These contracts, called LOA, are signed
by both the USG and the purchasing Government or international organization; and provide for the sale of defense


                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                   19
articles and/or defense services (to include training) usually from DOD stocks or through purchase under DOD
managed contracts. Further information regarding LOA can be found in paragraph 3–14. As with all security coopera-
tion, the FMS program supports U.S. foreign policy and national security objectives.
   b. The FMS training requirements pursuant to the sale of major equipment and weapon systems (ships, aircraft,
missiles) should be made a part of sale negotiations. Organizations involved in FMS sales must inform the respective
Service training organizations Army SATFA, Navy NETSAFA, Air Force AFSAT, Marine Corp Security Cooperation
Education and Training Center, and Coast Guard (G–CI) of training requirements. The same general initial and annual
programming process applies to both FMS and IMET. Eligible foreign purchasers may initiate training requests
through several channels; for example, designated Security Cooperation Organization, foreign embassies, or purchasing
missions located in the United States. Foreign purchasers, with the assistance of Security Cooperation Organization, are
encouraged to develop annual FMS training programs. The IMET fifth quarter planning and programming concept does
not apply to FMS training.
   c. For annual FMS training programs, blanket order (BO) FMS LOA will normally be used. The program presented
by the Security Cooperation Organization should be fully coordinated with the requesting government and reflect the
country’s annual training requirements. The FMS training programs will be accepted for planning, determining
capabilities, and allocating quotas.
   d. Upon determining capabilities, the MILDEP will assign an FMS case identifier, prepare the LOA, and submit it
to the appropriate country representative for customer acceptance and deposit of funds, as required. The MILDEP will
implement training only after the case has been accepted and obligation authority has been issued by DFAS.

3–6. Other security cooperation education and training programs
The following list of programs is not all-inclusive; however, the Security Cooperation Organization and Military
Service personnel should be aware that these programs exist since they may play an instrumental role:
   a. African Contingency Operations Training and Assistance. This program provides training of African troops in
peacekeeping and humanitarian crisis response. The European Command is the coordinating agent for the Combatant
Commands.
   b. Aviation Leadership Program. The Aviation Leadership Program provides undergraduate pilot training to a small
number of selected international students from friendly, less-developed countries. In accordance with 10 USC Chapter
9381–9383, Secretary of the Air Force (SECAF) may fund Aviation Leadership Program.
   c. Bilateral or Regional Cooperation Programs. Under 10 USC 1051, the SECDEF may pay travel, subsistence, and
similar personal expenses of defense personnel of developing countries in connection with attendance at bilateral or
regional conferences, seminars or similar meetings if the SECDEF deems attendance is in the U.S. national interest.
Also, see 10 USC 1050 for payment of personnel expenses in connection with Latin American Cooperation.
   d. Combatant commander initiative funds. Under 10 USC 166a, the CJCS may provide funds to combatant
commanders for military education and training of military and related civilian personnel of foreign countries (to
include transportation, translation, and administrative expenses). This authority provides funding for activities such as
force training, contingencies, selected operations, command and control, joint exercises (including activities of foreign
countries), humanitarian and civil assistance, military education and training, bilateral or regional cooperation pro-
grams, and force protection. An annual dollar limitation is legislated each year. Training falling under combatant
commander initiative funds is not managed by MILDEP Security Assistance offices.
   e. Disaster Response (Humanitarian Assistance). The Humanitarian Assistance, including training in disaster re-
sponse and/or disaster preparedness, is authorized by 10 USC 2561. Normally, Humanitarian Assistance and training
conducted under Title 10 is not provided to foreign militaries. However, selected military members of the host nation
are occasionally included in the training so that the military understands the role in supporting the civilian government
during emergencies. The ultimate goal of disaster response training is to improve host nation capability to effectively
respond to disasters, thereby reducing or eliminating the need for U.S. military response. The training is conducted in
the foreign country at no charge. The foreign country pays foreign student TLA expenses.
   f. Drawdowns of training. Under the FAA, Section 506(a)(1), the President may direct the drawdown of defense
services education and training from the DOD if they determine and report to Congress that an unforeseen emergency
exists which requires immediate military assistance to a foreign country or international organization; and that such
emergency requirement cannot be met under the AECA or any other law except this section. Under the FAA, Section
506(a)(2), the President must determine and report to Congress in accordance with FAA, Section 652 that it is in the
national interest of the United States to drawdown articles and services from the inventory of any USG agency and
military education and training from the DOD. The FAA, Section 552 provides for drawdown of commodities and
services from inventory and resources of any agency of the USG of an aggregate value not to exceed (NTE) $25M in
any FY. Under the FAA, Section 506(a)(1) and (2), tuition for military education and training is provided at no cost to
the foreign government. Student travel may be funded from the MILDEP operation and maintenance funds if foreign
recipient is not able to assume the cost. Students may stay in visiting officers quarters (VOQ) or visiting enlisted
quarters (VEQ) and use dining facilities operated by DOD funds, and living allowance is not provided to the student.
See SAMM, chapter 11 for additional information on drawdowns.



20                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   g. Enhanced - International Peacekeeping Capabilities. The Enhanced International Peacekeeping Capabilities
promotes burden sharing and enhances national and regional capability to support peacekeeping operations using a core
curriculum for peacekeeping operations education and training and procurement of nonlethal defense-related training
equipment. An FMS case is used to purchase this type of training with the Enhanced International Peacekeeping
Capabilities funding identified.
   h. Foreign Assistance Act, Section 544 - Exchange Training. The FAA, Section 544, authorizes reciprocal PME
exchanges. The President may provide for the attendance of foreign military personnel at PME institutions in the
United States (other than Service academies) without charge, if such attendance is part of an international agreement.
These international agreements provide for the exchange of students on a one-for-one reciprocal basis each FY between
the two military services participating in the exchange. Each country is responsible for paying for their student’s TLA.
Institutions specifically included are the U.S. Military Service Command and Staff Colleges, Joint Forces Staff College,
U.S. Military Service War Colleges, Navy Postgraduate School, and the Air Force Institute of Technology. The
Military Service is authorized to designate additional schools as PME institutions for security assistance training.
Requests for new PME exchanges should be sent to DSCA (Operations Directorate) in coordination with DSCA
(Programs Directorate) so that an umbrella (DOD and/or MOD) level exchange agreement is negotiated and completed.
Specific Service-level requests are sent to the Implementing Agency after the DOD-level agreement is in place.
Chapter 13 of this regulation provides the prescribed MOA format for this purpose.
   i. Arms Export Control Act, Section 30A - Exchange of Training and Related Support The AECA, Section 30A
authorizes the President to provide training and related support (for example, transportation, food services, health
services, logistics, and the use of facilities and equipment) to military and civilian defense personnel of a friendly
foreign country or international organization. Such training and related support are provided through the MILDEP (as
opposed to the combatant commands). Unit exchanges conducted under this authority are arranged under international
agreements negotiated for such purposes, and are integrated into the TSCP of the relevant combatant commander.
Recipient countries provide, on a reciprocal basis, comparable training and related support; however, each country is
responsible for paying their students’ TLA. The related reciprocal training and support must be provided within 1 year.
Should the foreign country or international organization not provide comparable training and support, the United States
must be reimbursed for the full costs of training and support provided by the United States. Chapter 13 of this
regulation provides detailed implementing instructions, to include the prescribed international MOA used for this
purpose. Requests for unit exchanges are forwarded to the appropriate MILDEP for action with an information copy to
DSCA (Policy, Plans, and Programs Directorate). Pricing guidelines and conversion to reimbursable training when
reciprocal training or related support is not provided or not received, is included in DOD 7000.14–R, Volume 11A,
Chapter 10.
   j. Flight training exchanges. The FAA, Section 544 authorizes the exchange of comparable flight training. The flight
training exchange must be pursuant to an international agreement, which provides for the exchange of students on a
one-for-one basis during the same U.S. FY. Chapter 13 of this regulation provides the prescribed MOA used for this
purpose. The flight training exchanges requests are forwarded to the Implementing Agency for action with an
information copy to DSCA (Programs Directorate). The flight training exchange with the United Arab Emirates (UAE)
Air Warfare Center are separately authorized.
   k. International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement. The International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement
has two strategic goals: minimize the impact of international crime on the United States and reduce the entry of illegal
drugs into the United States. The International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement training programs strengthen
foreign criminal justice sectors and promote international cooperation. Training provided through the FMS system
using International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement funds is governed by the same laws and policies as those
outlined for FMF.
   l. Joint combined exchange training. The JCET Program permits special operations forces (SOF) to train in a
foreign country through interaction with foreign military forces and is authorized by 10 USC 2011. It enhances SOF
skills, such as instructor skills, language proficiency, and cultural immersion, critical to required missions generated by
either existing plans or unforeseen contingencies. The primary purpose of JCET activities is the training of U.S. SOF
personnel, although incidental training benefits may accrue to the foreign friendly forces at no cost. The foreign
government pays foreign student TLA expenses. The United States may pay the incremental expenses incurred by a
foreign country as the direct result of this training. Incremental expenses include the reasonable and proper cost of
rations, fuel, training, ammunition, transportation, and other goods and services consumed during the training. Pay,
allowances, and other personnel costs are excluded.
   m. Mine action. Mine action programs provide training to foreign nations in mine clearance operations, mine
awareness education and information campaigns, assistance in the establishment of mine action centers, emergency
medical care, and leadership and management skills needed to successfully conduct a national level mine action
program (10 USC 401). The combatant commanders execute the mine action programs. The training is conducted in
the foreign country at no charge. The foreign country pays foreign student TLA expenses.
   n. Regional Centers for Security Studies. The regional centers provide a forum for bilateral and multilateral
communication and military and civilian exchanges within a region. Each center has a different set of legal authorities
based on when and how it was established. Some centers have authorities that allow cost waivers with no limits on


                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                   21
course length; other centers’ authorities are more limited. Some centers can accept foreign gifts to defray operating
costs; other centers cannot accept gifts. The payment of foreign student travel and supplemental living allowance varies
by center and circumstance. In general, students from developing countries may have these expenses funded, whereas
developed countries may be expected to pay these expenses. Each center determines the exceptions. The centers are:
Africa Center for Strategic Studies; Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies; Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies;
Marshall Center; and Near East South Asia Center for Strategic Studies.
   o. Regional Defense Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program. This program enables the DOD to assist key
countries in the war on terrorism by providing training and education on counterterrorism activities. Global Security
Affairs Partnership Strategy Office is the administering agency. The Security Cooperation Organization must have the
approval of the respective combatant commander before requesting courses under Counterterrorism Fellowship Pro-
gram. Training under Counterterrorism Fellowship Program will follow the same procedures as IMET with the
following exceptions: the fifth quarter planning and programming concept does not apply to Counterterrorism Fellow-
ship Program; living allowance funds for courses that begin in one FY and end in the next FY will be split between the
2 FYs.
   p. Counter-Drug Training Support. The Counter-Drug Training Support includes deployments for training of foreign
forces at the request of an appropriate law enforcement agency official as defined in Section 1004 of Public Law
101–510 (the National Defense Authorization Act for FY 1991). The purpose of the Counter-Drug Training Support is
to conduct counter narcotics-related training of foreign military and law enforcement personnel. DOD schools are
reimbursed for the additional costs incurred in providing training. Travel and supplemental living allowance for foreign
students based on the established IMET rate may be paid using Counter-Drug Training Support funds.
   q. Service Academy Programs. Department of Defense’s 3 Service Academies conduct traditional academic ex-
change programs of varying length and content. Up to 40 foreign students may attend each Service Academy at any
one time as actual members of an Academy class. Countries reimburse all or a portion of the program cost (to include
the living allowance) to the Service Academy.
   r. U.S. Coast Guard Academy Foreign Cadet Program. 14 USC 195 authorizes a limited number of foreign national
appointments (maximum of 36) to the USCG Academy. Cadets can earn a Bachelor of Science degree in: marine
engineering and naval architecture; electrical engineering: civil engineering; mechanical engineering; marine and
environmental sciences; management; or government. The foreign government must agree in advance to reimburse the
USCG for all costs incurred for a cadet’s training at the Coast Guard Academy, except when a waiver is granted by the
Commandant, USCG. Countries must agree that upon graduation, the cadet will serve in the comparable maritime
Service of their country for an appropriate period of time.

3–7. General constraints
   a. Foreign military sales training will be provided at no cost to the USG except as authorized by law. All costs, as
specified in the AECA and DOD 7000.14–R, will be identified and included in tuition pricing.
   b. Training listed in the Training Military Articles and Service List is currently provided to eligible foreign
governments. In cases where training not listed in the Training Military Articles and Service List is required by the
foreign government, the Security Cooperation Organization must submit the request with justification to the cognizant
Military Service. Direct or indirect contact with any prospective training activity by country personnel to coordinate
and/or commit SC training is strictly prohibited.
   c. Courses containing CMI or CUI will be offered to foreign governments on a “need-to-know” basis. Prior to
programming, approval must be obtained from the Military Service.
   d. The IMS must meet the course prerequisites set by the Military Service for training provided in CONUS or
overseas.
   e. All training requirements will be reviewed by the Military Service. Where training requirements are potentially
sensitive, approval of DSCA will be obtained.
   f. Technical skills and information acquired through U.S. training may not be used by the purchasing country to
train IMS from a third country unless approved in advance. Countries should submit requests for USG consent to the
transfer of training to third parties via diplomatic note to the Department of State. If such requests are received by the
Military Service, they should be referred to DSCA for forwarding to the Department of State.
   g. The FAA, Section 660, places restrictions on police, internal intelligence or surveillance, or civilian law enforce-
ment training conducted in a foreign country or in the United States. “Police” as used in this prohibition includes
military as well as civilian police if the military police perform civilian law enforcement functions. Neither the name
given to a unit by the foreign government nor the ministerial authority under which it operates is sufficient in and of
itself to determine whether a particular force is a police unit. The determining factor is the nature of the function
performed by that unit. Certification is required from the country that students attending military police training will
not be involved with or assigned to a unit performing in any civilian law enforcement functions for at least 2 years.
Similar certification is required for any training provided on an individual rather than a unit basis, if the individual is
from a unit that performs ongoing civilian law enforcement functions. The certification must be maintained by the
Security Cooperation Organization until 2 years following completion of training. Military police courses purchased



22                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
under FMS must have prior approval from DSCA if the IMS is a member of a country unit having civilian police
functions. Exceptions are—
   (1) Training of law enforcement personnel at WHINSEC, authorized under 10 USC 2166.
   (2) Maritime Law Enforcement and training in maritime related skills and training provided by the U.S. Coast
Guard, authorized by 22 USC 2420(b)(3).
   h. The scope of intelligence training normally available is limited to that which is directly related to combat,
operational, or joint staff intelligence.
   i. Follow-on training in civilian agencies constitutes termination of SC sponsorship unless DSCA grants a waiver.
   j. Section 620(q), FAA, and “The Brooke Amendment” to the FAA of 1961, as amended, imposes sanctions by
which security assistance provided to countries ceases when a country is in default in the payment of loans to the
United States. Accordingly, Security Cooperation Organization will not request training on weapon systems or
equipment that is not in or scheduled for delivery to the country.
   (1) Prospective IMET students may not travel to the U.S. or other locations to start training. IMET students outside
their countries of origin whose course of study or training program began before the effective date of the sanctions may
complete such courses, including already funded sequential courses. However, no additional sequential courses may be
added on or after the effective date of the sanctions. IMET students outside their countries of origin whose course of
study or training program did not begin before the effective date of the sanctions should normally be returned to their
home countries as soon as possible. For the purposes of the Brooke Amendment, an IMET funded course is deemed to
begin on the report date specified in the STL. If sanctions are lifted, these students will be considered for late
admittance or admittance to the next available course or training program.
   (2) The IMET funded MTT and LTD may not be dispatched or extended beyond their scheduled termination date.
   (3) The IMET funded training aids may not be issued from supply nor placed on contract by the supplying agency.
Section 620(q) does not affect the use of FMS credit funds.

3–8. Total package approach
The TPA outlines training requirements related to the purchase of major equipment or systems. (See fig 3–1 for a
training plan checklist for new equipment.)
   a. When a country plans to add a new item of equipment to its inventory, a TPA must be used rather than focusing
only on the item of equipment. Components of the TPA include the following:
   (1) Quantity of end items required for operational elements, training base, and maintenance support.
   (2) Training requirements including training aids, training ammunition, and such necessary additional facilities as
ranges, airfields, and port facilities.
   (3) Publications.
   (4) Foreign country facilities and available manpower.
   (5) Initial logistics support includes those items required to field the item or system, such as communications and
electronic equipment; basic issue items; and technical assistance and technical manuals. Sustaining support consists of
those items required to maintain the item or system in operational condition and includes replenishment repair parts,
overhaul requirements, and ammunition requirements.
   b. The time required to conduct adequate training as well as to develop an in-country maintenance or support
capability often becomes the pacing factor and must be considered in relationship to delivery dates of equipment in
developing a training plan for a particular end item of equipment or weapon system. Each country must be considered
individually. While general training requirements can be determined for any item, the exact composition and duration
of the training program will vary based on the individual requirements and capabilities of each country.
   c. A comprehensive training support package cannot be developed by Military Service trainers without knowledge
of the country specifics. Thus, the important role of the Security Cooperation Organization and survey teams cannot be
overemphasized. The Security Cooperation Organization and Military Service must begin planning when the country
initially expresses an interest in a weapon system or equipment. This will require close and continuous coordination
between the training and material personnel of the various organizations involved, both in the United States and in the
purchasing country. Essential information should be included in the initial request for P&A and LOA data on the major
item. In-country information on items such as existing facilities, training software, and hardware items in inventory,
and levels of experience and training of the IMS is essential to the TPA concept. Using this information as a point of
departure, the training support package would reflect the P&A of those additional software and hardware items
required to support the end items, as well as an appropriate training plan. A survey team may be required. A trainer
should routinely be included as a member of the team.
   d. Training programs must be planned realistically, taking into account the skills that must be developed, the
background and experience of the individuals selected for the training, and the time required to plan, implement, and
complete the program. In the final analysis, the success of any training program will depend upon IMS capability and
potential for success. The individual and collective performance of the IMS will set the pace for and measure the true
progress of a program.
   e. Training in support of FMS equipment purchases should be coordinated with the equipment sales case. Training


                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                 23
under the International Military Education and Training Program (IMETP) will not be provided to support FMS
equipment purchases. Request for exceptions to this policy should be referred to DSCA with appropriate justification
for consideration on a case-by-case basis.
   f. Suggested guidance concerning development of comprehensive training plans for new equipment is contained in
figure 3–1.




24                          AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Figure 3–1. Sample training plan checklist for new equipment-total package approach




           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                    25
            Figure 3–1. Sample training plan checklist for new equipment-total package approach–Continued



3–9. References used for security cooperation education and training
The principal references used in planning and programming SC education and training are listed in paragraphs a
through m, below.
   a. The SAMM (DOD 5105.38–M) published by DSCA, provides guidance and information for programming,
costing, and funding of security cooperation training (http://www.dsca.mil/samm).
   b. DOD 7000.14–R, Volume 15, published by Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (OASD) (Comptroller),
established the pricing and costing criteria for FMS sales of defense articles and services (including training) under the
AECA (http://comptroller.defense.gov/fmr/15/index.html).
   c. International Military Student Officers (USAF), (http://www.aetc.af.mil/afsat/afsat_fr.htm).
   d. The Navy International Training and Education Catalog (NETSAFA) (https://www.netsafa.navy.mil).
   e. Security Assistance and Training Desktop Guide (USMC/Security Cooperation Education and Training Center)
(http://scetc.tecom.usmc.mil/).
   f. International Training Handbook (USCG G–CI) (http://www.uscg.mil/hq/atcmobil/tradiv/IMS/IMSO_Main.htm).
   g. Planning and Programming Security Assistance English Language Training (DLIELC Instruction 1025.7).
   h. Field Studies Program for International Military and Civilian Students and Military Sponsored Visitors (DODI
5410.17).
   i. Expanded IMET Handbook.
   j. The Training Military Articles and Service List is a MILDEP database of training that can be provided. It is
available as a data download from the SAN to all Security Cooperation Organization (through the TMS) and selected
international users (through the international security assistance network (ISAN). The Training Military Articles and
Service List provides data on courses available from all Military Service to eligible foreign countries under the SCETP.
Associated data provided with the Training Military Articles and Service List are course descriptions, training location,
point of contacts (POCs), detailed training location information, and international notes and prerequisites.
   k. The STL is a MILDEP database of all training that has been approved and programmed in a country’s training
program, regardless of source of funding. It is available as a data download from the ISAN to all Security Cooperation
Organization and selected U.S. and international users. The STL provides data on all training that has been pro-
grammed by the Military Service training agencies. It not only identifies the selected training course, but also identifies




26                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
the cost of that course and any programmed travel and living allowance expense. The STL also provides scheduling
data (report, start, and end dates) of all selected training courses.

Section II
Programming

3–10. Programming cycle
   a. The State Department Mission Performance Plan and the Combined Education and Training Program Plan
comprise the U.S. country team document that supports the proposed program for the foreign country concerned. These
plans provide the level of detail of the proposed requirements for IMET and for FMS credit and Counterterrorism
Fellowship Program recommended by the country team. Training is categorized by an analysis code and dollar level. It
is submitted through State Department channels and provides the details to support the annual Congressional Budget
Justification for foreign operations. The Congressional Budget Justification for Foreign Operations is the supporting
document submitted to Congress with the annual legislative proposal for the Security Assistance Program authorization
and appropriations. IMET programming data will be forwarded to the Military Service not later than September in
support of the Congressional Budget Justification. The Mission Performance Plan also includes all known FMS
requests for the budget year (BY).
   b. Based on projected IMETP dollar ceilings, Security Cooperation Organization should prepare the Combined
Education and Training Program Plan for presentation to combatant commands and Military Service at least 30 days
before the annual SCETWGs or as directed by the appropriate MILDEP.
   c. Program submission will be by markup of the existing Combined Education and Training Program Plan made
available by the Military Service. Desired deviations to the program listing will be forwarded to the Military Service.
   d. Annual SCETWGs are hosted by the combatant commands.
   (1) The Security Cooperation Education and Training Working Group schedules are based on coordination between
combatant commands and Military Service.
   (2) The Security Cooperation Organization representative must be prepared to present, discuss, and justify each
training line in the proposed program. In this regard, each request for OJT, OBT, and familiarization training will be
submitted as shown in figure 3–2. Written justification must be submitted for all programmed OT, LTD, and SAT. If
no justification is included, the Security Cooperation Organization representative will be required to prepare one before
departure from the working group. Failure to submit proper justification will result in deletion of training from the
program.
   (3) The Security Cooperation Organization must stipulate factors to be used in IMET costing for travel and living
allowances to be paid by the USG or by the foreign government (cost-sharing).
   (4) The purpose of the Security Cooperation Education and Training Working Group is to accept, reject, change, or
add training lines and training teams to country programs within approved policy guidelines. Training is accepted by
the Military Service for programming only, subject to determining the capability to furnish that training in relation to
total worldwide requirements.
   (5) On completion of the Security Cooperation Education and Training Working Group, each Military Service will
have a complete copy of the refined country program.
   (6) Based on a refined country program, Military Service will process requirements. After the Security Cooperation
Education and Training Working Group, the Security Cooperation Organization will submit program deviations to the
Military Service with accompanying backup documents.
   e. Unprogrammed training requirements not included in the annual program will be handled on an exception basis.
Unscheduled requirements often have an adverse impact on the total training effort. This is particularly true in training
courses where quota availability is constrained. It also happens in those cases involving short-notice deployment of
MTT personnel from operational units for specialized requirements and preparation of tailored curricula. In addition,
unprogrammed training requirements distort planning and make forecasting ineffective. Every reasonable effort should
be made to develop programs that will not require revision after review at the Security Cooperation Education and
Training Working Group.
   f. Deferred items requiring special authorization will not be approved until DSCA has obtained the necessary
certification or a waiver has been granted.
   g. Upon receipt of funding authority, the Military Service will authorize the Security Cooperation Organization to
prepare ITO to send IMS to training.




                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  27
                 Figure 3–2. Sample format for an OJT, observation, or familiarization training request



3–11. Programming procedures
Strict programming procedures are necessary to achieve training objectives and to account for expenditures.
  a. International military education and training.
  (1) The IMET program provides training in the United States and, in some cases, in overseas U.S. military facilities
to selected foreign military and related civilian personnel on a grant basis.
  (2) Congressional scrutiny of the IMETP requires an indication of the relative priority of the training requirements
within each country program. These priority indicators are used in responding to Congressional queries, selecting
requirements for continuing resolution authority (CRA) funding, and adjusting programs to conform to executive
branch decisions and legislative actions when response time will not permit consultation with Security Cooperation
Organization or combatant commands. Accordingly, a training requirement priority code system has been established
according to the following standardized designations—
  (a) Priority Code A. (highest priority). Prime training requirements considered most essential for meeting an in
country training objective.
  (b) Priority Code B. Used only to indicate training the Security Cooperation Organization wants funded by end of
year funds (if available) and should only be used in execution year IMET Programs.
  (c) Priority Code D. Valid training requirement above the budget level but within the dollar amount that an Security




28                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Cooperation Organization could reasonably expect to receive at mid-year or end of year. Priority D is an unbudgeted
amount and will not normally exceed 10 percent of the budget. Military Service will not obtain quotas for D lines.
   b. Foreign military sales. All foreign military sales of defense articles and defense services including training are
handled through the use of a LOA. The LOA lists the items, services, estimated costs, terms, and conditions of the sale,
and requires the signature of a representative of the foreign country or international organization to indicate acceptance.
Receipt of the initial deposit and copies of the signed LOA by DFAS–DE and the MILDEP denotes acceptance on the
part of the purchaser of the terms and conditions.
   c. Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program.
   (1) The Counterterrorism Fellowship Program is to be included in the Combined Education and Training Program
Plan.
   (2) The combatant command Counterterrorism Fellowship Program coordinators will provide procedural guidelines
for coordination on Counterterrorism Fellowship Program plans/STL prior to the Security Cooperation Education and
Training Working Group.
   (3) Only after Global Security Affairs Partnership Strategy Office has formally approved a country’s planning year
Counterterrorism Fellowship Program STL is the program considered to be final.
   (4) Unlike the IMET program, there will be no additions, changes or deletions made by the Security Cooperation
Organization or MILSVCs to the country’s current year or approved planning year Counterterrorism Fellowship
Program STL without coordination and written approval from the commanders of combatant commands Counterter-
rorism Fellowship Program coordinator and Global Security Affairs Partnership Strategy Office.
   d. The Counter Drug Program.
   (1) The program is DOD funded and must comply with requirements contained in CJCSI 3710.01.
   (2) The MILDEPS establish pseudo-FMS case designators for DOS and OSD training and prepare separate STL/
International Standardized Training Listing.
   e. Work sheet control number. This number is the most important element identifier used in the SCETP. The most
important use is to track the IMS. Normally, one worksheet control number (WCN) will be assigned per IMS. This
procedure reduces administrative effort on the part of the scheduling commands and training installations and allows
effective tracking and billing.
   f. Cross-Service training. The policy for cross-Service training is as follows:
   (1) When an IMS from one Military Service is selected for training exclusively within schools of another Military
Service, such training will be made part of the program of the Military Service providing the training.
   (2) When an IMS is selected for training involving courses of more than one Military Service, the training will be
programmed by the Military Service providing the greater number of total training weeks, exclusive of ELT.
   (3) When OT are for IMS assigned to organizations equivalent to the U.S. DOD or when such tours are not clearly
identifiable to a particular Military Service, the Security Cooperation Organization will include the tour in the program
of the Military Service having predominant interest, or DSCA will designate the Military Service.
   (4) Joint courses will be included in the program of the Military Service having implementing agency responsibility
for the course. (See table 3–1.)



Table 3–1
Implementing agency for DOD schools
School                                                                  Location                           Implementing
                                                                                                           agency
American Forces Information Services                                    Fort Meade, MD                     Army
Center for Civil Military Relations                                     Monterey, CA                       Navy
Defense Acquisition University                                          Fort Belvoir, VA                   Army
Defense Ammunition Center                                               McAlester, OK                      Army
Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute                          Patrick Air Force Base (AFB), FL   Air Force
Defense Geospatial Intelligence School                                  Fort Belvoir, VA                   Army
Defense Information School                                              Fort Meade, MD                     Army
Defense Institute for Medical Operations                                San Antonio, TX                    Air Force
Defense Institute of International Legal Studies                        Newport, RI                        Navy
Defense Institute of Security Assistance Management                     Wright-Patterson AFB, OH           Air Force
Defense Intelligence College                                            Bolling AFB, Washington, DC        Air Force




                                      AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                             29
Table 3–1
Implementing agency for DOD schools—Continued
Defense Language Institute English Language Center                 Lackland AFB, TX                     Air Force
Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center                 Monterey, CA                         Army
Defense Logistics Agency Training Center                           Columbus, OH                         Army
Defense Logistics Information Service                              Battle Creek, MI                     Army
Defense Resources Management Institute                             Monterey, CA                         Navy
Defense Systems Management College                                 Fort Belvoir, VA                     Army
Joint Forces Staff College                                         Norfolk, VA                          Navy
National Defense University                                        Fort McNair, Washington, DC          Army
Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation              Fort Benning, GA                     Army



3–12. Distributive/distance learning
Distributive/distance learning (DL) courses are delivered through a variety of formats that include the Internet or an
Intranet, compact disk-read only memory (CD–ROM) or digital video disc (DVD). Military Service will ensure course
descriptions and course locations reflect the most current methods of delivery as courses are revised to nontraditional
classroom methods. Updated Training Military Articles and Service List information will facilitate selection of IMS
with the proper computer background and experience, as well as management of IMS expectations for course delivery.
The course delivery location will be included in the MASL description, but could be at the traditional training location,
or at a distance learning center. IMET IMS may attend DL courses in CONUS, but require DSCA waiver for
OCONUS delivery. FMS IMS may attend courses in CONUS or OCONUS. Distance learning courses delivered
OCONUS will have a Training Military Articles and Service List beginning with “B4, “D4,” or “P4” per DSCA
guidance. Prerequisites and procedures for course attendance generally mirror processes for all other courses; however,
each Military Service will provide Service unique procedures.

3–13. Civilian international military students
   a. Defense civilians, non-defense ministry civilians, legislators, and individuals who are not members of the
government may be trained under the E–IMET program if the military education and training would contribute to the
E–IMET objectives.
   b. Training of defense civilians for the express purpose of teaching, developing, or managing in-country ELT
programs is also authorized.
   c. Defense civilians in counter narcotics related positions may also be trained under the E–IMET program.
   d. Maritime law enforcement and other maritime skills training for agencies which are nondefense, or agencies
which perform a maritime law enforcement mission, and other maritime skills training provided to a country which
does not have a standing Armed Forces is authorized.
   e. The foreign government must agree to the same administrative control over civilians in training as applies to
military personnel. Equivalent grade civilians will be afforded the same status and privileges as military personnel.
   f. The military services may provide training to non-MOD personnel under the following authorities.
   (1) Training provided directly to non-MOD organizations of friendly countries, international organizations, or
voluntary nonprofit relief agencies registered with and approved by the U.S. Agency for International Development
(USAID), as authorized by FAA, Section 607, Part I. The military Service must obtain a determination from the
International Development Cooperation Agency, through DSCA, that the proposed training is consistent with and
furthers the purposes of part I, of the Foreign Assistance Act. The military Service must forward the request for
determination to DSCA with the following information:
   (a) Name of the international agency.
   (b) Number of students to be trained.
   (c) Type training, proposed dates, and estimated cost.
   (2) Upon receipt of the determination approval from International Development Cooperation Agency, the military
department will prepare an LOA for the training and forward to the Security Cooperation Organization for presentation
to the international agency. The LOA will include a copy of the determination as an attachment and a supplemental
condition as follows: “This sale is made under the authority of Section 607 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as
amended, and the determination there under made by the Director, Trade and Development Program, International
Development Cooperation Agency, on (date) (copy attached). Any reference to the Arms Export Control Act herein
will be construed to be a reference to FAA, Section 607, 1961, as amended. All other terms, conditions, and procedures
under this LOA will apply to this transaction.”
   (3) A report will be provided directly to Director, U.S. Trade and Development Program, International Development


30                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Cooperation Agency, upon completion of the training to include the completion or termination date of the training and
any changes in the original request concerning actual course and or type training, length, and cost.
   (4) Training provided in support of other U.S. government sponsored programs, provided in support of other U.S.
government programs authorized under the FAA, and financed by USG appropriations. Section 632(a) of the FAA
authorizes the transfer of funds from one agency to another to carry out the purposes of the FAA. This training support
will be provided under an interagency agreement.
   (5) Training provided to international students sponsored by another government agency, financed by the foreign
country. The Economy Act authorizes a government agency to render services for another on a reimbursable basis.
This training support will be provided under an interagency agreement. Guidance for determining tuition rates for non-
DOD-sponsored personnel is contained in DOD 7000.14–R; in all cases the established administrative surcharge will be
applied. Student support costs, such as TLA and medical services, are the responsibility of the student’s government or
the sponsoring agency.

3–14. Education and training provided by contractors or at civilian institutions
   a. Contractor-provided training under foreign military sales. Training conducted by contractors, either at DOD
contracted or USG facilities, will be conducted under the same procedures and regulations outlined for DOD provided
training, to include vetting of students, ITO, administrative support, and reporting in the SAN. When the training is
provided by a contractor in non-USG facilities, the contract SOW must include requirements to provide students the
same basic student management and life support afforded international students attending training on a USG installa-
tion to include payment of TLA (when applicable); travel arrangements, lodging, dining facilities, daily transportation
between International Military Students (IMS) quarters, training facility, dining facility, student reporting, medical
support, general administration, and a Field Studies Program if training is 4 weeks or longer. The cost of these
administrative services will be included in the cost of the contract. Figure 3–3 provides a price and availability
checklist for contractor-provided training.




                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                31
     Figure 3–3. Sample format of checklist for contractor training




32   AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   b. Support for direct contractor-provided training. Administrative support for direct contractor training is NOT
provided through an FMS case. Room, board, medical care, and related support arrangements for students undergoing
commercial contractor training must be arranged between the contractor and the purchaser.
   c. Education and training of international military students at civilian institutions.
   (1) Training is authorized under the IMET only if equivalent training is not available from U.S. military installa-
tions. DSCA approval is required prior to offer or programming.
   (2) The requirement to educate or train an IMS at a civilian institution under FMS is more appropriately handled by
direct negotiation between the civilian institution and the purchasing country. Security cooperation training at civilian
institutions, therefore, generally will not be accomplished under FMS. Requests for exceptions to this policy should be
addressed to DSCA Comptroller.
   (3) Training at civilian institutions under ongoing Military Service contracts may be requested from the Military
Service.
   (4) Contract training in support of DCS, that is, foreign government to defense contractor without DOD interven-
tion, is not managed under SC/security assistance training programs.

3–15. Letters of offer and acceptance for the sale of U.S. military training
The LOA, when signed, is an international binding agreement used by the USG to offer to sell defense articles and
defense services (training) to a foreign country or international organization. The LOA lists the items, services,
estimated costs, terms, and conditions of the sale, and requires the signature of a representative of the foreign country
or international organization to indicate acceptance. Detailed guidance on the use and processing of LOA, Amendments
and Modifications is in the SAMM, chapter 5.
   a. Purpose of the letter of offer and acceptance. The LOA will be used for all foreign military sales of defense
articles and defense services, which includes training. Also, when authorized for release to the foreign purchaser, the
LOA becomes the official offer by the USG.
   (1) The following denote acceptance on the part of the purchaser of the terms and conditions:
   (a) Signature by an authorized representative of the purchasing country.
   (b) Receipt of the initial deposit and signed copies of the LOA by DFAS and the MILDEP.
   (2) Additional terms and conditions as may be appropriate for a particular sales case will be set forth in one or more
attachments or continuation sheets to the LOA. All attachments, including notes, annexes, and appendices, are an
integral part of the LOA.
   b. Letter of offer and acceptance development. Development of an LOA may involve one or more of the statutes
that authorize FMS.
   (1) Those AECA and FAA sections that pertain to FMS training cases are as follows:
   (a) Section 21, AECA. Sale from stock.
   (b) Section 22, AECA. DOD Procurement for cash sales.
   (c) Section 23, AECA. DOD Credit sales.
   (d) Section 24, AECA. DOD guaranties.
   (e) Section 503(a)(3), FAA. Use of Foreign Military Financing Program funds for obligation authority.
   (2) The SAMM, chapter 5, lists in detail the requirements for preparation of LOA.

3–16. Letters of offer and acceptance for training
   a. Training in support of major equipment sales can include the development of operator, maintenance, logistical,
and other support skills. In support of such sales, accurate and early planning must be accomplished to complete the
following before equipment arrival:
   (1) Conduct a training assessment survey.
   (2) Determine both CONUS and OCONUS training requirements.
   (3) Develop training P&A information for country approval via FMS planning case.
   (4) Request, process, and accept LOA and complete financial requirements.
   (5) Screen and select IMS for required ELT and other preparatory training.
   (6) Conduct training required to operate and maintain equipment.
   b. Include in each LOA the date upon which the offer expires.
   c. Requests by the purchaser for extensions to expiration dates must be in writing. These requests will be granted
only after a full review by the preparing agency to ensure that all data included in the LOA remain valid. The
purchaser will be advised by message of the new expiration date, along with the authorization to make a pen and ink
change to the expiration date listed on the LOA or amendment. DFAS–DE and DSCA must be provided an information
copy of the message.




                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  33
   d. It is not FMS practice to provide a detailed description of the components of costs included in estimated prices
for line items on LOA. When such queries are received from the purchaser, the elements of tuition cost, as outlined in
DOD 7000.14–R, volume 15, may be provided. Detailed information on tuition computation will not be provided
unless specifically authorized on a case-by-case basis by DSCA.
   e. The obligation authority will be issued by DFAS–DE only after the receipt of the duly executed LOA and initial
deposit if required.
   f. To ensure uniformity of LOA for training, certain notes, or supplemental conditions must be included in the LOA.
These various notes or conditions are published by each Military Service. Special training cases involving long lead-
time and special training assets will necessarily require various caveats, notes, and explanations to legally and
administratively define the case. These notes will be prepared to adequately protect the interests of the USG and the
purchaser.
   g. The LOA must specify the purchasing government’s responsibilities; for example, providing pay and allowances,
funds for housing, qualified IMS, and any required supervision of these IMS.
   h. The LOA for defined training should, wherever possible, include firm scheduling of IMS into specific training
courses. When this is not feasible, a statement will be included in the LOA to the effect that the convening date and
scheduling information will be provided when available.

3–17. Letters of offer and acceptance amendments
Amendments should be used to meet only minimum essential administrative needs. They may be used for minor
changes in scope when such use is essential for administrative reasons. Detailed guidance on the use and processing of
amendments is in the SAMM.

3–18. Letters of offer and acceptance modifications
Modifications are used to record modifications to an existing LOA which do not constitute a change in scope. Detailed
guidance on the use and processing of modifications is in the SAMM, chapter 5.

3–19. Foreign military sales price increases
For price increase notifications, the following information, if applicable, will be included:
  a. Reason for the increase.
  b. Options the purchaser has, if any, with respect to avoiding the price increases, for example, contract termination
or reduction of quantities.
  c. Estimated financial consequences of selecting such options.
  d. Time limits, if any, for notifying the USG of the purchaser’s desire to cancel or reduce quantities.

3–20. Liability for damages
Training cases which involve the use of U.S. equipment (for example, aircraft and trucks), and which, due to special
pricing requirements, do not include an attrition factor, will include a statement on liability for damages. It will state
that the foreign government will be liable for any damage to such equipment due to negligence on the part of the
student.

Section III
Training Support (Other Media)

3–21. General
Publications necessary to support Security Cooperation cover a wide range of material, in print or other media (such as
microfiche, CD and so forth) including technical orders, compendiums/indexes, software, technical manuals, supply
catalogs, training publications, administrative publications, engineering drawings, and associated documents, Integrated
Logistics Support publications and associated documents, equipment component lists, special file extracts, decals,
forms, and audiovisual products. A publication may be bound or loose-leaf, imprinted form, automatic data processing
listing, operator’s card, microfilm, slide, motion picture film, CD–ROM, and so forth. In most cases, as with other
aspects of the FMS Program, no special system has been developed to requisition publications to support the FMS
customer. The systems already used by each of MILDEP and other DOD organizations to meet internal requirements
have all been adapted for the FMS customer. The U.S. Air Force Security Assistance Technical Order Data System
was developed to support the FMS program. However, the systems used by the Army, Air Force, Navy, and Defense
Logistics Agency are very different from one another, unlike the processes used to obtain spare parts.

3–22. English language training media
  a. Training aids, devices, equipment, books, tapes, and publications used in establishing or supporting in-country
ELTP may be programmed and funded in the country IMETP. The dollar value of items obtained under IMETP will be
applied against the country’s training dollar ceiling. Training materials programmed under Budget Project N90 will be



34                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
identified to DSCA when requesting funding and will include an indication that the materials support the in country
ELTP.
   (1) Training aids, devices, and equipment in support of ELTP will be in the U.S. Army IMETP (N9A).
   (2) Books, tapes, and publications in support of ELTP will be in USAF IMETP (N9B).
   (3) Packing, crating, and handling costs of the items in paragraphs (1) and (2), above, will be in the respective
MILDEP program (N9X).
   b. Training aids, devices, equipment, films, books, tapes, and publications not in support of in country ELTP will be
obtained through FMS channels. Requests for exceptions to obtain these items through programming and funding under
IMETP must be addressed on a case-by-case basis to DSCA. The DSCA exceptions will be granted on a one-time basis
and will not apply automatically to similar future requirements. Requests for training aids and support material should
be included in IMET waiver requests for SATs. Requests must be completely justified, in writing, and include the
following:
   (1) Why provisioning of training materials under IMETP is necessary?
   (2) Why it is in the U.S. interest?
   (3) The impact on the country training program (for example, specific courses and training to be deleted and how
this training will be accomplished).
   c. In view of the long lead time required in programming, procurement, and delivery, items must be programmed
sufficiently in advance to be available in-country when needed. After funding, timely requisitioning is essential to
allow Military Service obligations before 1 August of each year.

3–23. Constraints
Training media will not be provided to foreign countries on a loan or non-reimbursable basis. The term “loan” does not
apply to SCETP. Foreign governments should be encouraged to purchase training media for their training requirements.
However, training media may be leased under the provision of AECA, chapter 6. Under the terms of a lease, the
foreign government incurs an obligation to rent the training film and maintain it in an original condition. Lease
arrangements present cost-recoupment problems. The costs of cleaning and repairing damaged training media, produc-
ing additional film prints to meet foreign demands, and packing, crating, handling, and postage are difficult to factor
into the low cost of single training-film lease arrangements. These costs must, however, even though minimal, be
recouped by the USG. The following policy applies when providing training media to SC activities, foreign govern-
ments, and international organizations:
   a. Training media will not be leased to foreign governments without the authorization of DSCA.
   b. The SC activities receiving foreign government requests to lease training media will screen the requests carefully
to ensure that full justification is provided with the request. The SC activities are authorized to state that the lease, if
approved, will be on an exception basis only.
   c. The SC activities borrowing media will retain physical custody of the media at all times. The media will not be
given to foreign governments while in custody of the SC activity. The media may be shown to foreign government
representatives according to authorized disclosure but must be retained at all times by the borrowing SC activity.

Section IV
Department of the Army

3–24. Training references
   a. Courses. This document lists CONUS training activity, course number and title, duration (peacetime and mobili-
zation), purpose, scope, prerequisites, and special instructions. Many of these courses are not available to all countries;
however, references to this pamphlet and the Training Military Articles and Service List should give the Security
Cooperation Organization all necessary data to assist the host country in requesting the training that best meets
requirements.
   b. Catalog. Most MSCs, schools, and training activities publish printed and online catalogs on available training.
   c. The Training Military Articles and Service List.
   (1) Distribution. The Training Military Articles and Service List are distributed as required by SATFA to command-
ers of combatant commands, Security Cooperation Organization, and DA.
   (2) Changes. Changes are made when needed (for example, entering new courses, eliminating courses, and changing
course location, length, and cost). The IMSO is encouraged to notify SATFA Policy, Plans, Programs, and Projects
(P4)/Regional Operations when new training or courses having potential applicability to IMS have been developed. The
SATFA will determine if international interest exists, and if so, will assign a Training Military Articles and Service
List number and a cost to the training.
   (3) Updates. An update of the Training Military Articles and Service List is required annually to reflect available
courses, applicable changes and associated tuition costs for the next FY. SATFA will request an annual update of the




                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                    35
Training Military Articles and Service List, to include aforementioned information, from non-TRADOC training
activities and schools and ensure inclusion in the Training Military Articles and Service List.

3–25. General course prerequisites, training requirements, and standards
   a. The IMS must meet all course prerequisites, except service retainability and U.S. security clearances as prescribed
for U.S. personnel and reflected in the Training Military Articles and Service List, the school catalog, or other
prerequisites established by the U.S. Army component commander providing the training. IMS must also meet the age
requirements established in the SAMM.
   b. If IMS selected for Army training do not meet grade prerequisites, biographical data and complete justification to
waive grade prerequisites will be submitted to Director, SATFA and the concerned school for approval of course
attendance before preparing an ITO. Approvals will be granted by Director, SATFA in coordination with the affected
school.
   c. The IMS are expected to complete the same course requirements as their U.S. counterparts unless substitute
requirements have been approved by the school commandant and Director, SATFA, or unless the material is restricted.
IMS are expected to participate in physical training (PT), field training exercises, staff rides, and blocks of instruction
dealing with U.S. Army unique material.
   d. The IMS in training with U.S. personnel will not be routinely excused from class for prayer or holidays.
However, schools are encouraged to permit IMS in good academic standing to observe the two holidays per year
selected by their countries provided critical training or testing is not scheduled. The two holidays are chosen by the
countries, and published in the Combined Education and Training Program Plan. The DISAM places the complied list
on the IMSO Web.

3–26. Special courses
   a. Applicants for aviation, Airborne, Ranger, Special Forces, and other courses involving potentially hazardous
training will be carefully screened to ensure they meet the prerequisites, USASOC directives and/or the Training
Military Articles and Service List. These courses entail “danger to life and limb” activities and have the potential to
endanger not only the IMS, but also instructors and fellow students. In addition to meeting rigid physical requirements,
applicants must be highly motivated and possess an excellent understanding of and ability to communicate in English.
   b. The IMS taking other than airborne training, but who are airborne qualified, may be placed on airborne status for
the duration of CONUS training to maintain proficiency. Such status must be approved by the IMS’ government.
Specific authority must be included in the ITO. Implementation of this authority will depend on the school’s capability
to conduct airborne jumps.
   c. Candidates for initial entry rotary wing course flight training must have a proven aptitude for flight training
before reporting to the primary rotary wing course.
   d. The IMS that are scheduled for flight training in U.S. Army Service schools will be required to meet class I,
International Affairs, or II medical standards. (See AR 40–501, chap 4.) IMS who possess a current, valid aviator
rating in the armed forces of their respective countries will be considered the same as U.S. Army aviators and will be
required to pass a class II flight medical examination and possess a dental panorex. See paragraph 8–20b for additional
medical screening information.
   e. A U.S. Army aviation medical examination will be given to IMS selected for pilot training by a qualified U.S.
Army flight surgeon, U.S. Air Force flight surgeon, or U.S. Navy flight surgeon before the IMS departs from their
home area. If the country does not have a U.S. Armed Forces aviation medical officer, the IMS candidate, upon
approval of the Security Cooperation Organization, will report to the closest U.S. Armed Forces flight surgeon for
examination. The Security Cooperation Organization will issue the ITO and fund cite. The predeparture medical
examination will be performed as early as possible to prevent cancellation of training because of physical non-
qualification. The examining officer will determine the individual’s physical qualification for the flying course.
Requests for waivers will be sent to the Dean, U.S. Army School of Aviation Medicine, (MCCS–HAO), Building 301,
Fort Rucker, AL 36362–5377, for advice and recommendation (see para 8–11).
   f. Flight physical examination records will be hand-carried by the IMS and will accompany the individual through-
out aviation training. These records included but are not limited to DD Form 2808 (Report of Medical Examination)
and DD Form 2807–1 (Report of Medical History) and a dental panorex.
   g. The IMS undergoing physical re-examination in the United States prior to beginning flight training will be
required to meet class II medical standards for flying (see AR 40–501).
   h. An individual selected for flight training in CONUS must attend the Specialized English Training course at
DLIELC before attending flight courses. The Security Cooperation Organization may request exceptions from SATFA
only when the IMS has recent experience in an English language flight or navigational environment.

3–27. Senior professional military education
The IMS attend senior PME courses by invitation only. The commanders of combatant commands and the SATFA
operations division will be informed by the Security Cooperation Organization on acceptance or declination of



36                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
invitations. Prerequisites are located on the respective schools’ Web pages. Each course is preceded by required
preparatory courses.
   a. Senior international military officers may participate in the International Fellows Program at the National War
College and the Industrial College of the Armed Forces at the National Defense University, Fort McNair, Washington,
DC. Invitations are issued by the CJCS.
   b. Senior international Army officers may participate in the International Fellows Program at the Army War College
(AWC), Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania. Invitations are issued by the Chief of Staff of the Army (CSA). The AWC
offers a distance education course, also by invitation, in addition to the resident program. This course includes 2-week
resident phases.
   c. Mid-level international Army officers may participate in the ILE Program at the Command and General Staff
College (CGSC), Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Invitations are issued on behalf of the CSA. The school of advanced
military studies at CGSC accepts a limited number of international officers. Desire for possible SAMS attendance must
be expressed upon reporting to CGSC for ILE.
   d. International noncommissioned officers (NCO) in grades equivalent to master sergeant or above may participate
by invitation in the Sergeants Major Course at the U.S. Army USASMA, Fort Bliss, TX.

3–28. Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation
Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation is a DOD school operating under the executive agency of the
U.S. Army at Fort Benning, Georgia. Instruction is primarily in the Spanish language, with selected courses offered in
English.
  a. The WHINSEC educates and trains rising civilian, military and law enforcement leaders from throughout the
Western Hemisphere. Its goals explicitly include strengthening democracy, instilling a respect for the rule of law and
honoring human rights. It educates an array of military and civilian students to solve regional problems, including
peacefully resolving border conflicts; fighting terrorism, the illegal drug trade and organized crime; responding to
natural disasters; and supporting peacekeeping efforts.
  b. The WHINSEC offers an ILE course (in Spanish) that is equivalent to the course at CGSC, Fort Leavenworth,
Kansas.
  c. Additional information on WHINSEC is provided in appendix B of this regulation.

3–29. On-the-job training and observer training
   a. In OJT the IMS learns by actually doing a specific task. In OBT the IMS trains beside U.S. personnel and learns
by observation. Neither escorts nor interpreters are authorized for this training.
   b. Current assets at U.S. Army training activities and units often prevent offering OJT or OBT. Training should be
requested only when completely justified as a definite requirement to accomplish the country training goals. It will not
be used to acquire minimum training time to satisfy SAMM requirements or country regulations.
   c. Neither OJT nor OBT at HQDA or major Army commands is authorized.
   d. The OJT and OBT will normally be conducted on an unclassified basis. If classified information is to be
disclosed during the training, SATFA must be provided a detailed narrative of the information in advance of the
proposed training so that disclosure authority can be requested in accordance with AR 380–10.
   e. Activities should use the standard weekly OJT or OBT rates provided by SATFA unless actual costs are captured
and exceed those rates. Training for any portion of a week will be charged this full weekly rate (for example, OJT
lasting 4 weeks and 3 days will be charged for 5 weeks at the standard rate).
   f. OJT and OBT training with Army National Guard of the United States and U.S. Army Reserve units will be
conducted under normal SC training (for example, IMET, FMS) programs).
   g. If OJT is requested at a Forces Command (FORSCOM) installation or a unit, HQ, FORSCOM requires that the
request be submitted at least 120 days prior to the start of the desired OJT or OBT. Requests for OJT received after the
120 day cutoff may be rejected.

3–30. Limitations of on-the-job training and observer training
Both OJT and OBT may be provided to IMS at CONUS Army installations under the following conditions:
   a. On-the-job-training.
   (1) The IMS is scheduled to attend two or more courses at the same school with an interval of more than 5 working
days between the end of one course and the beginning of the next. The type of training to be furnished will be decided
by the school commandant.
   (2) The IMS is scheduled to attend two or more courses at separate Service schools with an interval between schools
of more than 5 working days, exclusive of processing and travel time. In this scenario, school commandant at the
losing school will conduct OJT before the IMS travels to the gaining school.
   (3) The IMS is removed from classroom instruction during classified portions of courses because access to the
classified information has not been granted. The type of training to be furnished will be decided by the school
commandant.


                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                 37
   (4) The IMS requires OJT to develop a specific skill for which training was not covered during the formal course of
instruction. This training must be directly related to home country duty assignment, must be planned in advance, and
must be included in the country’s training program. Detailed requirements for the training which include specific areas
of interest and type of materiel used by country (if applicable) will be furnished in advance by the Security
Cooperation Organization to the country program manager who forwards to the school commandant to determine
capability to execute requested OJT unless training with a FORSCOM unit is desired (see para 3–29g).
   (5) The OJT will not exceed 2 weeks except when strong justification is furnished by the country and approved by
Director, SATFA and the school commandant.
   (6) Requests for unprogrammed OJT will be forwarded by the Security Cooperation Organization to SATFA
country program manager NLT 120 days before requested start date. Requests will include the information contained in
figure 3–2.
   b. Observer training.
   (1) The OBT will be authorized only when no course covering the desired training is available. The duration will be
determined by the school commandant as to how long it will take to cover stated training objectives. Continental
United States OBT normally will be scheduled for a minimum of 2 weeks and not more than 6 months.
   (2) The OBT will be planned in advance and included in the country’s training program. Detailed requirements for
training and specific areas of interest will be furnished, as outlined in figure 3–2.
   (3) Requests for unprogrammed OBT will be forwarded by the Security Cooperation Organization to SATFA
country program manager NLT 120 days before requested start date.

3–31. Administration of on-the-job training and observer training
   a. The OJT or OBT programmed according to paragraph 3–27 will be included in the basic ITO (see fig 9–2).
   b. The OJT or OBT included in the ITO, but not requested according to procedures in paragraph 3–27, will not be
arranged.
   c. The OJT or OBT will not be scheduled at CONUS schools, installations, and units during the winter holidays.
This period, commonly known as Exodus, is usually the last 2 weeks of December through the New Year’s Day
holiday.
   d. Requests for medical OBT will be accompanied by one copy of the complete biographical data for each IMS and
will include specific data as follows:
   (1) Prior training, including all medical schools and hospitals where training was received.
   (2) Actual professional experience to include past, current, or future positions.
   (3) English language proficiency, both written and oral.
   (4) Other pertinent available data and any medical certifications and affiliations.
   e. Medical internships, residencies, and fellowships are not available in the United States.
   f. The OJT and OBT at overseas schools and installations will be provided according to the policies established by
the commanders of the commanders of combatant commands.
   g. For those IMS attending OBT, prior exposure to the Field Studies Program might be nonexistent or they may
have already fully participated in the program. Regardless of level of Field Studies Program exposure, more emphasis
should be placed on the specific type of technical training for which they have been programmed. However, in the off-
duty time available, IMS will be encouraged to participate in available Field Studies Program events.

3–32. Contractor provided training
   a. Specific training may only be available by agencies or civilian (contract) companies outside the military training
base. This training may be provided to IMS by requesting the training through SATFA country program manager
provided there is an existing USASAC contract vehicle in place. It is programmed and students placed on an ITO.
   b. Enough lead time must be given USASAC to establish administrative information such as prices for the training
to be included in the Training Military Articles and Service List. Security Cooperation Organization should be aware of
available student life support. Many contractor locations do not have IMSO support, VOQ/VEQ or installation
transportation; therefore students must arrive with sufficient funds (TLA if applicable) to sustain them during the
training period.

3–33. Distributed learning
   a. The IMS may take DL courses offered by the U.S. Army and other agencies. In pure DL courses, IMS may
access course material from their home countries via internet or CDs. The IMS are screened and vetted in the same
manner as IMS coming to CONUS for training. Many resident courses require a DL module or phase to be completed
prior to enrolling in the resident course. The IMS students will take the DL portion in residence as a stand alone phase
prior to joining the principal resident course. This phase will be scheduled and programmed like other prerequisite
courses. The IMSO will coordinate efforts for conducting this training for IMS in residence. Also offered are hybrid
courses in which the students take a portion of the course as DL at their home station and one or more resident
sessions at a U.S. location.


38                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   b. The IMET funding may not be used for home station DL instruction unless a waiver is granted by DSCA.
Security Cooperation Organization should forward request for waiver to DSCA for action with a copy furnished to
SATFA country program manager. All DL students will be programmed and tracked like other students that are
training in CONUS.

3–34. Training literature
  a. The Army Publishing Directorate is the Army POC for requisitioning all DA-approved paper and CD–ROM
publications and forms. Electronic training publications may be found on the Army Doctrinal and Training Digital
Library on the Internet. This site is available at www.apd.army.mil.
  b. The Commander, USASAC, is the Army POC for requisitioning training aids, devices, and equipment.

3–35. Programming cycle
   a. Security cooperation officer or commanders of combatant command. The Security Cooperation Organization will
submit their commanders of combatant commands-approved annual training programs to SATFA and other agencies as
directed by the published suspense date.
   b. Security Assistance Training Field Activity. The SATFA will request training seats from TRADOC, other MSCs,
DOD Schools, and Services as soon as the school schedules and seat availability are published.
   c. Senior professional military education.
   (1) The SATFA will allocate spaces to the Security Cooperation Organization as soon as they are obtained, provided
an invitation has been extended and country has accepted. Security Cooperation Organization will accept or decline
invitation to extending agency with copy furnished to SATFA country program manager. Once country has accepted
invitation and SATFA country program manager is notified, training will be programmed in the STL. Acceptance or
declination messages must include—
   (a) The SCETP program vehicle, that is, IMET, FMS, Counterterrorism Fellowship Program, and so forth.
   (b) The Training Military Articles and Service List ID.
   (c) Course title.
   (d) Other information as directed by SATFA.
   (2) When a program change is required, the Security Cooperation Organization should send an electronic mail
message or fax to SATFA (ATTG–TRI–SR) with an information copy to the commanders of combatant commands and
to DA for AWC, CGSC, and USASMA. When a program change is required for NDU, the Security Cooperation
Organization should send an electronic mail message or fax directly to National Defense University (NDU) Interna-
tional Student Management Office. Since quotas are much more difficult to obtain after the initial distribution, Security
Cooperation Organization should keep declinations and changes to a minimum.
   d. Data on confirmed and projected IMS load for current and future FYs are available from STL reports on the
IMSO Web. IMSO will provide copies of STL reports to installation resource management personnel to facilitate
budget projection, submit earnings to SATFA, and track actual execution.
   e. Training requirements are considered to be “confirmed” when dates have been in the STL for a period of at least
30 days.
   f. The SATFA will be notified of the cancellation of programmed CONUS training a minimum of 61 days before
the class start date to avoid application of a forfeiture charge. It will also identify the WCN, FMS case designator (if
applicable), and courses being canceled by starting dates. If medical training is involved, the Commander, U.S. Army
Medical Department Center and School (AMEDDC&S) will be included. Forfeiture charges do not apply to training
programmed in the STL less than 30 days unless confirmed in writing by the Security Cooperation Organization.

3–36. Letter of offer and acceptance functions
   a. The FMS Control Division of DSCA will submit FMS cases to Congress, as required. No implementing agency is
authorized to release LOA without DSCA countersignature review and approval.
   b. The SATFA provides FMS case load data that results in an initial draft of LOAs for CONUS training and
prepares LOA for CONUS training and CONUS-furnished security assistance teams, obtaining any additional neces-
sary data from the training agency, if other than TRADOC, or from SATMO in the case of security assistance team
cases.
   (1) The SATFA maintains the LOA training case designator file.
   (2) The SATFA assigns case designators for all Army FMS training cases to include those prepared overseas.
(Designators consist of three letters starting with the letter “O” in alphabetic sequence; for example, OAA, OAB ...
OBA, OBB ... OCA, OCB.) Once a case designator is assigned and entered into the DSCA 1200 system, it is important
that SATFA be notified of any later cancellation of the case, so that it may be transferred to an inactive or canceled
status.
   (3) The SATFA provides LOAs, amendments and modifications load data and related forms for CONUS training
and OCONUS training teams furnished from CONUS sources by the U.S. Army.



                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  39
  (4) Following SATFA receipt of an implemented FMS case, obligational authority-customer order is issued to each
CONUS school and/or SATMO.
  (5) SATFA obtains from each CONUS school or training activity all required bills, using SF 1080 (Voucher for
Reimbursement for Expenditures on Official Business), supported by copies of each IMS’s ITO or other obligating
documents.
  (6) Reimburse each CONUS school or training installation or command for training and services. No training may
occur on an FMS case without sufficient funds available in the case to reimburse the training school or activity.
  (7) The FMS purchaser/customer will forward the required data to SATFA to facilitate preparation of the LOA.
SATFA will input case data and forward it to the Case Writing Division for further case writing and counter signature
review/approval before release to the country according to prescribed procedures.

3–37. Blanket order foreign military cases
   a. Training cases will normally be prepared as BO. Defined-line training cases can be written, but should be kept to
a minimum because of inherent administrative difficulties.
   b. The BO FMS cases are prepared in an estimated dollar amount. (When the country accepts a BO FMS case and
deposits funds and DFAS issues the obligation authority, execution of the program is authorized. As the training
program develops, SATFA will forward the STL to the Security Cooperation Organization.)
   c. The following policies and procedures govern BO FMS cases:
   (1) The earliest training date on a BO case should be far enough in the future to allow implementation of the case
prior to the first training report date. Exceptions will be properly coordinated by SATFA among involved agencies.
   (2) The BO FMS cases are normally prepared in one of two ways.
   (a) For a dollar amount specified by the country, with the detailed list of required courses to be developed as
required throughout the life of the case.
   (b) For a dollar amount or a specific time period in excess of the training requirement known at the time of
preparation.

Section V
Department of the Navy (U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Coast Guard)

3–38. Acceptance of training
When quotas are confirmed, dates will appear in the Security Assistance Network IMSO and Security Cooperation
Organization Training Web. If no program changes are requested by the Security Cooperation Organization, training
dates are considered to be accepted. Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity will provide ITO
authority by a formal message for each WCN under IMET and Counterterrorism Fellowship Program. Naval Education
and Training Security Assistance Field Activity will provide ITO authority by formal message for all training under an
FMS case at the time the case is implemented.

3–39. Programming training under foreign military sales
   a. Annual FMS training requirements should be submitted at the commanders of combatant commands annual
Security Cooperation Education and Training Working Group; however, FMS training may also be arranged directly
between the Washington, DC, country representative and Navy IPO/Naval Education and Training Security Assistance
Field Activity, or directly between the Security Cooperation Organization and Navy IPO/Naval Education and Training
Security Assistance Field Activity. Requests for FMS training for USMC training should be submitted at the command-
ers of combatant commands annual Security Cooperation Education and Training Working Group; however, they
requests may be forwarded directly to CG, Security Cooperation Education and Training Center MCCDC. Such
requests are subsequently coordinated with Navy IPO and Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field
Activity for support in the preparation or management of the required FMS training case. USCG (G–CI) will act as
central authority for planning and programming all USCG training. Policy and procedural differences will exist for
Coast Guard training with regard to OJT, Family members, ship transfers, and so forth. USCG requests are also
coordinated with Navy IPO and Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity for support in the
preparation or management of the required FMS training case.
   b. Once a case has been signed and the purchaser has submitted any required initial deposit the implementing
agency will take action to implement the case. The FMS case must be implemented in all applicable data systems (for
example, DSAMS, Defense Integrated Financial System, DSCA 1200 System, and the MILDEP legacy systems before
case execution occurs. Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity will send a message to the
Security Cooperation Organization authorizing ITO issuance under the new case.

3–40. Course prerequisites and standards
The Security Cooperation Organization must ensure students meet prerequisites for all scheduled training. The
prerequisites are often included in the course catalog for the providing Service and in the Training Military Articles and



40                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Service List. Naval aviation, diving, swimming, explosive ordnance disposal, mountain warfare and reconnaissance
training are considered high-risk courses and candidates must be prescreened to meet specific physical and medical
requirements prior to enrollment. All international students must have at least the minimum ECL required for the
course of instruction and take Specialized English Training if required (unless country is exempt). Information to
prepare the students prior to enrollment in each unique area can be found in the U.S. Navy International Training &
Education Catalog, the USMC Desktop Guide and the USCG International Training Handbook. See also the DON
section of chapter 8.

3–41. Military information/controlled unclassified information
The SECNAVINST 5510.34A requires a disclosure determination by Navy IPO prior to foreign participation in all
classified courses. This must be done before training can be programmed. Classified training is provided on a need-to-
know-basis only. All requests for courses not previously attended by the country must include justification; this is,
explanation of circumstances facts supporting the request. See chapter 10, paragraph 10–39 for further information.

3–42. Additional training requests for International military student after arrival in the United States
Training for IMS at DON installations should be scheduled well in advance to assure proper programming. This
assures that the desired training is available when required. For purposes of this regulation and the administration of
students, the term “CONUS” includes U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps schools in Hawaii, unless otherwise specified.
   a. Occasionally, situations arise where changes in programmed training are necessary. Every attempt must be made
to keep these to a minimum and to reduce their impact. The addition of extra lines of training to that initially scheduled
for an IMS must have the concurrence of the IMS government, the Security Cooperation Organization, the commanders
of combatant commands, Navy IPO, and either Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity for
Navy training, CG, SCETC MCCDC for USMC training, or Coast Guard Headquarters, International Affairs (G–CI)
for USCG training. If the IMS is under the sponsorship of another Service, approval must also be obtained from that
Military Service security cooperation activity.
   b. Requests by IMS for additional training should be discouraged. IMS will be advised that additional training
should be requested through their own military Service, via their naval or military attaché or other official representa-
tive, a minimum of 60 days before completion of the current training course.

3–43. Training at nonmilitary institutions
This training for IMET/CT IMS is discouraged; however if circumstances dictate and training is not available from
U.S. military facilities, training may be authorized with prior approval by DSCA. If a country eligible for FMS training
only desires training at a civilian institution, this training can be negotiated directly by the country with the civilian
institution concerned or on a case-by-case basis training can be funded using an FMS LOA. In these cases, issuance of
ITO will be authorized, as training will be within the purview of the DON SCETP.

3–44. Contracting for foreign military sale training
In fulfillment of DON responsibilities to provide training for IMS in connection with the sale of equipment, weapons
systems, or services, situations will arise that preclude training in DON schools as they are presently organized.
Contractor services may have to be obtained to provide the desired training.
   a. When international training is conducted in Naval Education Training Center schools but requirements cannot be
met because of a shortage of instructors, Naval Education Training Center is responsible through the appropriate Navy
Field Procurement Activity for contracting civilian instructors. Naval Education Training Center will then prepare the
statement of work and will monitor performance of the contractor.
   b. When international training is conducted in Naval Education Training Center schools but requirements cannot be
met because of limited capacity, availability of training equipment, or national disclosure policy, Naval Education
Training Center is responsible through the proper Navy Field Procurement Activity for contracting training services to
be conducted at a contractor’s site. Naval Education Training Center will then prepare the statement of work and
monitor performance of the contractor.
   c. When a Navy or Marine Corps SYSCOM is adding new equipment or systems to the U.S. Fleet or Marine Force,
or is procuring new equipment peculiar to the international customer (non Service-approved or supported by the DON
system), the SYSCOM is responsible for contracting factory training.

3–45. Professional military education
   a. Naval Command College.
   (1) The Naval Command College is a graduate-level course for senior naval officers of allied and friendly nations. It
provides 10 months of intensive study in Strategy and Policy, National Security Decision Making and International
Maritime Operations in conjunction with the College of Naval Warfare at the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode
Island. Class size is limited to encourage personal interaction with classmates. For this reason, CNO controls the
frequency of invitations to any given country to ensure mix of larger and smaller navies, thus providing the optimum
avenue for the exchange of maritime concepts. CNO will issue invitations by message via the Security Cooperation


                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  41
Organization. Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity will confirm quotas after receipt of
formal acceptance by message via the Security Cooperation Organization. Candidates should hold the rank of Com-
mander or Captain U.S. Navy equivalent (O–5/O–6); have ECL of 80 or higher, and have demonstrated high leadership
and academic potential during career thus far. The objectives of the Naval Command College are to—
   (a) Develop mutual perspectives of international situations among allied and friendly navies, and between those
navies, and the U.S. Navy.
   (b) To provide instruction, at the post-graduate level, for those senior officer of allied and friendly navies who have
shown the clear potential to be chiefs of their services.
   (c) To enrich the academic environment of the Naval War College.
   (d) To provide an environment which showcases U.S. culture, institutions, and values.
   (2) Prerequisites for candidates for Naval Command College should—
   (a) Hold the rank of commander or captain U.S. Navy equivalent. Waivers will not be granted.
   (b) Score 80 or higher on the in-country screening ECL tests unless exempt by other statutes. Waivers will not be
granted.
   (c) Have demonstrated high leadership and academic potential during career thus far.
   (d) Have been extended a personal invitation by CNO via appropriate in-country Service chief. No alternate
invitation procedures are acceptable.
   b. Naval Staff College The Naval Staff College is a graduate level international program, designed for mid-career
naval officers, which is vital in expanding understanding and cooperation among the world’s navies. As coalition forces
are increasingly summoned to respond to conflicts and promote peace around the world, the role of Naval Staff College
gains significance. The Naval War College’s academic departments have adapted course studies to reflect the mission
confronting the naval forces of today. For example, the course incorporates studies of security assistance, combating
terrorism, insurgency and counterinsurgency, low intensity conflict, multilateral peacekeeping, human rights, and drug
control and interdiction. The course provides its students who are the future leaders in their respective navies with a
unique and unmatched opportunity to come together as a team to gain a respect and appreciation of other cultures, and
provides a place for individual professional study in order to realize each student’s potential. CNO will issue invitations
by message. Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity will confirm quotas after receipt of
formal acceptance by the Security Cooperation Organization.
   (1) The Naval Staff College 10-month course (Naval Staff College –10) is conducted annually in the FY 4th quarter,
commencing in July, and is open to a maximum of 20 Naval, Coast Guard, or Maritime Service officers, grades 0–3
and 0–4 (senior Lieutenants and Lieutenant Commanders). This program is a separate resident college within the U.S.
Naval War College; however, the academic programs of Naval Staff College –10 and its U.S. counterpart, the College
of Naval Command and Staff, are almost identical insofar as disclosure restrictions allow. Students pursue the
prescribed studies over three trimesters in Strategy and Policy, National Security Decisionmaking, and Joint Military
Operations. They follow the same basic schedule and are integrated into the seminars and lectures of their U.S.
counterparts. On an optional basis they may participate in the Electives Program during two trimesters. Their studies
differ from their U.S. counterparts in the addition of a preliminary orientation study, a course in Operational Law
conducted during one trimester, and a series of Curriculum field trip/Informational Program Visits designed to
familiarize them with U.S. Navy organization, methods, and doctrines, as well as the government, economy, culture
and geography of the United States.
   (2) The Naval Staff College five and one-half month course is conducted annually in the FY 2nd quarter, commenc-
ing in January, and is open to a maximum of 48 Naval, Coast Guard or Maritime Service officers, grades O–3 and O–4
(senior Lieutenants and Lieutenant Commanders). The program is a condensed version of the 10-month U.S. College of
Naval Command and Staff/Naval Staff College 10-month programs.
   c. United States Marine Corps Command and Staff College. The USMC Command and Staff College is an
intermediate professional military education course designed to prepare military officers for command and staff duties
with Marine air - ground task force with emphasis on amphibious operations, and for duty assignments with joint and
combined organizations. The intent of the curriculum is to provide officers with an understanding of the interrelation of
the strategic, operational and tactical levels of war within a joint and/or a combined environment. Attendance at this
course is by invitation of the Commandant of the Marine Corps. This course is for officers in the rank of O–4. Waivers
may be requested for officers in the rank of O–5. Waivers will not be provided for the rank of O–6. The ECL for this
course is 80, Specialized English Training Advised. Duration is 47 weeks and dependents are encouraged to accom-
pany IMS.
   d. Joint Forces Staff College. The Joint Forces Staff College is a joint school under the National Defense University
and the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The Chief of Naval Operations is responsible for the operations and maintenance of the
College facilities. The Joint Chiefs of Staff establishes student quotas; IMS quotas are administered by Naval
Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity. Courses are offered in joint and combined organization,
planning and operations, and in related aspects of national and international security, to enhance the preparation of
selected military officers for duty in all echelons of joint and combined commands. Entrance requirements for the
Intermediate Phase II Joint and Combined staff Officers School are: O–4/O–5 equivalent, ECL 85 Specialized English


42                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Training advised; graduate of resident U.S. intermediate level Service college or PME Phase I equivalent program
approved by JCS. Requests for programming should be directed to Naval Education and Training Security Assistance
Field Activity. The foreign country must then send a biography giving the background of the individual selected. If the
individual meets the entrance requirements, Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity will
confirm the quota. IMS will always be scheduled for a one week Joint Transition Course prior to the Joint Forces Staff
College.
   e. Naval Postgraduate School. The NPS, founded in 1909, is a fully accredited university offering over 35 unique
academic masters curricula to military and civilian members of the Department of Defense and allies around the world.
These graduate level programs are focused on increasing the combat effectiveness of U.S. and allied armed forces, and
fully support the unique needs and interests of the defense establishment. All programs contain a military application
and are not duplicated at civilian colleges and universities. NPS confers Master’s, Engineer’s, or Doctorate degrees
upon qualified graduates of the school, subject to U.S. Navy regulations and accreditation criteria. The academic
programs are administered through a unique organization composed of curricular offices and academic departments.
Each officer student is assigned to a military programs officer for military counseling and supervision, and an academic
associate for academic counseling. Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity will program a
country’s desired courses under the proper FMS or IMET Program. Security Cooperation Organization must then
forward candidate’s transcripts and Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) results (if candidate is from a non-
English speaking country) directly to the NPS for evaluation. Quotas will be confirmed by Naval Education and
Training Security Assistance Field Activity after review and acceptance by NPS.
   f. U.S. Marine Corps Expeditionary Warfare School. The Expeditionary Warfare School is a career-level profes-
sional military education school. Expeditionary Warfare School prepares Captains (O–3) to function as commanders
and staff officers at the appropriate level of the Operating Forces by providing instruction emphasis on command and
control, combined arms operations, warfighting skills, tactical decisionmaking, Marine air - ground task force expedi-
tionary operations, and naval operations. This course is for officers in the rank of O–3. Rank waivers may be requested
for the rank of O–4. The ECL for this course is 80, Specialized English Training Advised. Duration is 42 weeks and
dependents are encouraged to accompany IMS.
   g. U.S. Marine Corps School of Advanced Warfighting. The School of Advanced Warfighting is a graduate level,
military education tailored to amplify and complement the comprehensive foundations in Warfighting experienced
during the 47-week Command and Staff College curriculum for officers in the rank of O–4/O–5. This follow-on course
for selected graduates of the CSC focuses on the link between Warfighting and Warplanning, or preparation for war.
Utilizing a dynamic curriculum and an active methodology, School of Advanced Warfighting prepares its students for
significant roles in the future preparation of armed forces for success in war, should the nation require that end. The
course is held at the Marine Corps University. Participation in School of Advanced Warfighting is by invitation
extended to the specific individual based on performance in the USMC Command and Staff College, or an equivalent
course of instruction. The ECL for this course is 80, Specialized English Training Advised. Duration is 48 weeks and
dependents are encouraged to accompany IMS.

3–46. Accompaniment by dependents
   a. Although the practice of IMS bringing their dependents to CONUS while attending courses is generally not
encouraged, they are encouraged to bring their dependents while attending the following courses:
   (1) Naval Command College.
   (2) Naval Staff College for International Officers.
   (3) Marine Corps Command and Staff College.
   (4) Marine Corps Expeditionary Warfare School.
   (5) School of Advanced Warfighting (USMC).
   (6) Long-term resident postgraduate courses at NPS (excludes those in the curriculum at Defense Resources
Management Institute (DRMI).
   (7) NOTE: Joint Forces Staff College (while PME) does NOT encourage dependents.
   b. The IMET IMS bringing their dependents to the courses in paragraphs a(1) through (6), above, will receive the
full IMET living allowance allowable in accordance with the Joint Travel Regulation (JTR); for example, that living
allowance based on the non-availability of government quarters and messing facilities.

3–47. Visiting individuals or units
In the absence of statutory or other legal authority to the contrary, any training (or other Service) provided foreign
nationals or units (including air crews, explosive ordnance disposal units, sea, air, land teams, and so forth) visiting
DON activities will be subject to the AECA or the FAA, as applicable. SECNAVINST 5510.34A provides details on
approval procedures for visits.

3–48. Ship transfer, overhaul, and refresher training
Subject to appropriate congressional approval or notification, it is the policy of the U.S. Navy to transfer ships under



                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                 43
SC to eligible foreign governments or international organizations with a minimum use of U.S. Navy personnel. An
adequate degree of training in general operational readiness is expected. Training of crews incident to the transfer of a
U.S. Navy ship by sale, grant, lease, or loan to the foreign government is coordinated by Navy IPO under the SC
program.
   a. Guidelines.Guidelines for disclosure of CMI or CUI relating to international military training procedures incident
to the transfer of sale, loan, lease, or grant of ships under SCETP are set forth in SECNAVINST 5510.34A. The
SECNAVINST 4900.48 provides information and instruction pertinent to implementing the transfer of U.S. Navy ships
to foreign governments.
   b. Ship overhaul training. When the Security Cooperation Organization requests an overhaul for a foreign naval
vessel, it will also prepare, as a portion of the basic program, a request for suitable training to be given to the crew of
the foreign naval vessel during the overhaul period.
   c. Classified material related to ship turnover. The release of classified material in connection with a ship turnover
will be processed according to SECNAVINST 5510.34A.
   d. Authorization for transfer crew training. All requests for foreign transfer crew training, classified or unclassified,
will be submitted through the chain of command to Navy IPO, with copy to the cognizant offices, for determination of
feasibility. Upon receipt of approval, it is the responsibility of the requester to ensure that such training, if classified, is
authorized by competent authority. This can be accomplished as follows:
   (1) When it has been positively established that the training uses no classified information other than those manuals
or publications that have been authorized for release in conjunction with turnover of the ship, U.S. Navy commands
may provide ship transfer crew training without additional training disclosure authorization from higher authority. If
any doubt exists, a request for authorization will be submitted to Navy IPO with a list of classified material proposed
for release. SECNAVINST 5510.34A applies.
   (2) If classified information exceeds that turned over with the ship, disclosure authorization must be requested from
higher authority as follows:
   (a) If the training is to be accomplished at U.S. Navy commands or activities subordinate to the Fleet the disclosure
authorization should be requested from the pertinent Fleet who has authority to authorize disclosure according to
SECNAVINST 5510.34A.
   (b) All other cases must be submitted to Navy IPO for disclosure authorization.
   (c) All training, classified or unclassified, to be conducted in a naval shipyard requires the prior approval of
Commander, Naval Sea Systems Command.
   (3) In certain instances, a country or international organization will require refresher-type training in which its own
ships are used. Some of this training involves ships built in the U.S. for a foreign government or international
organization or transferred under the SC Program. In almost all instances, the ship has U.S. equipment in varying
quantities. Security Cooperation Organization desiring this type of training for a country should follow the procedures
below:
   (a) As far in advance as possible, submit total requirements to Navy IPO, with information copies to all concerned
and with minimum distribution being, commanders of combatant commands, COMFLTFORCOM/COMPACFLT,
Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, Commander, Naval Supply Systems Command,
Commander, Naval Sea Systems Command, Commander, Naval Air Systems Command, and all others involved.
   (b) These requirements will be in as complete detail as possible. The types of training desired, length of training,
dates of commencement and termination, and method of funding formal training courses envisioned for members of the
crew must be provided. MTT or technical assistance requirements for such things as weapons systems and communica-
tions systems, and level of competence of the crew, must be addressed.
   (c) Navy IPO will task the appropriate command to provide feasibility of the training requested, recommendations as
to alternate dates and training arrangements, and cost of the training. Navy IPO will authorize direct liaison as
appropriate.
   (d) The selected command may recommend that minimum safety-related training (for example, fire fighting and
damage control) be conducted before underway training to provide assurance of safety of observers.
   (e) Countries or international organizations eligible for IMET may, if they deem feasible, program such training
using IMET funds, provided that such program is submitted via the commanders of combatant commands according to
existing directives. An LOA will be prepared for countries using FMS funds to cover the cost of the training cruise. In
some instances, a training cruise may involve the issuance of both material and training LOA, or may provide for the
training as a line item in a material LOA. Navy IPO will be the focal point for all queries concerning the training
cruise. Countries and or international organizations should be thoroughly briefed by the Security Cooperation Organiza-
tion on all points contained in the LOA.
   (f) It is usually helpful to all concerned if a preliminary meeting is convened at which the country or international
organization and U.S. representatives have the opportunity to discuss in detail the aspects of the training cruise.

3–49. On-the-job training or observership training
OJT or observership training is conducted on a planned program of supervised instruction devoted to practical


44                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
application of previously achieved skills usually related to a formal course of instruction. All requests for OJT or
observership must include specific objectives.
   a. OJT or observership with USN shore activities—
   (1) Programmed OJT or observership will normally supplement formal training received at a school. This training
will be planned in advance in the country’s training program. It will include detailed requirements for training in
specific areas of interest and on types of material used by the country concerned. OJT or observership training
conducted independently and not in conjunction with formal courses of instruction will be authorized in CONUS only
when no course covering the desired training is available. Detailed objectives must be submitted at the time of the
initial request.
   (2) Medical and dental observation must include specific training objectives with the submission. Naval Education
and Training Security Assistance Field Activity will forward the objectives to Bureau of Medicine and Surgery
(BUMED) for details as to convening dates and location. Such observership will normally be scheduled for periods of
either 12 or 26 weeks. Certain observer training explicitly excludes “hands-on” training. For example, IMS enrolled
under medical and dental observer Training are prohibited from hands-on patient care.
   (3) OJT or observership on board U.S. installations, afloat or ashore, regardless of duration, is fully reimbursable,
either from IMET or FMS funds.
   (4) OJT or observership provided to a U.S. Navy employee (direct or indirect hire, regardless of nationality or
location) will be paid from MILDEP appropriate funds and is not part of the SCETP.
   (5) Any training provided to an IMS that results in identifiable expenses to the USG is fully reimbursable. In some
instances these expenses may be minimal, such as OJT or observership for an FMS IMS aboard a fleet unit when the
only identifiable expense is the dedicated Service of U.S. military personnel or transportation of an IMET IMS to and
from a unit using U.S. resources. Regardless of the amount, identifiable expenses must be recouped.
   b. OJT or observership with fleet units.
   (1) Requests for OJT or observership aboard COMSIXTHFLT units will be coordinated directly by the Security
Cooperation Organization with COMUSNAVEUR, with an information copy to the commanders of combatant com-
mands, Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, and others, as appropriate.
   (2) Requests for OJT or observership aboard COMSEVENTHFLT units will be coordinated directly by the Security
Cooperation Organization with COMPACFLT, with an information copy to the commanders of combatant commands,
Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, and others, as appropriate.
   (3) Requests for OJT or observership aboard fleet units other than specified in paragraphs (1) and (2), above, will be
directed to Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, with an information copy to the cognizant
combatant command and all concerned.
   (4) As indicated in paragraph a(1) above, OJT or observership will normally be included in the country’s planned
FY training program. Requests submitted after the Security Cooperation Education and Training Working Group will
be directed to Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, with an information copy to the
appropriate U.S. Navy Command. Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity will coordinate
with the appropriate U.S. Navy command to determine feasibility and cost. An update to the country program will be
made if required.
   c. OJT or observership with Marine Corps units or activities—
   (1) Requests for OJT or observership with Marine Corps units or activities should be submitted to CG, Security
Cooperation Education and Training Center MCCDC with the initial request for training. Programmed OJT or
observership will normally supplement formal training received at a Marine Corps school. Marine Corps OJT or
observership will not be scheduled unless the IMS has completed adequate Marine Corps or Marine Corps-related
training prior to enrollment in OJT or observership.
   (2) Requests for OJT or observership submitted after the training program management review must be received by
CG, Security Cooperation Education and Training Center MCCDC not later than 90 days prior to the proposed
commencement of training.
   (3) The USMC OJT or observership training must be scheduled for a minimum duration of 1 week. No more than
three OJT or observership training periods can be scheduled consecutively.
   (4) Country must provide specific training objectives.

3–50. Distributive/distance learning
Many courses have transitioned, or will be converted, from traditional classroom delivery methods to more efficient
and effective distance learning (DL) formats that include the Internet or an Intranet, CD–ROM, and DVD. The training
location may be at the traditional training location, or at a Distance Learning Center. MASL notes will reflect the most
current course delivery method as well as the course location. IMET IMS may attend DL courses in CONUS, but will
require DSCA waiver for OCONUS delivery. FMS IMS may attend DL courses in CONUS or OCONUS. DL courses
delivered OCONUS will have a “P4” MASL per DSCA guidance.
   a. Programming. The DL courses may be requested and programmed like a traditional classroom course. However,
Security Cooperation Organization should pay special attention to the following:


                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  45
   (1) English comprehension level. The IMS must meet the established ECL for all DL courses. In fact, English
reading comprehension is vital to successful completion of DL courses.
   (2) Prerequisite basic computer skills. The IMS must be proficient in basic computer and internet navigation skills,
including keyboard and mouse familiarization, start menu, minimize/maximize/close buttons, copy/cut and paste text,
save and/or save as, print command, Web browser navigation. Management Information Systems (PDET002) is a
prerequisite for all DL courses unless IMS has a requisite level of proficiency.
   (3) Minimum computer requirements for OCONUS courses.
   (a) An IBM-compatible PC which runs Windows 95/98/ME with 64 Mb RAM, or which runs Windows 2000/NT
with 128Mb RAM.
   (b) An internet connection of at least 56 Kb.
   (c) Internet Explorer 4.0 or later.
   (d) A 256-color monitor capable of a resolution of 800 x 600.
   (e) A current version of Apple QuickTime and Adobe Acrobat Reader.
   b. Navy designated point of contact. The Navy designated POC for DL registration will establish IMS access to
authorized course(s) after proper ITO authorization. The IMSO at the traditional training site or at the Distance
Learning Center will request IMS access by submitting IMS full name, foreign identification number, and date of birth
to the Navy designated POC who will then proceed with the registration process.
   c. Student administration If course is locally managed by a Facilitator or Instructor, all student administration
functions will be performed at the training location. If course is delivered at a Distance Learning Center, the Navy
designated POC will be responsible for the student administration functions. DL student administrative functions
include the following tasks in the Navy’s Learning Management System:
   (1) Finding and moving learner from a waitlist to a roster.
   (2) Assigning a “job” (content).
   (3) Assigning a seat if tracking seats.
   (4) Creating transcripts for any labs/tests that are not computer based training (CBT).
   (5) Creating and/or editing transcripts for CBT under special circumstances.
   (6) Verifying all content, labs, and tests required for curriculum completion are completed, and transcripts are in the
system.
   (7) Removing the seat assignment and job from learner.
   (8) Dropping the learner from a roster and creating a roster transcript that indicates the number of days the learner
was on the roster going through training.
   d. Cancellation penalty. A cancellation penalty will be applied if course is cancelled after establishment of the IMS
Learning Account.

3–51. Correspondence or self-study courses
The OSD policy precludes programming of correspondence of self-study courses under IMET. There is no objection;
however, to programming this type of training under FMS, provided the established criteria for enrollment are met. The
FMS case must be requested from Navy IPO. Classified correspondence or self-study courses are not available to IMS.
Correspondence courses are available from Naval Education Training Center, Pensacola, FL; NPS, Monterey, CA;
NAVWARCOL, Newport, RI; Marine Corps Institute, Washington, DC; and BUMED, Washington, DC. Catalogs
listing courses in detail are available from the foregoing activities upon direct request. Direct liaison is authorized as
necessary to obtain these publications.
   a. Programming procedure.
   (1) Requests for a correspondence or self-study course, once the particular course is determined, will be submitted to
Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity (for all Navy courses) or to CG, Security Cooperation
Education and Training Center MCCDC (for all USMC courses) with all available data to expedite processing. The
Security Cooperation Organization or other official requester should use the appropriate MASL ID when programming
or requesting these courses. The name and grade of the student, as well as a complete Army/Air Force Post Office
(APO) mailing address, is required prior to shipment of any correspondence or self-study courses. Naval Education and
Training Security Assistance Field Activity or CG, Security Cooperation Education and Training Center MCCDC, as
applicable, will authorize the cognizant activity to provide the course to the country via the Security Cooperation
Organization. Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity or CG, Security Cooperation Education
and Training Center MCCDC will advise all concerned of the cost involved and the amount to be charged against the
case. The request will be an integral part of the training program.
   (2) A WCN will be assigned to each request. For Navy courses only, at the option of the Security Cooperation
Organization or requesting country, a WCN may cover one course or a number of courses. This option is not available
for USMC courses. As courses are ordered and provided, the appropriate case will be billed. The country will pay only
for those courses received, as in the case of formal training courses.
   (3) Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity or CG, Security Cooperation Education and



46                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Training Center MCCDC is responsible for tracking this training as with other FMS training. Naval Education and
Training Security Assistance Field Activity is responsible for all billing for this training.
   b. Pricing. The Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity is responsible for coordinating
course costs for correspondence and self-study courses. Each course will be assigned all appropriate course costs. In
developing these prices, the cost of printed matter will be computed in addition to other appropriate factors. Billing and
collecting procedures prescribed for FMS training will be used in connection with recovery costs for correspondence
and self-study courses. These costs will be revised on an annual basis as part of the general MASL update. However,
once these costs are established for a particular FY, they will remain unchanged for the duration of that year.
   c. Self-study courses at NPS. It is advantageous to the NPS and to officer IMS entering its curricular programs to
have completed graduate preparatory studies before entry. Self-study materials prepared in English can be made
available on a loan basis to specific IMS who have an assigned entry date at the NPS. A Publication entitled
“Catalogue of Off-Campus Self-Study Credit Courses,” prepared by the Office of Continuing Education, Code 500,
Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA 93943–5000, is available upon request. Direct liaison is authorized between
Security Cooperation Organization and the NPS for administrative queries concerning the courses available. For
programming, however, the requests must be submitted to Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field
Activity. Any specific programming requests received by the NPS from an Security Cooperation Organization or
foreign country will be referred to Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity for official
processing.
   d. Constraints Correspondence or self-study courses will not be provided to IMS (either military or civilian) unless
they are officially requested by an appropriate representative from the customer country. Requests from individual IMS
will be returned with a statement that only requests submitted through the Security Cooperation Organization will be
honored and given consideration. Requests received by telephone will not be accepted.
   e. Sales of course materials. Countries desiring to purchase correspondence or self-study course materials, but not
for enrolling a trainee, will do so under current procedures involving the sale of material. These materials will be
purchased through a direct requisitioning procedures case or through a material FMS case established specifically for
this purpose. Questionable situations. In instances where a Security Cooperation Organization is doubtful as to how to
proceed in a case involving the courses and materials discussed in paragraph e, above, Naval Education and Training
Security Assistance Field Activity should be queried.

3–52. Commanding officer, Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical Training School
Commanding officer, Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical Training School operates a dedicated international
U.S. Navy Service School, and will—
   a. Foster increased levels of maritime security, professionalism and readiness in all Navy and Coast Guard Forces
throughout the world through the SCETP by conducting formal courses and Mobile Training Teams in Spanish and/or
English. Also provide translation services, if required, when conducting training in non English or Spanish speaking
countries. Translate all materials used in training into the required language when conducting MTT.
   b. Develop close working relationships with the USMC, USCG, and other governmental and nongovernmental
organizations to support CNO guidance and national security policy, enhance homeland defense and improve maritime
domain awareness.
   c. Conduct international maritime security training and curricula development surveys.
   d. Maintain liaison with Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity and Security Assistance
Office staffs on host national training needs.
   e. Administer a guest instructor program, to include USMC and USCG instructors.
   f. Develop and conduct new courses and modify existing courses in response to user country needs. All such
requests will be forwarded for approval to Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity via chain
of command.
   g. Appoint an IMSO to monitor and coordinate activities for IMS training, including implementation of the Field
Studies Program.

Section VI
Department of the Air Force (Planning and Programming General)

3–53. Training standards
   a. The IMS will attend classes with their USAF counterparts except for courses specifically established for them.
The IMS enrolled in formal training courses will be required to achieve the same standards of proficiency established
for USAF students as far as possible. Special training methods, individual attention, additional training time, and oral
or practical tests may be employed to maintain class standards. Actions taken in this respect will be reported to the Air
Force Security Assistance Training Squadron, info the appropriate air component command (U.S. Air Forces in Europe
(USAFE)/PACAF/12AF) immediately by electrical transmission or AF Form 1761 (International Student Status Repor-
t), identifying the IMS country project and line number, WCN, and new graduation date.


                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  47
   b. Flying IMS may be held over one class when necessary to overcome either flying or academic deficiency. These
IMS will be credited with the skill level equivalent to the average flying hours of the class to which they are being held
over. When it becomes apparent that additional flying hours are required, the MAJCOM will advise the Air Force
Security Assistance Training Squadron, with an information copy to SAF/Budget Management and Execution Security
Assistance Division. Cost data will be identified, the Security Cooperation Organization/country advised, and the
training line adjusted, as appropriate.
   c. Physiological training provided by foreign countries can be recognized by HQ, USAF/SGPA on a case-by-case
basis. Countries requesting evaluation of its physiological training must forward a request to the Air Force Security
Assistance Training Squadron with full details of standards, course outline, altitude chamber training, and overall
program.
   d. Professional and technical IMS may be held over not to exceed 30 days when it appears reasonably certain that
the additional training will enable them to complete the course successfully.
   e. Proficiency advancement is used in instances when an IMS is fully qualified and can complete scheduled formal
training, familiarization, or qualification in less than the scheduled time.
   f. Holdover actions for CONUS IMS in excess of those authorized in d above are subject to prior approval from the
Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron, the Security Cooperation Organization, or country. All advancement
and holdover sections will be reported to the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron as stated in paragraph a,
above.

3–54. Military assistance articles and services list items
The training items listed in the military assistance articles and services list (MASL) are not necessarily restrictive. Full
consideration will be given to providing other training when required, if requests are accompanied by justification and
sufficient detail to identify the requirement when forwarded to the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron.

3–55. Classified training
Dates or availability of classified training will not be provided unless disclosure has been authorized through foreign
disclosure channels.

3–56. International military student training
Interpreters will not normally be used to conduct USAF training, use of interpreters requires approval by SAF/IAPX.

3–57. United States Air Force training of non-Ministry of Defense personnel
The USAF training of non-MOD personnel will be according to the procedures in paragraph 3–4.

3–58. Contractor training
   a. The Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron is the focal point for all contractor-provided training
whether in CONUS or in the territory of the purchaser. Assistance may be required from other major commands in
preparing the SOW or the contracting process may be delegated to another major command when deemed appropriate.
However, all requests for contractor-provided training will be forwarded to and monitored by the Air Force Security
Assistance Training Squadron.
   b. The P&A or LOA requests will be processed according to current guidance under AFMAN 16–101, DOD 7000.
14–R, Volume 15, and DOD supplement to part 25 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation. See figure 3–3 for the
checklist for contractor (type 1) training.
   c. Foreign military sales programs should be structured to utilize customer country’s aircraft for contractor training.
If necessary, acceleration of initial aircraft deliveries should be explored to meet early training requirements if delayed
delivery to country is unacceptable.

3–59. Foreign military sales training programs
Eligible countries interested in USAF training which is not related to the provision of major defense equipment will
forward their request for P&A or LOA to the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron, with information copy
to the appropriate SAF/International Affairs regional division. Usually, such requests are for P&A for a certain course
or a number of courses for a number of IMS.

3–60. Implementation of Foreign military sales training cases
Upon receipt of the signed LOA, the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron prepares an Implementation
Program Directive to direct the appropriate commands to implement the FMS training case. The International Program
Directive is issued by message or letter.
  a. The Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron receives obligation or expenditure authority and develops
and issues a training project or instruction to the Security Cooperation Organization or designated FMS representative.
The implementing instruction generally authorizes the issuance of ITO.



48                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Note. Implementing agent is not required to issue an ITO authorization.
  b. Tuition rates indicated on the FMS cases are estimates only.

3–61. Medical requirements
For a rated IMS, the Security Cooperation Organization must ensure that all available medical and dental records, in
English, arrive at the flying training installation 30 days before training start date. This is required so that the Director
of Base Medical Services can determine if the IMS has had an adequate physical examination for flying within the
preceding 3 months and is qualified under class II standards (Air Force Instruction (AFI) 48–123)). If the IMS does not
meet both conditions, the IMS will be further examined and processed according to AFI 48–123. If they qualify, the
Director of Base Medical Services clears the individual without further examination. If the rated IMS does not meet the
physical qualifications when the records are screened by the Director of Base Medical Services, ITO should not be
issued.

3–62. International military student selection
   a. International military student (IMS) selected for training under security assistance must meet the ECL require-
ments for their particular training. Waiver of ECL requirements for entry into courses other than language will be
considered on a case-by-case basis. In addition, IMS must meet the prerequisite qualifications for CONUS formal
training set by the MAJCOM as outlined in the AF education and training course announcements (ETCA). Requests for
waiver of prerequisites outlined in AF ETCA and ECL will be submitted to the Air Force Security Assistance Training
Squadron for staffing with the MAJCOM, with information copies to the major command providing the training and to
SAF/IAPX.
   b. The IMS are classified as officers, warrant officers, officer candidates, NCOs, airmen, or USAFA cadets
according to their equivalent USAF military grade as specified in their original ITO.

3–63. Correspondence courses
The IMS attending training in CONUS under SCETP and other cooperative programs sponsorship may be enrolled in
correspondence courses offered by the AF Institute for Advanced Distributive Learning if funded under a FMS training
case or line.
  a. Correspondence courses, or any other off-duty education or training, must not be in conflict with security
assistance training.
  b. Correspondence course requirements for IMS not attending CONUS training should be processed according to
provisions in the AF Institute for Advanced Distributive Learning Catalog, with the exception of PME correspondence
courses.
  c. The AF Institute for Advanced Distributive Learning Catalog and Guide and changes to this publication may be
obtained online at www.au.af.mil/au/afiadl/.

3–64. Professional military education correspondence courses
Requests for PME correspondence courses for international students are forwarded to the Air Force Security Assistance
Training Squadron through the country Security Cooperation Organization or country embassy. The request must
identify an existing source of funding (for example, FMS training case) or request preparation of a new training case;
provide the name, address, email, and phone number for the U.S. military officer or U.S. civilian employee who will
sponsor the student; and include written verification by the U.S. sponsor that the student meets the rank prerequisite for
the desired program and is proficient in the English language to complete the program successfully. The Air Force
Security Assistance Training Squadron country manager reviews the request to insure all required information is
provided, adds the requirement to the identified FMS training case or prepares a new case, if required. After the
availability of funds is confirmed, the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron country manager forwards the
request to Air University/CFRR and directs them to enroll the student. Air University/CFRR enrolls the student and
provides the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron country program manager the date of enrollment and the
deadline for completion of the program, and mails the materials directly to the U.S. sponsor. The Air Force Security
Assistance Training Squadron country manager enters the enrollment date and deadline for completion as the start and
projected graduation date in the training database. Air University/CFRR will notify the Air Force Security Assistance
Training Squadron country manager of graduates and completion dates monthly and the Air Force Security Assistance
Training Squadron country manager updates the training database accordingly. If the sponsor changes during the
enrollment period, the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron country manager will provide Air University/
CFRR with required information on the new sponsor. Air University/CFRR forwards the student’s diploma to the
USAF sponsor when the international student successfully completes the program.

3–65. Professional Military Education Seminar Program
International students stationed at USAF installations or under SCETP and other cooperative programs sponsorship



                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                     49
may attend PME seminar programs. Applications should be submitted to SAF/International Affairs through FMS
channels and should cite a FMS training case or line.

3–66. Publications
   a. Country requests for English language publications under IMET will include these requirements in the USAF
IMET program (N9B) according to the instructions in chapter 5. Countries not eligible for IMET will process
requirements or requisitions through AFSAC/COMV under an FMS training case or line.
   b. Country requests for training publications (for example, course charts, plans of instruction, student training
specifications) not in support of their in-country ELT Program will be processed through AFSAC/COMV under an
FMS training case or line.
   c. Countries requiring large quantities of USAF directives will process requests through AFSAC under an FMS
training case or line.
   d. Air Force manuals (AFM), regulations, forms, and pamphlets for Security Cooperation Organization use are
ordered through the publishing distribution office (PDO) of the Security Cooperation Organization.

3–67. Training aids
Country requests for English language equipment under IMET will include requirements in the Army IMETP (N9A).
Air Force training aids must be requested under a FMS training case or line.

3–68. Training films and film strips
Available films are listed in DOD 5040.2C. Guidance for processing requests is in AFMAN 16–101. Request should be
sent to AFSAC, 1822 Van Patton Drive, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45443–5337. Training films and film strips are
provided under an FMS training case or line.

3–69. Scheduling and implementation
   a. The Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron, in coordination with other functional commands, will
tentatively schedule training to meet requested requirements. Details on the training will be included in the STL, which
will be forwarded to the Security Cooperation Organization or designated FMS representative at the earliest possible
date. Upon receipt, the Security Cooperation Organization or designated FMS representative will review class starting
dates and advise the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron of dates that cannot be met so rescheduling may
be accomplished or spaces deleted from the existing documents. Rescheduling or cancellation of line items must be
submitted to the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron at least 60 days before class entry dates to preclude
a forfeiture charge. To preclude a cancellation, action should be taken by the Security Cooperation Organization or
county representative to select and process alternate IMS as backups (complete in-country language training and
briefings).
   b. The IMS will be enrolled only in the training indicated in the applicable ITO and in the STL. Requests for
additional training must originate with the country concerned and be forwarded through established deviation channels.

3–70. Acceptance of training
Upon receipt of authority to publish ITO, which constitutes a commitment of funds, Security Cooperation Organization
or the FMS designated representative will advise the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron/FM by project
line number or WCN on acceptance or nonacceptance of training. Acceptance of training by line or WCN numbers
constitutes an obligation. The acceptance must be forwarded before the ITO are published. Deviation action is
necessary to delete any line items that the country does not accept. Nonacceptance or cancellation of training must be
processed to arrive at least 60 days before scheduled class start date to avoid a forfeiture charge, regardless of when
authority to publish the ITO is received.

3–71. Familiarization and qualification training
Qualification training is a portion of a dual channel OJT Program designed to provide the performance skills required
for the job. Qualification training for IMS can be provided by USAF or contractor personnel in conjunction with the
establishment of an in-country OJT Program. Familiarization training provides practical experience and job-related
training for specific systems, functional areas, or operations that require hands-on experience but does not provide for
skill-level upgrading. Familiarization training can be provided in the CONUS for a period of not less than 1 week at
each location. Familiarization training involving more than one location for a short duration must be considered as an
orientation tour (OT) since planning, scheduling, and arrangements are the same as an OT.
   a. For all familiarization training, the Security Cooperation Organization will forward the request to the Air Force
Security Assistance Training Squadron for evaluation of training capability. (The format for this request is in fig 3–2.)
When requesting this type of training, the requirements must be as specific as possible. To estimate the duration of
training, the Security Cooperation Organization must consider the complexity of the training desired, level of proficien-
cy, and the individuals’ prior experience.
   b. The Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron will review the request for validity and forward the


50                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
requests to the applicable MAJCOM or separate operating agency for determination of training capability and location.
The implementing command will—
  (1) Process the request.
  (2) Advise the Security Cooperation Organization of training dates, location, and security requirements.
  (3) Provide an information copy of the request to the base IMSO after MAJCOM or separate operating agency
approves the training.
  (4) Notify host MAJCOM by message or letter of training to be conducted by a tenant unit.
  (5) Coordinate with the Security Cooperation Organization if additional information is required by the MAJCOM or
separate operating agency.
  (6) Ensure that all deviations are coordinated with the MAJCOM or separate operating agency and the base IMSO.
  c. The MAJCOM or separate operating agency will—
  (1) Review requests for training received by the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron to determine
capability.
  (2) Determine the disclosure of classified information or access to secure areas according to AFI 16–201 and
MAJCOM determination of training capability.
  (3) Monitor the training program of all IMS.
  (4) Inform the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron of any changes in training capability.
  (5) Provide copy of the request to the base IMSO and or the project NCO.

3–72. Documentation for familiarization and qualification training
The following AF forms are used to plan, request, and document familiarization and qualification training for IMS.
   a. AF Form 623 (Individual Training Record Folder). This form will be initiated and maintained for all IMS
engaged in either familiarization or qualification training. Because of special requirements, OJT upgrade skill levels
may be required. The following procedures will be used.
   (1) Section I (Identification Data). Enter only the IMS name and USAF equivalent grade. Enter the project and line
number or WCN in the Social Security Account Number block.
   (2) Section II (Orientation and Certification). Leave blank.
   (3) Remarks. Enter each supervisor and all trainers by name, rank, and organization, with dates of supervision or
training. Enter on AF Form 623a (On-the-Job Training Record-Continuation Sheet) other appropriate data as required.
Do not record unfavorable comments about the IMS.
   b. AF Form 797 (Job Qualification Standard Continuation/Command JQS). This form, strictly for AF use, will be
used for familiarization and qualification training in excess of 4 weeks. The Security Cooperation Organization will list
all tasks and knowledge items to be accomplished during the training. In addition, the IMS’ name, project number, line
number, or WCN will be entered in the trainee name and Social Security Account Number block. The date started, date
completed, IMS initials, and trainer’s initials will be entered on the upper line of each tasks block by the training
installation.
   c. AF Form 1098 (Special Task Certification and Recurring Training). This form will be used to record all training
requiring special certification, such as Class A welder certification, egress familiarization, engine run, and flight control
rigging. This form will be attached to the AF Form 797. The identification section will reflect only the IMS’ name,
project, line number, and WCN.

3–73. Air Force Institute of Technology programs
   a. The IMS attendance at the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) programs is as follows:
   (1) Nonresident courses. These courses are not available to IMS under the SCETP and other cooperative programs.
The country must negotiate directly with the civilian institution concerned.
   (2) Air Force Institute of Technology resident courses.
   (a) The availability of quotas in AF Institute of Technology graduate programs is provided by the Air Force
Security Assistance Training Squadron after AFIT has determined the candidate is qualified for the program. Accepta-
bility of the candidate is the sole prerogative of AFIT. The candidate’s application should be forwarded to AFIT/ENES,
2950 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, Ohio 45433–7765 (Student Services) no later than 31 March for
proposed entry in the following August timeframe. Earlier submission is highly encouraged. The candidate’s applica-
tion for Master’s programs should include transcripts from all institutions previously attended and the TOEFL score, if
applicable. Additionally, graduate record examination (GRE) scores for technical programs or graduate management
admission test (GMAT) scores for nontechnical programs are highly encouraged and are required if admission waivers
are necessary. Admission applications will be processed by AFIT if GRE and/or GMAT scores are not available, but
the applicant’s academic record and TOEFL scores must be exceptionally strong to make up for the lack of GRE and/
or GMAT scores. Doctoral applications should include transcripts from all institutions previously attended, GRE
scores, TOEFL scores, if applicable, and a clear and concise statement describing the area in which the student intends
to concentrate on their studies.



                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                     51
  (b) Recommend country send more than one application package per graduate program quota request. The AFIT
will evaluate all applications and rank order eligible applicants according to academic potential at AFIT.
  b. The DSCA must approve funding of degree-granting programs under IMET.
  c. The AFIT Graduate School of Engineering and Management Department Heads reserve the right to conditionally
accept IMS pending their completion of the 9-week Specialized English Training Program at DLIELC.
  d. The cost of the TOEFL, GRE, or GMAT may also be funded by IMET. Test scores are usually valid for 5 years.
The Security Cooperation Organization will advise if these test costs will be assumed by IMET when requesting
approval of the program. The Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron will provide voucher cards to the
Security Cooperation Organization each summer. These voucher cards will be used by the candidates in lieu of money
when registering for the tests. Unused voucher cards should be returned to the Air Force Security Assistance Training
Squadron/FM so that the IMET program may be adjusted accordingly.

3–74. Air Force institute of technology short courses
Quotas for short courses taught at the AFIT School of Systems and Logistics (AFIT/School of Systems and Logistics)
and School of Civil Engineering and Services (AFIT/CE) are requested by the Air Force Security Assistance Training
Squadron from the appropriate school at least 1 year in advance of the course starting date. Therefore, identify
requirements to the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron with sufficient lead-time. Requirements for AFIT
courses should be included in the program submission for the annual Security Cooperation Education and Training
Working Group.
   a. Once a quota in an AFIT short course has been obtained, the appropriate Security Cooperation Organization will
provide AFIT with a complete itinerary of the IMS travel plans. Travel should provide for arrival of the IMS at AFIT
at least 3 days before the course starting date. Arrival notice must arrive at AFIT not later than 2 weeks in advance of
the planned departure date. Include the following information:
   (1) Foreign Service rank and its equivalent to U.S. grade structure.
   (2) Date and time of departure en-route to the United States.
   (3) Planned or anticipated delays en-route.
   (4) Anticipated date and time of arrival at Wright-Patterson AFB.
   b. IMS programmed for AFIT/CE and AFIT/School of Systems and Logistics short courses must have achieved an
80 ECL test score before departure for direct entry into training.

3–75. Air Force institute of technology eligibility for attendance
It is the responsibility of the country concerned to provide the necessary credentials for review by AFIT when the IMS
is seeking admission. Complete academic records and the TOEFL scores are required for all degree programs. Should
candidate’s undergraduate work not meet or exceed a grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, a GRE or GMAT must
accompany the application.
   a. The AFIT admission requirements state that Master degree candidates are required to take the GRE or GMAT.
GRE and/or GMAT scores can be waived during the initial admissions process; however, the absence of this data could
affect the individual’s unconditional admissibility into a requested program. The GRE and/or GMAT score are needed
to accurately determine the best course of action to ensure the student can successfully complete the requested AFIT
Program. If a student is admitted without GRE and/or GMAT scores, AFIT will make the necessary arrangements for
the student to take the appropriate examination after they arrive. Admission applications submitted without GRE and/or
GMAT scores should be sent to AFIT for consideration no later than 31 December in case it is necessary for the
student to arrive early to take preparatory courses. All transcripts for institutions previously attended, TOEFL scores,
and GMAT and/or GRE scores if available will be forwarded to AFIT/ENES, 2950 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson
AFB, OH 45433–7765, Attention: Student Services.
   b. Admission by AFIT is not a commitment. If AFIT accepts a candidate, the Air Force Security Assistance
Training Squadron will then determine availability.
   c. The AFIT will provide an estimate of the duration of the course when the IMS is determined eligible; however,
the exact number of transfer credits AFIT will accept and how rapidly the IMS will progress cannot be determined
until the IMS is enrolled. AFIT, therefore, will quote the maximum estimated course duration.

3–76. Inter-American Air Force academy
The IAAFA provides professional and technical training to students from partner nations eligible to receive Security
Assistance. While its primary mission is to train personnel from Latin America and the Caribbean Air Forces, IAAFA
offers selected training to Latin American and the Caribbean Army, Navy, and National Security Forces as well. The
curriculum is reviewed annually to ensure it meets overall U.S. and DOD security assistance interests. IAAFA conducts
training requirements assessment visits to partner nations on a regular basis and also provide Mobile Training Teams
(MTTs), when possible, upon request. Depending on the assessed need, IAAFA may propose course changes, deletions,
or additions. These proposed changed are submitted to the Curriculum Review Board. The Curriculum Review Board




52                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
brings together representatives of pertinent security assistance agencies (SAF/International Affairs, AFSOUTH, AF-
NORTH, and AETC to approve the curriculum to be offered over the following 2 years. Following the Curriculum
Review Board and USSOUTHAF/CC approval, IAAFA implements the approved curriculum.
   a. No later than 3 months prior to the Curriculum Review Board, a Strategy Coordination Panel (SCP), using
established strategic planning documents and guidance, in order to prioritize and de-conflict IAAFA training require-
ments and to make recommendations to the Curriculum Review Board will convene.
   b. The following information will be provided at the SCP at the Curriculum Review Board for proposed new
courses:
   (1) The need the course was designed to meet, including countries interested in the training and estimated annual
requirements.
   (2) Resources (manpower, equipment, and so forth) impact of providing the training.
   (3) Impact on current curriculum.
   (4) Estimated tuition cost to the country.
   (5) Proposed frequency of courses.
   (6) Language in which the course will be conducted.
   (7) Any other information pertinent to the request.
   c. The SCP will also identify low usage courses for possible deletion by the Curriculum Review Board.

3–77. Letter of offer and acceptance notes
The LOAs will include appropriate supplemental conditions for training. Approved LOA notes are included in the
Defense Security Assistance Management System (DSAMS). Requested or recommended changes to LOA notes must
be forwarded to SAF/IAPX for review, coordination, and approval.

3–78. Blanket order foreign military sales training cases
   a. The Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron will prepare and coordinate training “T” cases according to
DSCA and SAF/IAPX prescribed procedures.
   b. The Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron case managers will prepare blanket order (BO) training
cases unless the purchaser justifies and is granted approval for a defined order training case by SAF/IAPX. This will
allow the Air Force to be more responsive to changing purchaser’s training needs and is in the interest of saving time,
manpower, and costs involved in amending defined order cases.
   c. Foreign military sales training cases will be prepared for a minimum of $20,000 unless the requesting Service’s
annual training requirements have been for a lesser amount.
   d. An International Program Directive is required for each FMS case. The AFM 16–101 provides necessary
guidance and examples.

3–79. Security Cooperation Education and Training Working Groups
The 2ndAir Force and AETC/International Affairs participation in the annual SCETP and other cooperative program
management review are necessary for long-range forecasting, programming, and coordination of required international
training positions. HQ/DPLTS and AETC/DOPZ involvement provides input and analysis of the anticipated training
allocations.



Chapter 4
Security Cooperation Education and Training Teams

Section I
General

4–1. Purpose/Introduction
This chapter provides policy guidance on Security Cooperation Education and Training teams. The chapter defines
types of teams, discusses the process for requesting, programming, and deploying teams, and highlights quality of life
(QOL) and mission sustainment (MS) issues associated with team deployment. Security Cooperation Education and
Training teams consist of U.S. Military, DOD civilian, or contractor personnel, deployed to a foreign country on TDY
(less than 180 days) or permanent change of station (PCS, more than 179 days) status. These teams provide advice,
training, technical assistance, or support to personnel of the hosting country. This assistance is provided to meet
specific objectives in connection with development of a country’s capability. The deployment of these teams should be
based on consideration of all of the advantages and disadvantages inherent in the use of this type of assistance, at a
particular time, in a particular country, and should be consistent with DOD, Combatant Command, and Service security




                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                53
cooperation guidance or strategy. The teams support many of the programs and authorities associated with security
cooperation. The DOD 5105.38–M, table C10.T1, provides a listing of the various authorities for deploying teams.

4–2. Command relationships
   a. Chief of the U.S. Diplomatic Mission. The Chief of the U.S. Diplomatic Mission exercises general supervision
over the in-country operations and activities of Security Cooperation Education and Training teams through the
Security Cooperation Organization Chief. The regional combatant commander provides necessary technical assistance
and administrative support to Security Cooperation Organization to facilitate the efficient and effective oversight of
team activities, including quality of life for personnel. The level of support provided to team members varies depending
on the duration of their deployment and the program that funds that deployment. Support under an FMS case will not
exceed that authorized for other in-country DOD personnel of equivalent grade who are funded by U.S. appropriations.
Oversight of security assistance teams by regional combatant commander or their designated component command
through Security Cooperation Organization shall not usurp MILDEP authority in issues of case management, contract
administration, or the technical execution of the team mission as described in the individual LOA terms of reference.
   b. Security cooperation organization chief. The Security Cooperation Organization chief provides operational over-
sight and local administrative support over in-country teams and is responsible for coordinating team activities to
ensure compatibility with other DOD elements in or directly related to the U.S. diplomatic mission. The Security
Cooperation Organization chief ensures compliance with directives and keeps the Service International Affairs, team
management agency, the combatant commander, and/or the designated component command informed of team activi-
ties and progress.
   c. Team chief. The team chief is the senior team member and assigns duties and responsibilities to team personnel.
The team chief is under the administrative and operational oversight of the Security Cooperation Organization while in
country and is an integral part of the Security Cooperation Organization in support of the overall security cooperation
mission. The team chief is responsible to the Service International Affairs, team management agency, the combatant
commander, and/or the designated component command for the accomplishment of the education or training mission.
Team chief responsibilities include, but are not limited to, DOD 5105.38–M, table C4.T1 and paragraph 4–25c of this
regulation.
   d. Security cooperation education and training organization. The Security Cooperation Organization has responsibil-
ity for oversight of team personnel and activities and identifies problems to the Service International Affairs, team
management agency, the combatant commander, and/or the designated component command for resolution. The
Security Cooperation Organization ensures fair and equitable treatment in the level and quality of support provided to
all DOD personnel in country. Security Cooperation Organization support of the Service International Affairs, team
management agency, the combatant commander, and/or the designated component command includes, but is not
limited to, DOD 5105.38–M, table C4.T2 and paragraph 4–25bof this regulation.
   e. Military justice jurisdiction. The combatant commander has general courts martial convening authority over all
military personnel under their command, that is, personnel assigned to the command’s Joint Manning Document or
attached for Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) purposes. However, since disciplinary action is normally
administered by a commander of the same Service as the offender, the combatant commander should direct the
component commander of the member’s Service, or that commander’s designee, to take courts-martial jurisdiction over
PCS team personnel. If the component commander believes a case within their discretion should be referred to a court-
martial at a level that is not authorized to convene, they should inform the combatant commander. In these situations,
the combatant commander will have the authority to take disciplinary action or return the case back to the component
commander for disposition. The combatant commander reserves the right to exercise military justice jurisdiction in
those cases impacting the mission, or affecting external relations. Personnel assigned PCS orders and carried on the
authorization document (table of distribution and allowances (TDA)), modified table of organization and equipment,
and so forth) of the team management agency will remain under the military jurisdiction of that agency unless attached
to the combatant command. UCMJ jurisdiction over TDY team members resides with their parent organization
commander. Article 15 jurisdiction for all personnel (both TDY and PCS) will be exercised in accordance with Service
directives.

4–3. Constraints
Teams will not serve as an integral part of the Armed Forces of the country being served. Teams deploy under
authority of the relevant section of either Title 10, USC or Title 22, USC and are subject to such procedures and
constraints as the authorizing legislation and or established policy applicable to that type of team may mandate.
Procedures and constraints vary greatly from one legislative authority to another and all concerned with a particular
team’s deployment must fully understand those differences.
   a. Prohibited team activities Teams deploying under security assistance authorities (22 USC) will not engage in or
provide assistance or advice to foreign forces in a combat situation. Additionally, such teams shall not perform
operational duties of any kind except as may be required in the conduct of OJT in the operation and maintenance of
equipment, weapons, or supporting systems. Teams deploying under security assistance authorities shall not perform
Security Cooperation Organization functions, augment the Security Cooperation Organization or U.S. forces in country,


54                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
except where specifically authorized by the host country in the LOA. The SCO will inform teams deployed under one
of the 10 USC authorities on the rules of engagement or other constraints applicable to the particular section of the law
that authorizes their deployment before deploying or upon arrival in country. The Security Cooperation Organization
will refer any questions to the combatant commander’s staff judge advocate for resolution prior to deployment.
   b. Acts of misconduct by host country personnel. All members of Security Cooperation Education and Training must
understand their responsibilities concerning acts of misconduct by foreign country personnel. The team management
agency will brief team members prior to deployment on what to do if they encounter or observe such acts.
   (1) Common article three to the four Geneva conventions of August 12, 1949, provides a list of prohibited acts by
parties to the conventions as follows:
   (a) Violence to life and person-in particular, murder, mutilation, cruel treatment, and torture.
   (b) Taking of hostages.
   (c) Outrages upon personal dignity - - in particular, humiliating and degrading treatment.
   (d) Passing of sentences and carrying out of executions without previous judgment by a regularly constituted court,
affording all the judicial guarantees that are recognized as indispensable by civilized people.
   (2) The provisions in paragraph (1), above, represent a level of conduct that the United States expects each foreign
country to observe.
   (3) If team members encounter prohibited acts, they will disengage from the activity, leave the area if possible, and
report the incidents immediately to the proper in-country U.S. authorities. The Chief of the U.S. Diplomatic Mission
through the Security Cooperation Organization will identify proper U.S. authorities during the team’s initial briefing.
Team members will not discuss such matters with non-USG authorities such as journalists or civilian contractors.

4–4. Selection of personnel
   a. Agencies providing personnel for assignment to a SAT shall ensure that they have the experience, technical
ability, maturity, and personality to accomplish their duties in the best interests of the United States.
   (1) Maximum effort should be made to select team members who meet the desirable as well as the mandatory
qualifications.
   (2) Team members should be highly qualified in their respective fields. They should be the best available who meet
all other qualifications.
   (3) Team members should be capable of working with others and should have demonstrated their abilities to
supervise effectively and conscientiously.
   b. Personnel assigned to Security Cooperation Education and Training perform a mission of the highest importance.
They will serve as goodwill ambassadors of the United States. Foreigners will consider their behavior to be “typically
American.” Good or bad, the impressions will endure. Accordingly, selecting the best-qualified team members serves
the best interests of the United States.
   c. The Security Cooperation Organization requesting a Security Cooperation Education and Training will identify
the expertise and qualifications that the team members should possess. Any special requirements, considerations, or
restrictions should also be identified.
   d. Team members must be medically fit to perform duty with a Security Cooperation Education and Training in the
designated country. Physical disorders that may require medical attention or hospitalization disqualify a candidate.
Medical expenses incurred for nonmilitary team members will be charged to the program supporting the team.
   e. Personnel selected for Security Cooperation Education and Training must have enough time remaining in the
Service before separation or retirement to complete the required period of deployment.
   f. Refer to paragraph 8–6 for guidance on in-country healthcare.

Section II
Types of Teams

4–5. Extended training service specialist
The ETSS are PCS teams that are technically qualified to provide advice, instruction, and training in the installation,
operation, and maintenance of weapons, equipment, and systems. The ETSS deploy under one of the security assistance
authorities in 22 USC. They are not used for follow-on retraining or advisory roles, except in rare instances when the
recipient country cannot provide qualified personnel from its own resources or hire qualified personnel from non-
indigenous sources and the Security Cooperation Organization recommends it as in the interest of the United States.
The ETSS provided as English language instructors, supervisors, or advisors on detached duty status from DLIELC are
also attached to the Security Cooperation Organization. The English language technical Service provided by DLIELC is
referred to as a LTD. The ETSS may perform for periods up to 1 year under IMET; only DSCA (Programs (flight
training exchanges) Directorate) can approve longer periods.

4–6. Contract field services
The CFS personnel are civilian personnel under contract from private industry who perform the same functions as


                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  55
ETSS. Like ETSS, CFS personnel deploy under one of the security assistance authorities in 22 USC. The CFS
personnel are used only when the Service International Affairs determines that services by DOD personnel are not
practical. Only DSCA (Policy, Plans, and Programs Directorate) can approve use of CFS personnel under IMET.
Estimated contract cost covers the total training service costs.

4–7. Mobile education team/mobile training team
  a. Mobile education team. The Mobile Education Team provide training developed primarily in response to the
Expanded IMET Program (22 USC 2347) in a seminar and/or educational forum. DSCA waiver is not required for
E–IMET certified Mobile Education Team. Refer to figure 4–1 for format to request a Mobile Education Team.




56                         AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Figure 4–1. Format for submitting request for Mobile Education Team




   AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011            57
                    Figure 4–1. Format for submitting request for Mobile Education Team–Continued



   b. Mobile training team. The MTT are Military Service or contract personnel on temporary duty for the purpose of
training foreign personnel in the operation, maintenance, or support of weapon systems and support equipment or for
specific training requirements and specific capabilities that are beyond in-country U.S. resources. The MTT deploy
under one of the security assistance authorities in 22 USC or under one of the 10 USC authorized programs that follow
security cooperation procedures. The MTT may be authorized for CONUS or overseas deployment when it is more
practical to bring the training capability to country personnel. This includes in-country training surveys to determine
specific country training needs; quantity requirements that are beyond the country capability to assess, and that are
associated with equipment deliveries; and assistance leading to self-sufficiency. The MTT should be considered when
training must be accomplished quickly in response to a threat or adverse condition affecting the security of the country;
training is of relatively short duration, must reach a large number of trainees, and entails extensive use of interpreters;
or language qualified team members; or training can be conducted only on equipment; or in facilities located in the
foreign country. The format to request MTT is found in figure 4–2.




58                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Figure 4–2. Format for security assistance team request/call-up




AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011           59
                       Figure 4–2. Format for security assistance team request/call-up–Continued



   c. Funding constraints The Security Cooperation Organization may request programming of MTT as follows:
   (1) Foreign military sales. The MTT and Mobile Education Team may be programmed under FMS cases at the
request of the Security Cooperation Organization regardless of whether the FMS case is funded by country funds or
FMF, if it is within the scope of the case.
   (2) International military education and training. Although Expanded IMET Mobile Education Team does not
require a DSCA waiver, IMET MTT may be programmed only upon receipt of DSCA waiver. A fundamental IMET
objective is to reach foreign military personnel who are likely to be influential in their Services and/or countries. By
attending CONUS training, the students are exposed to the American people, their way of life, institutions, beliefs, and
aspirations. This must be considered when proposing an MTT versus CONUS training. Every attempt should be made
to provide MTT through FMS rather than IMET. The MTT requests under IMET must demonstrate that an MTT is the
best approach and IMET is the only available funding option. Subsistence expenses, or per diem allowance in lieu
thereof, obligated in one FY for IMET MTT cannot be extended into the succeeding FY. Therefore, personnel on MTT
duty must terminate temporary duty and return to home station prior to 30 September unless action has been taken to
reprogram the team in the new FY, subject to the 179 day restriction discussed in paragraph d below, receipt of CRA
or other budget authority in the new FY, and DSCA approval. Transportation costs for round trip team travel are
chargeable to the FY of the start of the TDY.
   (3) Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program. The MTT may be programmed under Counterterrorism Fellowship
Program only after receipt of Special Operations/Low Intensity Conflict and commanders of combatant commands
approval.
   (4) Other programs. The MTT may be programmed only after approval by commanders of combatant commands or
Department of State (as appropriate).
   d. Duration. The MTT and/or Mobile Education Team are authorized on a temporary duty basis for up to 179 days.
Requirements for assistance in excess of 179 days are met by CONUS training of country personnel leading to an in-
country capability or programming of U.S. ETSS.

4–8. Technical assistance field team
The TAFT deploy in PCS status under one of the security assistance authorities in 22 USC for the purpose of providing




60                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
in-country technical or maintenance support to foreign personnel on specific equipment, technology, weapons, and
supporting systems when MTT and ETSS are not appropriate for the purpose. The TAFT are Security Assistance
services, but are not considered training and are not provided under IMET.

4–9. Technical assistance team
Technical assistance team (TAT) deploy in TDY status to place into operation, maintain, or repair equipment provided
under one of the security assistance authorities in 22 USC TAT are Security Assistance services, but are not considered
training and are not provided under IMET, except in the case of the installation of English language laboratories.

4–10. Survey teams
   a. Requirements survey team. Requirements survey teams (RST) deploy to help the Security Cooperation Organiza-
tion develop and define equipment, training and technical assistance requirements for the host nation.
   b. Pre-deployment site survey. For a pre-deployment site survey, a Security Cooperation Education and Training
team chief deploys alone or with other personnel as an advance party to ensure preparations for the main body are in
place.

4–11. Combatant commander initiatives
Under the authority of 10 USC 166a, CJCS may provide funds to the combatant commanders to deploy personnel in a
TDY status to foreign countries to provide military education and training (to include transportation, translation, and
administrative expenses) to military and related civilian personnel of that country. These funds may also be utilized for
force training, contingencies, selected operations, command and control, joint exercises (including activities of partici-
pating foreign countries), humanitarian and civil assistance, personnel expenses of defense personnel for bilateral or
regional cooperation programs, and force protection.

4–12. Military-to-military contacts and comparable activities
Under the authority of 10 USC 168 the SECDEF may conduct military-to-military contacts and comparable activities
that are designed to encourage a democratic orientation of defense establishments and military forces of other
countries. The Secretary may provide funds to the combatant commanders to deploy DOD personnel in a TDY status
as a Traveling Contact Team. These funds support Traveling Contract Team expenses including transportation,
translation services, or administrative expenses. These funds may also be utilized for the activities of military liaison
teams, exchanges of civilian or military personnel between DOD and defense ministries of foreign governments,
exchanges of military personnel between units of the armed forces and units of foreign armed forces, seminars and
conferences held primarily in a theater of operations, and distribution of publications primarily in a theater of
operations. Except for the activities specifically authorized by this section, funds provided may not be used for the
provision of any other defense articles or services, including training, to any foreign country.

4–13. Joint combined exchange training
Under the authority of 10 USC 2011 the Commander, Special Operations Command (SOC) may authorize special
operations forces to deploy to a friendly foreign country to train armed forces and other security forces of that country
as long as the primary purpose of the training is the training of the U.S. Special Operations Forces.

Section III
Programming Guidance Programming

4–14. Guidance
General programming guidance for Security Cooperation Education and Training teams varies with the type of program
or authority under which the team is deployed. In general, however, there are some commonalities in teams that deploy
under either 22 USC or 10 USC; requests should be included in the Combined Education and Training Program Plan
and originate with the requesting country. The Security Cooperation Organization, combatant command and U.S.
country team will review and vet the requests. Requests that are not identified as part of the Combined Education and
Training Program Plan and submitted at the appropriate Security Cooperation Education and Training Working Group
are considered out-of-cycle requests.
   a. Teams programmed under FMS may be requested by the Security Cooperation Organization at any time and must
be coordinated between all cognizant training organizations.
   b. Teams programmed under IMET require DSCA waiver and must be included in the Combined Education and
Training Program Plan and requested at the Security Cooperation Education and Training Working Group.
   c. Teams programmed under Counterterrorism Fellowship Program require Special Operations/Low Intensity Con-
flict and commanders of combatant commands approval and must be included in the Combined Education and Training
Program Plan and requested at the Security Cooperation Education and Training Working Group.
   d. Teams in other programs should also be included in the Combined Education and Training Program Plan and
presented at Security Cooperation Education and Training Working Group. However, often these types of requests are


                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  61
addressed in separate reviews tied directly to the development of the Theater Security Cooperation Strategy/Plan for a
given geographic region. Security Cooperation Organization should make every effort to ensure full coordination of
these types of requests regardless of the forum in which they are presented. Requests not presented at a Security
Cooperation Education and Training Working Group or other appropriate meetings are considered out-of-cycle.

4–15. Extended training service specialist
The ETSS teams are normally programmed for a period of one year. Personnel selected for deployment on such teams
typically do so on a PCS basis. Because of funding severability issues associated with the IMET, Counterterrorism
Fellowship Program, or certain other security cooperation programs; the ETSS are not normally programmed under
those programs. They are most often programmed under a FMS or FMF case. The case manager and the Security
Cooperation Organization should assure that the case contains appropriate language to support such a deployment. All
costs involved in furnishing the ETSS must be included in the LOA. These include such costs as dependent travel,
movement of household goods, privately-owned vehicle (POV) (if authorized), and dependent schooling. The ETSS
costs are estimated when first programmed.

4–16. Contract field services
The CFS costs depend on the value of a negotiated contract with the civilian firm involved and include such costs as
salary, in-country maintenance, CONUS travel, and overhead. The contract cost will be reflected as unit cost in the
country program; other costs are considered as TLA.
   a. The CFS will be used only when needed to accomplish a military mission. However, it must be clearly shown
that personnel with the required skill are not available from DOD resources. Also, the Service involved must determine
that satisfactory provision of services by DOD personnel is not practicable.
   b. Under the provision of a nonpersonal services contract, U.S. officers should have no supervisory control over
contractor personnel.
   c. The Security Cooperation Organization is responsible for advising the contractor of regulations and procedures for
receipt, dispatch, storing, and safeguarding of military information, including classified defense information.
   d. Contractors and their employees will not—
   (1) Be placed in policy-making positions or in positions of command, supervision, administration, or control over
DOD personnel or personnel of other contractors.
   (2) Become part of the foreign government organization.
   e. Subject to the provisions of applicable international agreements, CFS personnel performing under the provisions
of this regulation are entitled to privileges and support equivalent to that furnished as GS–12 grade civilian, where
available. When agreements between the United States and the foreign government do not expressly authorize the
United States to accord these privileges to such personnel, they will be extended only with the consent of the foreign
government.
   f. Security clearance for employees of contractors performing field services will conform to the requirements of
applicable DOD instructions or regulations. Other administrative requirements such as those involving certificates of
performance, logistical support, travel, identification, privileges, and reports will conform to the appropriate provisions
of the Service regulation, as incorporated within the contract for the services.
   g. According to the terms of the contract, the contracting officer may require the contractor to remove from the job
site any CFS employee who endangers persons or property or whose continued employment under the contract is
inconsistent with the interests of the USG.
   h. Travel and allowances for CFS personnel will be according to the appropriate provision of the Defense Acquisi-
tion Regulation (DAR) as incorporated within the contract for the services.
   i. The CFS personnel are authorized leave for U.S. legal holidays as specified in MILDEP procurement procedures.
All other leave and absence will be authorized at the discretion of the contractor.

4–17. Mobile education team/Mobile training team
   a. General. The Mobile Education Team and MTT programming will include duration in weeks; number of team
members; costs for overseas travel (round trip); in country travel; travel and living allowances; CONUS travel;
baggage; and DOD civilian salaries. Per diem allowance costs during temporary duty travel outside CONUS are
computed according to Joint Federal Travel Regulations (JFTR) rates for U.S. military personnel, and rates shown in
the “Standard Regulations, Government civilians, Foreign Areas” (published by the DOS) for USG civilians. The MTT
CONUS travel costs are programmed at an estimated rate to include commercial air transportation, baggage, and per
diem. Only the Service International Affairs can approve excess baggage. Costs of team members traveling from
overseas locations are computed using commercial air (tourist rate) transportation, per diem, and excess baggage.
Additional travel costs should be based on the JFTR, JTR, and other applicable directives and regulations. When more
than one Service is involved, a Joint MTT is programmed using the MASL line of the Service providing the most team
members. If each Service provides an equal number of team members, the MTT is programmed using the MASL line
of the Service counterpart to the requesting foreign country Service. All team member costs, including pre-deployment



62                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
orientation or training costs are programmed as “unit costs” of the country program. Training aids (including parking,
crating, handling and transportation) are programmed separately. Training aids for IMET funded MTT must be
approved by DSCA (Programs Directorate).
   b. Teams programmed under international military education training.
   (1) The MTT are programmed by the Security Cooperation Organization in the FY program during which the team
will be used. The teams are programmed on a man-week basis. An MTT cannot be funded under the 5th quarter
concept since MTT funds cannot be extended from one FY into the next. Therefore, personnel on MTT duty must
terminate their TDY and return to home station before 30 September unless action has been taken to reprogram the
team in the new FY. Such reprogramming is subject to the 179-day restriction (see para 4–7d) and receipt of CRA or
other budget authority in the new FY. Transportation costs for roundtrip team travel are chargeable to the FY at the
start of the TDY. Initial programming of IMET MTT will be according to the SAMM. Once the formal MTT request is
submitted according to Service instructions and the details of mission, concept, composition, duration, and source
agency finalized, the IMETP will be adjusted to reflect the MTT cost estimate developed by the appropriate Service.
The following factors will be included:
   (a) CONUS travel and team orientation. Program per member to include CONUS airfare, per diem, and baggage.
   (b) Transoceanic travel (round trip). Compute using current airfare rates.
   (c) Travel and per diem allowances. Computed according to the JTR.
   (d) In country travel.
   (e) Team members. For civilians, the cost at base salary rate plus acceleration factor as prescribed by current DOD
pricing instructions. No salary costs are included for military members.
   (f) Fund-cite. U.S. regulations require that a U.S. person performing temporary duty be supported by an appropriated
fund cite; therefore, all travel and per diem for IMET MTT members must be programmed and funded by IMET.
   (2) Costs in paragraphs (a) through (e), above, are to be reflected as TLA in the country program. Civilian salaries
will be shown under unit cost.
   (3) Officers, enlisted personnel, and civilian members of the team will be shown in the country program on separate
lines under the WCN alpha designator, as appropriate.
   (4) MTT cannot be deployed under IMET until funds are available; therefore, lead times must be given careful
consideration when requesting and programming MTT.
   (5) For costing purposes, MTT are subject to IMET incremental pricing policy.
   c. International military education training programming procedures The program may be followed for MTT
funded by certain 10 USC or 22 USC authorities. These include teams funded under Regional Defense Counterter-
rorism Fellowship Program and Counter-Drug Training Support.
   d. Teams programmed under an foreign military sales or foreign military financing case
   (1) The MTT may be furnished under an LOA, either as a separate case or as part of an existing training case. MTT
under FMS may span FY since these teams are not required to terminate at the end of the U.S. FY.
   (2) Services develop cost data for MTT. The same cost elements as stated for IMET MTT are used, plus military
pay and allowances with current acceleration factors for all military members for FMS teams.
   (3) Requests for FMS MTT must be time-phased to allow for the following:
   (a) Determination of price and availability.
   (b) LOA preparation and processing.
   (c) Submission to and acceptance by the country.
   (d) Receipt of the initial deposit and issuance of obligation or expenditure authority.
   (4) Funds for the MTT must be received in advance of MTT deployment. Teams cannot be deployed until country
funds are available nor can team preparations requiring funds (for example, training aids and orientations) be initiated
or accomplished.
   (5) Light refreshments may be funded if providing such refreshments prevents disruption of the training agenda.
Documentation must be provided to the DSCA IMET financial manager to show there is factually no convenient
source for attendees to reasonably obtain refreshments during breaks. This documentation must be provided to the
DSCA financial manager at least 30 days prior to the start of training.

4–18. Other security cooperation teams
Teams or personnel deployed under various authorities, such as, initiatives (combatant commander initiatives) (10 USC
166a), military-to-military contacts (10 USC 168), or JCET (10 USC 2011) are programmed as a part of the
development of a combatant commander TSCP. Unlike those teams programmed under security assistance procedures
(IMET/FMS/FMF), these deployments are typically tasked by the combatant commander directly to the Service
Component involved. Funding is provided by the tasking combatant commander to the service component providing
the team. Teams composed of SOF personnel require Special Operations Command (SOCOM) approval.




                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                 63
4–19. Requests for teams
The format in figure 4–1 will be used to request Mobile Education Team. Requesters will use the format in figure 4–2
to request MTT, TAT, ETSS, TAFT, pre-deployment site survey, RST, and CFS teams.
   a. Foreign military sales/foreign military financing/international military education and training
   (1) The Security Cooperation Organization should submit the request for MTT or ETSS/CFS teams during each
annual Security Cooperation Education and Training Working Group or as soon thereafter as feasible. Specific training
objectives and requirements will be stated in the team request. The data provided should be complete and detailed. This
will enable furnishing Service to select and prepare the team properly for the mission. Teams included in a country-
training program are not automatically called up. Specific action must be taken by the Security Cooperation Organiza-
tion to formally request the team from the providing Service. Copies of this request must also be provided to the
Combatant Commander and all interested activities and commands. Once a request is received, the Service will
determine if deployment is feasible and supportable within current resources. If supportable, the Service will notify the
Security Cooperation Organization. Short lead-times should be avoided when requesting teams.
   (2) When requesting a team, the Security Cooperation Organization must ensure that the necessary equipment,
instruction facilities, and technical publications are available before or with the arrival of the team. This action should
be accomplished through requisition of the necessary equipment and publications in advance of team call-up. In-
country training surveys to determine specific country training needs and to refine requirements are a normal part of
team preparation.
   (3) Necessary interpreter support will be the responsibility of the foreign country to provide. If interpreter support
cannot be provided and funding source is IMET, then country must submit a waiver for DSCA approval. A waiver is
not required when using IMET funding for E–IMET training.
   (4) The Security Cooperation Organization will ensure foreign personnel to be trained meet the prerequisites and
necessary to comprehend the technical level of presentation. The Security Cooperation Organization vets all personnel
and units to be trained in accordance with current requirements.
   (5) The Security Cooperation Organization programs in-country arrival date based on the availability of trainees,
facilities, and equipment.
   (6) The Security Cooperation Organization will request unprogrammed teams from the providing Service in suffi-
cient time to permit that Service to determine supportability. Specific service timelines are found in Service specific
sections of this chapter.
   b. Regional Defense Counterterrorism Fellowship Program and Counter-Drug Training Support. Teams funded
under these programs follow request procedures similar to the ones outlined for FMS/FMF/IMET teams; however, each
requires additional vetting and approval before the request for this training is submitted to the providing Service.
Security Cooperation Organization should allow sufficient additional time to permit this extra processing and approval.
   c. Combatant commander initiatives, military-to-military contact, and Joint combined exchange training. Requests
for these teams are initiated as a part of the development of a combatant commander TSCP. Approved teams are tasked
directly to the supporting service component. Service components follow their prescribed internal procedures for filling
these taskings.

Section IV
Quality of Life and Mission Sustainment Items

4–20. Definition
   a. A QOL item is any article or Service that in the judgment of the Security Cooperation Organization chief and
combatant command will have a positive effect on the living and work environment of a deployed team. Factors to be
considered include the following:
   (1) Availability of suitable entertainment.
   (2) Climate/geography.
   (3) Security.
   (4) Language problems.
   (5) Recreational facilities.
   b. Quality of life items are procured for team rather than individual use. Quality of life items may include such
things as the following (if approved/authorized by the combatant commander and deploying Service):
   (1) Magazines (news and Service-related).
   (2) Athletic gear (recreational).
   (3) TVs/tapes/DVDs/VCRs/DVD players/CD players.
   (4) Fishing tackle.
   (5) Hunting equipment.
   (6) Boats (canoes, rowboats, sailfish).
   (7) Camping equipment.


64                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
  (8) Scuba gear.
  (9) Equipment repair.
  c. Quality of life items are subject to the policy guidance for morale, welfare, and recreation publications. Items
which are not considered appropriate for morale, welfare, and recreation funding will not qualify for FMS funding as
QOL items.

4–21. Mission sustainment items
The following is a partial list of mission sustainment type items (not QOL items):
  a. Dependent education.
  b. Housing.
  c. Medical support and medical evacuation (MEDEVAC).
  d. Furniture.
  e. Air conditioners (where required).
  f. Housekeeping equipment.
  g. Drivers.
  h. Rations.
  i. Security guards.
  j. Electrical equipment (generators, transformers, and voltage regulators).
  k. Physical conditioning equipment.
  l. Environmental and morale leave.
  m. Religious support.

4–22. Funding
   a. The Security Cooperation Organization chief will use a data sheet to identify the QOL items recommended for
funding.
   b. A decision on funding will include the judgment of training management agencies and combatant commands.
   c. Funding will be identified in the LOA under the team support line with a footnote.
   d. IMET funds are not available for purchasing QOL items. Such items may be provided to IMET-funded teams
from stock already available in country or by the parent Service from its supplies and resources.
   e. Quality of life items may be purchased using resources from FMF-funded FMS cases with the express approval of
the host country.

4–23. Fairness and uniform standards
   a. The Security Cooperation Organization/combatant commander will determine what is fair and appropriate for
team members.
   (1) The combatant commander will assure fair and appropriate treatment of all teams within countries under the
cognizance of the combatant commander. The level of support provided to a team member under an FMS case will not
exceed that authorized for DOD personnel of equivalent grade in countries funded by U.S. appropriations.
   (2) The Security Cooperation Organization will assure fair and appropriate treatment of all teams within a country.
   b. The combatant commander will establish standards for treatment of team members.

4–24. Inventory control
  a. The Security Cooperation Organization will ensure inventory control is according to the combatant command’s
procedures and guidance.
  b. The combatant commander may require periodic physical inventory.
  c. The LOA will include a statement, as appropriate, that QOL items will ultimately revert to the control of the host
nation.

4–25. Roles
   a. The combatant commander will—
   (1) Establish a combatant command policy on fairness and equitability.
   (2) Ensure compliance with the combatant command policy and also with the Service policy, to the extent possible.
   (3) Establish combatant command policies and procedures on accountability.
   b. The Security Cooperation Organization will—
   (1) Review residential leases to ensure quarters are appropriate for rank and dependent status of team members and
comply with DOD and DOS standards. The Security Cooperation Organization ensures each lease request is submitted
to the Embassy Interagency Housing Board for approval prior to signature by the appropriate contracting officer. If




                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                65
higher headquarters approval is required, ensure Embassy Interagency Housing Board reviews request before forward-
ing lease to the Service International Affairs, team management agency, the combatant commander, and/or the
designated component command.
   (2) Establish procedures to review all team TDY and approve requests for out-of-country travel.
   (3) Review team request for purchase of QOL and/or MS items, and other items required to execute the team
training and/or technical assistance mission. This includes healthcare items for the team members (see para 8–6). The
Security Cooperation Organization provides Service International Affairs, team management agency, the combatant
commander, and/or the designated Component Command with an itemized list of recommended QOL and MS articles
to be included in the LOA. Security Cooperation Organization ensure the requested items are authorized in the LOA
under which the team operates and that vendor discussions and actual purchases are made through a U.S. contracting
office.
   (4) Ensure team chief establishes supply and/or equipment accountability records that provide a complete audit trail
from item acquisition to disposal. All nonexpendable, durable property costing $50.00 or more is to be recorded on a
property record.
   (5) Periodically review team property and inventory records for accuracy. Ensure continuous in-country accountabil-
ity is maintained by conducting a physical inventory prior to team and/or team chief departure from country. As a
minimum, physical inventories for PCS teams are conducted annually.
   (6) Perform periodic reviews of team petty cash funds to ensure funds are adequately protected and cash manage-
ment is in accordance with Embassy budget and fiscal office procedures.
   (7) Assist the team chief to establish procedures with the Embassy for payroll support of any foreign Service
employees hired to support the team.
   (8) Assist the Service International Affairs, team management agency, the combatant commander, and/or the
designated component command to identify country unique management and administrative duties associated with the
team’s deployment.
   c. The team chief will—
   (1) Assign duties to team members to ensure the team mission is accomplished within the prescribed timeframe.
   (2) Submit requests and/or justification for QOL and/or MS items, and items required to execute the team mission to
the Security Cooperation Organization prior to purchase.
   (3) Establish and maintain supply and/or equipment accountability records for all QOL, MS, and mission essential
property in accordance with Service directives and procedures. Provide Security Cooperation Organization with a copy
of property records listing all non-expendable, durable equipment valued at $50.00 or more.
   (4) Provide Security Cooperation Organization with access to team property for the purpose of conducting a
physical inventory (at least annually for PCS teams and/or prior to team chief departure from country for TDY teams.)
   (5) Identify problems that may impact team personnel and/or mission, and report these problems and recommended
solutions to the Security Cooperation Organization, the Service International Affairs, team management agency, the
combatant commander, and/or the designated component command, as appropriate.
   (6) Send copies of receipts and vouchers to the Service International Affairs, team management agency, the
combatant commander, and/or the designated component command, and hold copies on open actions until cleared
through accounting and finance channels.
   (7) Provide annual (for PCS teams) or end of tour (for TDY teams) progress report to the Service International
Affairs, team management agency, the combatant command, and/or the designated component command, to include
complete listing of personnel/units trained.
   (8) Provide an after action report within 30 days of completion of the team’s mission. See format at figure 4–3 for
guidance.




66                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   Figure 4–3. Format for after actions report for teams




AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011    67
                           Figure 4–3. Format for after actions report for teams–Continued



Section V
Department of the Army

4–26. Programming security assistance teams under U.S. grant funded programs
   a. Policy guidance for Army Security Assistance Teams (SAT) can be found in Army regulation (AR) 12–7.
   b. The SATMO in coordination with SATFA will develop the SAT refined cost estimate.
   c. The SATMO and the furnishing agency will determine the team composition necessary to achieve the team
mission. SATMO will notify SATFA of any required program changes.
   d. The Security Cooperation Organization may request training expertise, literature, and general information on
training aids from the Commander, U.S. Army SATMO (AOJK–SA), Fort Bragg, NC 28310–5000.

4–27. Funding security assistance training under U.S. grant funded programs
  a. The SATFA allocates funds to SATMO. SATMO will provide furnishing commands with coordination instruction
and financial information for preparation of SAT orders.
  b. The furnishing command will properly reimburse any civilian salaries to the correct account.
  c. The SATMO will not deploy U.S. grant funded SAT before receipt of funding authorization from SATFA.

4–28. Programming security assistance training under foreign military sales
The SATMO will coordinate the development of cost data with SATFA.

4–29. Funding security assistance training under foreign military sales
The SATMO manages mission funds for FMS funded SAT and will not deploy SAT until receipt of FMS case funds
from SATFA. SATMO issues fund cites/military interdepartmental purchase requests and TDY orders to furnishing
commands/agencies as appropriate. Furnishing commands/agencies must provide copies of final settlement vouchers to
SATMO as soon as possible after mission completion. Furnishing commands/agencies will forward all SAT related
financial documents to: CDR, SATMO (AOJKSA–SASD), Fort Bragg, NC 28310–5000.

4–30. Security assistance team identification
The IMET and FMS SAT are identified as explained, below.
  a. Include the following components in the SAT number:
  (1) Type team (radio repair, personnel administration, general supply, and so forth).
  (2) Designator (MTT, TAT, ETSS, TAFT, pre-deployment site survey, or RST).
  (3) Two letter geopolitical (country) code as listed in the SAMM.
  (4) For IMET, the four digit WCN. For FMS, the alphabetical FMS case designator.
  (5) Four digits designating the FY in which the SAT is scheduled to deploy. (For IMET, an X following the FY
indicates a SAT that has been added to the program).
  b. The following are examples of MTT identification:
  (1) For IMET: UH 1 Maint MTT–TH 0014–2000.




68                          AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
  (2) For FMS: M113A1 Opns MTT–SR–OBQ–2000.

4–31. Temporary duty security assistance team request and authorized use
The TDY team request and Army decision process is depicted in AR 12–7, figure 4–1. The process starts with the
country team receiving an letter of request or a country’s request for a training team for an Army mission under an
existing LOA. The country team will assist the country by preparing a detailed team request memorandum (TRM). The
TRM format is provided at appendix D. The Security Cooperation Organization must send the TRM (see app D) for a
TDY team in accordance with figure 4–1 through the combatant command to HQDA a minimum of 10 months before
the date of deployment. The combatant command will validate and endorse TRM that do not meet the timeline in AR
12–7 and submit them with justification (operational requirements) to DASA DE&C for review and staffing to the Vice
Chief of Staff, U.S. Army for decision. Copies will be provided to TRADOC/SATFA and SATMO.
   a. Before submitting the TRM, the Security Cooperation Organization may request assistance from SATMO
concerning team composition, training concept, cost information, and general guidance on the availability of specific
skills.
   b. The requirements must be written to achieve a specific objective during a specific timeframe.
   c. The requirements must be tied into the current combatant commander’s TSCP or the country CETP to ensure
specified objectives are achieved. Here are some examples of current commanders of combatant commands and Army
strategic objectives:
   (1) Enhance partner capability to conduct internal stability operations.
   (2) Build partner capability to support commanders of combatant commands missions with a focus on regional
interoperability and stabilization operations, peacekeeping operations, and humanitarian assistance.
   (3) Deter aggression and counter coercion, and defeat adversaries.
   (4) Develop capabilities of key allies and partners to dissuade potential adversaries.
   d. Requests for P&A must use the TRM format containing the planning information necessary to estimate costs and
survey availability.
   e. The country team will then submit a detailed TRM through the commanders of combatant commands for
validation. The TRM will clearly state the mission, training goals, end state of the mission, and the qualifications the
team members should possess. The Security Cooperation Organization should also identify geographic or climatic
conditions to be considered in selection of team members. The Security Cooperation Organization will include a SOW
to be coordinated with SATMO as a part of the TRM. The commanders of combatant commands will coordinate with
the ASCC to determine if the mission can be satisfied from internal theater assets. If so, the mission is executed intra-
theater with no HQDA involvement required. If not, the commanders of combatant commands will forward the TRM
to HQDA for decision. The Army action agency address is DASA DE&C, Suite 8200, (SAAL–NP), 1777 North Kent
Street, Arlington, Virginia 22209.
   f. The DASA DE&C will coordinate with the DCS, G–1 and DCS, G–3/5/7 and make a decision on the TRM. If the
TRM is disapproved, it will be sent back through the commanders of combatant commands to the country team with
applicable justification. If the TRM is approved, DASA DE&C will draft an execution message to DCS, G–3/5/7,
Operations Division Operations with a mission statement, metrics for measuring success, and a timeline for completion.
   g. The DCS, G–3/5/7 Operations Division Operations upon receiving the draft execution message from DASA
DE&C will send a tasker to the USAR, NG, and TRADOC G–3/5/7 central tasking office to fill the request. Given an
approved and implemented LOA, SATMO will execute the fill of the team and prepare them for deployment.
   h. The Security Cooperation Organization, in coordination with SATMO ensures that all necessary equipment,
supplies, instructional facilities, and technical publications are on hand or available for the arrival of the team. Tools
and ancillary equipment needed for the training or technical assistance must be on hand and available for the team use
when the team arrives in country.
   i. The Security Cooperation Organization ensures that foreign personnel to be trained meet the prerequisites
necessary to comprehend the technical level of presentation and that they are vetted for training.
   j. The Security Cooperation Organization programs the in-country arrival date and must consider the availability of
trainees, facilities, and equipment.
   k. In accordance with 10 USC 167b, the Security Cooperation Organization will direct any requests for Army
Special Operations Forces personnel to the theater SOC for validation, then to the theater combatant commander, who
will forward the request to U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) for approval. Upon approval, USSOCOM
will direct team sourcing. Approval to use IMET funds for SATs requires that the Combatant Commander forward a
request for waiver to DSCA for consideration and approval before sending the TRM to HQDA. The waiver request
should include a cost estimate for training aids and training materials. The Security Cooperation Organization can
request P&A assistance from SATMO for the cost estimate for the IMET waiver.

4–32. The permanent change of station security assistance team request and authorized use
  a. The PCS team request and Army decision process is included in AR 12–7. The process starts with the country
TRM.


                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  69
   b. Before submitting the TRM, the Security Cooperation Organization may request assistance from TRADOC
concerning team composition, training concept, cost information, and general guidance on the availability of specific
skills.
   c. Need to add 15 months lead time for training and PCS teams into LOA.
   d. The requirements must be written to achieve a specific objective during a specific timeframe.
   e. The requirements must be tied into the current combatant commander’s TSCP or the country CETP to ensure
specified objectives are achieved. Here are some examples of current commanders of combatant commands and Army
strategic objectives—
   (1) Enhance partner capability to conduct internal stability operations.
   (2) Build partner capability to support commanders of combatant commands missions with a focus on regional
interoperability and stabilization operations, peacekeeping operations, and humanitarian assistance.
   (3) Deter aggression and counter coercion, and defeat adversaries.
   (4) Develop capabilities of key allies and partners to dissuade potential adversaries.
   f. Requests for P&A must use the TRM format containing the planning information necessary to estimate costs and
survey availability.
   g. The country team will then submit a detailed TRM through the commanders of combatant commands for
validation to HQDA for decision. The TRM will clearly state the mission, training goals, end state of the mission, and
the qualifications the team members should possess. The Security Cooperation Organization should also identify
geographic or climatic conditions to be considered in selection of team members. For contractor-staffed SAT, the
Security Cooperation Organization will include, as part of the TRM, a SOW to be coordinated with TRADOC.
   (1) The TRM will be submitted through the appropriate commanders of combatant commands staff to validate the
requirements.
   (2) Upon commanders of combatant commands validation of the TRM, it will be forwarded to HQDA for coordina-
tion and decision. The Army action agency address is DASA DE&C, Suite 8200, (SAAL–NP), 1777 North Kent Street,
Arlington, Virginia 22209.
   (3) The DASA DE&C will coordinate with the DCS, G–1 and DCS, G–3/5/7 and make a decision on the TRM. If
the TRM is disapproved, it will be sent back through the commanders of combatant commands to the country team
with applicable justification. If the TRM is approved, DASA DE&C will draft an execution message to DCS, G–3/5/7
Operations Division Operations with a mission statement, metrics for measuring success, and a timeline for completion.
   (4) The DCS, G–3/5/7 Operations Division Operations upon receiving the draft execution message from DASA
DE&C will send a tasker to the USAR, National Guard Bureau, and TRADOC G–3/5/7 central tasking office to fill the
request. Given an approved and implemented LOA, TRADOC will execute the fill of the team and prepare them for
deployment.
   (5) The Security Cooperation Organization, in coordination with TRADOC ensures that all necessary equipment,
supplies, instruction facilities, and technical publications are on hand or available for the arrival of the team. Tools and
ancillary equipment needed for the training or technical assistance must be on-hand and available for the team use
when the SAT team arrives in country.
   (6) The Security Cooperation Organization ensures that foreign personnel to be trained meet the prerequisites
necessary to comprehend the technical level of presentation and that they are vetted for training.
   (7) The Security Cooperation Organization programs the in-country arrival date in accordance with AR 12–7 and
must consider the availability of trainees, facilities, and equipment. The team chief, in coordination with SATMO and
the Security Cooperation Organization, will meet reporting requirements in AR 12–7.

4–33. Extensions
Continuation of the duration of an Army non-contractor PCS SAT beyond 2 years requires HQDA approval. If a PCS
team requires a continuation beyond 2 years, the Security Cooperation Organization will submit a team continuation
request memorandum through the same process as the TRM for approval. To meet Army personnel management
timelines, the team continuation request memorandum must be submitted by the end of the first year. No continuations
will be granted without Human Resources Command approval.

4–34. Correspondence
All significant communications concerning SAT will include the Security Cooperation Organization, commanders of
combatant commands, ASCC, SATFA, SATMO, furnishing agency, USASAC, and HQDA (DASA DE&C) as infor-
mation or action addressees, as appropriate.

4–35. Country or area clearances
Since the SAT request initiates within the country and are approved by the commanders of combatant commands,
HQDA (DASA DE&C), and OSD, the SAT is exempted from processing for theater or area clearance requirements




70                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
specified in AR 55–46. However, the provisions of DODD 4500.54E apply and SATMO will coordinate special actions
for clearance specified therein.

4–36. Passports and visas
The requirements outlined in DOD 1000.21–R apply to SAT members. When establishing the desired arrival date for a
SAT, the Security Cooperation Organization must consider the time required to process applications for passports and
visas (approximately 6 weeks).

4–37. Temporary duty orders
The SATMO will issue funded SAT orders in accordance with AR 600–8–105. Furnishing commands will follow the
instructions on these orders, such as, passport processing, immunizations, Soldier readiness, and so forth.

4–38. Team assembly
   a. The CONUS teams will assemble under the team chief at a location SATMO designates. The SATMO will
provide the Security Cooperation Organization the following information:
   (1) Estimated time of departure from CONUS.
   (2) Estimated time of arrival in the foreign country.
   (3) Travel information.
   b. Personnel deployed OCONUS under the Security Assistance Program as part of a security assistance team must
attend the Security Assistance Training Team Orientation Course conducted at Fort Bragg, NC. The CDR, SATMO,
may grant constructive credit for Security Assistance Training Team Orientation Course when the Security Cooperation
Organization and CDR, SATMO agree that is not required. Should CDR, SATMO and host country team not agree,
CDR, Security Assistance Training Management Organization will request constructive credit from HQDA (DASA
DE&C).

4–39. Arrival or departure notice
The Security Cooperation Organization will notify Security Assistance Training Management Organization, SATFA,
the furnishing agency, the commanders of combatant commands, and HQDA (DASA DE&C) of the arrival and
departure date of the SAT or members of the team, using the team identification number.

4–40. Personnel evaluation reports
   a. AR 623–3 (officers) and (enlisted) establish the requirement for personnel evaluations by grade.
   b. In coordination with the Security Cooperation Organization, Security Assistance Training Management Organiza-
tion will establish a rating scheme for PCS team members and for team members on TDY for more than 90 days.
   c. Unless otherwise specified in MOU/MOA, CDR, Security Assistance Training Management Organization will be
in the rating chain for all team chiefs.

4–41. After action report
   a. Upon completion of an assignment and before departure, the chief of each SAT will prepare a report (see fig 4–3)
on the effectiveness of the training presented and submit the original to the Security Cooperation Organization.
   b. The Security Cooperation Organization will forward a copy of the SAT evaluation and the after action report
through the commanders of combatant commands and the Service component to HQDA (DASA DE&C) with
information copies to Security Assistance Training Management Organization, SATFA, USASAC, and to the chief of
staff of each major subordinate command contributing to the composition of the team. On forwarding, the Security
Cooperation Organization will endorse the report and address any problems or make recommendations that are within
the Security Cooperation Organization purview. In the endorsement, the Security Cooperation Organization will also
evaluate the team’s overall effectiveness and performance.
   c. HQDA (DASA (DE&C)) will take action, as required, upon receipt of the comments of the Security Cooperation
Organization and commanders of combatant commands.

4–42. Flight physicals for U.S. Army security assistance team members
All aircrew personnel will complete a comprehensive annual flying duty medical examination (FDME) prior to
departing home base. When aircrew are on duty at an OCONUS station with limited medical facilities, they will
accomplish the FDME to the extent possible, and, in accordance with AR 40–501, paragraph 6–8d, attach a cover letter
explaining facility limitations. They will accomplish a comprehensive FDME within 90 days of return to a station with
adequate medical facilities. See AR 40–501, paragraph 6–8d for additional guidance.




                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                               71
Section VI
Department of the Navy (U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Coast Guard)

4–43. Mobile education teams
The Mobile Education Team are provided primarily under E–IMET programs in a seminar/educational forum in host
countries taught by designated activities referred to as Mobile Education Team providers.
   a. Programming procedures.
   (1) The Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity is the Training Management Activity for
all USN and Defense Institute for International Legal Studies Mobile Education Team, and USCG is responsible for all
USCG Mobile Education Team. The Mobile Education Team should be programmed at the annual Combatant
Command Security Cooperation Education and Training Working Group. Otherwise, a message should be submitted by
the Security Cooperation Organization to the Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity or
USCG Headquarters (G–CI) (as appropriate) no later than 120 days prior to the requested start date. The format for
requesting a Mobile Education Team is provided in figure 4–2 in the general section of this chapter. DSCA, the
combatant command, Navy IPO, and the Mobile Education Team provider should be copied on this correspondence.
   (2) The Mobile Education Team providers and Security Cooperation Organization will be responsible for verifying
programming entries on the Security Assistance Network Web. If there are discrepancies, the MILDEP should be
notified immediately.
   b. Security assistance officer responsibilities.The Security Cooperation Organization will ensure that the necessary
technical support and instruction facilities are available and that participants in the Mobile Education Team meet the
provider’s requirements. The Security Cooperation Organization will provide logistical support, which includes the
following:
   (1) Determine Mobile Education Team location, that is, hotel or host country facility.
   (2) Make reservations for lodging and arrange transportation (if applicable).
   (3) Lecture room containing seats and tables for each class member, faculty, and visitors.
   (4) Discussion rooms.
   (5) Overhead projector, screen, power outlets, chalkboard/wetboard, transformers, extension cords, adapters, com-
puter projector, and other requirements as indicated by the provider.
   (6) Reproduction, clerical assistance.
   (7) Interpreter support, if required.
   (8) Ensure speakers (Ambassador, DCM, MOD, MOJ, and so forth) are arranged for opening/closing.
   (9) Advise appropriate uniforms/civilian attire for receptions, and so forth.
   (10) Country clearance and assistance in procuring lodging.
   (11) Receive course materials from Mobile Education Team provider and ensure they are placed at the conference
site the weekend prior to course start date.
   (12) Provide list of attendees (name/rank/Service) to the Mobile Education Team provider and to Naval Education
and Training Security Assistance Field Activity or USCG Headquarters (G–CI) (as appropriate) 2 weeks prior to
Mobile Education Team.
   (13) Advise Mobile Education Team provider of estimated in-country costs for authorized expenses in call-up
message and more well defined estimate 90 days prior to Mobile Education Team.
   (14) Brief Mobile Education Team personnel upon arrival in foreign country on the following topics:
   (a) Training objectives.
   (b) Political situations.
   (c) Social customs.
   (d) Guidelines for official and personal associations with foreign personnel.
   (e) Currency control.
   (f) Logistics support.
   (g) Administrative support.
   (h) Legal status in relation to the foreign country.
   (15) Upon completion of the Mobile Education Team, the Security Cooperation Organization will notify the Naval
Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity or USCG International Affairs (G–CI) (as appropriate) via e-
mail or message the arrival and subsequent departure date of the Mobile Education Team after completion.
   c. Mobile Education Team provider actions. All significant communications concerning the Mobile Education Team
especially information concerning dates, costs, participants and confirmed programming, will include the Security
Cooperation Organization, the combatant command, the Mobile Education Team provider, and Naval Education and
Training Security Assistance Field Activity, or USCG International Affairs (G–CI) (as appropriate). Once a Mobile
Education Team is requested, the Mobile Education Team provider will communicate directly with the Security
Cooperation Organization. The provider will send requirements to the host country no later than 15 days after receiving
the request.


72                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   d. Mobile education team provider responsibilities.
   (1) Confirm dates for the Mobile Education Team and provide cost estimates to the Naval Education and Training
Security Assistance Field Activity or USCG International Affairs (G–CI) (as appropriate).
   (2) Request country/area clearances.
   (3) Coordinate instructors and class schedule.
   (4) Conduct course.
   e. Mobile education team chief actions. The team chief is authorized direct communication with the Security
Cooperation Organization. While in the foreign country, the team chief will work closely with the Security Cooperation
Organization to resolve problems. Problems that cannot be resolved at the local level will be reported to the Service
Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity or USCG International Affairs (G–CI) (as appropri-
ate). On completion of the team’s mission and before departure from the foreign country, the team chief will orally
brief the appropriate Security Cooperation Organization authorities on the effectiveness (for example, positive and/or
negative comments) of the Mobile Education Team.
   f. Reporting procedures.
   (1) Monthly summary reports of planned Mobile Education Team whether programmed on the STL or not, will be
provided by each Mobile Education Team provider to the Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field
Activity or USCG International Affairs (G–CI) (as appropriate) and will include the following information: country,
start and end dates, phase, estimated cost (when available), MASL number, WCN, and location.
   (2) After action reports should be provided upon completion of the Mobile Education Team; the Mobile Education
Team provider will submit a report in the format provided in figure 4–3. This report should be prepared within 30
working days of mission completion. A copy of this report should be provided to DSCA, the combatant command, the
Security Cooperation Organization/Embassy, Navy IPO, and Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field
Activity or USCG Headquarters (G–CI) (as appropriate). A list of attendees will be included.
   g. Funding procedures. Final in-country cost estimate will be submitted to the Mobile Education Team provider by
the Security Cooperation Organization no later than 90 days prior to the scheduled start of the Mobile Education Team.
Final Mobile Education Team provider cost estimate will be submitted to the Naval Education and Training Security
Assistance Field Activity or USCG International Affairs (G–CI) (as appropriate) and the Security Cooperation Organi-
zation no later than 60 days prior to the scheduled start of the Mobile Education Team. The Naval Education and
Training Security Assistance Field Activity or USCG International Affairs (G–CI) (as appropriate) will provide a
funding document to the Mobile Education Team provider 15 days after receipt of the cost and corresponding
confirmation dates from the Mobile Education Team provider.
   (1) Authorized expenditures.
   (a) Airline costs.
   (b) Per diem (meals & incidental expenses) and lodging.
   (c) Course cost (includes curriculum development as well as Mobile Education Team delivery).
   (d) Civilian/contractor labor.
   (e) Guest speaker honorariums ($250 per day limit per speaker).
   (f) Translation of material costs.
   (g) Miscellaneous (printing costs, excess baggage, rental car, FEDEX/DHL costs).
   (2) In-country authorized expenditures.
   (a) Facility rental.
   (b) Working lunch (in accordance with M&IE rates listed in the JTR).
   (c) Morning and afternoon breaks.
   (d) Interpreter support (minimum 2 simultaneous; add 2 more for discussion problems).
   (e) Translation equipment.
   (f) Duplication of materials.
   (g) Projector/computer for overheads.
   (h) Translation of materials (if not accomplished by Mobile Education Team provider).
   (i) Air travel in accordance with the JTR.
   (3) Cancellation policy. Navy IPO annual cancellation policy message addresses cancellation fees for Mobile
Education Team. In general, a Mobile Education Team that has been programmed requires DSCA approval for
cancellation and countries are liable for any charges incurred.
   (4) Medical Services. If a team member requires routine or emergency health services and does not have ready
access to the U.S. Embassy health unit or the Service required is not available at the health unit, the IMETP, or the
FMS case (if it includes a medical line) will be responsible for—
   (a) Cost of the treatment in-country.
   (b) Cost of transportation to the nearest appropriate U.S. military treatment facility. The U.S. Embassy’s regional




                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                               73
medical officer will make referral decisions. If there is not enough money in the FMS case or the IMETP to cover
expenses, the FMS case or the IMETP will be amended to include these costs.
   h. Regional Mobile Education Team. A regional Mobile Education Team is coordinated with the Mobile Education
Team provider and programmed by Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity or Coast Guard
International Affairs (G–CI) at the annual Security Cooperation Education and Training Working Group. Responsibili-
ties are similar to other Mobile Education Team with the following differences:
   (1) After receiving a reply from the Mobile Education Team provider acknowledging proposed Mobile Education
Team and timeframe and/or programming in STL, either the Security Cooperation Organization or the combatant
command will notify all countries in the region requesting participation. If the minimum class size (as coordinated by
the Mobile Education Team provider and Security Cooperation Organization) is not met, the host country will be
expected to provide additional students. Since tuition costs per student will be determined by dividing the total Mobile
Education Team cost (for example, instructor travel, conference fees, and so forth) by the number of participants, class
size should be determined NLT 30 days prior to course commencement.
   (2) If a student is scheduled to attend a regional Mobile Education Team and has been included for purposes of
course pricing, student cancellation charges will be 100 percent unless student’s country can provide a substitute.
   (3) Approved costs include travel, cost of lodging, meals and incidentals (in accordance with the JTR), and
proportionate course cost. Charges will be made to the appropriate IMET program for students who participate from
invited countries.
   (4) Fund cite for travel will be provided by Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity to the
Security Cooperation Organization in invited countries.
   (5) The Security Cooperation Organization with students attending from other countries will—
   (a) Provide names of vetted prospective students to the host Security Cooperation Organization, Mobile Education
Team provider, and the Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, or USCG International
Affairs (GCI) (as appropriate) 2 weeks prior to the scheduled start of the Mobile Education Team.
   (b) Coordinate payment of authorized living expenses with Security Cooperation Organization in host country.
Advance payment to students prior to departure if requested by Security Cooperation Organization in host country.
   (c) Issue ITOs and provide copies to all concerned.
   (6) The Security Cooperation Organization in the host country will—
   (a) Reserve lodging for visiting students as well as for the instructors teaching the course.
   (b) Advise the Mobile Education Team provider concerning in-country expenses (to include lodging for participating
students, working lunches, translator, and so forth).
   (c) Coordinate with the Security Cooperation Organization from other countries regarding information on visas,
flight itineraries, and transportation from the airport.
   (d) Pay approved costs of lodging, meals, and incidentals in accordance with the JTR for the city where training is
conducted (deduct meals that are provided by other sources) to each student from visiting countries from the fund cite
issued by the Mobile Education Team provider. If unable to pay directly, coordinate with Security Cooperation
Organization in participating countries to determine advance payment amounts.
   (e) Provide a complete vetted roster of students to the Mobile Education Team provider, Naval Education and
Training Security Assistance Field Activity, and the USCG International Affairs (G–CI) (if appropriate) one week prior
to the scheduled start of the Mobile Education Team.
   (f) Provide disbursement vouchers to the Mobile Education Team provider within 30 days of completion of the
Mobile Education Team. Security Cooperation Organization in participating countries are authorized to issue travel
advances in the amount recommended by the Security Cooperation Organization in host country or Mobile Education
Team provider.
   (g) If Mobile Education Team is funded by Counterterrorism Fellowship Program, provide Special Operations/Low
Intensity Conflict via commanders of combatant commands a total cost estimate (Mobile Education Team provider
cost, all in-country costs, and round-trip travel, lodging, meal and incidental costs for all participating students).
   i. The CONUS E–IMET training in conjunction with a Mobile Education Team. Requirements for CONUS E–IMET
training are submitted at the same time as the requirements for a survey/assessment. The CONUS training segment
normally contains a mix of content and planning. Participants should be programmed using individual WCN and ITO.
Participants should leave the CONUS planning segment with a clear idea of where the provider and the country will
proceed with future training.
   (1) The Security Cooperation Organization responsibilities are to—
   (a) Request programming.
   (b) Identify candidates and coordinate dates with E–IMET provider.
   (c) Make airline reservations and assist with visas.
   (d) Issue ITOs after receipt of authority from Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity.
   (e) Provide students with standard briefing before attending training in the United States.
   (f) Provide Mobile Education Team provider with arrival information.


74                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
  (2) The training activity responsibilities are to—
  (a) Schedule course dates with Security Cooperation Organization.
  (b) Keep Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity or Military Service informed when
communicating directly with Security Cooperation Organization.
  (c) Coordinate instructors and class schedule.
  (d) Make reservations for lodging and arrange transportation.
  (e) After receipt of funding from Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, pay expenses of
delegates.
  (f) Conduct course.
  (3) Upon completion of course, submit an after action Report as shown in figure 4–3 within 30 days to DSCA,
combatant command, Security Cooperation Organization/Embassy, Navy IPO, OSD, and the Naval Education and
Training Security Assistance Field Activity or USCG International Affairs (G–CI), as appropriate.
  (4) The Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity or Military Service: Program Mobile
Education Team so that it can be seen in the Security Assistance Network Web.
  (5) Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity—
  (a) Provide ITO authority to Security Cooperation Organization.
  (b) Enter financial data in STL/International Standardized Training Listing.
  (c) Provide funding document to Mobile Education Team provider.

4–44. U.S. Navy teams
   a. The Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity will act as the central reviewing authority
for all U.S. Navy MTT requests. Upon receipt of the call-up for an MTT, Naval Education and Training Security
Assistance Field Activity will issue the details necessary for team organization and deployment. This will include, but
is not limited to, cost estimates, funding data, country background, general administrative instructions, logistics
information, travel and transportation requirements and other information essential to the accomplishment of the team
mission. An ETSS is processed similar to a MTT except that the length of time requires PCS. Billets must first be in
place to support the team and the process to establish the billets and identify personnel requires a minimum of 18 to 24
months.
   b. The Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity will coordinate with Navy commands to
find team personnel, designate a furnishing activity, designate the team chief, in writing, and provide a letter of
instruction for the team. The furnishing activity will normally be designated as the command responsible for team
assembly. Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity will provide the necessary funding data or
appropriate documentation to commands issuing temporary additional duty orders for MTT personnel.
   c. The furnishing activity will prepare team orders according to existing Naval Military Personnel Command or
BUPERS instructions using accounting data furnished by Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field
Activity. Country, area, or personnel clearance(s) required by the JTR will be submitted by the furnishing activity.
   d. The Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity will specify required training prior to
deployment and will specify where team or the team chief will travel to provide briefing and or debriefings. This could
include Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, Washington, DC commands or the combatant
command.
   e. The Security Cooperation Organization will notify the furnishing activity, combatant command and Naval
Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity by message of the arrival and departure of the team or team
members. The Security Cooperation Organization will also prepare a report on team performance and mission
accomplishment. This report can be an endorsement on the team chief’s after action report, or prepared separately. The
report should be mailed to Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, copy to Navy IPO and the
furnishing activity. For teams deployed over 90 days the Security Cooperation Organization or a military group officer
senior to the team chief, will prepare a concurrent personnel evaluation concerning the team chief and forward it to the
command officer of the furnishing activity.
   f. Upon completion of an assignment, the team chief of each team will prepare an after action report as shown in
figure 3–4 on the effectiveness of the training presented. This report should be prepared within 30 working days of
mission completion and forwarded to Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity via the
furnishing activity, copies to the Security Cooperation Organization and Navy IPO. For a team deployed over 90 days,
the team chief will prepare a concurrent personnel evaluation on all team members and forward it to the commanding
officer of the member’s furnishing activity.

4–45. Ship transfer mobile training teams
The MTT associated with the transfer of a U.S. Navy ship to a foreign country by either sale, loan, or lease will be
governed by the same general rules as listed in this chapter. Due to the differing nature in certain aspects; however, the
following additional guidance is provided:
   a. A ship transfer MTT is normally drawn from members of the crew of the U.S. Navy ship being transferred to


                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  75
take full advantage of the knowledge and expertise of these personnel with regard to the particular ship. The MTT will
be under the administrative control of the type commander transferring the ship. This approach will be used in all cases
where practicable. For ships being taken from the inactive fleet or from new construction, BUPERS will be tasked with
selecting the required personnel. Every effort will be made to avoid depleting fleet personnel resources.
   b. When an MTT is required to report to a location in a foreign country for embarkation aboard a foreign ship,
extreme care will be exercised in the preparation of orders. Specifically, the MTT should be ordered to report to a U.S.
activity such as an Security Cooperation Organization for onward routing to the ship. Members of the team may be
housed in a foreign shipyard or ashore at a foreign naval activity while waiting to board the ship. The Security
Cooperation Organization will incorporate this in the call-up message so that orders issued to the MTT may be
comprehensive in nature.
   c. In cases where an MTT reports in a foreign country for duty as a shipyard MTT, it is incumbent upon the
Security Cooperation Organization to ensure that a workable system for the delivery of mail to the team is instituted.
   d. The MTT members should be designated and assembled at a central location for shipboard MTT, whether
embarkation is to be in the United States, in a foreign country, or at an overseas location. It is recommended that the
MTT report to the appropriate fleet commander approximately 2 weeks prior to CONUS departure or boarding.
   e. The MTT members should, where feasible, be volunteers. Experience has shown that non volunteer MTT
members required to board a foreign ship, subsist in a foreign mess, live in non-U.S. Navy quarters, and accommodate
themselves to foreign ship routine, frequently create problems for themselves, the team, the foreign navy, and the U.S.
Navy.
   f. Enlisted members of ship transfer MTT should be of a senior rate (chief petty officer or petty officer first class) if
feasible.
   g. The mission of the MTT is to assist the commanding officer in the training of the crew. An MTT should also be
prepared to do the following:
   (1) Supervise the maintenance or repair of equipment essential to the training mission.
   (2) Participate in the Supply Overhaul Assistance Program.
   (3) Schedule formal instruction.
   (4) Ensure that work done by shore facilities is correct.
   (5) Train the ship’s company in the maintenance and operation of their equipment.
   (6) Supervise and conduct team training.
   (7) Act as a liaison between the ship, shore facilities, other ships, and activities as required for successful
completion of the mission.
   h. If a ship is being transferred from an inactive status, the MTT should comprise personnel from the same class of
ship, so they will be familiar with the equipment on which they will be providing instruction. For example, ensure that
engineering personnel are familiar with the propulsion plant on the ship being transferred (for example, 600-psi plant
personnel should not be assigned to train on a ship with a 1200-psi plant).
   i. If possible, at least two officers will be assigned to a shipboard MTT. One officer will be experienced in
operations and one in engineering. Operations experience is necessary, as the ship will come under the control of
different commands requiring an officer familiar with operation orders, movement orders, movement reports, and
logistic requests. The major materiel problems encountered will usually be in engineering; therefore, an officer with
engineering experience will be an extremely valuable asset.

4–46. Marine corps teams
The SC teams from the USMC are in high demand. Requests for USMC assistance come from a variety of sources that
have different execution requirements, requiring differing policies and procedures.
   a. The security cooperation teams requested by a regional combatant commander or country.
   (1) The SC teams deploying under 10 USC (Armed Forces) Authorities. Many SC teams requested under a Title 10
authority follow the Joint Staff Joint Force Provider Request for Forces process. The USMC staffs and sources a team
requested in this manner per the Joint Staff and Commander, U.S. Joint Forces Command tasking and applies CMC
guidance. However, a commanders of combatant commands may direct its Marine Corps forces (MARFOR) to execute
a SC team under a specific Title 10 program such as combatant commander initiatives, Traditional Commander’s
Activity (TCA) that might not be sourced via the Request for Forces process. In these cases, the procedure outlined in
paragraph 4–46(b), below, applies as if the request originated from the regional MARFOR.
   (2) The SC teams deploying under 22 USC authorities. Requests for teams that deploy under one of the applicable
22 USC authorities normally originate from the requesting country through the Security Cooperation Organization in
that country. The Security Cooperation Organization forwards the request to Security Cooperation Education and
Training Center following procedures outlined in paragraph 4–46c, below.
  b. The security cooperation teams requested by a regional MARFOR.
  (1) Regional MARFORs conduct many SC events in support of their commanders of combatant commands’s TSCP
under one of the Title 10 authorities. When such an event involves deploying a team that cannot be accomplished using
assigned forces or through the Request for Forces process, the regional MARFOR submits a feasibility of support


76                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
message detailing the requirement to Marine Forces Command G–3/5/7 with an information copy to CMC P/PO/PL/
MP/IO and Security Cooperation Education and Training Center. If the SC event involves Marine Corps special
operations command (MARSOC) assets the FOS message should include MARSOC and SOCOM as information
addresses.
   (2) Mission analysis and validation will be conducted by CMC POC/PLU and Security Cooperation Education and
Training Center. Once validated, CMC POC commences coordination with Marine Forces Command and Security
Cooperation Education and Training Center for sourcing feasibility. Mission analysis, validation, and sourcing for
teams involving MARSOC assets will be coordinated with MARSOC and SOCOM.
   c. General policy and procedure for requesting, staffing, and deploying Marine Corps security cooperation teams
under Title 22 authorities. This section has been omitted pending the promulgation of revised policy and procedures for
requesting, staffing, and deploying USMC security cooperation teams. Interim guidance for sourcing teams under Title
10 and Title 22 will be published by Marine Corps message. Formal guidance will be announced in a subsequent
change to this publication as well as Marine Corps Order 5710.6B (USMC Security Cooperation.)
   d. Reports.
   (1) Status reports. USMC SC teams deploying for more than 30 days will normally be required to provide periodic
status reports on their activities. Format and submission requirements will be provided to the team chief prior to
deployment by the deploying activity/command.
   (2) Effectiveness reports. Defense Security Cooperation Guidance requires each Service to evaluate the effectiveness
of its SC events. In compliance with this guidance, an evaluation report is required for each USMC SC team regardless
of the deploying authority. The format in figure 4–3 will be utilized as the basis of this evaluation for Marine Corps
teams. The team chief is responsible for the preparation of this report. Item e (Number of Trainees) must accurately
reflect the number of host nation personnel trained. If feasible, a roster indicating name, rank and unit of assignment of
the trainees should be attached. At a minimum, the total number of trainees, broken down by category (that is, officer,
enlisted, civilian) and their unit/organization of assignment must be provided. Item k (Effectiveness) should recap the
Defense Security Cooperation Guidance objectives, as outlined in the original call up message, and evaluate the
effectiveness of the team in meeting those objectives. A “hot wash” of this report should be provided to the Security
Cooperation Organization, other appropriate members of the country team, or the supported command (if applicable)
prior to the team’s departure from country. The formal report will be submitted to CMC PLU, with copies to the
supported commanders of combatant commands, the regional MARFOR, Security Cooperation Education and Training
Center, and the Security Cooperation Organization/supported command not later than 30 days after the team’s return to
CONUS.

4–47. Coast Guard exportable maritime teams
   a. The USCG mobile maritime teams provide training in all USCG mission areas and are tailored to the host
nation’s needs. USCG unique mission capabilities and techniques are focused on development of skills to meet the
challenges of global maritime security. For example, USCG Military Law Enforcement training equips partner nation
maritime services to respond to security threats associated with trafficking in persons, drugs, or weapons of mass
destruction. Discussion with USCG International Affairs (G–CI) staff can align appropriate capabilities to global
strategic objectives. The USCG can deliver a complete package of training to small groups, multi-agency audiences or
several countries in a regional forum.
   b. Training provided by a Mobile Education Team/MTT is conducted in English and is usually available in Spanish.
When requested the USCG will coordinate with the host country to arrange for interpreters and the translation of
course materials to conduct the training successfully. The USCG training is provided on an unclassified basis only.
   c. Requests for USCG maritime training teams normally originate from the Security Cooperation Organization
during the Security Cooperation Education and Training Working Group process. Training objectives, proposed date(s)
and source of funding must be included in the request. Descriptions of course content are available in the USCG
International Handbook. Course content can be tailored to meet a host nation’s specific needs, based on skill levels,
prior training, local conditions, or capabilities to meet specific maritime strategy objectives. Specific requirements not
addressed in the International Handbook should be addressed with USCG International Affairs (G–CI) staff to
determine feasibility and appropriate course delivery. The G–CI will evaluate the requirement, provide estimate of cost,
specific support needs and possible date for completion.
   d. Off cycle requests may be submitted at any time during the year directly to USCG International Affairs (G–CI)
for consideration and possible inclusion in the annual training schedule. Since a schedule is nominally complete at the
end of the Security Cooperation Education and Training Working Group cycle, Security Cooperation Organization are
encouraged to forecast all team requirements during their respective SCETWGs.
   e. Of special note is the source and receipt of funding. The process for each specific fund source varies as does the
length of time required for student vetting and sponsoring agency approvals. Care must be given to incorporate these
requirements into the planning process. Funds not received at least 30 days in advance of mission date could cause
cancellation of the mission, as travel arrangements and country support requirements such as, translators cannot be
accomplished prior to receipt of funding. Due to limitations posed by potential CRA on availability and release of



                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  77
funds, requests funded from multiyear sources (for example, FMF) should be programmed during the 1st quarter of a
FY.
   f. After review and coordination between the Security Cooperation Organization and G–CI staff to determine
feasibility, availability of appropriate skill sets, and requested training dates, staff will compile the annual training
schedule. Requests received after the schedule is complied will be filled as availability of teams allows.
   g. The G–CI also sources all subject matter experts (SME) and combatant commander initiatives requests subject to
available resources and based on alignment of strategic objectives.
   h. A TAFT, TAT, Maritime Needs Assessment.
   (1) A TAFT/TAT is a unique and economical method to provide ongoing assistance that may be used to develop
regional maritime goals and objectives. As an example, USCG provided a TAFT funded by an FMS case to provide
Service and assistance in the operation, maintenance and repair of equipment to specific Caribbean regional nations.
This concept may be applicable in other developing maritime regions. As the process to coordinate funding, host
nations needs, strategic objectives, phases and desired outcomes is complex, a request for a TAFT/TAT must be
submitted directly to G–CI for implementation. Depending on the circumstances surrounding the creation of a team, the
time frame necessary to stand up each TAFT/TAT may vary and be somewhat lengthy.
   (2) Additionally, USCG receives many ambassador requests for long term assistance in the form of a maritime
advisor for development of a new coast guard. In general, a maritime advisor would craft multiyear requirements based
upon analysis of host nation training, personnel, material and missions. Initiation of a new training relationship with the
USCG, creation of a new host nation maritime Service, or significant mission changes in existing missions may
necessitate a maritime needs assessment. The assessment will yield a “road map” for the development of a new coast
guard, develop specific mission capabilities or assist in the integration and development of communications between
the various host nation agencies responsible for portions of coast guard-like functions.
   (3) A TAFT/TAT both requires the establishment of a baseline in personnel, skills, equipment, facilities and
assessment of legal authorities. To enable the gathering of relevant data, the USCG recommends Security Cooperation
Organization schedule an MTT to do a maritime assessment. This team is composed of a variety of specific skills
including training, legal and maritime security to determine requirements through observation and extensive discussions
with U.S. Embassy and host nation maritime personnel. This assessment is the first step to identify capabilities,
validate a need for a Maritime Advisor or determine other methods to meet host nation needs. The assessment will also
make recommendations for follow on training requirements to be provided over a period of time. USCG International
Affairs (G–CI) staff will work with Security Cooperation Organization to develop a strategic, phased and outcome
based strategic plan to meet identified needs.

Section VII
Department of the Air Force

4–48. Air Force security assistance teams and mobile training teams
   a. Air Force SAT will be deployed under the guidance of AFMAN 16–101 and this section.
   b. A survey team should be programmed to deploy at least 120 days before the in-place date requested for a MTT
unless otherwise justified by the Security Cooperation Organization. The purpose of the survey will be to assist the
Security Cooperation Organization in defining the mission, duration, composition, and equipment or support require-
ments for the MTT, and to determine the country’s ability to support the MTT. The follow-on team, will generally but
not always, consist of survey team members. Security Cooperation Organization should consider survey team require-
ments during programming. Surveys under FMS cases should be determined during the negotiation phase between the
purchasing country and the USAF.
   c. When planning to introduce a weapon system into a country for the first time, survey teams may be provided to
determine the overall country requirements. The SAF/International Affairs-sponsored teams are designated as systems
planning teams. Responsibilities for this type of team are contained in AFMAN 16–101. The system planning team will
normally include training representatives on all surveys.
   d. The training representatives will determine the parameters for operational and logistics training needs of the
country. The following country capabilities will be surveyed:
   (1) Operations, maintenance, and supply concepts.
   (2) Manpower and technical capabilities.
   (3) Interface of specialty system with USAF Air Force Staff College (AFSC).
   (4) Country training capabilities.
   (5) Student English language capabilities, this prerequisite ECL for training conducted by SATs is the same as
established for CONUS training. If IMS do not meet the prerequisite ECL, a plan to attain the ECL in country must be
developed. Requests for waiver of the minimum ECL levels will require an increase in the SAT duration to accomplish
the mission. The use of interpreters is not recommended as it degrades the quality of the training. Interpreters will not
be used in conjunction with flying training or other training where safety is a prime concern.
   (6) Requirements for peculiar equipment.


78                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
  (7) Number of personnel to be trained in each specialty.
  (8) Depot level training requirements.
  (9) Familiarization and qualification requirements.
  (10) Training milestone charts.

4–49. Mobile training team call-up
   a. Team call-up must be requested independently from requesting price and availability, LOA acceptance, obtaining
DSCA approval for IMET funding, or programming the requirement under the IMETP. The Security Cooperation
Organization will initiate a request for call-up of an MTT at least 120 days before the desired in-place date, as follows:
   (1) Send message to the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron RANDOLPH AFB TX// with an
information copy to OSAF WASH DC//IAPX//, HQ AFMPC RANDOLPH AFB TX//DPMRPP4//, the Air Component
Command and the unified command. If teams are from either DISAM, Defense Institute for Medical Operations, or
DLIELC, those activities should be information addressees instead of AFMPC.
   (2) Team members must be notified as early as possible to allow for preparation and mandatory pre-deployment
training. Mandatory pre-deployment training includes area orientation and antiterrorism training. The call-up must
include an MTT request if not previously provided. (See fig 4–1 for format and SAMM, fig C10.F1.)
   b. The Security Cooperation Organization will provide necessary support; for example, transportation, office sup-
plies, and housekeeping items not available from the local economy. Mobile training assistance will not be furnished if
the necessary support is not available. Before deployment of personnel, the Security Cooperation Organization will
notify the implementing command that the necessary support and equipment are available. If the Security Cooperation
Organization is unable to make this determination, survey assistance should be requested. Under no circumstances
should personnel arrive in a foreign country and be unable to perform the mission due to lack of advance support
planning.

4–50. Field training detachments
The administration of the field training detachment (FTD) is described in AFI 36–2201.
  a. Call-up of FTD to perform TDY as an MTT follows the same requirements and procedures for requesting and
programming MTT.
  b. Personnel provided as a part of an FTD are subject to the guidance outlined for MTT.

4–51. Ferry crews
USAF ferry crews are not considered to be MTT and do not provide transition or refresher training. If transition or
refresher training is required after delivery of aircraft, the appropriate mobile training assistance must be requested,
programmed, and approved.

4–52. Extensions
Any extension of the length of TDY for MTT members constitutes a deviation and must be submitted by the Security
Cooperation Organization to the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron under current deviation procedures
for IMET, or an amendment to an FMS case, when applicable. Parent organizations providing MTT personnel will not
extend team personnel TDY without the specific approval of the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron.

4–53. Restrictions
The IMS on duty with USAF organizations will not be used as members of USAF MTT (for example CAO, foreign
airmen, or personnel). Team members must be U.S. citizens. Security Cooperation Organization will not change nor
will team members deviate from the team mission as outlined in the call-up without prior approval by the Air Force
Security Assistance Training Squadron.

4–54. Substitutions
Commanders required to furnish MTT personnel are authorized to substitute U.S. Air Force airmen or officer’s one
grade higher or one grade lower than those requested if necessary to meet the other specified qualifications.

4–55. Team after action report
The senior member designated as the team chief of each MTT, CONUS or overseas, is required to submit the team
after action report. The report will be prepared as outlined in figure 4–3. Evaluations are conducted as follows:
   a. Initial report. Initial evaluations may be submitted via electronic message or letter to the Air Force Security
Assistance Training Squadron, with information copies to the Security Cooperation Organization, SAF/International
Affairs, DSCA, the unified command, air component command, and furnishing command.
   b. Final report. The team chief will submit final report to the Security Cooperation Organization, with information
copies to SAF/International Affairs, the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron, DSCA, unified command,
air component command, and furnishing command upon completion of the team mission. The Security Cooperation



                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  79
Organization will endorse the report and forward it to the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron, with
copies to the same information addressees. Final report will normally be prepared before team chief departure from
country. If this is not possible, the team chief will orally brief the Security Cooperation Organization on the team’s
effectiveness and will prepare the written report within 10 days of departure from country. When the period of TDY is
less than 8 weeks, the initial and final reports may be combined and submitted upon completion of the mission.
   c. Progress report. Progress reports are submitted immediately when difficulties arise that will have an impact on
the successful completion of the mission or schedule. Progress reports may be submitted via electronic message to the
agencies in paragraph (a), above.

4–56. Contractor field services/Air Force engineering and technical services/language training
detachments
   a. Contract field services.
   (1) All CFS requirements under IMET sponsorship must be justified to and approved by DSCA before
programming.
   (2) Determination under the FAA, as amended (Section 635(h)), permits obligation of current FY IMET funds for
CFS that extend into the succeeding FY.
   (3) All requests for CFS will include a checklist for contractor training (see fig 4–3 for checklist).
   (4) The Security Cooperation Organization will prepare and submit an effectiveness report for CFS upon completion
of the mission according to AFMAN 16–101.
   b. Air Force Engineering and Technical Services.
   (1) Staffing and administration for Air Force Engineering and Technical Services will be as prescribed for ETSS
(see fig 4–3 for format).
   (2) The Air Force Engineering and Technical Services will be identified under the training MASL in an FMS case.
Air Force Engineering and Technical Services not provided in conjunction with a system sale, will be assigned “T”
case designator.
   (3) The team chief will prepare and submit effectiveness reports according to AFI 16–103.
   c. Language training detachment.
   (1) Requests for this LTD will be forwarded from the Security Cooperation Organization in the same manner as
requests for MTT. Each request should include the same information as that provided in requests for FTS (see fig 4–3).
   (2) The Security Cooperation Organization must request call-up of LTD at least 120 days ahead of the projected in-
place date.
   (3) The LTD will prepare reports according to AFI 16–103.

4–57. Team preparation
Teams will normally be scheduled to attend area orientation and antiterrorism training course at the USAF Special
Operations School (USAFSOS) before deployment. Arrangements for training will be made by the Air Force Security
Assistance Training Squadron. Teams from DISAM and follow-on teams that can be briefed adequately by the
furnishing unit or command will be exempt from attending USAFSOS if deploying to a low-threat country.

4–58. Disclosure review
   a. Unclassified training. The training content must be reviewed for releasability before the team deploys. The
furnishing MAJCOM will ensure that the review is accomplished.
   b. Classified training Joint Security Cooperation Education and Training, chapter 8. This training applies.

4–59. Air Force security assistance training, extended training service specialist & long-term
deployment budget call
Each year, ETSS teams, and LTD are required to provide the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron with
their upcoming budget requirements. These reports are due to Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron/FM and
the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron/TOI (Teams Office) by the 1st week of September. To obtain
electronic copies, complete the following steps:
   a. The Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron will make available electronic copies of the budget call
forms at https://www.aetc.af.mil/afsat/afsat_fr.htm.
   b. Select button “Budget Call.”
   c. Open and save to your computer.
   d. Please do not try to save on the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron Web site.
   e. These forms will be updated yearly, no later than 15 August.




80                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Chapter 5
English Language Training (Policy, Planning, Programming, and Implementing English
language training)

Section I
General

5–1. Requirements
   a. Training in all U.S. military schools and installations is conducted in English, except for the military training
conducted in Spanish at Fort Rucker, AL, and Fort Eustis, VA; the WHINSEC at Fort Benning, GA; the IAAFA at
Lackland Base, TX; and the U.S. Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical Training School (Naval Small Craft
Instruction and Technical Training School) in Stennis, Mississippi. IMS usually attend classes with their U.S. counter-
parts. Therefore, the first prerequisite for IMS is the ability to understand, speak, read, and write the English language
at a level of proficiency commensurate with that required by the course of training so they can participate in the
training with their U.S. counterparts. This prerequisite cannot be overemphasized; any deficiency in this area will
defeat or severely limit the primary purpose of the SCETP that IMS attain required skills and professional competence.
All IMS selected for U.S. training must be carefully tested to determine that their English comprehension level (ECL)
meets the minimum MILDEP standard before invitational travel orders (ITO) are issued and IMS are sent to U.S.
training institutions. This requirement applies to all IMS except those from countries:
   (1) Exempt from all ECL testing requirements as updated annually by a SECDEF/DSCA message.
   (2) Granted a waiver by DSCA from in-country ECL testing requirements.
   b. The IMS who meet the minimum requirements for entering courses that do not require Specialized English
Training may be sent directly to the school/training activity. Others will be programmed for the required language
training according to DLIELC Instruction 1025.7. IMS programmed for Specialized English Training only must have
the minimum ECL required for entry into MILDEP courses before entering DLIELC. Those IMS entering DLIELC
who have less than the required ECL will be entered into the general English phase of training and will not be entered
into Specialized English Training until the required ECL is achieved. Some courses have a requirement for IMS to
attain a specified comprehension/speaking rating in accordance with the Interagency language Roundtable Language
Skill Level Descriptions (see figs 5–1 through 5–4). This ability is assessed through an OPI, which may be adminis-
tered face-to-face or telephonically in-country. IMS must meet the OPI requirement before entering Specialized English
Training and/or technical training.




                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  81
     Figure 5–1. Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Speaking




82                 AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Figure 5–1. Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Speaking




              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                      83
     Figure 5–1. Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Speaking–Continued




84                      AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Figure 5–1. Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Speaking–Continued




                   AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                           85
     Figure 5–1. Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Speaking–Continued




86                      AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Figure 5–2. Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Listening




              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                       87
     Figure 5–2. Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Listening–Continued




88                      AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Figure 5–2. Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Listening–Continued




                   AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                            89
     Figure 5–2. Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Listening–Continued




90                      AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Figure 5–3. Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Reading




             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                      91
     Figure 5–3. Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Reading–Continued




92                      AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Figure 5–3. Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Reading–Continued




                   AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                          93
     Figure 5–3. Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Reading–Continued




94                      AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Figure 5–4. Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Writing




             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                      95
     Figure 5–4. Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Writing–Continued




96                     AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Figure 5–4. Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Writing–Continued




                  AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                           97
     Figure 5–4. Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions - Writing–Continued




98                     AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   c. The DLIELC will report to the appropriate Military Service agency as soon as it is determined that an IMS will
meet the language prerequisites for follow-on-training (FOT) in less time than scheduled. The Military Service agency
in coordination with the FOT IMSO will determine if the IMS can be scheduled for earlier FOT or if the IMS should
remain at DLIELC until the original scheduled departure date.
   d. If an IMS with a language deficiency reaches a course of instruction, either as a graduate of DLIELC or as a
direct entry from an in-country language training program, the IMS may be provided additional training at DLIELC on
a one-time basis. Requests for this training, along with full details, will be forwarded to the appropriate MILDEP
agency with an information copy to DLIELC. Upon completion of the additional English language training, the IMS
will normally return to the same training installation to continue training.
   e. The DLIELC will notify, via e-mail, Military Service and IMSO at follow-on training schools of IMS travel
itinerary, TLA payments and potential language, academic and/or disciplinary problems.

5–2. Guidance and functions
   a. Secretary of the Air Force. The Secretary of the Air Force is designated as Executive Agent for the Defense
English Language Program. All requests for in-country ELTP, MTT and language training detachments (LTD),
language instructor training and DLIELC curriculum materials and publications will be processed under AF SC
programs. Requests for MTT and LTD will be forwarded according to paragraph 4–18.
   b. Commandant of DLIELC. The Commandant of DLIELC, under USAF Air Education and Training Command, is
directly responsible for technical control of English language training within CONUS for IMS and for the technical
control of DOD-sponsored English language training in CONUS and overseas. The Commandant of DLIELC will—
   (1) Command and operate the DLIELC at Lackland AFB, San Antonio, TX.
   (2) Develop and distribute ECL tests; provide personnel to conduct OPI (when assessment of oral proficiency skills
is required); establish English-testing policies and procedures; publish, and disseminate related testing directives to be
used by all DOD agencies required to assess English proficiency and monitor nonresident English language testing
programs.
   (3) Develop, refine, approve and arrange for procurement of American Language Course audio/multimedia materials
and other instructional aids.
   (4) Deploy English language specialists overseas.
   (5) Coordinate with the MILDEP on English language training requirements for the various courses attended by
IMS.
   (6) Provide English language instruction to IMS and offer basic and advanced English language instructor training
and language program management courses.
   (7) Evaluate and monitor all DOD-sponsored FMS, IMET, FMF, and related programs.
   (8) Publish, maintain, and update DLIELC publications.
   c. DLIELC publications.
   (1) DLIELC English Language Training Support for Security Cooperation Organizations. This handbook provides
detailed information pertaining to programming IMS for DLIELC training and programming services and materials in
support of a foreign country’s in-country ELTP.
   (2) DLIELC Catalog of Materials, Courses, and Support. This catalog lists information and prices for American
Language Course materials available for purchase through regular supply channels. Inquiries about ELT materials
should be sent to Commandant, DLIELC/LEN, 2235 Andrews Ave, Lackland AFB, TX 78236–5259. The catalog is
also available online at http://www.disam.dsca.mil/itm/.
   (3) DLIELC Instruction 1025.7, Planning and Programming Security Assistance English Language Training. This
regulation provides guidelines for planning and programming CONUS ELT, including Specialized English Training.
   (4) DLIELC Instruction 1025.15. This regulation provides instructions for the Security Cooperation Organization
and the ECL test control officer (TCO). It includes details on ECL testing kits, TCO appointments and procedures for
ECL test administration.
   (5) DLIELC Manual 1025.5–M. This pamphlet describes DLIELC training systems and presents guidance on
administrative and academic features of intensive ELTP.
   (6) DLIELC Instruction 1025.9. This regulation establishes guidelines for managing the OPI program and provides
guidance to Security Cooperation Organization on OPI scheduling and administration procedures.
   (7) Handbook for the American Language Course Placement Test (ALCPT). This pamphlet provides instructions for
securing and administering ALCPT and interpreting test scores.
   (8) DLIELC curriculum materials and publications.
   (a) Materials provided under IMET Military Standard Requisitioning and Issue Procedure requisitions must be




                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  99
processed through the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron/FMF, 315 J Street West, Randolph AFB, TX
78150–4354 with an information copy to DLIELC/LESL, 2235 Andrews Ave., Lackland AFB, TX 78236–5259.
   (b) Requests under FMS will be forwarded using an FMS publication case to AFSAC/XMPP, 1822 Van Patton
Drive, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433–5337.
   d. All Security Cooperation Organization (except those in countries exempt from all ECL testing requirements, as
defined by the annual DSCA message) will—
   (1) Encourage the teaching of English in foreign country military schools, particularly for prospective IMS.
   (2) Assist the country in procuring English language course materials, laboratories, spare parts, portable tape
recorders, and administrative requirements.
   (3) Arrange for additional English language training, as necessary, to meet the highest ECL requirement of
scheduled CONUS courses. This additional training should be conducted in country whenever possible.
   (4) Appoint a U.S. member as TCO to supervise the administration of in-country ECL/OPI tests to ensure proper
testing procedures and test security (except for countries granted a waiver by DSCA from in-country ECL/OPI testing
requirements).
   (5) Enter ECL and OPI information in the ITO (except for countries granted a waiver by DSCA from in-country
ECL and/or OPI testing).
   e. Commanders of training installations will appoint a TCO to supervise the administration of the CONUS course
entry ECL test at the installation level (see DLIELC Instruction 1025.15). One copy of the ECL TCO Appointment
letter will be sent to DLIELC/LEAT. The CONUS course entry ECL test will be administered to all direct-entry IMS
scheduled for training in English except those granted an annual waiver by DSCA or those in special courses granted a
onetime waiver of ECL test requirements by the MILDEP. The TCO will set up an OPI for IMS who are scheduled to
attend a course with an OPI requirement and who do not have a comprehension/speaking rating less than 6 months old.

5–3. Technical control of in-country and CONUS English Language Training Program
Maintaining an effective English Language Training Program is predicated on technical control of the program by
DLIELC.
   a. Those LOA that include provisions for ELT must be coordinated with DLIELC before negotiation.
   b. All security assistance sponsored CONUS ELT will be conducted by DLIELC unless unusual or extraordinary
conditions exist that would warrant exceptional ELT arrangements under FMS training. No exceptions will be
permitted for IMET-funded ELT. To request an exception for FMS-funded ELT, a written justification must be
submitted by the military departments to the appropriate DSCA regional directorate prior to submission of LOA or
LOA amendments to DSCA for countersignature. Waivers must be approved by DSCA. Justifications must include the
following information:
   (1) Written DLIELC comments and recommendations on the proposed exception.
   (2) Explanation of the unusual or extraordinary conditions that would warrant training outside of DLIELC.
   (3) Complete information on the ELT to be conducted to include location, description of training facilities, number
of students, training objectives, duration of the overall ELTP, and estimated cost.
   (4) A statement that DLIELC will coordinate and approve the ELT curriculum, teaching materials, and instructor
qualification standards.
   (5) A statement that DLIELC will monitor the ELT to ensure that DLIELC technical standards are being met and
that DLIELC will certify the ELTP every 6 months.
   (6) A statement that the LOA will contain an appropriate line item for DLIELC to monitor and provide quality
control of the proposed ELTP.
   c. If a DSCA waiver is granted, the waiver will strictly apply to the scope of the proposed ELT program justified in
the exception request. No change to the LOA will be made to increase the student load or extend the duration of the
ELT program without submitting a revised request to DSCA, to include information in paragraph b, above.
   d. When the Director, DSCA, approves that ELT be provided by a commercial contract, DLIELC will provide
technical advice and assistance during the contracting process.
   e. When the Director, DSCA, approves that Specialized English Training be conducted in CONUS by U.S. agencies
other than DLIELC, the following conditions must be met:
   (1) The trainees have achieved the prerequisite ECL/OPI proficiency as prescribed by Military Service regulations
for entry into technical training.
   (2) Training is given in conjunction with equipment-specific, hands-on training or familiarization.
   (3) Training is effective and economical to the USG and foreign government and meets the technical standards set
by DLIELC.
   f. Specialized English Training must be conducted at DLIELC. Exceptions to this policy must be granted by DSCA.
If DSCA grants an exception, DLIELC must evaluate and certify the in-country Specialized English Training ELTP




100                          AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
and also certify that in-country Specialized English Training ELTP graduates meet all standards prescribed by
DLIELC.

Section II
Security Assistance Program Services and Training

5–4. Services
The purpose of the in-country ELTP is to produce English-language-qualified IMS to directly enter U.S. military,
technical or professional courses conducted in English or to qualify IMS for entry into DLIELC for additional intensive
general English, Specialized English Training or instructor development training. DLIELC furnishes the following in
support of the in-country ELTP:
   a. Field training services. The DLIELC provides English language technical services on a PCS or TDY basis as
follows:
   (1) The LTD provides English language services, such as instructional or managerial assistance to in-country ELTP,
on a PCS basis.
   (2) The MTT performs several functions:
   (a) Surveys to evaluate in-country ELTP capabilities and needs.
   (b) The same services as LTD on a temporary basis.
   (c) Pre-deployment surveys prior to the deployment of DLIELC personnel.
   b. Language training materials. Information on obtaining personnel assistance and language training materials
(texts, tests, audio/multimedia materials, and so forth) is contained in the DLIELC handbook, English Language
Training Support for Security Cooperation Offices, which is available on request from Commandant, DLIELC/LEN,
2235 Andrews Ave., Lackland AFB, TX 78236–5259. Direct communication with DLIELC is authorized for requesting
this handbook and assistance.
   c. Language laboratories. The DLIELC handbook provides information about various types of language laboratory
systems, guidance on their appropriateness for different types of ELTP and the operational components of an ELTP
which should be established before a language laboratory system is purchased. The DA is the cognizant MILDEP for
language laboratory system procurement. The procurement, installation and follow-on logistical support of language
laboratory systems furnished to foreign countries under SC is the responsibility of the Commander, U.S. Army
Communications-Electronics Command (CECOM), Fort Monmouth, NJ 07703–5000. Commander, CECOM directs
subordinate commands and contractors to perform procurement, installation and follow-on logistical support for
language laboratory systems. Requests for language laboratory systems utilizing FMS funds will be submitted to the
Commander, United States Army Security Assistance Command (USASAC), 5701 21st Street, Building 216, Fort
Belvoir, VA 22060–5940. Requisitions for language laboratory systems utilizing IMET funds will be submitted to
Commander, USASAC, 54 M Avenue, Suite 1, New Cumberland, PA 17070–5069. CECOM provides detailed
guidance on the language laboratory acquisition process. Requests for laboratory installation teams, regardless of host
country Service, will be programmed by Director, SATFA (ATTG–TRI–S) and Commander, CECOM (AM-
SELLC–SA–CCA). These teams will be programmed as MTT.

5–5. General English language training
The DLIELC offers courses designed to develop the English language capability of IMS so they can attend DOD
schools. The mission is to teach IMS to understand, speak, read, and write English for the wide spectrum of training
provided by the Military Service. DLIELC has an established student-to-instructor ratio of 6 to 1 to ensure adequate
time to practice the four language skills so students will meet their graduation goals. In addition, DLIELC assists
training installations in resolving problems related to English language training.

5–6. Specialized English training
The 9-week Specialized English Training provides intensive practice in the functional English language skills and
technical terminology identified by Military Service as essential for success in technical training courses and profes-
sional military education. Excerpts from actual training materials associated with military occupational skills (MOS)
areas are used as realistic vehicles for IMS language practice and solidification of FOT language proficiency require-
ments as well as orientation to the organization and format of military training documents. Military Service have
identified in the Training Military Articles and Service List those courses for which Specialized English Training is
either required or advised by an “SR,” “SO,” or “SC” suffix to the ECL score, respectively (for example, ECL 80SR,
ECL 85SO, ECL 70SA).
   a. The “SR” designation is usually assigned to highly technical courses such as flying courses, medical courses or
courses in which safety is paramount (for example, pilot training, diving salvage and Army biomedical equipment
specialist).
   b. The “SC” designation is assigned to those courses not qualifying under paragrapha, above, but having sufficiently




                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                               101
high or peculiar technical requirements as to warrant Military Service advisement of Specialized English Training in
CONUS (for example, sonar maintenance, field artillery officer and jet engine accident investigation).
   c. The “SO” designation is assigned to those courses requiring English oral proficiency skills in addition to
Specialized English Training (for example, flying courses or the Public Affairs Officer course at the Defense Informa-
tion School).

5–7. Additional special language training
The DLIELC has developed language training to assist IMS in meeting language requirements for certain courses.
   a. Advanced English Language Program. This 16-week advanced English language course is designed for students
who need to improve their language skills, with an emphasis on speaking and writing. This course prepares students
who have not yet met their ECL and OPI requirements for professional military education training courses, officer
basic and advanced courses, and so forth.
   b. Oral Proficiency Skills for Aviation. This course concentrates on language skills needed by students going to
aviation-related training. The course enables students to improve pronunciation for successful radio communication, to
improve comprehension skills under adverse conditions, to practice immediate oral responses, and to practice speaking
while performing a complex motor task. This is a 25-week course, the last nine weeks being Specialized English
Training.
   c. Test of English as a Foreign Language Preparation and Academic Writing Course. The TOEFL is a prerequisite
for entering the graduate programs at certain senior professional military education courses. This 16-week course
develops the advanced English language skills necessary to compete successfully at university level and to improve a
minimum entry TOEFL score of 173 on the computer-based test and 61 on the Internet-based test. The course
emphasizes the development of academic writing skills for university-level students and includes completion of one
major research paper and numerous other writing assignments.

5–8. Forfeiture charge
Guidelines in paragraph 6–3 (forfeiture charge) are amplified, as follows, for IMS at DLIELC:
   a. Late cancellation/reschedule/no-show. Assess 50 percent of the tuition for the training line.
   b. Late arrival. For training priced on a per-week basis, assess 50 percent of the tuition for the number of weeks
late, up to a maximum of 50 percent of the scheduled training.
   c. Attrition. Charge for the actual number of weeks completed, but not less than 50 percent of the training line.
   d. Military Service. This Service will immediately advise the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron/FM,
in writing, of any forfeiture to be applied for training under their sponsorship.

5–9. Minimum entry score and waiver policy
   a. The DSCA has established a minimum score of 55 ECL for entry of IMET IMS into CONUS English language
training at DLIELC. Exceptions will be granted only where clearly justified in support of major programs, and with
DSCA approval on a case-by-case basis, within the capability of DLIELC. Based on an in-depth review of in-country
ELTP, DSCA publishes annually a list of IMET countries granted a waiver from the 55 ECL requirements.
   b. FMS IMS are not restricted to a minimum ECL score for entry into DLIELC.
   c. Requests for waivers of ECL prerequisites for direct-entry training will be addressed to the Military Service.

5–10. Objective of English comprehension level scoring
   a. The Security Cooperation Organization are responsible for ensuring that IMS meet the minimum ECL score
prescribed for direct entry into each follow-on course of instruction or for entry into DLIELC. The highest ECL
required within a sequence of training will be the governing factor. Security Cooperation Organization will enter the
highest ECL required in block 10 of the ITO (except for IMS from countries exempt from all ECL testing require-
ments, as defined by the annual DSCA message). The ECL score achieved (including the form and date of the test
taken) will also be entered in block 10 of the ITO for all IMS required to be tested in-country.
   b. The Training Military Articles and Service List may indicate a minimum ECL requirement for each course listed.
The word “minimum” as used here is significant because it indicates the lowest possible ECL the IMS should possess
to enter training. It should not be interpreted as an optimum ECL.

Section III
Tests

5–11. Test types and formats
The DLIELC currently uses three tests to assess general English proficiency. The ECL test and the ALCPT both
measure non-interactive listening and reading skills, while the OPI assesses interactive listening and speaking ability.
These tests have been developed to determine whether the English proficiency level of IMS considered for assignment
to CONUS or overseas schools/training installations is sufficient to enter training at DLIELC or for direct entry to


102                          AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Military Service courses of instruction. ECL and OPI (if applicable) requirements for each course conducted in English
are determined by the school, approved by the Military Service and published in the Training Military Articles and
Service List.
   a. The ECL tests and ALCPT are standardized multiple-choice tests of the IMS’ ability to understand spoken and
written English of the variety that would be encountered in a military training environment. The audio portion of the
tests consists of recorded questions, statements and dialogs. The reading components contain discrete vocabulary and
grammar items, as well as reading passages. ECL tests and ALCPT are designed and validated in the same manner, and
they render equivalent scores on a scale of 1 to 100. The main difference between the two tests is the amount of
control and oversight required by DLIELC. ECL tests are strictly controlled and are provided (at no cost) by DLIELC
only to duly appointed TCO, who must be both U.S. citizens and U.S. Government personnel. ECL TCO Appointment,
Memorandum for Record, can be faxed or mailed to DLIELC. (See DLIELC Instruction 1025.15.) The ALCPT can be
purchased from DLIELC through normal SC procurement channels for use in OCONUS ELTP. (Special “U.S.”
versions of the ALCPT are provided to the U.S. Army at no cost for use in lieu of the ECL to fulfill testing
requirements for certain Army programs, such as the inter-Service Physician Assistant Training Program. These forms
are not sold OCONUS.)
   (1) A computer-adaptive training version of the ECL is used on the DLIELC resident campus. Scores on the
computer-adaptive training ECL are equivalent to scores on the paper-and-pencil test.
   (2) New paper-and-pencil versions of the ECL and instructions for administering them are developed and distributed
to nonresident test sites by DLIELC every year. However, shipment of new tests is not automatic. The TCO must
submit a questionnaire indicating the test site’s ECL test material needs and must be in compliance with all testing
documentation requirements before new materials are shipped. (See DLIELC Instruction 1025.15.)
   (3) The ECL test is used for final certification of IMS for SC-sponsored training. The ALCPT is prescribed for
screening candidates for ECL test readiness and for all other in-country testing purposes. To preserve the validity and
reliability of ALCPT the same measures for security and accountability should be applied to them as are taken with
regard to ECL tests. Failure to comply with the guidelines in the ALCPT Handbook (for example, allowing the
materials to fall into the hands of unauthorized parties, duplicating them, or using them in an unauthorized manner-
such as for training or teaching purposes) can result in test compromise and sanctioning of future sales of ALCPT to
the buyer.
   b. The OPI is a test of a candidate’s interactive listening comprehension and speaking ability, conducted under
controlled conditions by two certified OPI raters provided by DLIELC. It is a standardized method of measuring actual
performance and proficiency in language skills required to function in given life/job situations. During the 20–40-
minute interview, OPI raters ascertain the examinee’s highest level of listening comprehension and speaking abilities
and rate them on an eleven-point scale (0 to 5, including plus levels) in accordance with the Interagency language
Roundtable skill level descriptions. OPI can be conducted face-to-face or via telephone. TCO can schedule an in-
country OPI for an IMS through DLIELC only after the IMS has achieved the required ECL score. (See DLIELC
Instruction 1025.9.)

5–12. Test score validity and reliability
The OPI scores are valid for 6 months. IMS who fail to make the required score OCONUS will not be retested for 90
days, and they should be enrolled in an intensive ELTP that stresses oral communication during that time. In-country
ECL test scores are valid up to 105 calendar days. When the date of testing is more than 105 days from the report date,
the IMS will be retested with a different form of the ECL test before departure for CONUS. An individual who does
not make the required score on the first exam must wait 30 days before taking another in-country ECL test (a different
form). Waivers to required “wait” periods before retesting must be approved by DLIELC. The TCO will mail all in-
country ECL answer sheets monthly by certified or other secure mail to DLIELC/LEAT 2230 Andrews Ave., Lackland
AFB, TX 78236–5207.
   a. One of the greatest concerns in language testing is the reliability of tests administered overseas. Some of the
causes of lower test reliability are—
   (1) Test compromise through physical loss of test materials, failure to maintain test security, or granting access to
unauthorized personnel.
   (2) Overexposure of test forms, due to excessive test administration (a result of poor scheduling and insufficient
management oversight) or failure to rotate ECL test forms in an unpredictable manner.
   (3) Substandard procedures for examinee identification, ineffective monitoring or failure to follow test administra-
tion procedures to the letter.
   (4) Changes in test administration personnel and/or facilities.
   (5) Testing candidates too frequently or when inappropriate.
   (6) Errors in scoring or recording data.
   b. To check test reliability and to ensure that IMS entered into training are English-language-qualified, the following
testing procedures will be used at all training installations:
   (1) Within 3 to 5 calendar days after IMS’ arrival at the first training location and, if possible, before course entry,


                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  103
the TCO will administer the CONUS course entry ECL test to all direct-entry IMS (except those from countries listed
as exempt from all ECL testing in the annual DSCA message). Once a month, ECL test answer sheets will be mailed
by certified or other secure mail to DLIELC/LEAT, 2230 Andrews Ave., Lackland AFB TX 78236–5207. Answer
sheets will reflect the test site number, the name of the IMS, the country of origin, IMET worksheet control number
(WCN), or FMS case designator and WCN, the sponsoring Service, the required ECL score and the actual ECL score.
On a quarterly basis, DLIELC will upload a report of test results on the Security Assistance Network.
   (2) The TCO will adhere to testing procedures defined in DLIELC Instruction 1025.15. Measures will be taken to
ensure careful control over the administration of the ECL examinations and security of test materials to prevent
possible compromise.
   (3) If the IMS fails to achieve the prerequisite ECL at first testing, the IMSO will notify the appropriate MILDEP
agency by telephone and schedule the IMS for another ECL test within the next 2 to 3 working days to confirm the
score using an alternate ECL test form. If the score achieved on the second ECL test is less than the established
prerequisite, the IMSO will immediately notify the appropriate MILDEP and DLIELC by telephone of the score
achieved. MILDEP will determine required action and disposition of the IMS and notify all concerned. A second retest
will not be administered unless permission is obtained from the MILDEP and DLIELC.
   (4) English comprehension level testing of IMS is normally the responsibility of the IMSO. However, the Base
Education Office TCO may be appointed the ECL TCO if local conditions require.
   (5) A forfeiture charge of at least 50 percent will be imposed in all instances when direct-entry IMS fail to achieve
the prerequisite ECL on the CONUS course entry ECL test and when failure results in rescheduling or cancellation of
the direct-entry training due to a language deficiency. This forfeiture policy applies to all direct-entry IMS, including
those from countries granted a waiver from in-country ECL testing.

Section IV
Department of the Army

5–13. Minimum entry score and waiver policy
   a. Requests for waivers of the ECL requirement for direct entry into formal training except for medical training will
be addressed to Director, SATFA. Requests for waivers for medical training will be addressed to Office of the Surgeon
General, International Programs. Immediately upon being notified that an IMS has failed to achieve the required ECL,
IMSO will notify the appropriate SATFA country program manager by telephone or e-mail. If the student fails the
second test, IMSO will coordinate with the course director or equivalent to determine if the school recommends a
waiver of the ECL requirement. IMSO will contact SATFA country program manager via e-mail and forward the
school recommendation, including justification. Director, SATFA will determine, taking the school recommendation
into account, which of the following will occur:
   (1) The SATFA may grant a waiver and allow the IMS to enter or continue training as scheduled. In recommending
a waiver, the IMSO should remember that the ECL for a particular course is the minimum required, not the optimum.
   (2) Director, SATFA may determine that the IMS must be sent to DLIELC for English language training prior to
enrolling in the course. This option depends on the ability of SATFA and the installation, along with concurrence of
the home country, to reschedule the course to follow language training.
   (3) Director, SATFA may determine that the IMS ECL is not sufficient to allow successful course completion, that
training cannot be rescheduled, and that the IMS must be returned to their home country.
   (4) Director, SATFA may, in conjunction with the IMSO, coordinate with DLIELC for a second re-test. If a student
fails the second retest as stated in paragraphs (1), (2), or (3), above, will apply.
   b. Students will meet the highest ECL required within a sequence of training. The only exception is when the Army
Basic Instructor Course (ABIC) is the highest ECL requirement and is programmed as the last training line. In this
case, the next highest ECL requirement within the training sequence will take precedence.
   c. The IMS may be admitted to training after failing an initial ECL test if there is not sufficient time for a second
test to be administered prior to the course starting.

5–14. Establishing English comprehension levels
Each installation is responsible for establishing the ECL requirement, subject to the approval of SATFA, for each
course to which a Training Military Articles and Service List is assigned. The IMSO should monitor the progress of
students with various ECL to make recommendations concerning the appropriate ECL for each course. The ECL, once
established, may not be changed without the approval of Director, SATFA. The following factors should be considered
when recommending new ECL to SATFA:
   a. Determine the historical success/failure data for IMS at different ECL for the course in question.
   b. Analyze changes that have taken place in the course in terms of both course content and methods of instruction.
For example, determine if the reading grade level has changed, if it includes DL, if it has become faster-paced, and so
forth.



104                          AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
  c. Coordinate with the appropriate school personnel and SATFA P4 prior to sending a recommended ECL change to
Director, SATFA.

5–15. English language refresher program
Depending on installation resources, an English Language Refresher Program may be available. This program is
normally conducted in coordination with the on-post educational activity. Additionally, IMS should be encouraged to
engage in available off-post programs offered in the local community. The ECL test will not be used for testing in
refresher programs.

5–16. Required in-country English comprehension level testing
Students attending Army courses that encourage dependents are required to be ECL tested in country even if they are
from countries which are exempt from in-country ECL testing.

Section V
Department of the Navy (U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Coast Guard)

5–17. English language training actions required
Navy IPO is responsible for the establishment of DON policy regarding ELT, to include authority to concur/non-concur
with decision to “contract out” ELT and to ensure Services comply with DOD Regulation on ELT. In the execution of
this policy for courses under their cognizance, Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, CG,
Security Cooperation Education and Training Center TECOM, and USCG International Affairs (G–CI), will—
   a. Evaluate the English proficiency of IMS in the schools and installations under their cognizance and recommend
to DLIELC measures for improvement, both for IMS who receive all language training in their own country and those
who attend DLIELC.
   b. Provided DLIELC with information on courses under their cognizance that require special language training.
   c. Set ECL requirements for the courses under their cognizance.
   d. Schedule ELT at DLIELC for students under their cognizance, as required.
   e. Recommend to DLIELC changes in language curricula to enhance the English proficiency of IMS scheduled for
specialized training.
   f. Coordinate disposition of an IMS that does not possess an ECL adequate for scheduled training. Disposition may
include scheduling of additional ELT at DLIELC or termination of training, as appropriate.
   g. Ensure TCO appointment letters have been issued in accordance with DLIELC Instruction 1025.15.

5–18. Establishing the English comprehension level scores
The Command providing training to an IMS is responsible for establishing the course ECL requirement, subject to the
approval Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, CG, TECOM Security Cooperation Educa-
tion and Training Center or USCG International Affairs (G–CI). The IMSO is responsible for reporting ECL require-
ments and monitoring IMS progress to make ECL recommendations to Naval Education and Training Security
Assistance Field Activity, USMC Security Cooperation Education and Training Center or USCG G–CI.

5–19. Minimum English comprehension level
The ECL requirements vary and the Training Military Articles and Service List should be checked for the minimum
ECL for each course.
   a. Professional military education. Minimum ECL requirement for Naval Command College and Naval Staff
College is 80. Minimum ECL requirement for Joint Forces Staff College is 85. Minimum ECL requirement for USMC
Command and Staff College and Expeditionary Warfare School is 80 with Specialized English Training advised. A
computer based TOEFL test score of 207 is required for entry into the Naval Postgraduate School graduate degree
programs. (TOEFL test results are valid for 2 years from the test date.) A candidate with a TOEFL of 173 or greater is
eligible to enter the TOEFL Preparatory Writing Course at DLIELC.
   b. Flight training The minimum ECL score for flight training (including simulator training) is 85 plus an OPI plus 9
weeks of Specialized English Training is also required.
   c. Hazardous duty training. The minimum ECL for swimming, diving, Basic Underwater Demolition/Seal and
explosive ordnance disposal training is 85 plus 9 weeks of Specialized English Training is also required.
   d. Medical. Medical officer training usually requires an 80 ECL with 9 weeks of Specialized English Training. An
ECL of 70 with 9 weeks of Specialized English Training is normally required for medical technician training.
   e. Observer and technical training Most OJT, observer and technical training require an ECL of 70. There are no
specific requirements for ship transfer crews, but a qualified interpreter at a ratio of one interpreter to 10 crewmembers
is recommended. Ship shakedown training is greatly enhanced if all or most of the crew understands English.
   f. English Comprehension Language requirements. There are no specific ECL requirements for IMS who are trained



                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                 105
by a deployed team, provided the numbers of interpreters as determined during the mission analysis or site survey are
available.

5–20. Waivers of English comprehension level requirements for Department of the Navy courses
Requests for waivers of ECL requirements for DON training will be forwarded to Naval Education and Training
Security Assistance Field Activity for Navy training, with information copy to Navy IPO (02CT), CG, Security
Cooperation Education and Training Center MCCDC for Marine Corps training, and to USCG International Affairs (G-
CI) for Coast Guard training. Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, CG, Security Coopera-
tion Education and Training Center MCCDC and USCG International Affairs (G-CI) will coordinate with the com-
mands involved for determination. Requests for waivers will be considered on a case-by-case basis. The factors that
determine if a waiver is appropriate include, but are not limited to the following:
   a. Method of presentation of the course, level of difficulty of material presented, experience level of the prospective
IMS, presence of other IMS from the same country and previous U.S. training.
   b. No ECL waiver is required for Spanish speaking students attending Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical
Training School.

Section VI
Department of the Air Force

5–21. Continental United States English language training
   a. The IMS who are selected for flying training, air traffic controller, weapons controller, and other courses that
require Specialized English Training and who meet minimum ECL prerequisites will proceed first to DLIELC,
regardless of ECL. A minimum of 9 weeks for processing, physical examination, and additional language training is
required. This requirement may be reduced or waived if the IMS meets all AF administrative and training prerequisites
and has had recent, frequent contact with English-speaking personnel in their country.
   b. Request for waiver or reduction of the 9-week Specialized English Training course requirement will be forwarded
to the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron. Requests will cite the appropriate AF medical and physiologi-
cal training certification and circumstances of contact with English-speaking personnel.
   c. The AWC, Air Command and Staff College (ACSC), and the Secretary of State are each preceded by a
mandatory International Officers School preparatory course at Maxwell AFB, Alabama. Direct entry into other Air
University courses is commensurate with ECL and AF ETCA requirements.

5–22. Language training detachment manpower requirements packages
The Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron will prepare the Manpower Requirements Package, Manpower
Travel Data Sheet, obtain all associated costs, and prepare the LOA or amendment as required to comply with the letter
of request. The Manpower Requirements Package and MTDS will be accomplished using the Security Assistance
Manpower Requirements System (SAMRS).



Chapter 6
Financial Management

Section I
General

6–1. Purpose
The purpose of the chapter is to establish policies and procedures for financial management of funding provided to
cover expenses associated with training international students under the SCETP.

6–2. Tuition pricing
The tuition price as shown in the Training Military Articles and Service List is a unit cost per IMS. The types of cost
(direct, indirect, incremental, and attrition, Field Studies Program (formerly Informational Program), and mailing fee)
applicable to the different tuition rates are identified in DOD 7000.14–R. Regardless of the funding source, the tuition
price charged is the cost in effect at the time the student enters each course.

6–3. Forfeiture charge
   a. Training contracted/dedicated for international customers. Once a contract is let or a quota is confirmed, a
forfeiture charge up to 100 percent will apply if the country fails to send a student to the training, unless the quota is
filled by another international student. Dedicated/contract training includes courses which rely on contract support and/
or courses that are designated for international students only.


106                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   (1) The MILDEP will identify those courses that are dedicated/contract training by message to the Security
Cooperation Organization on an annual basis.
   (2) If the contractor cancels or reschedules training no penalty will be assessed.
   b. Training contracted for a single international customer Under USG direct contract, all costs incurred up to the
point of contract cancellation shall be paid. This could include total charges or partial charges. Each element of cost
will be reviewed and negotiated for a final settlement cost by appropriate USG contracts personnel and the contractor.
   c. All other training. There will be a 50 percent charge for all confirmed training canceled or rescheduled with less
than 60 days notification unless the quota is filled by another student. The charges will be applied to all confirmed
training within the 60-day window. Additionally, a 50 percent forfeiture charge will be applied to all training that falls
within and outside the 60-day window if the training is part of a sequential pipeline that a student would attend as part
of a complete curriculum. MILDEP will specify training that is part of a sequential pipeline by message to Security
Cooperation Organization on an annual basis. Any cancellation or rescheduling of training that was scheduled at the
request of the country without the required lead time to cancel/reschedule similarly will incur a 50 percent charge.
   d. Procedures. The date the request is received from the country by the Security Cooperation Organization or other
duly appointed and recognized U.S. representative will constitute the official notification date. The Security Coopera-
tion Organization must immediately comply with the cancellation procedure established by the MILDEP, indicating the
date that formal cancellation was received from the country.
   e. Forfeiture charges. These charges will not be applied when cancellation is the fault of the USG, such as deletion
of classes or rescheduling, nor will it be applied when the cancellation is due to unavoidable circumstances within the
country, such as national disasters or airline strikes. Ultimate assessment of the penalty is at the discretion of the
Military Service.
   f. The country should be provided training dates at least 90 days before the start date. Forfeiture charges will not be
applied if country cancels or declines training and dates were provided less than 90 days in advance. However, if later
training dates were provided at the request of country, the charges will be applied.
   g. For training under IMET only. When IMET appropriations do not materialize at the program CPD levels and
DSCA directs countries to reduce their program, they are allowed 60 days to make the required adjustments without
penalty for course cancellations. The 60-day adjustment period begins with State Department notification of IMET
levels. Waiver of penalty charges under this paragraph does not apply to contract/dedicated or sequential training or to
normal program adjustments to accommodate new courses during the same timeframe.
   h. Access charges. The following guidelines apply to assess charges after arrival of the IMS at the first CONUS or
OCONUS training activity.
   (1) When the direct-entry IMS fails to achieve the prerequisite ECL on the CONUS course entry ECL test resulting
in rescheduling or cancellation of training, charges will apply according to paragraphs 6–3a through 6–3c. When IMS
attending ELT at DLIELC fail to meet the language prerequisite of the follow-on course, the country will be charged
for the language training received and for follow-on training according to paragraphs 6–3a through 6–3c.
   (2) When the IMS is recalled by their country for official reasons or the IMS has disciplinary problems, illness, or
disability incurred before departing country, forfeiture charges will be assessed for the current course or phase and for
the follow-on course according to paragraphs 6–3a through 6–3c.
   (3) When the IMS has an injury, illness incurred during training, or compassionate return, the country will be
assessed forfeiture charges for all contract/dedicated/sequential pipeline training according to paragraph 6–3a through
6–3c. For all other training courses, assess forfeiture charges for the course started but not completed; do not assess
forfeiture charges for the follow-on course.

Section II
International Military Education and Training

6–4. General
   a. The DOS in consultation with the DOD will determine IMET dollar levels for each IMET country. The DOS will
provide approved country allocation levels to the DSCA Directorate of Business Operations Comptroller
(DSCA–DBO–CMP). DSCA manages and issues the IMET funds to the MILDEP, who allocates funds to each of the
Service training activities to fund program execution. Actual annual IMET appropriations may be less than anticipated
in the Congressional Budget Justification; therefore, country allocation levels may be lower that the Congressional
Budget Justification country levels which were used previously for planning purposes. Consequently, training programs
should be adjusted to reflect the allocation level. Finally, during the course of the year, the stated allocation levels may
not change except as reallocated at the DSCA end-of-year IMET meeting held during the fourth quarter of the current
FY. The reallocation is dependent upon the country’s ability to utilize the funds.
   b. IMET under Budget Project N10 commencing during the first quarter (Oct, Nov, and Dec) of the subsequent FY
may be programmed and funded in the current FY’s IMET program under the fifth-quarter concept. Project N10
includes CONUS and OCONUS formal courses, OBT, OJT, and familiarization training. If this method is desired, the
IMS reporting for initial training during the first quarter of the subsequent FY will be programmed in the current fiscal


                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                   107
year’s IMET program. Training requirements programmed in the current year with an availability of fifth quarter must
be re-priced as soon as FY course costs are known.

6–5. Funding
   a. Upon receipt of IMET funding authority from DSCA, funds for international training are distributed by MILDEP.
   b. The IMET funded MTT and Mobile Education Team must return to CONUS prior to end of the FY.
   c. The IMET funds must be obligated before the close of each FY. This includes funds for training programmed
under the fifth-quarter concept and for IMS who have follow-on training that will commence after the end of the
current FY.
   d. Country allocations are received through the DSAMS throughout the FY, and country programs are executed by
the training activities within the limits of both funding and country allocation levels.

Section III
Foreign Military Sales Training

6–6. General
   a. The FMS training is financed through payment in U.S. dollars.
   b. The FMS training will be provided at no cost to the USG except as authorized by law. All costs, as specified in
the AECA and DOD 7000.14–R, will be identified and included in tuition pricing.
   c. The FMS training cannot commence until DFAS–DE has implemented the case. FMS CONUS training cannot
begin until the MILDEP has authorized the Security Cooperation Organization to issue an ITO.
   d. Except as specifically authorized by statute, the law requires that the U.S. recoup all expenses from a country
under FMS. Training provided to a foreign country that results in identifiable expenses to the USG is fully reimbursa-
ble from the purchaser country. Unless identifiable expenses are authorized through independent statutory or other legal
authority, they are considered to be under the SCETP and must be fully recouped.
   e. Bilateral, combined, or multilateral exercises conducted to test and evaluate mutual capabilities do not require
authorization or funding under the SCETP. In the absence of independent, statutory, or other legal authority, costs of
foreign participation in such exercises will not be directly paid for or reimbursed from DOD funds. DOD funds will
bear only the costs of U.S. Armed Forces participation in such exercises. The costs of any U.S. support provided to the
participating countries or international organizations for training exercises for defense Service is pursuant to the AECA.
The extension and receipt of services furnished as reciprocal international courtesies (10 USC 2350g), when authorized
under the general provisions of the DOD annual Appropriations Act, may serve as authority for bearing certain costs of
providing these services to foreign participants when such services are offered to U.S. Forces on a reciprocal basis.
   f. In the absence of statutory and other legal authority to the contrary, visits of eligible IMS to U.S. units that are
conducted for training purposes will be fully reimbursable through FMS procedures. Visits by IMS to U.S. units
extended for periods beyond 3 working days at one location will be considered as training subject to reimbursement.
Visits of three working days or less at one location will be considered as nontraining and administered as a self-invited
visit.

6–7. Funding
The FMS Training will not commence until the purchasing country has deposited sufficient funds against the
appropriate FMS case and has issued obligation authority. The use of MILDEP-appropriated funds for training under
FMS is not permitted by law.

Section IV
Counter-Drug Training Support

6–8. General
Counter narcotics under Public Law 101–510, Section 1004 (reference by the National Defense Authorization Act for
Fiscal Year 1991), is authorized to obtain defense articles and services via direct arrangements with the MILDEP or
other DOD agencies. More information on Counter-Drug Training Support is available in the DOD 5105.38M, chapter
11, C11.3.

6–9. Funding
Under the Counter-Drug Training Support Program, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense-Counter-Narcotics
(DASD–CN) issues authority to release funding to MILDEP.




108                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Section V
International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

6–10. General
The International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement has two strategic goals: minimize the impact of international
crime on the United States; and reduce the entry of illegal drugs into the United States. More information on
International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement is available in the SAMM DOD 5105.38M, chapter 10, C10.7.9.

6–11. Funding
Under the International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Program, State Department issues each MILDEP a
separate MOA for each FY and country as International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement funding authorization.

Section VI
Regional Defense Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program

6–12. General
Programming and financial guidance on the Counterterrorism Fellowship Program is available in DOD 5105.38M,
chapter 10 and Implementation of Guidance Message Numbers One and Two for the Regional Defense Counterter-
rorism Fellowship Program, DSCA Policy 04–40 and Counterterrorism Fellowship Program FY 05 Financial
Severability Procedures Memorandum, DSCA Policy 05–02.

6–13. Funding
   a. The DSCA contracts (DBC) division will be the primary point of contact for all financial accounting questions
and issues related to the routine processing of Global Security Affairs approved STL including but not limited to
quarterly funding releases.
   b. All Mobile Education Team/MTT must be programmed in the FY program in which the training will be
performed. Teams must deploy and return to CONUS by the last day of the FY (30 Sep).
   c. To permit appropriate identification and obligation of funds by country, funding for the Counterterrorism
Fellowship Program will be provided from DSCA–DBO to the MILDEPS via the Program Budget Accounting System.
After MILDEP STL has been certified as accurate by Global Security Affairs, DSCA–DBO will issue all funding (to
the nearest thousand) each quarter based on requirements for that quarter in the country’s STL.
   d. The MILDEP will not be permitted to authorize Counterterrorism Fellowship Program training funding authority
until Global Security Affairs has provided final policy approval via the Counterterrorism Fellowship Program functions
on the Security Assistance Network Web.
   e. The DSCA–DBC division will conduct comptroller reviews of the program as required during the FY and notify
Global Security Affairs/Counterterrorism Fellowship Program of findings and recommendations for improvement.

Section VII
Other Security Cooperation Education and Training Programs

6–14. Presidential drawdown authority (see Foreign Assistance Act, Section 506)
   a. Drawdown authority authorizes the disposition of U.S. property or services to foreign countries, in support of
unforeseen military emergencies, humanitarian efforts, peacekeeping needs, or counter-narcotics requirements. The
signed Presidential Determination is the official authorizing document for execution of a drawdown. The DOD is not
authorized to initiate provision of property or services until the Presidential Determination is signed. This approval is
cited in message traffic tasking the drawdown. Each Presidential Determination is assigned to a control number that is
also referenced in any message traffic, or other correspondence associated with the drawdown.
   b. Each Presidential Determination cites a dollar ceiling for the drawdown. The DOD is not authorized to exceed the
drawdown authority ceiling provided in the Presidential Determination. The total authority is divided among the
supporting services, and then within each Service, as required. There is no budget authority associated with
drawdowns.

6–15. Exchange Training
The FAA, Section 544 authorizes reciprocal PME exchanges. The President may provide the attendance of foreign
military personnel at PME institutions in the United States (other than Service academies) without charge, if such
attendance is part of an international agreement. These international agreements provide for the exchange of students
on a one-for-one reciprocal basis each FY between the two military Services participating in the exchange. Each
country is responsible for paying TLA for their own students. Institutions specifically included are the National
Defense University, U.S. Military Service Command and Staff Colleges, Joint Forces Staff College, U.S. Military
Service War Colleges, Naval Postgraduate School, and the Air Force Institute of Technology. MILSVCs are authorized
to designate schools as PME institutions for security cooperation training. Requests for new PME exchanges should be


                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                 109
sent to DSCA (Regional Directorate) in coordination with DSCA (Policy, Plans, and Programs Directorate) so that an
umbrella (DOD and/or MOD) level exchange agreement is negotiated and completed. Specific Service-level requests
are sent to the Implementing Agency after the DOD-level agreement is in place.

Section VIII
Department of the Army

6–16. Recycle charge
Training requirements are considered to be confirmed when dates have been in the STL for a period of at least 30 days.
When SATFA recommends a CONUS IMS be recycled or set back because of illness, injury, emergency leave, or
academic failure, the training installation in conjunction with SATFA will determine the additional costs of the
recycling/set back action to include any additional course costs. SATFA country program manager will advise Security
Cooperation Organization of options complete with associated costs and with concurrence of Security Cooperation
Organization to recycle/set back IMS, training will be programmed and costs assessed. SATFA will assist activities in
assessing the appropriate reimbursement pertaining to cancellation or rescheduling.

6–17. International military education and training funding
   a. The IMET funds for Army school training are distributed by SATFA, as DA implementing agent, to agencies
from funds provided by DSCA.
   b. To obtain reimbursement for IMET funded IMS, the training activity submits a SF 1080 (with copy of IMS ITO)
through DFAS channels. This is required so that IMET funds will be collected as reimbursement to DA appropriations
indicated in the approved course costs.

6–18. Foreign military sales funding
   a. The FMS funds for Army school training are distributed by SATFA. The funding authority is in a specific
amount for total training costs obligation authority and the portion attributable to operations and maintenance, Army
(OMA) for station costs.
   b. To obtain reimbursement for FMS funded IMS, training activities not on automatic bill submit a SF 1080 (with
copy of IMS ITO) to DFAS–DE. To obtain reimbursement for FMS training activities on automatic bill, DFAS–DE
creates SF 1080 through the automatic billing cycle 30 days after the student start date.

6–19. Section 1004 - Counter-drug training support funding
   a. Section 1004 funds for Army school training are distributed by SATFA.
   b. To obtain reimbursement for Counter-Drug Training Support, training activities not on automatic bill submit a SF
1080 (with copy of IMS ITO) to DFAS–DE. To obtain reimbursement for Counter-Drug Training Support, training
activities that are on automatic bill, DFAS–DE creates SF 1080 through the automatic billing cycle 30 days after the
student start date.

6–20. International narcotics control and law enforcement funding
   a. The International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement funds for Army School training are distributed by
SATFA.
   b. To obtain reimbursement for International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement, training activities not on
automatic bill submit a SF 1080 (with copy of IMS ITO) to DFAS–DE. To obtain reimbursement for International
Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement, training activities that are on automatic bill, DFAS–DE creates SF 1080
through the automatic billing cycle thirty days after the student start date.

6–21. Regional Defense Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program funding
  a. The Counterterrorism Fellowship Program funds for Army School training are distributed by SATFA.
  b. To obtain reimbursement for Counterterrorism Fellowship Program, training activities not on automatic bill
submit a SF 1080 (with copy of IMS ITO) to DFAS–DE. To obtain reimbursement for Counterterrorism Fellowship
Program, training activities that are on automatic bill, DFAS–DE creates SF 1080 through the automatic billing cycle
30 days after the student start date.

6–22. Presidential drawdown authority funding
   a. The President approves a drawdown through the execution of a signed Presidential Determination document. The
Presidential Determination is the official authorizing document for execution of a drawdown. DOD is not authorized to
initiate provision of property or services until the Presidential Determination is signed. This approval is cited in
message traffic tasking the drawdown. Each Presidential Determination is assigned a control number that is also
referenced in any message traffic, or other correspondence associated with the drawdown.
   b. Each Presidential Determination cites a dollar ceiling for the drawdown. DOD is not authorized to exceed the
drawdown authority ceiling provided in the Presidential Determination. The total authority is divided among the


110                          AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
supporting services, and then within each Service, as required. There is no budget authority (no funds) associated with
drawdowns. Simply put, it is a charitable donation. Activities receiving drawdown authority should not expect or
anticipate reimbursement, and are required to “cash flow” requirements. TRADOC will attempt to reimburse support-
ing TRADOC schools/activities for costs incurred if year end funding is available.

6–23. Exchange training funding
No funds are executed for exchange training.

6–24. Section 1206 funding
  a. Section 1206 funds for Army school training are distributed by SATFA.
  b. To obtain reimbursement for 1206, training activities not on automatic bill submit a SF 1080 (with copy of IMS
ITO) to DFAS–DE. To obtain reimbursement for 1206, training activities that are on automatic bill, DFAS–DE creates
SF 1080 through the automatic billing cycle 30 days after the student start date.

Section IX
Department of the Navy (U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Coast Guard)

6–25. International military education and training funding
The Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity has program and financial oversight for all DON
IMET programs, regardless of whether training is under USN, USMC, or USCG. The Security Cooperation Organiza-
tion must provide the amount of the country’s total IMET allocation to be allocated to the DON. If changes occur
during the FY, the Security Cooperation Organization must request the amount of funds to be transferred between the
three MILDEPs. As funds are received and quotas are confirmed, Naval Education and Training Security Assistance
Field Activity will send messages throughout the FY, providing authority to issue the ITO for each individual IMS/
WCN which is annotated as “Priority A.” If TLA is authorized, this message will also provide the fund cite.

6–26. Foreign military sales funding
The Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity will have financial oversight for all FMS training
cases regardless of whether training is under USN, USMC, or USCG. The Naval Education and Training Security
Assistance Field Activity must be informed of all changes that may affect the scope of an FMS training case. When a
new FMS training LOA is implemented, Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity will issue a
message providing authority to issue ITO. This authority will continue throughout the scope of the case. If the FMS
LOA includes funds for TLA, fund cites will be provided with this message. The fund cite will be included on each
ITO throughout the scope of the FMS case.

6–27. Regional defense combating terrorism fellowship program funding
The Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity provides financial oversight and issues funds for
all DON training under Regional Defense Counterterrorism Fellowship Program, regardless of whether courses are
under USN, USMC, or USCG. Upon approval by commanders of combatant commands and Special Operations/Low
Intensity Conflict, Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, CG, Security Cooperation Educa-
tion and Training Center MCCDC, and USCG International Affairs (G–CI) will program their respective training,
request and confirm quotas (or Mobile Education Team/MTT dates). After candidate vetting has been approved by
Special Operations/Low Intensity Conflict and funds have been authorized/provided by DSCA, Naval Education and
Training Security Assistance Field Activity will issue a message providing authority to issue the ITO or authorize a
Mobile Education Team/MTT and provide funds to the Mobile Education Team/MTT provider. If TLA is authorized,
this message will provide the fund cite and other funding with information copy to Navy IPO.

6–28. Counter-narcotics program
Under the Counter-Narcotics program, DASD–CN issues authority to release funding to either Naval Education and
Training Security Assistance Field Activity or USCG International Affairs (G–CI). Upon receipt of funding, a message
will be issued providing authority to issue the ITO or authorize the Mobile Education Team/MTT and provide funds to
the Mobile Education Team/MTT provider.

6–29. Export control/border security, Georgian border security and law enforcement and similar
programs
The USCG International Affairs (G–CI) provides program support and issues funding authority for all USCG training
under export control border and similar Department of State programs for which the USCG provides training under the
provisions of 22 USC 2420(b)(3) and 22 USC 2420(b)(7). Upon acceptance and subsequent approval of training
requests, USCG (G–CI) will program their respective training, request and confirm quotas (or Mobile Education Team/
MTT dates). Funds will be provided via an Interagency Acquisition Agreement (IAA) to USCG (G–CI). As with all
other funding sources, services cannot be provided until funding is received. Funding must be received at least 30 days


                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                               111
in advance of commencement of training. USCG-(G–CI) will provide via e-mail to the appropriate training center the
funding authority to issue the ITO or authorize a Mobile Education Team/MTT and provide funds to the Mobile
Education Team/MTT provider. If TLA is authorized, this message will provide the fund cite and other funding
information as required. All requirements for scheduling, student administration, background and security checks and
processing are exactly as outlined in chapters 4 and 10.

6–30. Forfeiture fee
   a. Navy IPO is responsible for the establishment of DON policy regarding forfeiture charges. If a country cancels a
confirmed quota in a DON course within 60 days of commencement, a 50 percent cancellation fee will normally be
applied unless the quota is filled by another student. Navy IPO releases an annual message during the first quarter of
the FY to provide a list of courses that will incur a 100 percent tuition fee if a country cancels after a contract is let or
a quota is confirmed (unless a waiver is requested and approved). In addition to the courses listed in the message, there
are other courses where a forfeiture charge will apply. In those cases, the customer will be informed up front, either
when provided price and availability data, with a note in the LOA, or in correspondence dealing with scheduling.
These courses generally fall into two categories:
   (1) Training where a contract must be in place prior to student arrival. This is most likely to happen during ship
transfers or aircraft sales where regular U.S. training is not available.
   (2) Training that incurs up-front costs prior to actual commencement of training. Examples would be: changes to
computer programs (such as, aviation training where computer software must be changed or modified in either the
aircraft or the simulator or both) and up-front translation cost or tailoring of course material to meet a specific country
requirement.
   b. Many of the E–IMET Mobile Education Team and all MTT programmed through DON fall into category (1)
above. Additional clarification on Mobile Education Team is provided as follows:
   (1) A Mobile Education Team which is already programmed (whether funded or not) requires DSCA approval if the
country via the Security Cooperation Organization requests cancellation. Programmed is defined as appearing in TMS
or on the Security Assistance Network Web. The Security Cooperation Organization (versus the Mobile Education
Team provider) should request DSCA approval via the regional combatant commander to cancel, info Navy IPO and
Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity.
   (2) If approval is granted by DSCA for cancellation of a Mobile Education Team the country canceling the Mobile
Education Team pays 100 percent of the variable preparation costs that may have been incurred prior to the time of
cancellation (that is, travel, per diem, honorariums, miscellaneous trip preparation costs, in-country site costs, and
salary costs for preparation and conduct of the Mobile Education Team). The Mobile Education Team providers will
detail such expenditures and notify Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, who will review
and charge to appropriate country’s IMET account. Questions concerning appropriateness of charges should be
forwarded via Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity to Navy IPO/DSCA.
   c. The Mobile Education Team and MTT funded programmed under Regional Defense Counterterrorism Fellowship
Program will be subject to the same requirements as stated in paragraph b, and will also require commanders of
combatant commands and Special Operations/Low Intensity Conflict approval.
   d. A forfeiture charge will not be applied when cancellation is due to the following:
   (1) Decisions by the U.S. such as deletion or rescheduling of classes.
   (2) Significant unavoidable circumstances affecting the armed forces within a country such as a national disaster.
   (3) Personnel required to support the Global War on terrorism. Forfeiture charges will be programmed for applicable
courses and will be designated by an “S” in the WCN suffix to indicate that a forfeiture charge was charged for the
training line. The appropriate Military Service will make the final determination regarding the forfeiture charge.

Section X
Department of the Air Force

6–31. Financial management
   a. The IMET. Generally, the cost of foreign training under IMET is initially financed by Air Force appropriated
funds with subsequent reimbursement from IMET funds. Reimbursement includes indirect costs such as, tuition,
training aids, publications, and proficiency flying hours. Direct costs reimbursable from IMET funds are as follows—
   (1) Travel.
   (2) Living allowances. (DOD 5105.38M, SAMM, chapter 10, table titled “Daily Supplemental Living Allowances
for International Military Students Under Security Cooperation Programs.”
   (3) Certain medical and burial costs.
   (4) The Field Studies Program activities.
   (5) Extraordinary expenses.
   (6) Travel and per diem of U.S. personnel in support of IMET.
   b. The FMS. The FMS training is paid for by the recipient countries. Payment for FMS cases is generally on a cash-


112                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
in-advance basis. Normally, the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron notifies DFAS of the costs of the
country’s quarterly training requirements. The DFAS–DE provides the purchasing country with a quarterly statement of
charges for training. Training is considered “delivered” as of the date the IMS enters the course, or the date funds are
released for an MTT.
   c. Inter-America. Air Forces Academy.
   (1) The fixed operating costs of IAAFA are financed by appropriated funds. Guest instructor costs are considered
“fixed costs” when guest instructors are assigned to authorized USAF Unit Manning Document positions. Guest
instructor positions will be reflected on Part 4 of the Unit Manning Document.
   (2) Guest instructors will receive a living allowance, round trip transportation for guest instructor and dependents;
2,000 pounds household goods (HHG) allowance; furnishings for quarters according to Table of Allowance 414 (or
increased HHG allowance); limit of $2,000 per year medical coverage per guest instructor Family.
   (3) Administration and control of the guest instructor, USAF and parent country financial responsibilities, guest
instructor benefits, and other pertinent information will be addressed in an attachment to the ITO for all guest
instructors.
   (4) Additions to IAAFA curriculum will be processed according to paragraph 3–77.
   d. Military assistance other agency funded. The Military Assistance Other Agency Funded training is provided
without charge to the recipient country with subsequent reimbursement to the Air Force by the sponsoring U.S.
Agency. Reimbursement for training is accomplished by the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron/FM. All
other costs are the responsibility of the sponsoring U.S. agency, the foreign student, or their Government. The USAF
support to other U.S. Government agencies is authorized by the U.S. Economy Act.

6–32. Forfeiture charges and adjustments
To avoid forfeiture charges, training must be canceled at least 60 days prior to the course start date and 180 days for all
flying training. Training dates are provided to the Security Cooperation Organization in the STL or by message. The
training dates are considered acceptable unless the Security Cooperation Organization requests a change. If an IMS is
eliminated before completing a course, tuition costs will be adjusted as follows:
   a. Flying courses-prorated basis but not less than 50 percent.
   b. Technical courses-prorated basis but not less than 50 percent.
   c. Training cost on a per week basis-for the number of weeks training was received.

6–33. Transportation allowances
The IMET IMS are authorized transportation allowances as prescribed in their ITO. (See chaps 7 and 8.)

6–34. Living allowances
The IMET IMS are authorized living allowances as prescribed in their ITO. (See chaps 7 and 9.)

6–35. Subsistence
At training bases where messing facilities are available, the base food service officer will submit a certified invoice
monthly (in triplicate) to the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron/FM through the IMSO for payment.
This invoice will list the following data:
  a. Names and nationalities of the IMS.
  b. Number and type of meals furnished.
  c. Total amount.

6–36. Housing security assistance training program and other cooperative programs personnel
   a. For IMET enlisted personnel provided quarters, reimbursement for quarters is made as follows if these students
are receiving a living allowance under IMET. The base billeting or housing officer must submit certified invoices
monthly in three copies to the local Accounting and Finance Officer (AFO) through the IMSO for payment. Invoices
must list names, nationalities, number of days that quarters were furnished, and total amount of charges. A copy of
each student’s ITO must be furnished with the invoice. The AFO prepares a SF 1034 (Public Voucher for Purchases
and Services other than Personal) upon receipt of the IMSO verification for reimbursement to the base billeting or
housing office. The accounting classification cited in the ITO is charged for these services.
   b. Other IMET students and all FMS students assigned Government housing are required to pay the cost from
personal funds.
   c. The charge for Air Force unaccompanied personnel housing is the Service fee. Rates for family housing are
provided in the DOD 7000.14–R and AFI 32–9003.

6–37. Budget and funding
Procedures for SCETP and other cooperative programs are contained in AFI 65–601 and DFAS–Denver 7010.3–R.



                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  113
6–38. Costing
Course costing will be accomplished by the MAJCOM in accordance with SAF/Budget Management and Execution
Security Assistance Division directives and resulting tuition prices forwarded to the Air Force Security Assistance
Training Squadron/FM comptroller for incorporation into the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron
database. The SCETP and other cooperative programs unit cost for each course or item is listed in the Training
Military Articles and Service List. For those items marked “EST” (estimate), separate pricing will be used, as required.

6–39. Accounting and finance
Accounting, paying, collecting, and reporting will be as stated in accordance with applicable DFAS guidance on
“Accounting and Obligations” and “Accounting for Commitments.” IMS entitlement to expenses and eligibility such as
travel, transportation, living allowances, subsistence, medical care, and burial will be as stated in chapters 8 and 9.
   a. All AFO or other offices that forward invoices to higher headquarters for payment will submit invoices on a
controlled transmission basis.
   b. The AFO or other office will include in each applicable invoice package a preaddressed acknowledgment form
letter that can be returned to the originating office. If acknowledgment is not received within 15 days after forwarding,
the sending office will conduct a follow-up.



Chapter 7
Travel/Transportation, Quarters, Meals, and Living Allowance
The purpose of this chapter is to provide guidance for travel/transportation, quarters, and meals for an IMS, both when
these expenses are funded by their country; and when travel and living allowances are included in the U.S. funded
training program. U.S. funded training programs that normally include these funds (referred to as TLA) usually refer to
training under the IMET, Counterterrorism Fellowship Program, and other USG-funded programs. In rare cases;
however, TLA may also be included in FMS cases (when DSCA waiver is provided).

Section I
Travel and/or Transportation

7–1. Scheduling International Military Student travel
The IMS are discouraged from reporting to a training installation prior to the published report date because access may
be denied based upon the installation security policy.
   a. When travel/transportation is funded by the country. All travel/transportation expenses incurred by IMS will be
borne by either the IMS or their country. Although any desired mode of travel or carrier can be used for IMS when
travel is funded directly by country, use of U.S. commercial carriers is encouraged. IMS will bear all expenses in
connection with OCONUS travel by POV, if authorized on the IMS ITO. The Security Cooperation Organization will
assist with scheduling as necessary. Every effort should be made to schedule transportation so that IMS arrive at
training installations during normal working hours, Monday through Friday.
   b. When travel/transportation is funded by the USG training program..
   (1) The Security Cooperation Organization will arrange transportation for IMS to the United States according to ITO
when overseas transportation is funded by the U.S. The Security Cooperation Organization will receive a line of
accounting (fund cite) from the MILDEP, which will be annotated on the ITO. The Security Cooperation Organization
will then arrange ticketing to the first CONUS training activity charged to the fund cite. Every effort should be made to
schedule transportation so that IMS arrive at training installations during normal working hours, Monday through
Friday.
   (2) Tariff regulations preclude honoring airline tickets issued more than 6 months in advance of travel completion.
One-way tickets will be issued for all students for training that exceeds five weeks duration. For training with duration
of five weeks or less, the Security Cooperation Organization is authorized to purchase round-trip transportation.
   (3) In-country travel from the IMS duty station to point of departure in country is not authorized at USG expense.
In-country travel for a student to attend a Mobile Education Team/MTT within their own country is not authorized at
USG expense.

7–2. Excess baggage
   a. When travel/transportation is funded by the country, the cost of transporting FMS IMS personal excess baggage is
the responsibility of IMS or their country. If country has requested and DSCA has approved student travel under the
LOA, student baggage allowances are limited to the baggage authorizations described below (see para 7–2b).
   b. When travel/transportation is included in the USG training program:
   (1) The baggage weight allowances described in paragraphs (3) through (7), below, are authorized for IMS when
travel costs are charged to the U.S. funded program, and apply to both overseas travel and travel to U.S. training



114                          AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
installations. Baggage in excess of the amount authorized in this regulation will be at the expense of the IMS or their
government.
   (2) Excess baggage is authorized for IMS under certain conditions (length of training and type of course(s)). Excess
baggage is that amount over the two bags generally allowed free of charge for OCONUS travel. Training duration
indicated in paragraphs (3) through (6), below, will be determined using the report date for the first course and the
projected graduation date for the last course.
   (3) Two pieces of checked baggage, not to exceed 50 pounds each, are authorized for IMS receiving TLA when
training is 12 weeks or less. (No excess baggage is authorized.)
   (4) Three pieces of checked baggage, not to exceed 50 pounds each, are authorized for IMS receiving TLA when
training is 13 through 23 weeks. (One piece of excess baggage is authorized.)
   (5) Four pieces of checked baggage, not to exceed 50 pounds each, are authorized for IMS receiving TLA for 24
through 35 weeks. (Two pieces of excess baggage are authorized.)
   (6) Five pieces of checked baggage, not to exceed 50 pounds each, are authorized for IMS receiving TLA for 36
weeks and longer. (Three pieces of excess baggage are authorized.)
   (7) In addition to the allowance in paragraphs (3) through (6), above, one additional piece of baggage (Six pieces of
checked baggage/four pieces of excess baggage, not to exceed 50 pounds each) is authorized for the following IMS
receiving TLA for:
   (a) Accompanied IMS attending the PME, graduate, and postgraduate programs listed in DOD 5105.38–M, table
C10.T3, (see table 7–1).
   (b) IMS attending flight training.
   (8) If U.S. and foreign flag carrier airlines differ in free baggage allowance, or baggage is authorized over 100
pounds, transportation officers may issue a Miscellaneous Charge Order, or the equivalent to cover the difference, up to
the free allowable amount of the U.S. flag carriers, and also any authorized excess baggage allowance. The IMSO may
determine the cost of the authorized excess baggage and include it in the last living allowance payment, if a
Miscellaneous Charge Order is not available. If neither a Miscellaneous Charge Order, nor advance payment of the
authorized excess baggage is feasible, the IMS may file a travel reimbursement claim upon return to home country
with the assistance of the Security Cooperation Organization.
   (9) Baggage size, dimensions, and weight, will conform to carrier stipulations. Baggage must accompany the IMS.
No change in baggage allowances will be made after students have departed country.
   (a) If IMS baggage is unable to accompany the student on the flight due to airline imposed baggage embargos in
country, IMSO is authorized to mail IMS baggage to the home address via the most economical rate available.
   (b) The baggage being mailed back must be in accordance with applicable airline regulations and authorized number
of bags and weight as authorized on the ITO.
   (10) When any portion of the travel cost is paid by the foreign government the baggage allowance for that portion
of the travel is without restriction if the cost of the excess weight is paid by the foreign government. However, for that
portion of the travel paid from the program funds, each IMS is authorized baggage allowance not to exceed the
limitations in paragraphs (1) through (7), above.

7–3. Disposition of unauthorized excess baggage when travel/transportation is funded by the U.S.
Government Training Program
Disposition of unauthorized excess baggage will be made at the expense of the IMS or their Government. The
following procedures apply for control of unauthorized excess baggage for IMS when travel is charged to the U.S.
Funded Program.
   a. The IMS will ensure that unauthorized excess baggage will be shipped at the IMS expense prior to the departure
from the installation.
   b. The IMS reporting to the port of departure with unauthorized excess baggage will be requested to forward the
unauthorized excess baggage to their home country by commercial means at no expense to the USG. If the time
element prohibits this, the unauthorized excess baggage will be taken into custody by the IMSO or the USG
representative and the IMS will be given a receipt for the baggage. The IMS will sign a notification/release statement,
acknowledging that their baggage is being held by the IMSO, and that if no disposition instructions are provided by the
IMS or the foreign consulate within 30 days, the IMSO may then dispose of the baggage. The IMS will proceed on the
scheduled flight or carrier.
   c. After the carrier departs, the IMSO or the USG representative will hold the unauthorized excess baggage no
longer than 30 days awaiting further instructions from the IMS or nearest foreign consulate. If no action is taken either
by the IMS or the foreign consulate, the unauthorized excess baggage may be sold, donated, or destroyed, as
appropriate, with documentation to record the transaction. If sold, the sale value should be forwarded to the Security
Cooperation Organization for delivery to the IMS.

7–4. Arrival notification for all international military students regardless of funding source
  a. After travel arrangements have been completed, the Security Cooperation Organization will send an advance


                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                 115
arrival notice through the Security Assistance Network Security Cooperation Organization training Web, to the first
training installation, with information copies to the Military Service as appropriate. This notice must arrive at the first
training installation at least 15 days prior to IMS scheduled arrival or 30 days in advance if accompanied by
dependents. If the IMS name or arrival information is not available, the Security Cooperation Organization will inform
the IMSO at the first training installation and the appropriate Military Service by e-mail. Training activities including
DLIELC will provide arrival notification to the next training location at least one week prior to completion of training.
   b. The advance notice of IMS arrival will include the following information:
   (1) Name, grade, Service, and sex.
   (2) Travel itinerary with dates, airline flight numbers, and times of arrival in CONUS for first training location.
   (3) ITO number, date, WCN, initial course, and report date.
   (4) FMS case designator, IMET program year, or other USG-funded case designator.
   c. Names, ages, and relationships of accompanying dependents if applicable. Changes that occur after transmittal of
the advance arrival notice will be forwarded by e-mail to the addressees shown in the original arrival notice.
   d. Security Cooperation Organization will advise IMS to contact the first training installation immediately after
arrival in CONUS and provide information on the mode of onward travel and estimated time of arrival.

7–5. Continental United States travel
When an IMS is scheduled for consecutive training at different locations, the IMSO at each training installation should
review the ITO to determine if the travel cost is funded by the IMS’s own country, or a U.S. funded training program.
   a. When travel/transportation is funded by the country. The IMSO should review the airline ticket(s) against the ITO
for accuracy. If an airline ticket is incorrect, the IMSO will notify the Security Cooperation Organization or the
Military Service for assistance. If the IMS has follow-on training at another location, the IMSO will inform the gaining
installation of the arrival of the IMS by the most expeditious means. If the duration of the last training course is 2
weeks or less, the IMSO at the training installation prior to the last will coordinate with the last training installation to
determine if training dates are firm and inform the Military Service and Security Cooperation Organization if dates
have changed and a change in ticketing is required.
   b. When travel/transportation is funded by a USG training program. Normally, the program includes all transporta-
tion costs, travel allowances, and all authorized expenses in connection with the official travel of IMS. However,
certain countries defray all or part of these costs. The original ITO must stipulate the specific responsibility for funding
of travel. When CONUS travel is authorized, the IMSO will make the necessary transportation arrangements and will
inform the gaining installation of the arrival of the IMS by the most expeditious means. If the duration of the last
training course is 2 weeks or less, the IMSO at the training installation prior to the last will coordinate with the last
training installation to determine if training dates are firm or have the potential to change. If training dates are firm, the
IMSO will make travel arrangements to the last training installation and return to homeland, taking into account leave
authorized in the IMS ITO. This IMSO will also arrange for advance payment of living and travel allowance to the day
of arrival in home country, except for periods of leave. The IMS ITO will be endorsed to indicate the student has
received advanced living and travel allowances due through arrival in home country and issued a government
transportation request (identify number) or provided funds for excess baggage if authorized in accordance with
paragraph 7–3 of this regulation for return travel to home country. Travel by IMS in CONUS will be by the most direct
routes between points specified in the travel orders. The mode of transportation used will be that which is most
economical, subject to availability, and in the best interest of the USG. Distances will be determined by provisions in
the JTR.
   c. Transportation costs for an IMS returning to their home country on emergency leave are the responsibility of the
IMS or their government, if the IMS is to return for continuation of training. Only one round trip between the home
country and the United States is authorized.
   d. When an IMS is permitted by their own Government to deviate from the most direct return route for visiting
other countries, USG sponsorship will terminate at the point and time of such deviation. Further, should IMS elect to
remain at a point en route to their home country beyond the time normally required to make travel connections, living
allowance during that excess time is not authorized.
   e. In no instance will U.S. funds be used to provide transportation for dependents of IMS. However, IMS attending
courses identified in DOD 5105.38–M (SAMM), table C10.T3, (see table 7–1 “Additional Information” para (7)) of
this regulation may be reimbursed for the cost of transportation to which they are entitled based on normal routing and
mode to travel with their dependents. Normal routing and mode of transportation will be included in item 15 of the
IMS ITO. U.S. flag carriers must be used wherever available. The IMS will be reimbursed for their own transportation
costs at the first CONUS training installation in the amount it would have cost the USG. IMS will not be reimbursed
for travel on foreign airlines if U.S. airlines service the same route.




116                            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Table 7–1
Daily supplemental living allowance for international military students under security cooperation programs
        Government or        Mess            Dependents encour-   Dependents accom-   Living allowance rate       Remarks
        contracted Govern-                   aged                 pany student
        ment quarters

1       Yes                  No              No                                       Actual cost of lodging
                                                                                      (NTE) maximum lodging
                                                                                      authorized in the JFTR
                                                                                      + JFTR local meal rate
                                                                                      + $11 special Interna-
                                                                                      tional Military Student
                                                                                      incidentals
2       No                   No              No                                       Actual cost of lodging      A statement of non-
                                                                                      (NTE maximum lodging        availability or equivalent
                                                                                      authorized in JFTR) +       must be issued to the
                                                                                      JFTR local meal rate +      International Military
                                                                                      $11 special Interna-        Student and filed with
                                                                                      tional Military Student     voucher. International
                                                                                      incidentals                 Military Student must
                                                                                                                  show proof of rental
                                                                                                                  agreement or lodging
                                                                                                                  receipt.
3       Yes                  Yes             No                                       Actual cost of lodging
                                                                                      (NTE maximum lodging
                                                                                      authorized in JFTR) +
                                                                                      JFTR Government meal
                                                                                      rate + $11 special Inter-
                                                                                      national Military Student
                                                                                      incidentals
4       Yes                  One or two      No                                       Actual cost of lodging
                             meals are                                                (NTE maximum lodging
                             available                                                authorized in JFTR) +
                                                                                      JFTR proportional meal
                                                                                      rate + $11 special Inter-
                                                                                      national Military Student
                                                                                      incidentals
5       Yes and free of      Yes and free    No                                       $11 special Interna-
        charge               of charge                                                tional Military Student
                                                                                      incidentals
6       Yes and free of      Available       No                                       Government meal rate
        charge               aboard ship                                              + $11 special Interna-
                                                                                      tional Military Student
                                                                                      incidentals
7       Yes but Interna-                                                              $0
        tional Military
        Student chooses
        to live off base/
        post
8       No                                   Yes                  Yes                 Actual cost of lodging      Availability of quarters is
                                                                                      (NTE maximum lodging        based upon the availa-
                                                                                      authorized in JFTR) +       bility of Government
                                                                                      JFTR local meal rate +      family housing. Interna-
                                                                                      $11 special Interna-        tional Military Student
                                                                                      tional Military Student     must show proof of
                                                                                      incidentals                 rental
                                                                                                                  agreement and certify
                                                                                                                  that dependents reside
                                                                                                                  with International Mili-
                                                                                                                  tary Student for at least
                                                                                                                  75 percent of the course
                                                                                                                  duration.




                                    AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                             117
Table 7–1
Daily supplemental living allowance for international military students under security cooperation programs—Continued
          Government or        Mess             Dependents encour-   Dependents accom-     Living allowance rate       Remarks
          contracted Govern-                    aged                 pany student
          ment quarters

9         Yes                  No               Yes                                        Actual cost of lodging
                                                                                           (NTE maximum lodging
                                                                                           authorized in JFTR) +
                                                                                           JFTR local meal rate +
                                                                                           $11 special Interna-
                                                                                           tional Military Student
                                                                                           incidentals
10        Yes                  Yes              Yes                  Yes                   Actual cost of lodging      Availability of quarters is
                                                                                           (NTE maximum lodging        based upon the availa-
                                                                                           authorized in JFTR) +       bility of Government
                                                                                           JFTR local meal rate +      family housing.
                                                                                           $11 special Interna-
                                                                                           tional Military Student
                                                                                           incidentals
11        Yes                  One or two       Yes                  Yes                   Actual cost of lodging      Availability of quarters is
                               meals are                                                   (NTE maximum lodging        based upon the availa-
                               available                                                   authorized in JFTR) +       bility of Government
                                                                                           JFTR local meal rate +      family housing.
                                                                                           $11 special Interna-
                                                                                           tional Military Student
                                                                                           incidentals
12        Bachelor Govt or                      No                   Yes                   $0
          Contracted Quar-
          ters are available
          but student
          chooses to re-
          side off base/
          post
13        N/A                  N/A                                                         Actual cost of lodging      When a student from
                                                                                           (NTE maximum lodging        one country is attending
                                                                                           authorized in JFTR) +       a regional Mobile Edu-
                                                                                           meals in accordance         cation and Training (Mo-
                                                                                           with JFTR + applicable      bile Education Team)
                                                                                           OCONUS incidentals.         course in another coun-
                                                                                                                       try.
                                                  Additional Information for Table C10.T3
(1) Quarters available means that USG quarters or contracted Government quarters were either furnished or made available. For Inter-
national Military Student currently attending training in the U.S. that elected to reside off-base/post under the old 1999 TLA policy, the
student is authorized to continue to receive TLA at 1999 TLA policy rates until their current line of training is completed and the student
has returned home. However, if the student is scheduled for follow-on training at a different training location, the TLA rates in this table
($0) apply at the new training location.
(2) Mess available means three meals per day are available in a USG mess, whether or not actually consumed.
(3) When TLA is authorized, the travel allowance rate includes the day of departure from home country to the day of arrival at, and day
of departure from, each training installation, and the day of arrival at home country. TLA rates, while the International Military Student is
on travel status including unscheduled delays, are based on rates equal to those in the JFTR for U.S. personnel. In most cases, the
student does not receive their first TLA payment until they have been in CONUS for 2 weeks; therefore, the Security Cooperation Or-
ganization is encouraged to advance student sufficient funds in U.S. dollars to meet all expenses while the student is enroute to include
2 weeks advance TLA. Any such advances shall be annotated in the special conditions block of the ITO to prevent duplicate payment
of entitlements at CONUS training activities.
(4) When the International Military Student is scheduled to attend training for 5 weeks or less, the Security Cooperation Organization is
authorized to purchase roundtrip transportation and to pay the student total authorized living allowance entitlements at the time of de-
parture. Government Transportation Request number (government transportation request #) and amounts paid for transportation and
living allowances are annotated in the special conditions block of the ITO to prevent duplicate payment of entitlements.
(5) If the duration of training at the last training installation is 2 weeks or less, and/or the last training installation has no means of pay-
ing the International Military Student, the IMSO at the next-to-last training installation arranges for advance payment of travel and living
allowance for that period of time to the day of arrival at the next follow-on training installation or country. Except for periods of leave,
the student ITO is endorsed in the Special Conditions Block to identify the period of time for which advanced living and travel allow-
ances were made.
(6) If it is determined that an International Military Student who has departed the CONUS or overseas training activity was overpaid in
CONUS or at the overseas activity, no attempt is made to collect the overpayment from the student. The Implementing Agency deter-
mines whether a funding adjustment via the Security Cooperation Training Program is necessary.




118                                   AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Table 7–1
Daily supplemental living allowance for international military students under security cooperation programs—Continued
         Government or        Mess            Dependents encour-   Dependents accom-   Living allowance rate    Remarks
         contracted Govern-                   aged                 pany student
         ment quarters

(7) The International Military Student is encouraged by the Department of Defense to bring dependents ONLY to the following courses:
Air Command and Staff College Air War College Armed Forces Staff College Army War College Army Command and General Staff
College at Fort Leavenworth and at the WHINSEC Graduate Programs at Naval Postgraduate School Graduate Programs at the Insti-
tute of Technology, The Inter-American Defense College National Defense University, Naval Command College, Naval Staff College
Sergeants Major Academy Squadron Officer School, USMC, Command and Staff College, USMC Expeditionary Warfare School USMC
School of Advanced Warfighting An International Military Student scheduled to attend any of the above courses may also bring de-
pendents to prerequisite courses, follow-on courses, and authorized leave periods. Students are not encouraged to bring dependents
to any other courses. The “with dependent” TLA rate is intended/authorized when the dependents reside with student for the majority
(75 percent) of the course duration. The “with dependent” TLA rate is not intended/ authorized for students with dependents who come
only for periodic visits.
(8) Accompanied students living off post/base attending courses where dependents are encouraged by the Department of Defense
(see note (7), above) may draw a living allowance advance upon arrival in CONUS of an amount not to exceed 10 percent of their total
maximum living allowance authorized at a particular location. The student living allowance drawn during the period of training is ad-
justed to ensure that the amount of the advance is fully recovered before the student completes training at that location.
(9) When an International Military Student is authorized the “with dependent” TLA rate and is subsequently hospitalized, the “with de-
pendent” TLA rate will continue to be paid.
(10) TLA is not authorized for leave periods before or following completion/termination of training. Leave with living allowance may be
granted during periods of class breaks, authorized holidays, and between consecutive courses.
(11) Guest instructors assigned to WHINSEC, IAAFA, or Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical Training School are paid a living
allowance based upon the installation’s Government quarters or Government contracted quarter’s rates by grade and a standard sub-
sistence allowance regardless of rank. Guest instructors’ allowances are paid out of the military Service’s Operations and Maintenance
account, not security assistance training programs.
(12) When an IMS is authorized TLA and is concurrently TDY, the IMS will be reimbursed for travel and per diem (lodging, subsistence,
and incidentals) in accordance with the JFTR rate for the TDY location plus the TLA authorized at the training location.



7–6. Travel by privately-owned vehicle when travel and/or transportation is funded by a U.S.
Government Program
   a. Travel by POV within CONUS is normally permitted except when it would not be in the best interests of the
USG or would result in late arrival for scheduled training. The Security Cooperation Organization must indicate on the
ITO when travel by POV is authorized. The IMSO must ensure that the ITO indicates travel by POV is authorized.
   b. When all or partial travel is performed by POV in CONUS under orders permitting this mode of travel, the IMS
responsible for paying POV operating expenses is entitled to a monetary allowance in lieu of transportation. This
monetary allowance will be paid at the currently authorized rate for official highway distance according to the JTR.
Reimbursement will be limited to the official distance from the installation to the next training site or point of
departure, not to exceed the economy class commercial airfare cost. Living allowance will be authorized for a period
not to exceed constructive travel time by air. If IMS travels as a passenger in a POV, they are not entitled to mileage,
but is entitled to per diem.
   (1) No separate shipment of baggage at USG expense is authorized. IMS will bear cost of shipment of personal
baggage not carried in the POV.
   (2) Shipment of a POV cannot be charged to IMET or other USG-funded program.
   (3) Shipment of household goods is not authorized at USG expense.
   (4) Security Cooperation Organization will identify point of entry and point of departure on the ITO (or amendment)
if IMS is authorized POV travel within the U.S.
   c. Advance travel allowance is allowed when IMS are—
   (1) Permitted to travel by POV between CONUS training facilities and departure point.
   (2) Traveling to and from Central America when authorized travel by POV.

7–7. Arranging return transportation when travel/transportation is funded by a United States
Government program
Approximately 2 weeks before the end of the IMS last course, arrangements for return transportation should be
completed. The last training installation to which the IMS is assigned will make arrangements for return travel. IMSO
at installations where dependents are encouraged to attend should make return arrangements early enough for IMS to
secure transportation for Family members. When travel is paid under the USG program, the cost of the airfare will be
charged to the fund cite indicated on the IMS ITO. The last training installation will notify the Security Cooperation




                                     AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                        119
Organization by message of the IMS return itinerary in sufficient time before the IMS departs so that the Security
Cooperation Organization can meet the student upon return to home country if desired.

Section II
Quarters and Meals

7–8. Quarters and meals
The IMS will be provided quarters and meals (messing/subsistence) in USG facilities when available. However, IMS
are not guaranteed USG quarters. The commander of the U.S. installation or designated representatives will endorse
ITO to indicate that USG quarters and messing were or were not made available. To be consistent and to avoid
possible embarrassment, guidance applicable to U.S. personnel should be applied, insofar as possible, to IMS. When
quarters are provided, they will be of a comparable standard to that provided U.S. personnel of comparable rank. The
IMSO is responsible for making reservations for IMS quarters. When USG quarters are not available, the IMSO will
make commercial lodging reservations if possible. If commercial lodging reservations cannot be made without a credit
card to secure payment, the IMSO will not use their personal account. The IMSO must contact the Military Service or
Security Cooperation Organization for further assistance.
   a. Quarters.
   (1) Quarters are defined as ’provided’ if made available to officers and civilian IMS including periods of hospitali-
zation. In all cases, Government quarters, which include USG controlled or privatized quarters, will be used where
available. The fact that an IMS is accompanied by dependents has no bearing in determining the availability of quarters
for the IMS.
   (2) IMS should not occupy military quarters before the report date for scheduled training at that installation or more
than one week after termination of the last training course scheduled at an installation. IMS whose travel and or living
allowance is paid by the U.S. funded program should be scheduled to depart the day following graduation; however,
when a delay is caused by extenuating circumstances and MILDEP approval is granted, students may be paid a living
allowance and remain in military quarters until departure. An IMS who elects to arrive earlier than their scheduled
report date will not receive living allowance payments for the period prior to the report date.
   (3) Unaccompanied personnel housing (UPH) when available; is authorized for IMS on a scale to that authorized for
U.S. personnel, according to MILDEP regulations.
   (4) Officer and civilian IMS occupying UPH will personally be required to pay custodial fees in the same amount
charged and on the same payment schedule as U.S. counterparts.
   (5) Enlisted IMS occupying UPH may personally be required to pay custodial fees in the same amount charged and
on the same payment schedule as their equivalent U.S. counterparts or as prescribed by installation commanders.
   (6) USG family housing is not guaranteed, and IMS are not generally encouraged to bring their families with them
while training under the SCETP. The IMS will be responsible for payment of a monthly rental fee if occupying USG
family housing. (See DOD 7000.14–R, volume 15.) If an IMS is ineligible for government quarters because they are
accompanied by dependents while attending a course where dependents are NOT encouraged they will no longer be
eligible to receive a living allowance (if previously authorized) and a statement of nonavailability will not be issued to
an accompanied IMS when quarters are available for unaccompanied personnel.
   (7) When training within their own country, IMS will not be furnished quarters at USG expense.
   b. Meals.
   (1) The IMS will be required to pay the standard rate, including surcharge fees if applicable, at USG dining
facilities.
   (2) Enlisted IMS receiving living allowances are authorized subsistence (meals) in kind without charge, according to
food service management directives currently in force at some installations. Subsistence without charge to the IMS in
USG dining facilities may be provided while the IMS is attached to training installations or duty stations, while in
transit, and while either in CONUS or overseas training. When meal tickets are issued to enlisted and civilian
equivalent IMS in a travel status, appropriate endorsement will be made on the ITO so that the value of the meal ticket
may be deducted from amounts otherwise payable as living allowance. Enlisted IMS authorized and electing to subsist
in a NCO mess will personally reimburse the mess for any cost in excess of the commuted ration value chargeable to
the USG-funded training program.
   (3) Officer and civilian IMS will not be provided subsistence in kind, but will pay for meals taken in USG dining
facilities at the food rates prescribed.
   (4) An effort should be made to satisfy special dietary requirements of IMS who are unable to eat certain foods due
to religious reasons. However, additional pay and allowances will not be authorized just because the IMS does not like
American food, or USG messing facilities are unable to provide proper food for a diet imposed by an IMS’s religion.
In countries where problems of this nature are anticipated, IMS will be briefed on the above policy before departing for
CONUS. Additional living allowances will not be authorized for IMS on the basis of a medical officer recommenda-
tion. IMS must consider following three alternatives:
   (a) Adapting to the American diet.


120                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
  (b) Providing food to their own liking at their own expense.
  (c) Requesting disenrollment from training and return to the home country.

7–9. Messing
   a. Temporary duty/temporary additional duty. When IMS are on a cross-country training flight or TDY/temporary
additional duty in connection with a required course of training, IMS are eligible for TDY entitlements which will be
included in the course tuition. When an IMS is authorized TLA and is concurrently TDY, the IMS will be reimbursed
for travel and per diem (lodging, subsistence, and incidentals) in accordance with the JFTR rate for the TDY location
plus the TLA authorized at the training location, which will be charged to the fund cite on the ITO.
   b. Payment of USG-funded quarters and meals.
   (1) A certification or endorsement provided by the installation commander or designated representative, indicating
appropriate dates and availability of quarters and or subsistence, will accompany the original and two certified copies
of the ITO in support of a claim for living allowance. The original, with appropriate endorsement by the disbursing
officer indicating payment, will be returned to the IMS. The two certified copies will support the original and retained
copies of the DD Form 1351 (Travel Voucher) and DD Form 1351–2 (Travel Voucher or Sub-voucher). All payments
of living allowance will conform to the rates listed in DOD 5105.38–M, table C10.T3, (see table 7–1). Group payments
of living allowances are authorized when all IMS are listed and identified by their ITO numbers on DD Form 1351 and
DD Form 1351–2. Payment of living allowance due and unpaid at the port of departure may be made through Security
Cooperation Organization disbursing channels in local currency at official rates of exchange.
   (2) The IMSO will verify subsistence and housing invoices for—
   (a) An IMS who was in a duty or authorized leave status during the time specified on the invoice for subsistence.
The IMSO will insert on the invoice the WCN and, as proper, the project line and training number for each enlisted
IMS. The IMSO will submit the invoice and a copy of the ITO to the finance and accounting officer for payment.
   (b) An IMS who was furnished quarters. The IMSO will insert on the invoice the WCN and country, IMET program
year, or applicable FMS case and or other SC program case designator for each enlisted IMS. The IMSO will submit
the invoice and a copy of the ITO for processing.
   c. Subsistence. Subsistence provided to IMS by USG messes will be reimbursed by SF 1080 USG charging the
designated funded training program. It will be substantiated by a certification that rations were provided without
reimbursement. Each certificate will cite the applicable country and ITO numbers. NCO messes will be reimbursed at
the rate applicable to military personnel as a direct charge to USG-funded Training Program according to authorizing
publications. Commissioned officers’ closed messes subsisting IMS cadets will be reimbursed by local finance officers
at the current rate.
   d. IMS status changes. If an IMS changes from enlisted to officer status while undergoing training, the effective date
of change of living allowance will be the date the IMS is promoted, as certified by the Security Cooperation
Organization or official foreign representative of the IMS concerned. However, the date of the change in living
allowance will not be before the date the IMS leaves enlisted quarters.
   e. Students. Students whose governments require a record of payments received must be reminded to maintain
vouchers for record since that information cannot be furnished at a later date.

Section III
Living Allowance

7–10. Requirements
   a. When travel/transportation is funded by the country. The foreign government should ensure that IMS receive
sufficient allowances to defray all living costs and personal expenses. These expenses are the responsibility of the IMS
or the country purchasing the training. Living allowances for IMS will not be included in an FMS case unless approved
by DSCA. When approval is granted to pay living allowance under an FMS case, it will be at the same rates authorized
for IMET students.
   b. When travel/transportation is funded by the USG training program. Certain programs include costs for IMS living
allowances. Most IMET, Regional Defense Counterterrorism Fellowship Program, and Counter-Drug Training Support
programs will include living allowances.

7–11. Funding guidance
   a. Living allowance rates authorized for IMS when living allowance is funded by the USG program as shown in
table 7–1. Where training is conducted under contract or at civilian institutions, it will be ascertained if USG quarters
and messing facilities are not available.
   b. Each ITO must be carefully scrutinized to determine what payments, if any, are authorized. The IMSO and
finance officer will examine each ITO when the IMS reports and discuss the funding authorization with the IMS. This




                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                 121
is done to ensure mutual understanding. Living allowance expenses will be charged to a fund cite/line of accounting
provided on the ITO.

7–12. Restrictions
   a. Living allowances are programmed only to defray costs of meals and personal necessity items while in training.
   b. IMS who are authorized living allowances will be paid for periods of hospitalization while in a training status.
Payment for the period of hospitalization will be substantiated by an endorsement on the ITO by the installation
commander concerned.
   c. Living allowance will be computed in accordance with the JTR as stated in DOD 5105.38–M, table C10.T3, (see
table 7–1 in this regulation).
   d. IMS from countries for which the USG pays transoceanic and CONUS travel are entitled to living allowances in
a travel status to include the day of departure from the home country through the day of arrival at the first training
location and to include the day of departure from the last training location until the day of arrival in the home country.
This excludes periods of leave authorized by the IMS government following termination of training. In no case will
living allowances be paid for travel within the IMS’s own country.
   e. The IMS whose governments pay only for transoceanic travel costs are entitled to living allowances to include the
day of departure from the U.S. entry port en-route to the training location, through the day of arrival at the training
location and includes the day of arrival at the U.S. departure point.
   f. Living allowances are authorized for periods between courses and between schools when such periods are
included in the overall training schedule. Appropriate living allowances will be programmed to cover the entire period
of training.
   g. Leave with living allowances may be granted IMS within CONUS as specified below.
   (1) During authorized holidays.
   (2) During periods between consecutive courses. It is not the intent of this provision that leave be given or used
indiscriminately to occupy the IMS during periods between courses of instruction.
   (3) During periods of delay while awaiting transportation to the home country.
   h. The installation commander or the designated representative will make every attempt to collect an overpayment of
living allowance prior to the IMS departure from that installation. Failure to collect overpayment will be reported to the
Military Service. Underpayment will be resolved by the Security Cooperation Organization in local currency.
   i. When official travel is performed at personal expense, living allowances at the prescribed travel status rate are
authorized for a period not to exceed the authorized travel time for mode of transportation most advantageous to the
USG.
   j. DD Form 652 (Uniformed Services Meal Ticket), although authorized, is not normally issued to USG-funded
Training Program IMS while in a travel status. When tickets are issued, living allowances are payable at the rate
prescribed in the JTR for “travel status and USG mess available.”
   k. When travel has been completed to the first training installation, IMS will be paid living allowances covering
periods of unscheduled delay that occurred before their arrival at the port of embarkation in the United States or in
overseas commands.
   (1) A delay of 10 hours or more will be substantiated by a statement from a port, air, or other transportation
terminal official and be attached to the IMS ITO.
   (2) When USG quarters and meals are not available at a military installation for periods of delay en route, the
commanding officer or designated representative will give the IMS a written statement to that effect. The statement
will indicate the dates those quarters and meals (by number) were not available. If the delay en route is at other than a
military installation, the IMS written statement as to the non-availability of USG quarters and meals will substantiate
the voucher.
   (3) Care must be taken to clearly define periods of leave or delay en route and, upon completion of training, to
ensure proper payment of living and travel allowances.
   l. Living allowances are not authorized for the following:
   (1) Periods of unauthorized absence (UA) from duty.
   (2) Excess travel time when proceeding by other than USG transportation not authorized by the administrative
authority of the Military Service concerned.
   (3) Periods of delay not connected with training, except for hospitalization or outpatient care.
   (4) IMS whose country assumes the payment of all living allowances.
   (5) Periods of travel from country duty station to country port or vice versa.
   (6) A period of leave authorized by IMS government following the termination of all training courses.
   m. IMS may choose to rent cars from commercial sources at their own expense. Cost of rental vehicles will not be
charged to the U.S. Funded Training Program.




122                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
7–13. Advance
The IMS initial living allowance payment may be delayed until they have been in CONUS for 2 weeks; therefore, the
Security Cooperation Organization is encouraged to advance the IMS sufficient funds in U.S. dollars to meet all
expenses while the student is en-route, to include 2 weeks advance living allowance. Any such advances will be
annotated in the special conditions block of the ITO to prevent duplicate payment of entitlements at CONUS training
activities.

Section IV
Department of the Army

7–14. Baggage allowance
   a. Miscellaneous charge order. The most efficient way to pay for excess baggage is to use a Miscellaneous Charge
Order. The IMSO provides the size and weight of each bag several days in advance of travel to the ticket office; any
excess bags must be authorized on the ITO. The ticket office issues a paper Miscellaneous Charge Order voucher along
with the student’s ticket (paper or e-ticket). The fund cite on the ITO pays for the Miscellaneous Charge Order.
Department of the Army has agreed to the use of the Miscellaneous Charge Order for IMS provided it does not
adversely impact the central billing account process.
   b. Excess baggage. Another method is for the student to pay for the excess baggage and obtain reimbursement for
that amount either prior to departure from CONUS training site or after arrival in home country. The former requires
payment several weeks in advance of travel.

7–15. Retainable instructional material
   a. The SATFA will reimburse the cost of shipping retainable instructional material (RIM) from Army installations
through course tuition.
   b. The Army courses in table 7–2 are considered to be in the senior PME category. The IMS attending these courses
are authorized a RIM weight allowance of up to 200 pounds per course.
   c. Costs for the shipment of RIM are not applicable to DL training/courses.
   d. The IMS attending all formal courses of instruction not specifically covered in table 7–2 are authorized a RIM
weight allowance of up to 50 pounds per course.
   e. Some Army schools provide compact discs (CDs) containing reference material used in courses to students
enrolled in certain courses, making RIM weight negligible.
   f. If school officials determine that IMS require publications not retained by U.S. students, the cost of the
publications must be specifically identified on the TRADOC ATRM–159 or on the appropriate document for non-
TRADOC schools so that they will be included in course costs.



Table 7–2
Army courses in the senior PME category authorized 200 pounds of RIM
MASL ID             Course title
                    Sergeants Major Academy
B171200
B171765             Advanced Operational Studies Fellowship
B171768             Intermediate Level Education
B171425             Command and General Staff - Spanish
B171798             Combating Terrorism Fellows Program
B171800             Army War College
B171801             National Defense University International Fellows Program
B171806             Industrial College of the Armed Forces International Fellows Program



7–16. Quarters
  a. The IMS will be considered as neither TDY nor PCS for purposes of assignment of UPH.
  (1) So far as possible, IMS will be housed in UPH permanent party quarters (see AR 420–1; priority V). IMS will
not be charged rent but will be responsible for payment of the same custodial (maid service) charges as U.S. personnel
occupying UPH permanent party quarters. IMS will receive custodial (maid service), if available.
  (2) With approval of the installation commander, IMS may elect assignment to UPH transient quarters (VOQ/VEQ).



                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                             123
IMS will be responsible for payment of custodial (maid service) charges at the established rate. When occupying UPH
transient quarters, IMS will be authorized ’space confirmed’ reservations.
   (3) For IMS with dependents refer to paragraph 10–60.
   b. DFAS–IN 37–1 contains specific guidelines and steps for developing and calculating monthly rental charges for
Government family housing provided to IMS.

7–17. Subsistence
Payment for meals, per AR 30–22, taken in U.S. Army dining facilities will be according to food rates as prescribed by
the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD, Comptroller). New rates are developed annually and are posted and
effective 1 October each year.

Section V
Department of the Navy (U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Coast Guard)

7–18. Round trip tickets when travel/transportation is funded by a U.S. funded training Program
Round trip tickets are discouraged for IMS overseas travel unless training duration is 5 weeks or less due to difficulties
in making changes to tickets issued OCONUS. If there is significant cost savings however, the Security Cooperation
Organization may request a waiver to purchase a round trip ticket for training durations over 5 weeks. The waiver
request must be sent to Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, with information copy to the
Service providing the training, for all IMS training in all DON courses. The Security Cooperation Organization can
authorize the purchase of a round-trip ticket for IMS attending training at a commercial site.

7–19. Quarters when living allowance is funded by a United States funded program.
  a. Officer IMS lodging costs will be included in the living allowance. Officers will be responsible for payment of
lodging costs directly.
  b. Enlisted IMS (E–8 and below) occupying base quarters are generally not required to pay fees. Bills for services
should be forwarded the Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity for payment for all DON
IMS. When enlisted IMS are billeted in a transient or public private venture facility on base that requires direct
payment, the cost of the lodging may be included in the living allowance.

7–20. Travel and living allowance payments - Coast Guard
The USCG IMS TLA payment process is managed by USCG, G–CI Resource Management. Disbursements are
processed from a central location. Requests for payment should be submitted for processing through USCG training
center Yorktown Resource Management. An IMS initial payment request must be accompanied by a funds request
form and a copy of the ITO. Resource Management validates the student entitlement and funding authorization.
Payment of TLA is made through a convenience check to the IMS.

Section VI
Department of the Air Force

7–21. Air Force travel information for international military student officers
The IMSO will send required travel information by the Security Assistance Network Web.

7–22. Tickets
   a. The Randolph AFB commercial travel office will send tickets to the IMSO by an overnight parcel delivery
service or certified mail. For short-notice reservations or ticketing, the Randolph AFB commercial travel office will
confirm the reservations by phone, followed by the hard-copy backup to the requesting agency. A prepared ticket
advice will be generated by the carrier at the departure airport. The carrier will issue a ticket against the prepared ticket
advice to the traveler on demand (with positive identification; for example, passport).
   (1) Tickets issued by the Randolph AFB commercial travel office (only) that are not used will be returned to that
office with three copies of the international student’s ITO. Partially used tickets will be returned to the Randolph AFB
commercial travel office who will process a refund. Notify the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron/FM of
any returned tickets that are sent to Randolph AFB commercial travel office for refunds.
   (2) The IMSO is responsible for receipt or verification of tickets until delivered to the IMS.
   (3) Change of departure date on an issued ticket may be made by the local commercial travel office if time does not
permit changes by the Randolph AFB commercial travel office.
   (4) In case of an emergency, each Randolph AFB commercial travel office confirmation will include a toll-free
number should the student encounter any difficulty regarding their reservations or tickets.
   (5) If travel arrangements are required for an IMS with fewer than four hours lead time, the IMSO may use the local
commercial travel office for obtaining the necessary tickets or reservations.



124                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   (6) IMS transoceanic travel by Air Mobility Command is arranged according to applicable Air Force policies using
the USG (common user) tariff rate.
   b. Ticketing requests for Maxwell AFB IMS students may be processed locally through the Maxwell AFB official
travel office using JFTR guidance for ticketing for official travel.

7–23. Air Force International Military Education and Training travel payment
Control methods for travel payment for IMS will be as outlined in DFAS guidance on Procedures for Travel
Accounting Operations. DD Form 1588 (Record of Travel Payment) will be forwarded to each AFO at the new training
location. When final payment is made to the IMS at the final training location, the AFO will forward DD Form 1588 to
the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron/FM, 315 J Street West, Randolph AFB, TX 78150–4302, for final
auditing and file.

7–24. Air Force retainable instructional materials
The USAF PME courses for which the shipment of up to 200 pounds of RIM is authorized are the Air War College,
Air Command and Staff College Course, USAF Test Pilot School, and AFIT graduate programs. IMS attending
language instructor courses at DLIELC are authorized the shipment of 100 pounds of RIM. For all other formal
CONUS training courses, up to 50 pounds of RIM for each course is authorized.

7–25. Billeting service charges
   a. Officer IMS under FMS or IMET are required to personally defray the billeting service charge.
   b. Enlisted IMS under FMS or IMET will not normally be subject to service charges when occupying USAF
quarters for durations of 20 or more consecutive weeks. Enlisted IMS occupying USAF quarters for fewer than 20
weeks are subject to a service charge.
   (1) Enlisted IMS with ITO authorizing them an IMET living allowance will not be required to personally defray
these charges. Base billeting offices will submit invoices to their servicing DFAS office.
   (2) The IMET enlisted IMS who are not authorized an IMET living allowance and all FMS enlisted IMS will
personally defray the billeting service charge.

7–26. Supplemental payment
Claims for supplemental payment after a student has returned to the home country should be filed with the Security
Cooperation Organization and a copy forwarded to the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron/FM.

7–27. Family housing
On-base family housing is seldom available. When available, it will be according to AFI 32–6001.

7–28. Reimbursement for temporary duty to international military students
   a. Reimbursement of quarters cost in connection with TDY must be made from assigned training base funds since
these costs are calculated in the tuition rate.
   b. All IMS receiving a living allowance under IMET and attending AF professional or military education courses
identified in table 7–1, note 4, will continue to receive the accompanied rate while TDY. The IMS will also receive the
per diem rates for the location(s) to which they are TDY as part of their course of study without forfeiture of their
basic TLA. The SAMM, table C10.T3, (see table 7–1) and Defense Security Cooperation Agency policy letters provide
additional information concerning travel and living allowance issues.

7–29. Subsistence
Billing will be as prescribed in chapter 6.

7–30. International military student paydays
The IMS entitled to receive supplemental living allowances under IMET or an FMS case will normally be paid on the
1st day of the month. Travel and living allowances will be in accordance with JFTR where the individual is attending
training.




                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                               125
Chapter 8
Medical Requirements and Healthcare

Section I
General

8–1. Purpose
The purpose of this chapter is to delineate the medical requirements, entitlements, and reporting procedures for IMSs
and their authorized dependent(s). This chapter covers the required examinations, eligibility, benefits and reimburse-
ments for healthcare, hospitalization, and other medical topics. For the purposes of this regulation, the term healthcare
refers to both medical and dental care.

8–2. Responsibilities
   a. The Security Cooperation Officer (Security Cooperation Organization) will ensure—
   (1) Each IMS has completed a medical and dental examination by a medical authority (see para 8–3c) within 3
months prior to departure from home country for training before issuing an ITO.
   (2) Each dependent authorized on the ITO has completed a medical examination by a medical authority within three
months prior to departure from home country before issuing an ITO or amendment. See paragraph 8–4, Pregnancy
Policy, and paragraph 8–7a, Healthcare coverage.
   (3) All examinations are completed on DD Form 2807–1 (Medical History and DD Form 2808, Report of Medical
Examination). These forms and instructions for completing them are located within Health Affairs under Functional
Areas on the DISAM International Training Management Web site at http://www.disam.dsca.mil/itm. The forms and
associated laboratory results will be recorded in English using U.S. measurements. Also refer to paragraph 8–5 and the
MILDEP sections in this chapter for additional course specific medical examination requirements.
   (4) The IMS and dependents authorized to accompany or join the IMS are briefed on their responsibilities to
maintain healthcare coverage. If the IMS is financially responsible for coverage, the Security Cooperation Organization
will verify that the IMS has adequate health insurance prior to the issuance of an ITO.
   (5) Item 12 of the ITO specifies the correct source for IMS and/or dependent healthcare coverage/reimbursement.
See paragraph 8–6.
   (6) A sealed medical packet is developed that includes the following items. The IMS will hand carry this packet to
be delivered to the healthcare provider at the training installation, and will deliver a second copy in English of the
medical insurance policy to the IMSO.
   (a) DD Form 2807–1, Medical History.
   (b) DD Form 2808, Report of Medical Examination.
   (c) Radiology report of the chest x-ray (for those age 15 and older).
   (d) Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) laboratory results (for those age 15 and older).
   (e) Pregnancy laboratory results (female IMS only).
   (f) Dental panorex (only if required in the course prerequisites).
   (g) Other tests as required.
   (h) Health insurance policy (if applicable; must be in English).
   (i) Medical waiver approval (if applicable).
   b. International Military Student Office (IMSO) will review the ITO for the required healthcare statements and the
medical packet for completeness. Discrepancies will be reported to the MILDEP Country Program Manager and the
Security Cooperation Organization. The IMSO will forward the packet on to the local medical authority for storage and
the creation of an outpatient medical record.

8–3. Medical requirements
   a. The IMS selected by their country for training are presumed to be in good physical and mental health, as well as
being free from communicable diseases (see table 8–4). If it is discovered that an IMS cannot qualify for training by
reason of physical or mental condition and, in the opinion of medical authorities, will require treatment before entering
training, the IMS will be returned to the home country immediately, or as soon thereafter as their condition will permit
travel.
   b. Medical examinations are required for the IMS and each dependent listed on the ITO.
   c. Examination forms DD Form 2807–1 and DD Form 2808 combined serve as the official record and fulfill the
examination requirements of the Security Cooperation Education and Training Program (SCETP). These forms serve as
a single medical document certifying that the participant is free from communicable diseases and is medically qualified
for training or accompany the IMS. A DD Form 2808, block 81 will be signed by a physician, by a dentist in block 83
and by a foreign military representative in block 84. The foreign military representative is validating that the exam was
conducted in accordance with DSCA and Military Service requirements. The examination will include any laboratory



126                          AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
test that is deemed necessary for the examining physician to reach a conclusion about the presence of any abnormali-
ties, diseases, disabilities, or disqualifiers. Laboratory investigation for the diseases listed at table 8–4 are not
mandatory unless clinically indicated. The IMS (not dependents) from DSCA approved “fast track” countries may use
their national forms.
   (1) Medical examinations.
   (a) Serological tests for HIV and Acquired Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) are required for the IMS and each
dependant listed on the ITO. Dependants under the age of 15 will not be tested unless there is a medical reason to
suspect such infection. IMS with serologic evidence of HIV/AIDS are not necessarily ineligible for training. Country
may request a waiver for HIV/AIDS positive IMS and/or dependants from the MILDEP sponsoring the training. If the
MILDEP determines that the IMS is healthy enough to participate in training, that dependants are healthy, and that
neither present a threat to anyone else, the waiver may be approved.
   (b) Immunizations for each IMS will maintain current immunizations as prescribed by the World Health Organiza-
tion and the Public Health Service. (See table 8–1.) Authorized dependents are required to maintain those immuniza-
tions recommended by the World Health Organization and Public Health Service. Results will be recorded on DD
Form 2808, Item #73.
   (c) Chest x-ray for tuberculosis (TB) is a chest x-ray is required for the IMS and each authorized dependent 15 years
of age or over. Dependents under the age of 15 are not required to have a chest x-ray for TB; however, if the
dependent has evidence of contact with a person with TB, a tuberculin skin test will be performed and if positive, an x-
ray will be performed. If the initial chest x-ray shows any abnormalities, further evaluation will be performed via a
sputum smear test. If an individual needs to travel to the United States for training more than once in a 12 month
period and the chest x-ray prior to the initial training period is documented to be negative for active disease, a repeat
chest x-ray is not required unless the individual has symptoms or a clinical examination is suspicious for a pulmonary
(lung) problem. The same applies to the dependents with initial negative chest x-rays who accompany this student more
than once in a 12 month period. Results will be recorded on DD Form 2808, Item #73 and a copy of the laboratory
results will be attached.



Table 8–1
Immunizations
                                               Required immunizations for IMS
Disease                                                       Remarks
Measles, Mumps, Rubella
Polio
Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus (DPT)                          If immunization is given in U.S. then recommend; Tetanus, diphthe-
                                                              ria, and Pertussis (Tdap)
Varicella (Chickenpox)
Influenza B                                                   If vaccinated for Influenza within U.S., recommend using term
                                                              “Influenza.”
Hepatitis A & B                                               If attending medical training
Yellow fever                                                  If traveling from or through an infected area


                                        b. Recommended immunizations for dependents
Disease                                                       Remarks
Measles, Mumps, Rubella
Polio
Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus                                If immunization is given in U.S. then recommend; Tetanus, diphthe-
                                                              ria, and Pertussis (Tdap)
Varicella (Chickenpox)
Influenza B                                                   If vaccinated for Influenza within U.S., recommend using term
                                                              “Influenza.”
Pneumococcal                                                  Ages 0–18




                                 AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                      127
Table 8–1
Immunizations—Continued
Yellow fever                                                              Ages 19 and above if traveling from or through an infected area

Notes:
1 The Security Cooperation Organization will contact the school IMSO for local and state primary and secondary school immunizations for dependents.

These will vary from locale to locale. For immunization updates or questions, refer to: www.cdc.gov/nip or call 1–800–232–2522.




   (d) Female IMS will undergo a pregnancy examination. Results will be recorded on DD Form 2808 Item #73 and a
copy of the laboratory results will be attached. In order to participate in training, pregnant IMS are required to submit a
waiver request. See paragraphs 8–4 and 8–13.
   (2) Dental examinations. Each IMS will have a complete dental examination to ensure that the IMS does not require
treatment during training for caries (cavities), an infection or an oral disease. IMS who require an aviation/flight
examination will also undergo a dental panorex. If countries are not capable of performing a panorex, the panorex will
be performed at country expense at the first U.S. installation attended. The panorex will be included in the IMS
medical packet and hand carried to each training location. Results will be recorded on DD Form 2808 Item #43. Dental
examinations are not required for dependents.
   (3) The physician and dentist who sign the examination forms are verifying that the IMS is medically qualified to
attend training and is free from any communicable diseases of public significance. The IMS diagnosed with a
communicable disease(s) listed on table 8–4, communicable diseases, will not be issued an ITO. Dependents diagnosed
with a communicable disease(s) listed on table 8–4 will not be listed on the ITO.
   (4) If an IMS is certified capable of successfully undergoing instruction even though medical or dental conditions
capable of impacting training exist (for example, diabetes, cardiac condition, metabolic disorder, prosthetics), those
conditions will be noted on DD Form 2808, Item #77 and a statement will be included in Item #78 and ITO Item #15
that those medical conditions may have an impact on training if not properly controlled or monitored.
   d. When U.S. education/training of IMS takes place in a third country, the IMS must meet all of the medical
screening requirements of the third country.
Note. A third country is defined as a country other than the CONUS or the IMS home country.
   e. When training is to take place in home country; the medical screening per this chapter is not required. Security
Cooperation Organization should make sure the country understands that the IMS must meet the medical prerequisites
for the training.
   f. When the individual is in the United States for a noneducation/training purpose and the non-education/training
purpose remains the main reason that person is in the United States, medical screening is not required prior to
attendance at security cooperation education/training programs in the United States.
   g. When the individual is in the United States. for noneducation/training purpose and the purpose changes such that
the primary reason that person is now in the United States is to attend security cooperation education/training the
regular medical screening requirements and statements on the ITO will apply.

8–4. Pregnancy Policy
Dependents known to be pregnant will not be placed on the ITO or approved for travel unless/until the IMS shows
proof of medical coverage including pre/post natal care, delivery, and postpartum care for the dependent and care for
the newborn, a medical line is included in a FMS case, or the foreign government pays all expenses connected with
childbirth. In the latter case, the ITO remarks section will include the address to which the bills will be sent for
payment. If the IMS cannot or does not secure medical coverage for pregnancy prior to departure, IMS will proceed to
the United States unaccompanied. Dependents may proceed to the United States with an amended ITO after proper
medical coverage is obtained. Also see paragraph 8–6a healthcare coverage for dependents.

8–5. Course related medical requirements
The MILDEPs have identified courses that require additional or extensive medical/dental examinations. Such courses
are aviation, airborne, ranger, special forces, diving, explosive ordnance disposal, mountain warfare, reconnaissance,
and swimming. These courses are identified in the Training Military Articles and Services List. The Security Coopera-
tion Organization must carefully review the course requirements to determine if there are special medical and dental
requirements associated with attending the course. The Security Cooperation Organization must notify the examiner of
the additional examination requirements. If IMS home country is not able to perform the required course examination
requirements, the common examination listed in paragraph 8–3 will be performed to allow the IMS to proceed to a
U.S. training location. The Security Cooperation Organization will contact the first U.S. base training location to
coordinate further medical examinations set by the course. If the IMS is required to have an examination in CONUS,




128                                 AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
the cost of the examination and transportation will be borne by the foreign government. See Health Affairs link under
functional areas at http://www/disam.dsca.mil/itm/.

8–6. Medical eligibility
   a. The IMS and authorized dependents, except parents and parent-in-laws, under the SCETP are eligible to receive
healthcare in DOD facilities for the length of the training posted on the ITO.
   (1) The IMS and dependents from a country under the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and or
Partnership for Peace (PFP) that have a status of forces agreement (SOFA) on file with the U.S. Government have the
same access to healthcare as U.S. military personnel and dependents.
   (2) The IMS and dependents from non-NATO/PFP SOFA countries have access to healthcare facilities on a space
available basis.
   (3) The IMS and dependents covered by a Reciprocal Healthcare Agreement have the same access and priority to
healthcare in DOD facilities as U.S. military personnel and dependents. See paragraph 8–6d(3).
   (4) Exchange IMS and dependents are eligible for access to healthcare facilities subject to any existing exchange
agreements. Reimbursement for healthcare will be made if required by the exchange agreement, laws, and regulations
of the United States.
   (5) Paramilitary and civilian IMS and their authorized dependents are eligible for emergency care only.
   (6) The Security Cooperation Organization will inquire with the appropriate MILDEP regarding healthcare for IMS
in training at civilian or contractor locations.
   b. When IMS and/or authorized dependent reports to any medical facility for treatment, they must have in their
possession their ITO, a photo identification and if applicable, their health insurance card or policy. A parental
identification card will be used for children under the age of 10. Dependents listed on the ITO are the only dependents
authorized to have access and receive care in DOD healthcare facilities.
   c. Tri-Service Medical Care (TRICARE) is a DOD, regionally managed healthcare program for U.S. only active
duty and retired members of the uniformed services and their Families. The IMS and dependents are not enrolled in the
TRICARE healthcare plan. However, NATO/PFP SOFA countries participate in the TRICARE Standard program for
dependent outpatient healthcare only. Those TRICARE Standard dependents will have the same deductible and co-pay
as U.S. dependents when outpatient care is provided at civilian facilities.
   d. Medical treatment for the various SCETP is funded as follows, (ITO, Item #12):
   (1) The USG-funded programs, such as, the IMET Program, Regional Defense Combating Terrorism Fellowship
Program, International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Program, Counter-Drug Training Support Program and
others will pay for the IMS healthcare but not for dependent(s) healthcare. Dependents are required to maintain medical
coverage either through the foreign government or health insurance. USG-funded programs will not provide medical
coverage when training occurs in the IMS home country or a third country. See paragraph 8–4.
   (2) FMS.
   (a) FMS cases may have a medical line that is designated to fund medical care for the student. In some cases the
country authorizes and funds dependent healthcare coverage, as well.
   (b) The foreign government may elect to directly pay the IMS and/or dependent medical bills. The ITO, Items #12
and #15 will state where the bills are to be sent to for payment.
   (c) When the IMS is responsible for payment, they must have health insurance that meets DSCA standards.
   (3) Reciprocal Healthcare Agreements.
   (a) Reciprocal Healthcare Agreement are individual agreements between the U.S. DOD and the defense organization
of another country which offers comparable reciprocal healthcare to certain military, and in some instances, their
dependents from that country in U.S. based DOD facilities only, at no cost. These agreements will vary by country and
each one has an expiration date. Security Cooperation Organization will validate the training duration with the
Reciprocal Healthcare Agreement expiration date prior to issuing an ITO using this coverage. The U.S. authority for
Reciprocal Healthcare Agreement is the U.S. Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs.
   (b) Reciprocal Healthcare Agreement has precedence over all other U.S. government-funded programs when treated
in a U.S. based DOD facility.
   (c) Reciprocal Health Care Agreement is not applicable for treatment at civilian facilities. Many military installa-
tions do not have full-Service military treatment facilities. The Security Cooperation Organization should check with
IMSO concerning availability of medical care at the installation.
   (d) Reciprocal Health Care Agreement do not cover civilian and para-military students nor their dependents.
   (e) The IMS and accompanying dependent(s) who rely on a Reciprocal Healthcare Agreement for healthcare
coverage must also have healthcare coverage from the foreign government or health insurance per paragraph 8–7 to
cover care that may be received from civilian healthcare providers when DOD services are not available.
   (4) Aviation Leadership Program students are provided medical coverage by the U.S. Air Force.




                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                               129
8–7. Healthcare coverage
   a. Every IMS and accompanying dependent is required to have and maintain coverage for healthcare for the
duration of their travel and training. Failure to maintain coverage may result in the IMS removal from training and
return to home country. Coverage can be provided by the U.S. Government-funded program, FMS Case, foreign
government, Reciprocal Healthcare Agreement as noted in paragraph 8–5d(3); health insurance or a combinations of
these.
   b. Dependents are not authorized to accompany or join IMS in the U.S. unless the foreign government ensures
medical coverage for the dependents is provided during the IMS training through the FMS case medical line, directly
through the Foreign Government, NATO/PFP SOFA, through health insurance, a DOD Reciprocal Healthcare Agree-
ment, if applicable, or a combination of these programs. If there is a lapse in medical coverage or a situation arises
where coverage does not include the disease, illness, pregnancy or treatment, or the IMS fails to pay a co-pay/
deductible, the medical bills are the responsibility of the foreign government and will be forwarded to the foreign
government address listed on the ITO section 12, 15 or the Defense Attaché in the United States for payment. The IMS
will be removed from training and the IMS and dependents returned home if at any time the foreign government fails
to provide coverage or payment within 30 calendar days of notification by the MILDEP. If medical coverage is not
obtained for dependents prior to departure of the IMS for CONUS, dependents will not be authorized to accompany the
IMS. Dependents may be authorized to join IMS in CONUS after the required coverage is obtained and the ITO
amended.
   c. When the IMS is financially responsible for their authorized dependent healthcare costs, adequate health insur-
ance is required and must be demonstrated to the Security Cooperation Organization prior to issuance of an ITO or
listing of dependents on the ITO. Minimum acceptable insurance coverage is described in detail in the current DSCA
medical coverage policy message. Health insurance must remain in effect for the duration of the IMS and dependents
stay in the U.S. under security cooperation sponsorship.
   d. When medical coverage is provided by health insurance, a copy of the policy in English will be provided to the
Security Cooperation Organization, IMSO, and the servicing medical treatment facility. If the insurance company is not
U.S. based, the policy must have international benefits that cover care in the U.S. The lack of medical coverage for
IMS or dependent(s) (if applicable) revealed at any time during their stay in the U.S. will result in IMS or the foreign
government being responsible for the payment of incurred medical bills, removal of the IMS from training and the IMS
and or dependent(s) return to home country.
   e. All IMS participating in U.S. training in a third country are required to have insurance as their sole means of
medical coverage. Insurance coverage must be applicable to and must meet the requirements of the third country. See
paragraphs 8–3d and e.
   f. The IMS and or dependents who plan to visit other countries while attending education and training under
sponsorship of Security Assistance or Security Cooperation must also obtain healthcare coverage and meet the
insurance requirements, if applicable, of the countries they plan to visit.

8–8. Security assistance teams
   a. If a U.S. team member requires routine or emergency healthcare, and does not have ready access to the U.S.
Embassy health unit or the required medical service is not available, a referral decision will be made by the U.S.
Embassy’s regional medical officer in concert with the responsible U.S. MILDEP.
   b. The cost of treatment in a host nation medical facility will be borne by the foreign government.
   c. The cost of transportation to the nearest U.S. military treatment facility with the appropriate Service will be borne
by the foreign government.
   d. Medical and transportation costs will be charged to country FMS case or USG-funded Program. If there is not
enough money in the FMS case or USG-funded Program to cover expenses, the FMS case or USG-funded Program
will be amended to include these costs.
   e. Team members who are U.S. contractors are responsible for their own healthcare, including routine health
services and emergency medical evacuation, under provisions of the contract.

8–9. Hospitalization and disposition
   a. When an IMS or dependent requires hospitalization, the training installation will notify the Military Service and
local agencies in the chain of command, as appropriate. The notification will include all pertinent information
concerning the IMS or dependent’s condition as well as prognosis (see para 8–10). The Military Service will notify
DSCA, the Security Cooperation Organization, the commanders of combatant commands and other agencies in the
chain of command as appropriate. The IMSO will notify the Military Service when the patient status changes or when,
in the opinion of U.S. medical authorities, the hospitalization or disability could prevent the successful competition of
training. The School Commandant or IMSO will notify the Military Service by message and request disposition
instructions.
   b. When the IMS is scheduled for additional training at another installation, the IMSO at that installation will also
be notified if follow on training is terminated.



130                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
  c. When an IMS dependent hospitalization impacts on the IMS’s training, has political implications, or will result in
excessive medical charges, the school commandant, IMSO or designated representative will send a message to the
Military Service and appropriate agencies in the chain of command.
  d. For Service specific requirements, see sections II, III, or IV.

8–10. Medical reports and health records
   a. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 institutes business practices to protect the use
and disclosure of protected health information. The medical facility ensures the Health Insurance Portability and
Accountability Act compliance prior to the release of information to the military chain of command. The individual’s
right to privacy of medical information will be adhered to. The military chain of command will use the below format
when reporting medical information.
   b. When reporting a serious medical situation or hospitalization, use the WCN in lieu of patient names. If the patient
is a dependent, use the WCN and the dependent # from the ITO block 12b; for example, WCN 5004–2 with “2” being
the second dependent listed in block 12b. For Service specific requirements, see sections II, III, or IV.
   c. Each IMS or dependent who receives care at a medical facility is entitled to a personal copy of their inpatient and
outpatient medical records. Outpatient records will be provided to the IMS/dependent during their routine out-
processing. Inpatient records can be obtained upon the patient’s written request.

8–11. Subsistence while hospitalized
All patients are charged for hospital rations when hospitalized as an inpatient. Reimbursements are made as follows:
  a. Cost of subsistence for IMS with meal cards will be sent to the MILDEP for reimbursement.
  b. IMS without meal cards will pay locally at the medical facility.
  c. Dependents will pay locally at the medical facility.

8–12. Emergency healthcare
   a. Emergency healthcare is defined as care that saves life, eyesight, and limbs. A dental emergency is a situation
where dental treatment is required for relief of painful or acute conditions. Dentists are authorized to include in the
concept of a dental emergency, care that is required to keep the student progressing in their studies. Medical/dental care
that can wait until the following normal work day is not emergency care.
   b. Healthcare required during a Field Studies Program trip, when more than 40 miles from a DOD medical facility,
will be considered an emergency. See paragraph 8–16.
   c. Procedures—
   (1) The IMS or dependent shall report to the nearest emergency room, military or civilian, when emergency care is
required. If emergency medical services are required, the IMS will notify the IMSO as soon as practicable. The IMS
will provide a copy of their ITO, a copy of their ID card and insurance, if applicable, to the emergency room for billing
purposes. All care provided must be recorded as an “Emergency” for billing purposes.
   (2) When emergency care is received from a civilian healthcare facility the IMSO will—
   (a) Notify the nearest DOD medical facility Medical Services Account Office (MSCO) of the IMS/dependent visit
to a civilian emergency facility. If care is provided during an Field Studies Program trip, the IMSO will notify the
installation MSCO at the conclusion of the trip.
   (b) In situations where the medical bills are paid by the USG or a medical line on a FMS case, IMSO will obtain
three copies of the bill(s) for treatment and services including a statement signed by the doctor that states: “I certify
that the above services are necessary in treatment of the above named individual, that services were as stated, and that
charges are not in excess of those customarily made in this vicinity.” If care is provided during an Field Studies
Program trip, the IMSO will also provide a statement including the fact that treatment occurred during an Field Studies
Program trip.
   (c) Forward the bill(s), the civilian medical statement, and three copies of the IMS’ ITO to the appropriate MILDEP
agency for payment. See paragraph 8–16 for details.
   (d) When the ITO states the IMS is financially responsible for healthcare, the IMS will either pay the bill, or in the
case of insurance, will pay the deductible and any co-payment. The medical facility will collect the IMS insurance
information and directly bill the insurance firm for the balance due
   (e) When the ITO states the foreign government will pay for healthcare, the civilian medical facility will directly bill
the foreign government point of contact listed on the ITO.
   (f) The local DOD medical facility MSCO will assist and process reimbursements. The MSCO will forward these
forms to the appropriate MILDEP for disbursement.
   (g) For Service specific requirements, see section II, II, or IV.

8–13. Waivers
  a. The IMS may have medical conditions that do not prohibit their training. Also, while requirements dictate that the
IMS must be free of communicable diseases and in good health an individual may have a communicable disease that is


                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  131
no longer a risk to the general populace. In such instances, a medical waiver may be warranted/requested. However, the
communicable diseases listed in table 8–4 will not be waived. Requests for medical waivers will be submitted through
the commanders of combatant commands to the MILDEP Training Policy Officer(s) and will contain the information
listed below. Everyone will take the necessary precautions to protect the patient’s identity. The request will be
submitted as a standard memorandum and will include—
   (1) Country.
   (2) WCN and IMET FY or FMS case number (if the waiver is for an accompanying dependent, state WCN xxxx
dependent and relationship, that is, xxx, dependent, spouse).
   (3) Scheduled Training Military Articles and Service List and report date.
   (4) Medical condition and copies of the appropriate laboratory results.
   b. Medical waivers will not be approved for pregnant IMS under a USG Grant Program unless the foreign
government submits a signed statement with the waiver request agreeing that the foreign government will pay for pre/
postnatal care, delivery and postpartum care for the IMS and care for the newborn. Medical waivers will not be
approved for pregnant IMS under any other program unless IMS has medical coverage for pre/postnatal care, delivery
and postpartum care and care for the newborn.
   c. The MILDEP Training Policy Officer(s) will coordinate the waiver request with the MILDEP/Military Service.
IMS will not depart home station until a decision is rendered by the MILDEP Training Policy Officer.
   d. If a waiver is granted, Security Cooperation Organization will enter the following information on the ITO, Item
#15: Medical waiver for (name) approved on mm-dd-yyyy. Do not list the nature of the waiver.

8–14. Constraints
   a. Under no circumstances will the SCETP be utilized for the sole purpose of obtaining medical care for IMS or
dependents. Pre-existing conditions will be considered on a case-by-case basis.
   b. Elective medical, surgical, or dental care is that type of care desired or requested by the individual or recom-
mended by the physician or dentist which, in the opinion of professional authority, can be performed at another time or
place without jeopardizing the health or well-being of the patient. The overall policy regarding pre-existing conditions,
elective and definitive healthcare is that moderation should prevail, except for bona fide emergency situations. Security
Cooperation Organization personnel will not imply to an IMS that U.S. DOD medical facilities will be available for
elective care.
   c. Prosthetic devices, such as eye glasses, hearing aids or orthopedic footwear, are not authorized for issue to non-
NATO/PFP SOFA IMS or to any dependents. Eyeglasses may be furnished to non-NATO IMS when necessary for the
IMS to perform their assigned duties but only when eyeglasses are not available through civilian/commercial sources.
   d. When an IMSO is notified that an IMS or their dependents have a communicable disease, no travel arrangements
will be made until they are cleared or received a waiver by the medical authority. Circumstances will be reported to the
Military Service. For Service specific requirements, see sections II, III, or IV.

8–15. Medical screening, urinalysis, blood screening, and mandatory drug testing programs in
CONUS
   a. Medical screening. Except as noted below, medically certified IMS are exempt from medical examinations or
Implementing Agency screening programs before beginning training at U.S. training installations. Students may be
tested medically as follows:
   (1) At and by any U.S. training installations when the associated physical examination is an established prerequisite
for admission for training that involves exceptional physical activity or safety.
   (2) At and by a U.S. training installation on an exceptional basis pending development of particular testing
capability, that does not exist in country. In this instance, country will pay for the cost of testing.
   (3) Physical examination in conjunction with sick call, emergency treatment or hospitalization in order to diagnose
or treat a student’s ailment.
   b. Mandatory urinalysis, blood screening, and mandatory drug testing. The IMS are excluded from any mandatory
Military Service urinalysis and blood screening programs other than for selected training that involves exceptional
physical activity, aviation training, or safety and for which the associated physical examination is a prerequisite of the
course. Any indication or evidence of alcohol or drug abuse or a debilitating or communicable disease will be reported
to the IMSO and Military Service. IMS may be tested under the following circumstances:
   (1) During a command-directed probable cause search or seizure when there is reason to believe the urine to be
collected contains evidence of illegal drug use.
   (2) When consent has been provided voluntarily by IMS as part of a consent search conducted or self-referral to
substance abuse counseling.
   (3) Following any safety mishap under the regulations of the Military Service involved, a specimen may be
collected from any individual directly or indirectly involved. Samples so collected may be used for inclusion as
independently collected evidence in a safety mishap investigation or other investigations. Specimens will be treated in
accordance with DODI 6055.7 and applicable Military Service regulations.


132                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   (4) During a command-directed examination of an IMS to determine IMS competence for training or need for
counseling, rehabilitation, or other medical treatment when the commander has reason to question IMS behavior (for
example, aberrant, bizarre or uncharacteristic behavior, unauthorized absences, violations of safety regulations, and
breaches of discipline).
   c. HIV/AIDS. The IMS country authority will be notified immediately through CONFIDENTIAL U.S. Military
Service channels of an IMS who is diagnosed as antibody positive following a physical examination or as a result of
the IMS treatment or hospitalization. In order to protect the confidentiality of the individual, only the country code,
WCN, and the foreign identification number will be used. Report shall be made when confirmed by the Western Blot
Test. The CONFIDENTIAL message should also contain the results of the medical evaluation for fitness for continued
training.
   (1) An IMS who manifests evidence of progressive clinical illness or immunological deficiency will be immediately
released from training and returned to home country.
   (2) An IMS who is antibody positive but manifests no evidence of progressive clinical illness or immunological
deficiency (physical and laboratory assessment, demonstration of ability to respond to immunizations, and ability to
mount a protective immune response to immunizations or exposure to naturally occurring pathogens) subject to the
approval of the IMS military authority will continue in training or be rescheduled. The following conditions will be
included as part of the notification to the IMS country referred to in paragraph 8–9, medical reports.
   (a) Each IMS will accept counseling; will agree to follow standard preventive medicine requirements designed to
reduce the risks of disease transmission to other persons; and will agree not to donate blood. IMS members that do not
agree to follow preventive medicine requirements will be returned to their home country.
   (b) The IMS will receive a comprehensive clinical and immunological evaluation at least annually.
   (c) Noncompliance with the above will be cause for the termination of training and return of the IMS to their home
country. The cost of return travel of the student will be at the expense of the IMS USG-funded Country Program or
their government. The Country Program will be charged a proportionate share of the training completed by the IMS but
not less than 50 percent of the course cost.
   (d) While it may not be necessary to limit the activities of IMS who do not have evidence of progressive disease,
the school may consult with the appropriate base, post, or station medical authority to determine if training and related
activities should be limited in order to protect the IMS health and safety as well as that of others. If such limitations
result in failure to meet the requisites for successful completion of training, the IMS will be terminated from training
and returned home at the expense of the USG-funded Program or the foreign government. The country will also be
charged a proportionate share of the training completed by the IMS as outlined in the paragraph, above.
   (3) The IMS who voluntarily request HIV screening will be tested, provided that the student’s government approves
and agrees to assume the cost of such testing. The IMS must also agree to accept the possible consequences to include:
   (a) Counseling on the risks of disease transmission, methods of prevention, and IMS agreement not to donate blood.
   (b) A comprehensive clinical immunological evaluation at least annually.
   (c) Possible return to the home country.

8–16. Reimbursements
   a. Regardless of where or by whom care is rendered, military or civilian, those facilities will be reimbursed in
accordance with DOD and MILDEP regulations (see item #12 and or #15 on the ITO). The exceptions are for care
rendered under a Reciprocal Health Care Agreement, or outpatient care provided to NATO/PFP SOFA IMS and
authorized dependents in DOD medical facilities.
   b. The IMS who are responsible for their dependents’ healthcare per the ITO are required to maintain health
insurance. The IMS and/or dependent(s) are required to pay any deductibles and co-payments. The medical facility
(DOD or civilian) will directly file for reimbursement with the insurance company.
   c. In situations where the medical bills are paid by the USG or charged to the medical line of the FMS case, the
servicing medical facility will send the bills to the appropriate MILDEP on DD Form 7 (Report of Treatment
Furnished, Pay Patients, Hospitalization Furnished (Part A)) or DD Form 7A (Report of Treatment Furnished, Pay
Patients, Outpatient Treatment Furnished (Part B)).
   d. Civilian facilities will contact the local DOD medical facility MSCO or the MILDEP for verification of billing
instructions for non-insurance claims. DOD facilities will process civilian reimbursements in accordance with Military
Service procedures. See sections II. III, and IV. IMSOs are required to provide their local DOD billing contact
information to the civilian provider.
   e. For Service specific requirements, see sections II, III, or IV.

8–17. Air evacuation
   a. Aeromdical evacuation is authorized for IMS in accordance with DODI 6000.11 when necessary. Reimbursement
rates for patient movement include both the cost of transportation and the cost of en-route medical care. The full daily
hospitalization rate is charged for each day patients are in the Aeromedical Evacuation System. The cost of transporta-
tion and enroute medical care will be borne by the foreign government. Applicable patient movement reimbursement


                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                 133
policies and third party billing procedures and guidance for collections in accordance with 32 CFR Part 220 (reference
(m)).
  b. The SCOs will be contacted if IMS requires air evacuation to their home country. SCOs will notify the
appropriate foreign government representative(s).

Section II
Department of the Army

8–18. References
Additional references for the Department of the Army are listed in appendix A.

8–19. Filing for healthcare reimbursement
Reimbursements for medical costs will be processed to the Army MILDEP: Commander, U.S. Army Medical
Command (MCRM–F), 2050 Worth Road, Suite 9, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78254–6000, telephone (210) 221–7860.
Refer to the ITO, Item #12. DD Forms 7 and or 7A will be used for DOD reimbursements and SF 1034 for civilian
reimbursements.

8–20. Medical reports
Per paragraph 8–9, medical reports will be forwarded to SATFA country program manager.

8–21. Unique examination requirements
   a. U.S. Army aviation examinations. International military pilots and IMS attending U.S. Army flight training are
required to meet the appropriate U.S. Army Aviation Class medical standards per AR 40–501, chapter 4–1c. IMS from
NATO/PFP nations will adhere to standardized agreement (STANAG) 3526 (see para (1)). IMS from non-NATO/PFP
nations will adhere to policy and procedures outlined below (see para (2)).
   (1) In accordance with NATO/PFP STANAG 3526 edition 6, NATO and PFP IMS members will conduct their
normal flight physical examination using their military’s qualified flight surgeons. Parent nations are responsible for
standards of primary selection, permanent medical disqualification, and determination of temporary flying disabilities
exceeding 30 days.
   (a) The U.S. Army will accept the medical category and qualification for flying status, including the expiration date.
Parent nations will provide a medical statement in English describing the IMS’s medical fitness for flying duties, and
forward the latest flight physical report with pertinent medical information and other pertinent documentation helpful in
case of post-mishap identification purposes (fingerprints, dental records, and so forth) to the U.S. Army Aero-medical
Activity (USAAMA) (MCXY–AER), Building 301, Fort Rucker, AL, USA 36362.
   (b) Upon reporting to the U.S. Army training facility, the local flight surgeon will review the IMS’s medical
information, insure there has been no change in medical status, and issue a DA Form 4186 (Medical Recommendation
of Flying Duty), using the expiration date assigned by the parent nation, for medical clearance for local flying duties.
   (c) In cases where the expiration date for flying status occurs during training, periodic flight, physical examinations
will be conducted in accordance with U.S. Army policies and procedures, and entered in the Aeromedical Electronic
Resource Online. A copy of the flight physical report will be forwarded to the appropriate aeromedical authority of the
Parent Nation for review and determination of fitness to fly.
   (d) If a medical issue is discovered or occurs prior to completion of training, any provider may temporarily ground
the IMS until resolution using U.S. Army policies and procedures. Only a U.S. DOD Flight Surgeon may return the
IMS to flying status. If the grounding condition is of more than 30 days or potentially permanently disqualifying, the
case will be referred to the parent nation for action in accordance with its regulations. The parent nation is responsible
for the costs per established agreements.
   (2) If the IMS is not from a NATO/PFP nation, and not subject to STANAG 3526, the IMS will need to meet U.S.
Army standards with submission and approval through the USAAMA (MCXY–AER), Building 301, Fort Rucker, AL,
USA 36362.
   (a) If available, a U.S. Army aviation medical examination will be performed by a qualified U.S. DOD flight
surgeon before the IMS departs from their home station; the cost of the examination and transportation will be borne
by the foreign government. A flight student must meet Class 1 standards. A rated aviator must meet Class 2 standards.
   (b) If a U.S. DOD flight surgeon is not available, a U.S. Army aviation medical examination may be performed by a
parent nation flight surgeon and submitted to the USAAMA for review. A flight student must meet Class 1 standards.
A rated aviator must meet Class 2 standards.
   (c) Flight physical examinations should be documented in English on DD Forms 2807–1 and 2808 in accordance
with U.S. Army flight standards. The flight physical examination will be given as soon as possible to prevent
cancellation of training because of physical non-qualification. References and forms are available at https://aamaweb.
usaama.rucker.amedd.army.mil/.




134                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   (d) Host nation waivers for medically disqualifying conditions will be reviewed by the U.S. Army Aviation School
and the USAAMA.
   (e) Upon the IMS’s arrival at the U.S. Army training location, a U.S. DOD flight surgeon will review Aeromedical
Electronic Resource Online and all examinations/applicable waivers prior to completing a DA Form 4186 and prior to
the IMS participation in actual aerial flight.
   (f) If a new disqualifying defect is discovered upon arrival to the U.S. Army training location, the IMS will undergo
the necessary evaluations for requesting the new medical waiver/exception to policy through the appropriate U.S. Army
Aviation Waiver Authority. The parent nation is responsible for the costs per established agreements. The medical
examination/aeromedical summary will be referred from the DOD flight surgeon to the Director, USAAA
(MCXY–AER), Building 301, Fort Rucker, AL 36362–5377, for advice, recommendation for waiver/exception to
policy approval. Waiver approval authority for IMS will be in accordance with AR 40–501, chapter 6–20a, Command-
er, Human Resource Command (TAPC–PLA), 200 Stovall Street, Hoffman Building, Room 3N25, Alexandria, VA
22332–0413. Temporary up-slips (DA Form 4186) may be given pending receipt of the waiver per the aeromedical
policy letters. For further questions or requests status please contact the Chief, Flight Physical Review and Disposition,
by phone (334–255–7430/7575, DSN 558 or e-mail: flight_physical_review_and_disposition@usaama.amedd.army.mil.
   b. Cardiovascular screening.
   (1) All IMS age 40 and older and required to participate in mandatory physical fitness training and testing will
undergo a cardiovascular screening (CVS) as a component of their predeparture examination. The CVS consists of a
fasting blood sugar test; a fasting lipid profile, including total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, high density
lipoprotein, and triglycerides; and an electrocardiogram with results posted on DD Form 2808 Item #73 and attach a
copy of the laboratory results. A smoking history, if applicable, will be recorded on DD Form 2807–1, section 30.
   (2) If countries do not have the capability of performing a CVS during the predeparture examination, the CVS will
be performed at country expense at the school location requiring mandatory physical fitness participation.
   (3) The school(s) requiring PT participation and testing will forward the IMS medical packet to the local medical
authority for review. The IMS may take part in physical training, to include diagnostic physical fitness tests, unless
profiled or contra-indications to exercise exist. The IMS will not take part in a physical fitness test for record until
cleared by the local U.S. medical authorities.
   c. Certain courses, such as flight, special operations, airborne, and ranger have medical requirements in addition to
those in the routine examination required for all IMS. The Security Cooperation Organization should check the course
requirements in Training Management System to determine what is needed to attend each course.

Section III
Department of the Navy (United States Navy, United States Marine Corps, and the United States Coast
Guard)

8–22. References
Additional references for the Department of the Navy are listed in appendix A.

8–23. Ship transfers and foreign vessel overhaul
If IMS of foreign naval ships being overhauled use messing and berthing facilities at U.S. Navy activities ashore, the
local U.S. Navy authority concerned will ensure that such IMS are medically screened. IMS of foreign ships
undergoing overhaul who receive training at USN activities during the overhaul period will also be medically screened.
The activity accomplishing the medical examinations will endorse the ITO to the effect that a physical examination
was conducted in accordance with this regulation. Reimbursement for the medical examination will be in accordance
with the ITO.

8–24. High risk training
   a. Aviation training. The Security Cooperation Organization must ensure that the required medical examination,
medical records and laboratory test accompany the IMS in the sealed medical packet. USN aviation program physical
standards are determined by USN in coordination with the parent nation. Some medical conditions may exist that are
within the country’s physical standards, yet may or may not be waived under the USN standards. The USN retains
authority to determine permanent medical disqualification from USN aviation programs. The USN in coordination with
the country is responsible for determination of temporary flying disabilities exceeding 30 days. Periodic examinations
will be conducted according to USN procedures.
   (1) Undergraduate flight training. All undergraduate flight training begins at the Naval Aviation Schools Command,
Pensacola, FL, where all aviation students must pass an additional rigorous medical examination performed by USN
designated medical officers at the Naval Operational Medical Institute. Cost of this examination and any treatment
required to meet course medical prerequisites will be paid by the country. IMS must be prepared to pass a physical
readiness test and a swim test in accordance with standards as outlined in the Navy International Training Catalog.
   (2) Graduate flight training. The Security Cooperation Organization must ensure the required medical examination,



                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                 135
medical records, laboratory test and country Flight Physical, in English, are included in the sealed medical packet. The
local U.S. Medical Treatment Facility flight surgeon shall prepare Aeromedical Clearance Form NAVMED 6410/2
(Clearance Novice (Aeromedical)) based on the statement of medical fitness for flying duties issued by the foreign
country and any additional medical examinations required to meet USN physical standards. Pre-existing conditions
waived by the country will be accepted unless the condition represents a risk to safety of flight. If there is progression
of the IMS existing medical condition, USN medical standards apply regarding fitness to perform flight duty and
remain in effect when in the United States.
   (3) New medical conditions. If a new medical condition arises (for example, illness or injury), the military flight
surgeon providing routine care will determine the IMS fitness to fly based on USN aviation medical regulations and
procedures. Conditions with potential waiver implications shall be handled in accordance with paragraph 8–26, below.
   (a) Temporary flying disabilities likely to exceed 30 days and conditions likely to lead to permanent aeromedical
disqualification should be referred to the country via the command of record, Chief of Naval Air Training and Naval
Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity.
   (b) The IMS who develop new medical problems and are determined not to be within established USN aviation
standards that can be waived, may request a waiver of physical standards. Waivers will be routed via the command of
record, Chief of Naval Air Training and Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity.
   (c) The IMS that develop new medical problems that are determined not to be within established USN aviation
standards, when waivers are not granted, will have this condition reported, by the attending flight surgeon. This
notification shall be routed via the command of record, Chief of Naval Air Training and Naval Education and Training
Security Assistance Field Activity.
   (d) Medical conditions that develop or are discovered that are within the USN physical standards but may pose a
risk to safety of flight will be referred to Chief of Naval Air Training and Naval Education and Training Security
Assistance Field Activity for resolution or disposition.
   (4) Medical delays. The IMS who experience significant medical delays shall be managed in accordance with
existing Naval Training Command (NATRACOM) directives regarding medical surveillance of any student who
experiences medical delay.
   (5) Anthropometrics. IMS shall receive anthropometric codes prior to aerial training to ensure anthropometric
compatibility in accordance with Naval Air Instruction 3710.9C for all planned phases of flight training to be
conducted.
   (6) Conflicting directives. For IMS for which specific MOAs exist between the United States and home country that
conflict with this directive, the MOA shall take precedence.
   b. Basic underwater demolition seal training. The basic underwater demolition seal course is the most physiologi-
cally challenging course offered in the maritime environment and has the highest attrition rate. All candidates must
have a Diver/Bud/S Medical Screening Questionnaire prepared and signed by a competent medical authority in advance
of training and included in the sealed medical packet. Copy of the questionnaire can be found at http://www.disam.
dsca.mil/itm/. If additional medical examination/test is required the cost will be paid by the country.
   c. Diver training. All candidates must have a Diver/Bud/S Medical Screening Questionnaire prepared and signed by
a competent medical authority in advance of training and included in the sealed medical packet. Copy of the
questionnaire can be found at http://www.disam.dsca.mil/itm/. If additional medical examination/test is required the
cost will be paid by the country.
   d. Explosive ordinance disposal training. Medical examination requirements can be found at http://www.disam.dsca.
mil/itm/functional/hlth_affairs. IMS must have this medical examination prior to reporting for training. A copy of the
examination and all required medical/laboratory test will be included in the sealed medical packet. If additional medical
examination/test is required the cost will be paid by the country.
   e. Mountain warfare training (high altitude). Medical examinations for the courses at the Marine Corps Mountain
Warfare Training Center must include additional medical screenings when indicated in the course descriptions in the
Marine Corps Desktop Guide for sickle cell traits and the enzyme deficiency G6PD. These medical screenings must be
completed prior to arriving at the Mountain Warfare Training Center.
   f. Reconnaissance training. Students must have normal color and visual acuity, and be medically qualified and free
of any cold, upper respiratory, ear, nose, or skin disorders, or any other disorders that would preclude participation in
prolonged salt water training.
   g. Examination availability. If the country does not have the capability to perform the required medical examina-
tions for high risk training, the Security Cooperation Organization must arrange to have the IMS examined at the
closest U.S. medical facility. Cost of transportation and examination will be borne by the country.

8–25. Hospitalization/serious medical incident notification procedures
  a. Notification of hospitalization/serious medical incident for Navy IMS and dependents will be sent to Naval
Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity with information copies to Navy IPO, BUMED, DSCA, the
Combatant Command, the Security Cooperation Organization and others, as appropriate.
  b. Notification of hospitalization/serious medical incident for USMC IMS and dependents will be sent to Security


136                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Cooperation Education and Training Center, in accordance with current Marine Corps Serious Incident Report (SIR)
procedures, with information copies to Navy IPO, BUMED, Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field
Activity, DSCA, the Combatant Command, the Security Cooperation Organization and others as appropriate.
  c. Notification of hospitalization/serious medical incident for USCG IMS and dependents will be sent to G–CI.
Upon receipt, G–CI will disseminate to Navy IPO, DSCA, DOS, the Combatant Command, the Security Cooperation
Organization and others, as appropriate.

8–26. Waiver request
Navy IPO is the waiver approval authority. Requests for medical waivers will be sent to Navy IPO Training Policy
Officer with a copy to the appropriate Military Service. Navy IPO will coordinate with BUMED and Military Service
prior to granting or disapproving a waiver request. Requests for medical waivers for the USCG will be coordinated on
a case-by-case basis by USCG International Affairs (G–CI). Requests for medical waivers for USMC will be
coordinated on a case-by-case basis with Security Cooperation Education and Training Center.

8–27. Reimbursement procedures
   a. USG-funded IMS and FMS IMS and dependents whose care/medical examination is charged to the FMS Case.
   (1) Request for reimbursement for care/medical examination received in DOD medical activities will be sent to
Commanding Officer (Code N–8), Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, 250 Dallas Street,
Suite B, Pensacola, FL 32508–5269. Invoices will be accompanied by a complete ITO. IMSO who have an IMS in
USCG training programs who receives care from a USCG medical facility must coordinate with their respective
location to ensure that medical billings are sent to USCG International Affairs (G–CI) for processing. Billings must
contain student name, country, WCN, date of treatment, and Medical Expense and Performance Reporting System code
and total cost.
   (2) Request for reimbursement for care/medical examination received in Civilian medical activities will be sent
through the IMS to Commanding Officer (Code N–8), Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field
Activity, 250 Dallas Street, Suite B, Pensacola, FL 32508–5269. The bill with completed NAVMED Form 2161
(Referral for Civilian Care), will be accompanied by a complete ITO. For IMS in USCG training programs, invoices
should be sent to USCG International Affairs (G–CI). A copy of the civilian healthcare invoice, a statement of non-
availability and a copy of the ITO must be forwarded to USCG International Affairs (G–CI). The IMSO will describe
the circumstances on the NAVMED Form 2161 when the civilian care is required during an Field Studies Program
event.
   b. When healthcare (for either IMS or dependent) is the responsibility of the foreign government; care/medical
examination received in DOD and civilian medical facilities, bills will be sent directly to the cognizant Embassy in
Washington DC. The IMSO will provide the healthcare provider with a copy of the IMS ITO and address of the
appropriate embassy if it does not appear on the ITO.
   c. When healthcare (for either IMS or dependent) is covered by health insurance, DOD and civilian medical
facilities will bill the insurance company directly.

Section IV
Department of the Air Force

8–28. References (http://www.e-publishing.af.mil)
Additional references for the Department of the Air Force are listed in appendix A.

8–29. Billing procedures
Billing procedures are identified in the individual’s ITO, item #12. If the ITO states payment is to be made under the
FMS case, then send the bill to the Military Service sponsoring the individual. For the Air Force, the address is Air
Force Security Assistance Training Squadron/FM 315 J Street West, Randolph AFB, TX 78150–4302, in accordance
with AFH 41–114.

8–30. Medical reports
Medical reports per paragraph 8–7 and 8–8 will be forwarded to the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron
country program manager at the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron/FM 315 J Street West, Randolph
AFB, TX 78150–4302, and info copy SAF/International Affairs, 1740 AF Pentagon, Washington, DC 20330–1740.
Include the individuals name, grade, service number, home country, diagnosis, prognosis, expected time, and type of
disposition, and recommendation on whether return to home country is indicated. If “MINIMIZE” restrictions are in
place, send the message priority and note “MINIMIZE CONSIDERED.” If the patient is subsequently transferred to
their home country, provide a complete set of medical records and ensure the patient’s personal effects accompany the
individual. Movement is requested by Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron, not by the Medical Treatment
Facility through GPMRC, in accordance with AFH 41–114.



                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                              137
8–31. Physical standard requirements
  a. Physical standards of all international students attending Air Force training programs must be in accordance with
AFI 48–123.
  b. Any student who fails to meet medical standards will be managed in an individual basis by HQ AETC/SG and
HQ AETC/International Affairs, who will in turn, coordinate with AF/SG, SAF/International Affairs, as appropriate.

8–32. Unique examination requirements
   a. Air Force aviation medical examinations—
   (1) IMS who are scheduled for flight training in U.S. Air Force Service schools are required to meet USAF Flight
Class I, International Affairs, or II medical standards. (See AFI 48–123 V3, chap 1 and Attachment 4. Also see AFI
48–123 V3, chap 5.)
   (2) IMS who have received a current, valid aviator rating in the armed forces of their respective countries will be
considered the same as USAF aviators and will be required to pass a Flying Class II medical examination and posses
an oral panorex. The Security Cooperation Organization will issue the necessary travel order and fund cite.
   b. The predeparture examination should be performed as early as possible to prevent cancellation of training because
of physical non-qualification. The examining officer will determine the individual’s physical qualification for the flying
course. Requests for a waiver will be sent to the HQ AETC/SGP, HQ AETC/SGPS 63 Main Circle, Ste 3 Randolph
AFB, TX 78150–4549, DSN 487–3900, Comm (210) 652–3900. (See AFI 48–123 V3, chap 5.)
   c. Examination records, DD Form 2807–1 and DD Form 2808 and an oral panorex will be hand carried by the IMS
and will accompany the individual throughout aviation training.
   d. IMS undergoing physical reexamination in the United States prior to beginning flight training will be required to
meet Flying Class II medical standards for flying (See AFI 48–123 V3, chap 1 and attachment 4).



Table 8–2
International military student medical benefits and eligibility
Benefit                                                                           Eligibility
                         NATO/PFP          NATO/PFP             NON NATO            NON NATO             Paramilitary & ci- Paramilitary & civilian
                         SOFA              SOFA                 USG-funded          FMS & PME            vilian             FMS & PME
                         USG-funded        FMS & PME            programs                                 USG-funded pro-
                         programs                                                                        grams
Outpatient, direct       YES               YES                  YES                 YES                  NO                 NO
care                     See note 1        See note 1
Outpatient, emer-        YES               YES                  YES                 YES                  YES                YES
gency                    See note 1        See note 1
Inpatient, direct care   YES               YES                  YES                 YES                  NO                 NO
Inpatient, emergency YES                   YES                  YES                 YES                  YES                YES
Immunizations            YES               YES                  YES                 YES                  NO                 NO
                         See note 1        See note 1
Dental care              YES               YES                  Emergency           Emergency only       Emergency only     Emergency only
                         See note 1        See note 1           only
CHAMPUS                  NO                NO                   NO                  NO                   NO                 NO
TRICARE
Supplemental care        Diagnostic        Diagnostic test      Diagnostic tests Diagnostic tests        NO                 NO
                         test only         only                 only             only
Prosthetic devices       YES               YES                  NO                  NO                   NO                 NO
Aeromedical evacua- YES                    YES                  YES                 YES                  NO                 NO
tion
Reimbursement rate       IMET Rate         Full Reimbursa-      IMET Rate           Full Reimbursa-      IMET Rate          Full Reimbursable
                                           ble Rate                                 ble Rate                                Rate
Notes:
1 Reimbursement is not required in accordance with the NATO PFP SOFA agreement.
2 If the country has a Reciprocal Health Care Agreement, the agreement takes precedence in DOD facilities.
3 Supplemental care purchased/provided by nongovernmental healthcare.
4 Providers/facilities.




138                                   AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Table 8–3
Authorized dependents medical benefits and eligibility
Benefit                                                                                   Eligibility
                                          NATO/PFP                         NON NATO                        Paramilitary and civilian
                                          SOFA
Outpatient, direct care                   YES                              YES                             NO
                                          See note 1
Outpatient, emergency                     YES                              YES                             YES
                                          See note 1
Inpatient, direct care                    YES                              YES                             NO
Inpatient, emergency                      YES                              YES                             YES
Immunizations                             YES                              YES                             NO
                                          See note 1
Dental Care                               Emergency only                   Emergency only                  Emergency only
Civilian Health and Medical Program Outpatient care only                   NO                              NO
of the Uniformed Services/TRICARE
Standard
Supplemental care                         Diagnostic test only             NO                              NO
Prosthetic devices                        NO                               NO                              NO
Aeromedical evacuation                    YES                              YES                             NO
Reimbursement rate                        Full Reimbursable Rate           Full Reimbursable Rate          Full Reimbursable Rate
Notes:
1 Reimbursement is not required in accordance with the NATO PFP SOFA agreement.
2 If the country has Reciprocal Health Care Agreement, the agreement takes precedence in DOD facilities.
3 Supplemental Care purchased/provided by nongovernmental healthcare.
4 Providers/facilities.




Table 8–4
Communicable diseases of public significance
The presence of the following diseases makes the individual ineligible to enter the U.S. or obtain a Visa. Waivers will not be granted.


Chancroid
Cholera or suspected cholera
Gonnorhea
Granuloma Inguinal
Hansen’s Disease (leprosy), Infectious
HIV Infection
Lymphogranuloma Venereum
Plague
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome
Suspected viral hemorrhagic fevers (Lassa, Marburg, Ebola, Congo-Crimean, other not yet isolated or named)
Suspected smallpox
Syphilis, Infectious state
Tuberculosis, infectious state
Yellow Fever




                                     AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                           139
Chapter 9
Invitational Travel Orders

Section I
Preparation and Use

9–1. Purpose
The purpose of this chapter is to provide procedures for the preparation and use of the ITO for IMS trained under
security cooperation and other programs administered by the security cooperation community.

9–2. Basic document
An ITO must be issued for every IMS being administered under the security cooperation program and the responsibil-
ity for doing this is the singular responsibility of the overseas security assistance office (Security Cooperation
Organization). This includes students funded under all of the programs listed in the Joint Security Cooperation
Education and Training, paragraph 3–6. The ITO provides recognition of the military status of the IMS and is the
controlling document for authorized training terms, conditions, and privileges. The ITO is also the basic document used
for accounting purposes. In addition, it provides guidance to the appropriate agencies to determine which support is
payable. The Security Cooperation Organization will issue a separately numbered ITO for each IMS: multiple students
will not be entered on a single ITO.

9–3. Format
   a. The Security Cooperation Organization training manager will prepare each ITO separately using the Training
Management System. The letter format ITO that is generated by Training Management System is the only authorized
document that will be used for IMS provided training under the provisions of this regulation. The previously used DD
Form 2285 (Invitational Travel Order (ITO) for International Military Students (IMS)) is no longer authorized to enter
an IMS into training, as there is no provision for the required reporting and tracking of the IMS. The Training
Management System generated ITO will not be altered or shortened from that published by use of the Training
Management System.
   b. A complete explanation of the informational content of the ITO is provided in figure 9–1 of this chapter.
Instructions for preparation of an ITO are also provided with user instructions of the Training Management System.
Examples of the Training Management System generated ITO are provided in figures 9–2 through 9–5 of this chapter.
   c. For training at WHINSEC, IAAFA, Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical Training School, and other
Spanish speaking schools, Security Cooperation Organization training managers may attach a Spanish language
translation to the Training Management System published ITO.




140                          AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
           Figure 9–1. Invitational travel order




AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011   141
             Figure 9–1. Invitational travel order–Continued




142   AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
       Figure 9–1. Invitational travel order–Continued




AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011   143
             Figure 9–1. Invitational travel order–Continued




144   AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
       Figure 9–1. Invitational travel order–Continued




AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011   145
             Figure 9–1. Invitational travel order–Continued




146   AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
       Figure 9–1. Invitational travel order–Continued




AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011   147
      Figure 9–2. Sample Training Management System generated ITO for IMET-funded training




148               AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Figure 9–2. Sample Training Management System generated ITO for IMET-funded training–Continued




                  AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                        149
      Figure 9–2. Sample Training Management System generated ITO for IMET-funded training–Continued




150                     AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Figure 9–2. Sample Training Management System generated ITO for IMET-funded training–Continued




         Figure 9–3. Sample Training Management System generated amendment for ITO




                  AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                        151
               Figure 9–4. Sample endorsement for ITO




152   AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Figure 9–5. Sample Training Management System Generated ITO for FMS-funded Training




            AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                   153
      Figure 9–5. Sample Training Management System Generated ITO for FMS-funded Training–Continued




154                    AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Figure 9–5. Sample Training Management System Generated ITO for FMS-funded Training–Continued




                 AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                        155
             Figure 9–6. Sample Training Management System Generated Amendment for ITO in figure 9–5



9–4. Original invitational travel order and copies
   a. A signed original of the ITO will be considered by the training installation as final authorization for admission of
the IMS named therein to the courses listed in paragraph 8 of the ITO. If an IMS arrives at a training installation
without a signed original, the training installation will notify its MILDEP international training agency and will not
enter the IMS into training until approval is received. It is emphasized that each IMS must have in their possession the
original ITO, bearing an original signature and not a facsimile. Certain U.S. commands and activities will not disburse
funds on a document bearing non-original signature.
   b. If determined that the original ITO of the IMS was lost, a copy of the ITO may be certified as an original by




156                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
adding in paragraph 15 of the ITO the following certification: “I certify that my original ITO was lost and that if the
original is located later, no further claims will be submitted on the basis of recurrent copy of orders. If the original is
located, it will be returned by direct mail to the appropriate Service.” This certification must be signed by the IMS with
their name and rank listed in full.

9–5. Distribution
   a. The IMS scheduled for training will report with the original ITO and the following copies in their possession:
   (1) IMS reporting to DLIELC as first training installation–15 copies.
   (2) Direct entry IMS–5 copies.
   b. The ITO distribution is automated through use of the IMSO training web on the Security Assistance Network.
The Military Service sections of this chapter provide any other required distribution. The ITO will be prepared and
distribution made at least 2 weeks (4 weeks if accompanied) before the IMS scheduled arrival at the first training
installation.
   c. In the event that an IMSO office does not exist at a training activity or installation and, therefore, is not using the
automated IMSO training Web, the ITO may be distributed via e-mail attachment or conventional mail to the training
activity.
   d. If copies of the ITO are not available 2 weeks before the first training report date, the first training installation
will query the Security Cooperation Organization concerned on the status of the student and the ITO.
   e. Distribution, by activity, will be listed in item 16 of the ITO. A local distribution formula (such as “DIST A”)
will not be used.

9–6. Amendments
When an ITO has been published using the Training Management System, any subsequent change to the ITO must be
done by publishing an amendment to the ITO. The ITO and ITO amendment data is then uploaded to the Security
Assistance Network from the Training Management System.
   a. All ITO amendments will be prepared separately by the Security Cooperation Organization training manager
using the Training Management System. Thus, using the Training Management System, all amendments will be
identified and linked to the original ITO. Amendments will no longer be published by the IMSO at the training
activity.
   b. For routine administrative issues, the IMSO may contact the Security Cooperation Organization directly and
request that an ITO be amended. The Military Service country program manager should be provided an information
copy.
   c. The Military Service country program manager must direct the Security Cooperation Organization to amend the
ITO whenever there is a cost impact on the training program, such as a change in training duration. Upon receipt of
conclusive written evidence of the promotion of an IMS while in training, the Military Service training agency must
contact the Security Cooperation Organization to amend the ITO to reflect the IMS change in rank. Conclusive
evidence is defined as notification from the Security Cooperation Organization, the IMS attaché in Washington, DC, or
the CLO. Evidence may also be received from a staff maintained by a foreign government in the United States for
administering training in CONUS.
   d. An ITO amendment will not be used to replace a specific student on a previously issued ITO. The Military
Service training agency will rescind the original ITO by directing the preparation of an ITO amendment that rescinds
the ITO. And the Military Service will then direct preparation of a completely new ITO with a different ITO number
for the new student who is to attend the training.
   e. Examples of Training Management System generated ITO amendments are provided in figures 9–3 and 9–6.

9–7. Endorsements
   a. An endorsement is a written record of actions that have been accomplished for or to an IMS. ITO is to be
endorsed upon the issuance of transportation requests and meal tickets. They will also be endorsed upon payment of a
living allowance (from and to dates), change of training installation, and issuance and return of the U.S. DOD/
Uniformed Services Identification and Privilege Card. Certificates or endorsements indicating that Government quarters
and subsistence were or were not available will be provided and affixed by appropriate commanding officers,
designated representatives, or the IMSO. Appropriate authorities at each training installation will endorse the original
of the ITO showing dates and times of arrival and departure and the mode of transportation.
   (1) An ITO endorsement will be prepared separately by the IMSO using the Security Assistance Network IMSO
training Web. Headings will contain as a minimum the following data:
   (a) Name of organization and official address of publishing activity.
   (b) Original ITO number and date.
   (c) Rank/grade and name (surname (all capitals), first, middle) of IMS.
   (d) Country.
   (2) Program type and WCN.


                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                    157
   (a) For IMET IMS, indicate IMET FY and WCN.
   (b) For FMS IMS, indicate FMS case identifier and WCN.
   (c) For other program types, enter the case identifier.
   b. All ITO endorsements will be signed by an authorized representative with the same distribution as that in
paragraph 16 of the ITO. IMSO will provide IMS with 5 copies of the endorsement. Distribution via e-mail attachment
is authorized.
   c. Example of IMSO training web generated ITO endorsement is provided in figure 9–4.

9–8. Authorized training
Schools and training activities are only authorized to provide the training that is listed in paragraph 8 of the ITO.
Additional training can only be provided by the training activity upon receipt from an Security Cooperation Organiza-
tion of a properly authorized ITO amendment. Only through this process can the training installation be sure that the
training has been authorized by the Military Service, has been funded, and that disclosure authority has been issued.

9–9. Security and screening of student
   a. Screening of the student’s background by the country and U.S. Embassy personnel in accordance with the
SAMM, paragraph C10.3.4 and Joint Security Cooperation Education and Training, paragraph 10–38 must be accom-
plished before the ITO can be published or officially distributed.
   b. Compliance with security requirements will be indicated by the statement of training classification in accordance
with Joint Security Cooperation Education and Training paragraph 10–8 in item 11 of the ITO. The ITO document
itself will not be classified on the basis of these statements.
   c. U.S. training installations will not train the IMS until the above security requirements are met. If the appropriate
classification is not entered in paragraph 11 of the ITO, the training installation will contact the Military Service
country program manager for compliance. The statement of country security clearance as stated in the ITO only
specifies the level of security clearance of the IMS as granted by their government.

9–10. Appropriation citation
   a. An IMET funded ITO will cite the appropriation to which travel, living allowance, and other authorized expenses
are chargeable if appropriate. These fund cites are the responsibility of the appropriate Military Service and are
provided as a data element to the Training Management System. If for any reason the appropriation citation is not
provided as a data element, it is important that the manual entry be accurately cited in paragraph 9 of the ITO. If
DSCA has authorized funding of travel and or living allowances from an Foreign Military Financing Program funded
FMS case, include fund cite provided by the Service in paragraph 9 of the ITO. Likewise for all other grant assistance
programs where funding of travel and or living allowances is authorized, the fund cite provided by the Military Service
will be entered in paragraph 9 of the ITO.
   b. An ITO for cash funded FMS cases, does not contain fund cites, as all expenses are the responsibility of the
purchasing country. However, if an FMS case is funded by U.S. grant funds (such as Foreign Military Financing
Program funds) there will be an appropriation citation on the ITO and the travel and living allowance, and other
authorized expenses will be funded by that fund citation.

9–11. Dependents
Dependents (as defined in Joint Security Cooperation Education and Training, para 10–9.b.(12)) accompanying or
joining the IMS must be authorized in the ITO to be eligible for privileges: for example, identification (ID) cards,
exchange and commissary privileges, and medical services. If dependents are authorized, their names, relationships,
dates of birth, passport numbers and visa type and number will be listed in paragraph 1–2a of the ITO.

9–12. Medical care
Medical care to international military students and their authorized dependents is not free, rather it is provided on a
reimbursable basis. The only exceptions to this are outpatient care for NATO/PFP SOFA countries and healthcare
authorized under a reciprocal healthcare agreement. Only ITO authorized medical care can be provided to the IMS and
authorized dependents. All medical activity patient administrators/treasurer offices must be provided a copy of the ITO
to insure that appropriate billing is accomplished in accordance with ITO content.

Section II
Department of the Army

9–13. General
   a. Foreign military sales. On receipt of a signed LOA, obligation authority from DFAS–DE, and letter of instruction
from USASAC, SATFA will provide the Security Cooperation Organization authority to release the ITO for FMS IMS.




158                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   b. International Military Education and Training. As funds are received from DSCA, SATFA will issue authoriza-
tion for the ITO. Request for authorization prior to receipt of fund cite message will be addressed to SATFA country
program manager.

9–14. Distribution
  a. The ITO for IMS under U.S. Army sponsorship for CONUS training will be distributed electronically to
individuals/organizations as shown, below.
  (1) Each IMS.
  (2) SATFA country program manager.
  (3) Commanders of CONUS MSCs other than TRADOC (that is, FORSCOM) conducting the training, as
appropriate.
  (4) IMSO at each U.S. Army Service school, installation, and/or Army managed DOD entity at which the IMS will
be training.
  (5) Commander, U.S. Army Medical Command.
  (6) Government of country concerned and its Washington Embassy.
  (7) Other addressees - as considered appropriate by the issuing authority.
  (8) For distinguished visitor orientation tour and OT only, NDU Operations.
  (9) For AWC, ILE, and USASMA only, add DASA (DE&C) (SAAL–NP).
  b. In addition to appropriate distribution, the Security Cooperation Organization will be provided a copy of all
endorsements prepared by other agencies.

Section III
Department of the Navy (U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Coast Guard)

9–15. Invitational travel orders authority
   a. Foreign military sales training. On receipt of appropriate funding authority, Naval Education and Training
Security Assistance Field Activity will provide the Security Cooperation Organization with authority to publish ITO for
USN, USMC, and USCG IMS. When a new FMS training LOA is implemented, Naval Education and Training
Security Assistance Field Activity will issue a message providing authority to issue ITO. This authority will continue
throughout the scope of the case. If the FMS LOA includes funds for TLA, a fund cite to be included on the ITO will
be provided with this message. This fund cite will be included on all ITO throughout the scope of the FMS case. Naval
Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity will authorize all amendments to ITO for USN sponsored
training. CG, Security Cooperation Education and Training Center MCCDC will authorize all amendments to ITO for
USMC sponsored training, and USCG International Affairs (G–CI) will authorize all amendments to ITO and for
USCG sponsored training. Security Cooperation Organization are responsible for preparing the amendments to the ITO.
   b. International Military Education and Training funding. Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field
Activity has financial oversight for all DON IMET programs, regardless of whether training is under USN, USMC, or
USCG. On receipt of appropriate funding authority, Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity
will send messages throughout the FY, providing authority to issue the ITO for each individual IMS/WCN which is
annotated as “Priority A.” If TLA is authorized, this message will also provide the fund cite to be included on the ITO.
Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity will authorize all amendments to ITO for USN
sponsored training. CG, Security Cooperation Education and Training Center MCCDC will authorize all amendments
to ITO for USMC sponsored training, and USCG International Affairs (G–CI) will authorize all amendments to ITO
for USCG sponsored training. The Security Cooperation Organization is responsible for preparing all amendments to
the ITO.
   c. Regional Defense Regional Defense Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program funding. Naval Education and
Training Security Assistance Field Activity provides financial support for all DON training under Regional Defense
CTFP, regardless of whether courses are under USN, USMC, or USCG. After candidate vetting has been approved by
Special Operations/Low Intensity Conflict and funds have been authorized/provided by DSCA, Naval Education and
Training Security Assistance Field Activity will issue a message providing authority to issue the ITO or authorize a
Mobile Education Team/MTT and provide funds to the Mobile Education Team/MTT provider. If TLA is authorized,
this message will provide the fund cite and other funding information as required to be included on the ITO. Naval
Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity will authorize all amendments to ITO for USN sponsored
training. CG, Security Cooperation Education and Training Center MCCDC will authorize all amendments to ITO for
USMC sponsored training, and USCG International Affairs (G–CI) will authorize all amendments to ITO and for
USCG sponsored training. The Security Cooperation Organization is responsible for preparing all amendments to the
ITO.
   d. Counter-Narcotics Program. Under the Counter-Narcotics program, DASD–CN issues authority to release fund-
ing to either Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity or USCG G–CI. Upon receipt of
funding, a message will be issued providing authority to issue the ITO or authorize the Mobile Education Team/MTT


                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                159
and provide funds to the Mobile Education Team/MTT provider. Naval Education and Training Security Assistance
Field Activity will authorize all amendments to ITO for USN sponsored training. USCG International Affairs (G–CI)
will authorize all amendments to ITO and for USCG sponsored training. The Security Cooperation Organization is
responsible for preparing all amendments to the ITO.

9–16. Distribution
The distribution list of an ITO and amendments should be tailored to the training listed therein and include the IMS,
Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, commanders of combatant commands, CG, Security
Cooperation Education and Training Center MCCDC for IMS if attending any USMC courses, USCG International
Affairs (G–CI) if IMS is attending any USCG courses, appropriate SYSCOM if IMS is attending SYSCOM training,
CFFC if IMS is attending Commander, Fleet Forces Command training, COMPACFLT if IMS is attending any
Commander, Pacific Fleet training, BUMED if IMS is attending any Bureau of Medicine training, DLIELC if IMS is
attending English language training and the IMSO at each of the training sites.

Section IV
Invitational Travel Orders (Department of the Air Force)

9–17. General
On receipt of appropriate funding authority, the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron will provide the
Security Cooperation Organization with authority to publish ITO. Security Cooperation Organization will not use the
STL programming document as the basis to publish ITO.

9–18. Invitational travel orders amendments
The ITO amendments to reflect changes should be accomplished as soon as data becomes known and sent via e-mail
attachment to the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron/FM, Randolph AFB, TX 78150–5001, to facilitate
recording of obligations and financial payments against the ITO.

9–19. Distribution
The ITO for IMS under U.S. Air Force sponsorship will be distributed as shown in table 9–1.



Table 9–1
Air Force distribution guide for invitational travel order
Recipient                                                 CONUS and overseas training                            Number of copies
Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron/                                                                                   1
FM (Note 1)
Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron/                                                                                   1
Regional Division (Note 1)
BASE IMSO                                                                                                                          1
IMS (see para 9–5a)
Country Liaison Officer, if assigned                                                                                               1
Country Air Attach, Washington, DC                                                                                                 1
Notes:
1 The Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron distribution may be mailed under one cover but should be assembled in sets plainly marked for the

respective activities.




Chapter 10
International Military Student Administration

Section I
General

10–1. Scope
This chapter outlines procedures for administering IMS under the SCETP. Unless otherwise indicated herein, IMS
administration policies and procedures apply to all IMS participating in the SCETP.




160                                  AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
10–2. Responsibilities to international military student
In fulfilling the responsibility of the United States to IMS undergoing education and training, all personnel will afford
IMS traditional American courtesies. Responsibilities to IMS include not only the obligation to teach a particular skill,
but also the fostering of friendly relations by a genuine display of hospitality, interest in their welfare, and personal
assistance. Beyond this, a basic rule requires that the IMS be treated, so far as possible, like their U.S. counterparts.

10–3. Unauthorized commitments
Only Military Service representatives engaged in the administration and training of IMS will make any training
commitments to individual IMS or foreign country representatives. Further, no agreements will be entered into with
regard to curricula, types of training, or length of stay of IMS in the United States. Doubtful situations will be referred
to the appropriate Military Service for resolution.

10–4. Channels of communication, international military student officer Web, and correspondence
   a. Direct communication between training installations and Security Cooperation Organization is authorized only on
routine administrative matters concerning IMS such as ITO, biographical data, and travel arrangements.
   b. All matters originating at the training installation that involve policy determinations or program changes will be
directed to the implementing Military Service through the chain of command. Any prior commitment for training made
to IMS must be in accordance with the policies and procedures contained in this regulation. For all cross-Service and
Joint training programs, the Military Service providing the training will communicate through and coordinate with the
sponsoring Military Service prior to taking any action to change the training program or to remove the IMS from
training. An exception is where safety is an issue. In this case, the IMS will be eliminated from training and the
sponsoring Military Service notified.
   c. The subject line in message traffic or correspondence should be comprehensive so action officers throughout the
Military Service can readily identify the subject and resolve the problem as quickly and smoothly as possible. When
communicating about an IMS, the subject line will contain, as a minimum, the IMS name, country, case, WCN, and
FY.
   d. The combatant command and Security Cooperation Organization will be provided information copies of commu-
nication between the Military Service and training installation regarding controversial IMS matters.

Section II
Responsibilities

10–5. Security cooperation officer
   a. See paragraph 2–11 for a comprehensive description of the Security Cooperation Organization duties and
responsibilities.
   b. In regard to international education and training, the Security Cooperation Organization responsibilities
include–—
   (1) Make recommendations concerning Security Cooperation Education and Training for their host country and
assist in the development of these programs.
   (2) Assist in the selection of IMS and ensure that they meet security, medical, English language, technical
qualifications, and course prerequisites, as required.
   (3) Ensure IMS are briefed prior to departure from their home country.
   (4) Prepare necessary administrative documents and provide appropriate records to the initial training installation.
   (5) Obtain feedback from returning IMS concerning the education or training received.
   (6) Administer approved programs in country, including Security Cooperation Education and Training Teams.
   (7) Prepare ITO and all amendments.

10–6. International military student officer
Each commander or delegated authority will appoint in writing a U.S. military or civilian IMSO during any period the
installation is engaged in training (classroom, and equipment, such as simulators) IMS with ITO.
   a. Selection. It is extremely important that IMS are received and treated with the proper consideration. Therefore,
the commander must exercise care in selecting the IMSO. The IMSO must be tactful and mature, possess a pleasant
personality, and have the ability to associate with and understand IMS. The name, office, telephone number, and e-mail
address of IMSO will be reported to the Military Service. Changes will be furnished as they occur. Appointment of an
overseas IMSO is at the discretion of the overseas command.
   b. Functions. In addition to the overall administration of IMS, the IMSO will—
   (1) Keep IMSO Training Web information up to date. The IMSO Training Web on the Security Assistance Network
provides for the entry of IMSO office point of contact information and detailed training location information. This
information is entered only by the IMSO (not by the Military Service) and must be kept current by the IMSO. In
addition, IMSO can enter specific international notes and prerequisites that pertain to specific courses of instruction at


                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  161
their training activity. Again, this information is entered by the IMSO and is thus tailored to a need to provide specific
information for the international community on their courses.
   (2) Brief IMS. As a complement to the in-country predeparture briefing, IMSO will also brief IMS as soon as
possible after the IMS arrive at the training installation. This briefing will cover items contained in section IV and
other information pertaining to the local installation and surrounding community.
   (3) Implement procedures to avoid the indebtedness of IMS to the USG or a nonappropriated fund. See paragraph
10–31.
   (4) Maintain IMS records. The IMSO will accurately maintain a complete personnel and training record on each
IMS. The IMS will not hand-carry these records or review their contents. The personnel and training record will be
established at the first U.S. military training installation. Information such as, but not limited to, that listed below will
be filed in chronological sequence of action in the record.
   (a) Copy of ITO, amendments, and endorsements.
   (b) Application for ID cards for IMS, and for their authorized accompanying dependents; copies of passport, visa,
and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Form I–94.
   (c) Maintain a copy of the IMS Academic Report.
   (d) Record of courses attended.
   (e) Any correspondence relating to indebtedness, traffic violations, civil law violations and charges, and similar
incidents or actions regardless of action taken. Such collection of documents should indicate the result of each action if
available.
   (f) Record of individual counseling given the IMS.
   (g) Record of DOD Field Studies Program activities in which IMS either participated or were given the opportunity
to participate.
   (h) Any other documents that would furnish data beneficial to IMSO at subsequent training locations.
   (5) Transmit IMS records.
   (a) The IMSO will forward original IMS personnel and training records to the gaining installation as soon as
possible (not later than 10 days) after IMS complete training. Training records will be retained in accordance with
Military Service regulations.
   (b) Classified notebooks, workbooks, and similar documents developed by IMS will be forwarded to their home
service, through the Security Cooperation Organization, using appropriate disclosure release procedures. (See para
10–41.)
   (c) Individual flight records may be hand-carried between training installations by IMS or mailed to the gaining
installation. The last installation will forward these records to the Security Cooperation Organization after IMS
complete training.
   (d) Unclassified medical records may be hand-carried between training installations by IMS or mailed to the gaining
installation. See paragraph 8–9c.
   (6) Check IMS installation clearance and checkout procedures. IMSO will ensure that proper installation clearance
and checkout processing procedures are followed.
   (7) Plan and conduct Field Studies Program for assigned IMS. See chapter 11.
   c. The IMSO Training and Liaison visits.
   (1) The IMSO will attend the DISAM SAM–TO course using quotas allocated by the respective MILDEP. DISAM
controls and issues the fund-cite for travel and per diem for attendance at this course.
   (2) The MILDEPs will hold conferences/workshops for IMSO and other U.S. persons charged with the training,
administration, and orientation of IMS every 18 months or as required. Attendance at conferences of U.S. personnel
charged with the training, administration, and orientation of IMS may be charged to the Field Studies Program funds.
   (3) The IMSO are encouraged to visit other installations to exchange ideas and information. The cost of travel and
per diem for these visits is normally chargeable to administrative funds. IMSO are encouraged to occasionally visit
their Military Service Security Cooperation Field Activity and other training activities, as funds will allow, for
exchanging ideas and information.
   d. Controversial matters. The IMSO will immediately initiate action through Military Service chain of command
where unique or controversial situations exist that may be detrimental to IMS successful completion of training.

10–7. Country liaison officer
The Military Service may request that a CLO be certified to a command in the United States to assist with
administrative details for IMS from the CLO country. When a CLO is not assigned for a particular country, the
country’s senior IMS located at the training installation may be used in this capacity.
  a. The controlling command will designate the location within the command where the CLO will perform their
duties. Assignment at overseas installations will be at the discretion of the appropriate commander.
  b. Installation commanders requiring the assistance of a CLO may contact the appropriate command that has a CLO



162                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
assigned and coordinate visits of CLO to other installations with the commanders concerned. The commander of the
installation to be visited will be informed of the following:
   (1) Purpose of the CLO visit.
   (2) Mode of transportation.
   (3) Arrival time.
   (4) Names of individuals to be contacted.
   c. The CLO may be authorized to travel by POV between training facilities.
   d. The CLO, programmed in the USG-funded programs and assigned to administer IMS, are eligible to receive
travel and living allowances as authorized by the ITO.
   e. The CLO will not be assigned duties that will interfere with their responsibilities to the SCETP. Specifically,
CLO will:
   (1) Be the contact between the IMSO and the IMS they represent.
   (2) Ensure that IMS adhere to appropriate regulations.
   (3) Assist in correcting problems associated with dress, personal appearance, grooming standards, and IMS
indebtedness.
   (4) Be responsible for whatever action is necessary in connection with breaches of discipline involving IMS.
   (5) Assist in routine inspections of IMS and quarters.
   (6) Act as nonvoting members of a faculty or administrative board as required. Commanders will advise CLO of the
time and place of meetings. CLO will inform the commander whether they plan to attend. Requests for CLO
participation as nonvoting members of boards will be forwarded to the controlling command.
   (7) Assist in administrative details regarding the disposition of graduates and IMS.
   (8) Advise the IMSO of any customs and traditions that should be recognized.
   (9) Make routine administrative reports as required by their government.
   (10) Pay IMS any allowances received from the home country if so directed by their government.
   (11) Assist in the orientation of IMS.
   (12) The CLO will not be entered into formal training without prior Military Service approval.
   (13) The CLO will be handled in the same manner as IMS for medical and dental care. (See chap 8.)
   (14) The CLO are subject to the same security restrictions and regulations as those governing IMS.

Section III
Predeparture

10–8. International military student screening, passports, visas, and Department of Defense foreign
visit system
   a. The Security Cooperation Organization will develop a student-screening checklist which will include the records
identified in this paragraph 10–38a, and making adjustments to accommodate regional guidance. The Security Cooper-
ation Organization should inform the host country of the required checks. When a country formally submits a student
name, this constitutes certification that the required host country-conducted checks have been completed. U.S. Embassy
personnel, including the human rights officer, regional security officer, Drug Enforcement Agency, consular section,
and other offices as appropriate then thoroughly screen each student candidate. The checklist will include the items
below and when completed, the checklist will be included with other documents related to each country nominee and
maintained for 10 years. The Security Cooperation Organization can issue the ITO only after the checklist is complete
with no disqualifying results.
   (1) In-country U.S. officials will screen IMS for records of human rights abuses, drug trafficking, corruption,
criminal conduct, or other activities inconsistent with U.S. policy goals. If an individual’s reputable character cannot be
validated, the individual will not be approved for training.
   (2) In-country U.S. officials will perform a security screening of each student prior to issuance of the ITO regardless
of the level of classification of the training. The level of security clearance will be shown in item 11 of the ITO by
selecting either statement (a) or statement (b) as shown below:
   (a) “U.S. security screening has been accomplished. All training will be conducted on an unclassified basis.”
   (b) “U.S. security requirements have been complied with. The home government has granted the IMS a security
clearance. This in and of itself does not permit the disclosure of classified U.S. information. Such disclosure must be
specifically authorized by an official delegated authority and U.S. foreign disclosure regulations or directives.”
   (c) The level of the security classification granted by the home government will be indicated in block 11 (1) of the
ITO and the U.S. equivalent classification level will be shown in block 11(2) of the ITO.
   b. The foreign government is responsible for issuing necessary passports and for requesting visas for travel to the
United States. Passports and visas of IMS and their dependents must be valid for the entire duration of the IMS
training period. Security Cooperation Organization will ensure that IMS and dependents have appropriate visas by



                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  163
visually inspecting copies of each for currency and correctness. Candidates who fail to meet the medical requirements
of chapter 8 are ineligible to receive a visa or to enter the U.S.
   c. The U.S. visa is the authority to travel to the United States during the valid period; it has no relation to the period
of stay in the United States. The USCIS will issue Form I–94 to the IMS when they enter the United States. The
USCIS Inspector will write a date or “D/S” (duration of status) on the Form I–94. This date, in conjunction with the
ITO, forms the documentation that governs the IMS status in the United States. The IMSO at the first training location
should verify that the IMS Form I–94 has enough time to complete the training or is marked “D/S.” The IMSO should
initiate action to extend the date on the Form I–94 if there is insufficient time to complete the planned training.
   (1) Visas for the United States are obtained through procedures prescribed by the Department of State. Dependents
of NATO Armed Forces personnel are entitled to “NATO–2” visas. Civilian IMS from NATO countries and their
dependents are entitled to “NATO–6” visas. IMS from other than NATO countries and their dependents are authorized
and will be issued “A–2” visas in most cases. “B” visas are not appropriate for IMS or their dependents.
   (2) Visas should contain multiple entry provisions.
   (3) Group visas for IMS traveling together should not be obtained. This practice causes complications when the
group is divided or when IMS return independently.
   (4) The IMS training in CONUS are responsible for finding out from their embassies whether they need in-transit
visas while enroute to their home country. When visas are required, IMS should forward their passports and documen-
tation to their embassies early enough to be processed and returned before graduating from the last phase of training.
   d. The SECDEF policy requires that all foreign personnel visiting a DOD component shall be screened for terrorist
and criminal associations prior to their arrival in the United States, and that their arrival and departure from their
assigned duty stations are documented. This documentation is accomplished in the DOD’s Foreign Visits System
(FVS), a database that captures key information about international personnel and their itinerary as they travel to U.S.
military facilities. For IMS under the sponsorship of a SCETP, the data is transferred to the FVS from the Security
Assistance Network Training Web after the Security Cooperation Organization enters student information from the
ITO. As IMS carry out their training and the Security Assistance Network Training Web is updated by the IMSO, the
training status and location of the IMS will be updated in the FVS.

10–9. In-country predeparture briefing
   a. In-country predeparture briefing-general.
   (1) Predeparture briefing. Proper preparation of IMS for U.S. training can create a favorable attitude toward
achieving the objectives for which they are being trained. Therefore, a thorough predeparture briefing is essential for
each IMS selected for U.S. training.
   (2) Oral predeparture briefing. Each Security Cooperation Organization will ensure that IMS selected for training at
DOD installations receives a thorough oral predeparture briefing. The DISAM CD–ROM predeparture briefing stand-
ardizes the information provided to IMS, and covers all topics required in this paragraph. The Security Cooperation
Organization should utilize the DISAM predeparture briefing as part of their departure procedures, and supplement
with specific training location information listed on the Training Management System and Security Assistance Network
Web, as well as their locally prepared information. The predeparture briefing is available in Spanish for IMS enroute to
Spanish-speaking schools.
   b. In-country predeparture briefing content. The Security Cooperation Organization will ensure that all areas of
concern to the IMS and their authorized dependents when authorized on the ITO are covered in the predeparture
briefing. Also, each IMS and orientation tour participant will be given an explanation of the Field Studies Program and
its objectives before departing for the United States. (See chap 11 for information on the Field Studies Program and its
objectives.) The briefing will include the following:
   (1) The Military Service training organization overview. Give IMS a brief description of the organizational structure
of the Military Service to which they will be assigned for training. Emphasize the commands, schools, and geographic
locations where IMS will receive training.
   (2) Passports, visas, and DOD FVS. Inform IMS of their personal responsibility to obtain any required in-transit
visas and other passport documentation from their embassies before leaving the last U.S. training installation. Inform
IMS that it is important to retain the USCIS Form I–94, which is the authority to enter the United States.
   (3) Travel. Advise IMS that transportation, when provided at USG expense, is by the mode and routing most
advantageous to the USG and that special routing will not be made for individual benefit. The Security Cooperation
Organization will explain travel arrangements in detail. IMET IMS must obtain statements verifying any delays at
transportation terminals.
   (a) Make IMS aware of the different means of transportation that may be required to travel to their training
assignments. For example, when traveling by train or air, some inter-Service transportation may be required, such as,
taxis or limousines. IMS must use the most direct route and should ask for the cost before departing. Receipts for such
services must be retained by the IMS to present to the finance officer making any living allowance or transportation
payments.



164                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   (b) The IMS entering the United States must present their passports and ITO to the immigration authorities to
receive an entry permit. Passport and ITO must be kept on the person at all times while traveling.
   (c) Health, immigration, and customs officials are located at the point of entry. For a health inspection, the
individual must show the International Certificate of Immunization. Immigration officials will stamp the passport or
ITO and issue an entry permit; the customs inspector will require a customs declaration. In this regard, each individual
will bring items for personal use only. Merchandise for resale or for gifts is subject to a duty tax.
   (4) Baggage. Thoroughly explain the baggage policy to each IMS. (See chap 7.) No exception to this policy will be
made.
   (a) Excess baggage is the weight over that permitted by the carrier and should not exceed the total authorized. See
paragraph 7–2b for further information.
   (b) The IMS may bring into the United States, duty-free only items required for personal use by themselves or their
Families. On their return home, no duties are imposed on necessary personal belongings taken out of the United States.
These items, however, may be subject to home-country duties.
   (c) Discourage IMS from bringing firearms with them to CONUS. However, when IMS choose to bring ammuni-
tion, handguns, shotguns, or rifles for sporting purposes, they will be advised that they are subject to federal, state and
local laws and regulations. Compliance is without exception; failure to comply can result in confiscation of firearms by
authorities or possible administrative or judicial action.
   (d) Checked baggage should not be locked, since it will be subject to inspection. Also, items of value should not be
packed in checked baggage.
   (e) Advise IMS to mark each item of baggage with the address of their first training installation. Additionally, one
copy of the IMS ITO should be placed in each piece of baggage to help locate the owner if the baggage is lost,
misrouted, or misplaced.
   (5) Reporting to the training installation. Advise IMS of the following:
   (a) An IMS training at a military installation will usually be met by a representative of the installation at the local
airport, rail, or bus station when advance notice of the arrival has been received. If the IMS are not met, they should
call the training installation IMSO or duty officer for assistance.
   (b) Since IMS reporting to a civilian installation may sometimes not be met, they should be briefed on what action
to take in that event. IMS should be provided telephone number of the gaining IMSO or installation POC.
   (c) The IMS should be briefed to contact the gaining IMSO if they encounter unexpected travel delays, and provide
IMSO with new arrival time and flight numbers if possible.
   (6) Information about the first training installation. The Security Cooperation Organization should review the
Security Assistance Network Web for current information regarding the first training installation, course of instruction,
and points of contact. Significant information should be provided to the IMS. In particular, the IMS should be informed
that the IMSO will be of great assistance to them. If problems or complaints arise, the IMS should bring them to the
IMSO’s attention.
   (7) Country liaison officer. Explain the role of the CLO, a foreign officer in the United States, who will supervise
and administer the IMS from their country. See paragraph 10–7. Some of the CLO responsibilities are as follows:
   (a) Monitor the IMS adherence to regulations.
   (b) Advise the training installation commander of national customs and habits.
   (c) Help IMS become acquainted with the installation and the training program.
   (d) To take disciplinary action and make disposition of IMS as authorized by their country.
   (8) Clothing. Advise IMS of the general climatic conditions within the geographic areas where they will be
receiving training. Actual clothing requirements will vary depending on the assigned training area; changes in training
locations may change the clothing needs of the individual. Clothing requirements for various courses can generally be
found on the Security Assistance Network IMSO Web, either as general information for a particular location, or in the
course specific section. Advise IMS that they may use DOD clothing sales stores at U.S. military installations. All U.S.
insignia must be removed before wearing U.S. military clothing.
   (a) The recommended minimum for military clothing is as follows:
   1. Two complete winter uniforms and four complete summer uniforms.
   2. One raincoat.
   3. One winter topcoat or jacket (if appropriate).
   4. Two work uniforms (as appropriate).
   5. One pair of work shoes (if appropriate).
   6. Other necessary items such as dress shoes, socks, underwear, caps, and military insignia.
   (b) The requirement for special clothing and equipment for IMS is significant for some courses. This is especially
true regarding flying training. The Security Cooperation Organization must determine these requirements well in
advance and advise the prospective IMS.
   (c) Explain the custom in the United States of military personnel wearing uniforms only during duty hours, although
uniforms may be worn at any time.


                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  165
   (d) The IMS should also pack appropriate civilian clothing, including casual clothes for free time, travel, and leave.
They should also pack a business suit for official functions, as appropriate.
   (9) Money. Explain the American monetary system to IMS. This may require considerable explanation depending on
the country and the IMS’ familiarity with the American monetary system. Make a comparison between expected prices
on general commodities and the cost relationship between those items in the IMS’ country and the same items in the
United States. Also, discuss the following points with the IMS:
   (a) The IMS should have in their possession upon entry into the United States sufficient funds to cover expenses for
a minimum of 30 days. Point out that banking facilities and travelers checks may be conveniently used during the stay
in the United States. Explain the travelers check, personal checking account custom, and credit card use followed by
most U.S. personnel. Large amounts of cash should not be carried by the IMS.
   (b) All IMS will be concerned with payment procedures; how they will be paid, when they will be paid, how much
will be paid them, and whether per diem will be authorized. Security Cooperation Organization should ensure that IMS
understand when and how they will be paid during the course of their education or training in the United States. Most
countries pay their IMS an allowance in addition to their regular pay; some pay less than the normal allowance. Most
IMET IMS will receive a USG living allowance, which is intended to supplement their normal pay and allowances.
   (c) When required, IMS will obtain certificates of nonavailability of USG quarters and messing facilities from the
training installation. Inform IMS that certificates of non-availability will not be issued if the IMS is accompanied by
authorized or unauthorized dependents to a course that does not encourage dependents.
   (d) The IMS will keep a complete record of all travel, including dates of arrival and departure at various locations
and modes of transportation used. This information is the basis for travel and living allowance payments.
   (e) The IMET IMS should always retain copies of vouchers that must be provided to U.S. finance offices making
payments against their orders. This is especially true for tour participants for whom no intermediate orders are
published to indicate the date they were last paid living allowances. Unless the participants can furnish the last paid
voucher to the next finance officer, they will have difficulty in receiving their living allowances. IMS whose
governments require a record of payments received must maintain vouchers for that record since training installations
cannot furnish the information at a later date.
   (10) Privately-owned vehicle. When IMS buy POV in the United States, make them aware of ownership responsibil-
ities. As a condition to registration, IMS must purchase public liability and property damage insurance in the amount
required by the IMS country or the amount required by U.S. State, or local law, or the training installation, whichever
is higher. There are varying requirements among various states. Insurance costs vary, depending upon area and
company; however, the IMS should be prepared to pay a substantial amount per year for insurance. The IMS may be
required to obtain a U.S. driver’s license under state laws. The IMS planning to drive in the United States should bring
their international driver’s license. An international driver’s license will generally facilitate obtaining insurance and
installation decals. Although some states will accept a valid driver’s license from a foreign country, military installa-
tions may require either an international driver’s license or a valid U.S. State license in order to drive on the
installation. An outline of traffic laws is usually available at the installation security and law enforcement office.
   (11) Standards of conduct. Advise IMS that they will be required to conduct themselves in a manner that will bring
credit to themselves and their country. Standards prescribed for counterpart DOD personnel also apply to IMS. This
includes duty hours, off-limit establishments, travel distance limitations, military courtesy, financial responsibility,
military bearing, appearance, and hair grooming. IMS are required to abide by U.S. sexual harassment laws and policy.
See paragraph 10–46. IMS will maintain these standards; failure to do so or committing an act that would bring
discredit to themselves or to their country could result in disenrollment and immediate return to the home country.
   (12) Dependents.
   (a) Definitions of dependents and their eligibilities are governed by Title 10 USC 1072; DODI 1000.1, DODI 1341.
2, and DODD 1441.1. This Joint Security Cooperation Education and Training regulation is subordinate to these
statutes, DOD Regulations and Directives, but for the purpose of this regulation, ITO authorized dependents are
defined as follows:
   1. Some countries may allow legally recognized, nontraditional marriage customs (by U.S. standards), which may
include multiple spouses. In the case of multiple spouses, the IMS will have to decide which one or their spouses will
be the one spouse authorized on the ITO to be eligible for an ID card and other benefits.
   2. Unmarried children or wards under the age of 21, including legitimate, adopted, stepchild, illegitimate child of
member, or illegitimate child of spouse. A ward is defined as a person whose care and physical custody has been
entrusted to the sponsor by a legal decree or other instrument that a court of law or placement agency. The Security
Cooperation Organization will validate the status of wards prior to authorizing the ward as a dependent on ITO.
   3. An unmarried child or ward, age 21 years and over, if either a or b apply—
   a. The child or ward is enrolled in a full-time course of study at an institution of higher learning and is dependent
on the IMS for over one-half of their support.
   b. The child or ward is over 21 years of age and is incapable of self-support because of mental or physical
incapacity that occurred while a dependent of the IMS before the age of 21.



166                          AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   c. The child or ward is over 21 years old and incapable of self-support because of a mental or physical incapacity
that occurred while a dependent of the IMS before the age of 21.
   d. Dependent children or wards defined in this paragraph are not eligible for benefits unless they are full time
students and are dependent on the IMS for over one-half of their support. In this circumstance, benefits are extended
until the child reaches the age of 23.
   4. An IMS father, mother, father-in-law, mother-in-law, stepparent, or parent by adoption or ward, if the IMS
provides for over 50 percent of their support.
   5. Siblings, other extended family members, maids, au pairs, and other family support personnel are NOT authorized
dependents on the ITO and will not be eligible for ID cards or other benefits.
   (b) Except for expressly designated courses or training, encourage IMS not to have their dependents accompany or
join them during their training period outside their country. The IMS are responsible for the conduct and expenses, and
financial obligation of their dependents.
   1. Except for those courses specifically identified by the Military Service, the administration of IMS is geared to
IMS without dependents. IMS with dependents are invariably confronted with problems that interfere with their
training and their timely movement between the station and the port. Training programs, movement schedules, and
reporting dates will not be altered to meet the special requirements of IMS with dependents.
   2. An IMS unaccompanied by a spouse but accompanied by dependent children are responsible for developing and
maintaining a dependent care plan for their dependents. The following instructions and forms can provide guidance in
developing such plans:
   a. DA Form 5305 (Family Care Plan); DA Form 5304 (Family Care Plan Counseling Checklist).
   b. Chief of Naval Operations instruction (OPNAVINST) 1740.4B; NAVPERS 1740/7 (S/N 0106- LF–985–2900).
   c. AFI 36–2908; AF Form 357 (Family Care Certification).
   3. U.S. government family housing is normally not available and is not guaranteed to IMS with dependents, and
additional living allowances for dependents, whether authorized or unauthorized, are not provided. Civilian housing is
generally distant, expensive, and difficult to obtain. However, Military Service have identified certain schools where
Family members are encouraged to accompany the IMS during their course of education or training. See SAMM, table
C10.T3, note 7 for the list of schools, and specific details regarding living allowances.
   4. For training at sites where dependents are encouraged, make IMS aware that only unaccompanied housing will be
authorized unless dependents accompany the IMS for 75 percent of the training at the course location.
   (13) Military status. Advise IMS that they will be treated in the same manner as their U.S. Military Service
counterparts of equivalent grade. No training program will be arranged to treat the many IMS in exactly the manner to
which they are accustomed. IMS are accorded the same privileges and, therefore, assume the same responsibilities as
U.S. personnel. Although IMS are not subject to U.S. military law, they do remain under the criminal and civil
jurisdiction of U.S. Federal and State laws. They also remain under the jurisdiction of the military authorities from
their own countries.
   (14) Military, social, and athletic privileges. Ensure that IMS understand that clubs for officers, noncommissioned
officers, enlisted personnel, and civilians on most training installations are supported by the members and not by DOD
funding. On some training installations, IMS are authorized membership without charge, while at others a small
monthly payment is required. Clubs generally provide dining rooms, bars, cocktail lounges, game rooms, reading and
television lounges, snack bars, and swimming pools. Most training facilities also have areas where IMS can play golf,
basketball, football, soccer, volleyball, and softball. Roller skating rinks, gymnasiums, tennis courts, and libraries are
generally available. Movies are normally shown nightly for a nominal price at theaters located on the training
installation.
   (15) Medical care in the United States is expensive. Ensure the IMS is aware of and in compliance with the
requirements for medical coverage outlined in chapter 8.
   (16) Military courtesy. IMS are required to observe universally recognized military courtesies.
   (17) Student and instructor relationship. Advise IMS that an instructor in a Military Service facility is responsible
for maintaining control of a training situation at all times, even if an enlisted instructor is teaching senior personnel or
officers. The rules of conduct apply equally to all IMS; any breach of etiquette or protocol will be brought to the
attention of the appropriate IMSO, and if necessary, the Security Cooperation Organization and country military
authorities.
   (18) Cultural differences. Make the IMS aware of customs and beliefs that are markedly different from those of the
U.S. to avoid embarrassing situations. Also, mention the behavior pattern of Americans, their spirit of independence,
and their freedom of action in matters such as, religion and politics.
   (19) Quarters. Advise IMS that they must follow the billeting procedures and policies of each school or training
installation throughout the course of their education or training. This includes maintaining a clean, healthy, and safe
living environment.
   (20) Smoking. Advise IMS that there are significant restrictions and limitations on smoking, both on military
installations and throughout American society. This includes smoking restrictions in schools, government quarters,



                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                   167
office areas, restaurants, shopping areas, and public transportation. IMS and their dependents are expected to abide by
these restrictions and limitations.
   (21) Military meals. Advise IMS that military dining halls usually are not equipped to accommodate special requests
for national dishes. However, attempts are made to accommodate religious dietary habits at installations with large
numbers of IMS. There will be no increase in living allowances if IMS refuse, for any reason, to eat food served in
military dining halls. Dependents are generally not authorized to eat in military dining facilities.
   (22) Invitational travel order. Explain in detail the use of the ITO for identification, itinerary, payment, medical
services, baggage limitations, and authorization of dependents. This is necessary since many IMS have little or no
knowledge of the importance and use of their ITO. Special emphasis should be given to Block 13, Terms. Also, stress
the need to retain the original ITO and sufficient copies, explaining that the ITO is the controlling document for the
training and administration of the IMS. The IMS will be authorized only the training and privileges stated in the ITO
and any amendments.
   (23) Requests for changes to training. Inform IMS of the training they are scheduled to receive. Also advise them
that they are not to contact representatives of the training installation to arrange unprogrammed training. Any requests
for changes to training, as contained in item 8 of the ITO, must be processed through Military Service channels.
   (24) Leave policy and delay enroute. Ensure that IMS understand the policies and regulations concerning leave and
delay enroute. Cover the following points:
   (a) IMET living allowances are not authorized during a delay enroute.
   (b) Authority for a delay enroute must be included in the ITO.
   (c) For tour participants, a delay enroute may be authorized only from the last point in their itinerary to the CONUS
point of departure.
   (d) Policies concerning stopover in other countries enroute to the home country should be carefully explained.
   (e) Delay enroute will automatically be terminated upon arrival at the first training installation. (IMS with approved
delay enroute sometimes report early to the training installation, wanting to receive accrued living allowances, store
their baggage, and continue their delay enroute. Training installations are not staffed to administer such Services.)
   (25) Military records. Advise IMS that when they move between training installations that their military records are
kept by various offices. For that reason, they will be asked to execute in- and out-processing forms when they report to
or depart from training installations. All records will be transferred by the training installation except for medical
records, which the IMS hand-carries. Training installations are authorized to transfer medical records with other
documents if deemed advisable for processing or administrative purposes.
   (26) Postal facilities. Advise the IMS to contact the nearest post office on postal rates or postal problems. The IMS
should inform their Families and friends that certain articles (for example, meat and food products) are prohibited from
being imported into the United States and that any package containing such items must be returned at the senders
expense. A list of prohibited or restricted items will be prepared both in English and in the local language.
   (27) Tax-free merchandise. Emphasize that purchases of tax-free merchandise will not be abused, especially as they
pertain to alcoholic beverages that may be purchased for personal use.
   (28) Off-duty employment. Indicate that IMS and their alien family members are not permitted to engage in
employment.
   (29) Religious services. Explain to IMS that religious services for most faiths are available at training installations or
in the local community. IMS should NOT expect release from training or other duties for routine religious activities.
   (30) Course entry English Comprehension Level testing. All direct-entry IMS (except from countries exempt from
all ECL testing requirements) will be administered the CONUS course entry ECL test within 3 to 5 calendar days after
the IMS arrival at the first training location. This also includes IMS from those countries granted a waiver from in-
country screening ECL testing.
   (31) Instructional material. Advise IMS that personal items and household goods will not be packed or shipped as
instructional material.

10–10. International military student arrival arrangements
   a. The Security Cooperation Organization will provide the following information via the Training Management
System and the Security Assistance Network IMSO Web to the receiving installation at least two weeks prior to arrival
date if unaccompanied and 30 days prior if accompanied to ensure proper reception of the IMS (see para 7–5 for
further information):
   (1) Estimated time of arrival.
   (2) Mode of travel.
   (3) Flight number.
   (4) Number of dependents and age of children accompanying the IMS.
   (5) Other pertinent travel information.
   b. The IMSO will coordinate IMS arrivals and departures within their area of responsibility. Generally, IMS will be
met at the airport by an escort from the training installations. The following points should be stressed:



168                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   (1) An atmosphere of welcome, courtesy, efficiency, patience, and consideration is essential.
   (2) Care and formality will be used in dealing with IMS, who are often sensitive in matters of propriety and rank.
Whenever possible, personnel of equal grade should greet new arrivals, particularly general and flag ranks. Applicable
protocol procedures will be followed.
   (3) Information and instructions will be given in easily understood English, avoiding the use of slang or idioms.
   (4) If arriving after normal work hours, the escort should ensure that the IMS knows where they should report for
in-processing the following morning.
   (5) Prior arrangements should be made to meet religious or national dietary requirements (for example, list of local
restaurants including type and price of food served).
   (6) General information should be available on items of local interest such as special events, bus schedules, taxi
rates, hotels, and local community organizations established to assist IMS.
   (7) Assistance to dependents should be provided, as appropriate.
   c. Commanders of training installations, designated representatives, or IMSO are responsible for reporting the failure
of an IMS to arrive as scheduled. This report will be sent to the Military Service and, if appropriate, to the losing
activity, with an information copy to the appropriate Security Cooperation Organization within 48 hours after scheduled
arrival.

10–11. Biographical data
   a. Unless otherwise specified in MILDEP sections of this chapter, the Security Cooperation Organization will
furnish biographical data for each officer IMS not later than 15 days before the IMS reporting date. If at all possible,
the biographical data for senior PME schools is to be provided 60 days prior to the reporting date.
   b. The biographical data is entered by the Security Cooperation Organization using the Training Management
System International Military Student Information function, and is then uploaded to the Security Assistance Network.
   c. Distribution of the biographical information is automatic to all training activities via the Security Assistance
Network IMSO Web system and is available to all Military Service within the DSAMS Training System.

Section IV
International Military Student Arrival

10–12. Reporting to training installation
   a. The IMS will comply with the reporting date as shown in Item 8 on the ITO. The reporting date at the first
training installation is usually 3 to 5 business days prior to the commencement of training. Reporting earlier or later
than the stated reporting date can cause administrative and academic problems. This could result in IMS being denied
admission to training.
   b. If IMS arrive in the United States early for purposes of tourism, personal business, or for other reasons not related
to Security Cooperation Education and Training, they will be considered as being under the cognizance of their
Washington-based attaché or other appropriate U.S. based foreign national representative. A statement to this effect
should be placed in their ITO. During this pre-reporting period, IMS will not be under DOD sponsorship. In cases
where the Security Cooperation Organization is aware of such circumstances, competent authority should be appraised
as early as possible before the IMS arrival in the United States.

10–13. Training installation briefing
The IMSO will brief IMS as soon as possible after IMS arrival at the training installation. The IMSO will ensure that
all elements of concern to the IMS are covered in the briefing with special attention to chapters 10 and 11 of this
regulation. The briefing will include the following:
   a. The IMSO-duties and functions.
   b. Policy and regulations-privileges; restrictions; conduct, appearance, and grooming; medical and dental care;
identification cards, and financial responsibility.
   c. Legal status-applicability of federal and state laws; indebtedness; shoplifting; purchase of duty-free, tax-exempt
liquor and the penalties for abuse; passports and visas.
   d. Training program-ITO governing document; unprogrammed training; officers in enlisted courses; elimination
from training for cause; meeting schedules and appointments; English language testing; clothing and equipment; release
and shipment of instructional material.
   e. Full studies program objectives and activities.
   f. Conduct and personal appearance-grooming standards; cleanliness; morale problems; military discipline and
courtesies.
   g. Sexual harassment, fraternization, or conduct as defined in DOD policy (see para 10–45).
   h. Student and instructor relationship-male; female; officer; enlisted; civilian; minority instructors.
   i. Travel-arrangements; accommodations; baggage allowance; delays enroute; travel schedules.



                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  169
   j. Privately-owned vehicle-purchase; registration; insurance; operation; travel; laws.
   k. Living allowances-authorized amount; payment schedule.
   l. Dependents-authorization; housing; cost of living; access to medical care, charges, payment procedures and health
insurance.
   m. An IMS unaccompanied by a spouse but accompanied by dependent children are responsible for developing and
maintaining a dependent care plan for their dependents. The following instructions and forms can provide guidance in
developing such plans:
   (1) DA Form 5305; DA Form 5304.
   (2) OPNAVINST 1740.4B; NAVPERS 1740/7 (S/N 0106–LF–985–2900).
   (3) AFI 36–2908; AF Form 357.
   n. Currency-monetary exchange; banking.
   o. Mail - postal facilities; official and personal mail.
   p. USG quarters-occupancy; duration, housekeeping; custodial fees.
   q. Firearms - purchase; possession; transportation.
   r. Employment - restriction against IMS and alien Family members being employed during their stay in the United
States.
   s. Identify theft - IMS should be cautioned not to divulge personal information to anyone who does not have an
official, legitimate reason for having the information.

10–14. Legal status and claims
   a. Jurisdiction.
   (1) Military and civilian IMS and their dependents, while in the United States, are subject to the jurisdiction of the
U.S. courts, both state and federal. This is true unless they are exempted by treaty, or other specific authority, or have
diplomatic immunity.
   (2) Questions on the jurisdictional status of IMS or their dependents should be referred to the servicing judge
advocate.
   b. Diplomatic status. IMS usually do not have diplomatic immunity; however, those who believe themselves entitled
to diplomatic immunity or other special status should have their claimed status verified. The IMSO should contact the
Military Service for determination of IMS status. As a general rule, a sponsor’s diplomatic immunity extends to their
dependents as well.
   c. Authority over international military student. The IMS are not subject to the UCMJ. Generally, no authority exists
under which U.S. military authorities may place IMS in military confinement. Under the federal statutes, however,
Australian military authorities in the United States may request the assistance of U.S. military authorities to apprehend
and confine members of Australian forces in the United States. U.S. civil authorities, State or federal, may also
apprehend and confine IMS for breaches of State or federal law. Except for authorization by treaty or agreement (such
as NATO SOFA), or by statute, Executive Order, or Presidential Proclamation (such as in the case of Australia),
foreign military attaches or commanders stationed in this country have no authority to arrest, detain, or confine
members of their forces within the United States; nor can they empower U.S. military authorities to arrest, detain, or
confine members of their forces. When warranted by urgent circumstances, the installation commander may authorize
temporary restraint to prevent bodily harm to the IMS or to other persons, pending arrival of civilian authorities. Such
IMS may not be returned to their home country without written approval of the appropriate Military Service.
   d. Claims against international military student. For information concerning claims arising in the United States from
the activities of IMS from countries that have ratified the NATO SOFA, see MILDEP regulations and the provisions of
NATO agreements. For information concerning claims that arise incident to the activities of IMS in overseas areas, see
pertinent command claims directives. If an inquiry is made concerning a claim involving non-NATO personnel, the
claimant should be advised to seek redress from the IMS or their Government. IMS training in the United States have
no special status to equate them to members of the U.S. Armed Forces for the purpose of filing claims in accordance
with 10 USC 2731–2738. If otherwise a proper party claimant under U.S. law, an IMS may, subject to the command-
er’s discretion, present an appropriate claim for relief.
   e. Living allowance claims involving deceased USG-funded international military student. An appointed U.S. officer
will determine the amount of living allowance or other payments due to the deceased member. To get this information,
the U.S. officer will check with the last finance and accounting office serving the deceased member. The officer should
ascertain from the Security Cooperation Organization the name of the deceased’s next of kin to whom check payment
is to be made. Checks will be forwarded to the Security Cooperation Organization for disposition.
   f. Reports. The IMSO will refer legal questions concerning IMS to the local military legal office. An incident
involving IMS that might lead to or has led to the exercise of criminal jurisdiction by state or federal authorities should
be reported immediately according to appropriate Military Service regulations.

10–15. Alien registration
The IMS in CONUS on valid ITOs are not required to register as alien residents of the United States. These IMS are


170                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
exempt from the provisions pertaining to registration, fingerprinting, and reporting of address as outlined in 8 USC
1302. The above statement does not apply if a student’s status changes, and the student is no longer pursuing the
training prescribed in the ITO. Dependents of IMS will register according to immigration determination.

10–16. Family members
See paragraph 10–9b(12) for definitions of authorized Family members.
   a. The IMS attending PME programs identified in the SAMM, table 10.2 are encouraged to bring their dependents
with them for the duration of their education. The IMS attending these schools will be responsible for the cost of
housing, food, and health insurance (if applicable) for their dependents while in the United States.
   b. The IMS attending all other schools and courses will not be encouraged to bring their dependents to the U.S.
during their training periods. The presence of their dependents will not in any manner alter their (IMS) duty status or
availability for training. If IMS insist on bringing dependents at their own expense, they will be directed to acquire
suitable housing before the family arrives. Housing on and around most military installations may be expensive, scarce,
or unavailable. Furthermore, IMS should understand that the TLA they receive is to defray the cost of USG quarters
and meals. They will, in most cases, not be entitled to TLA if they occupy civilian housing (see para 7–8a(6)).
   c. Travel and living allowance of dependents cannot be funded by the U.S. Government. Scheduled reporting dates
will not be altered merely to accommodate IMS travel with dependents. The use of USG-owned vehicles in the
reception and departure of bona fide dependents of IMS is authorized, subject to local vehicle availability.
   d. Exchange, commissary, and medical privileges for dependents are limited to those IMS dependents authorized in
the ITO. Responsibility for payment of medical care expenses will be clearly indicated on the ITO by selecting the
appropriate block in figure 9–1, item 12b(2). When dependents accompany or join IMS without authorization on the
ITO, the dependents are not authorized commissary or exchange privileges nor medical care at DOD medical facilities.
These privileges cannot be extended without an amendment to the ITO by the Security Cooperation Organization.
   e. When necessary, IMS will finalize and implement dependent care plans before commencement of training.

10–17. Identification cards
   a. Identification (ID) cards, DD Form 1173 (United States Uniformed Services Identification and Privilege Card
(Dependent)) will be furnished to IMS and civilian students undergoing DOD Security Cooperation Education and
Training, and to each authorized, accompanying dependent by the first training installation, according to Military
Service regulations. DD Form 2765 (DOD/Uniformed Services Identification and Privilege Card) (see DODI 1000.13,
AR 600–8–14, BUPERSINST 1750.10, and AFI 36–3026(I)) has been replaced by the Common Access Card for
students.
   b. The IMS foreign identification number will be indicated on the card. An endorsement to the individual’s ITO will
indicate that an ID card has been issued and will include the number of the IMS card. The ID card expiration date will
be the date that out processing is expected to be completed at the last training site.
   c. ID cards will be issued to the one spouse and other dependents authorized to accompany the IMS. (See para
10–9b(12)) ID cards will be surrendered by IMS and their dependents during out-processing at the last training
installation. Cards will be disposed of according to DOD instructions. An endorsement will be made on the sponsor’s
ITO that the cards have been returned. IMS may use their ITO if identification is required while on leave.
   d. Foreign active duty or retired personnel and their dependents that meet the situations below are not eligible for
medical or dental care, commissary, theater, exchange or similar privileges.
   (1) Those living in the U.S. at their own convenience or the convenience of their government.
   (2) Those present in the U.S. in connection with the purchase of U.S. defense articles or services or for collecting
information relating to FMS programs.

10–18. Mail
   a. The IMSO is authorized to send correspondence in support of the SCETP by registered or certified mail.
   b. Personnel at CONUS training installations will not address mail directly to an IMS in country through APO
facilities. Material should be addressed to the Security Cooperation Organization with instructions for delivery to the
IMS.
   c. The IMS may use military postal facilities for the purchase of stamps and the receipt and dispatch of mail.

10–19. Public affairs
   a. General. Public affairs activities will be conducted under the appropriate MILDEP provisions. Data on the
number of IMS, by nationality, who are training at any given time, may be released. A general description of the
training being conducted may also be released. All requests received from the civilian media for the interviews or for
photographs of IMS undergoing training will be referred through channels to the Office of the Assistant Secretary of
Defense (Public Affairs) (OASD (PA)), 1400 Defense Pentagon, Washington DC 20301–1400, for evaluation before
making any commitment.
   (1) If OASD (PA) grants approval, all IMS involved will be given an opportunity to contact their embassy or a


                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                               171
senior advisor from their country before they participate. The OASD (PA) specifies that IMS are not required to
contact their embassy or seek counsel unless they choose. In many cases, IMS will feel there is no need to avail
themselves of that opportunity.
   (2) The IMS should be aware that representatives of news organizations, including film crews, have access to areas
normally open to the public, and that IMS could be photographed or be in contact with the media in those areas
without prior knowledge.
   (3) The release of hometown-type stories and pictures of IMS and visitors are governed by separate MILDEP
instructions. Installation commanders, their designated representatives, or IMSO will dispatch hometown-type releases
directly to the Security Cooperation Organization. Releases require coordination by the Security Cooperation Organiza-
tion with ambassadors or public affairs officers of the U.S. International Communication Agency. Hometown-type
news releases and photographs of IMS undergoing training should stress the following:
   (a) Stories of graduations and honor graduates.
   (b) Highlighted training activities and individual achievements of IMS.
   (c) Action photographs showing IMS training with equipment that they are likely to use when they return to their
home countries. Off-duty photographs should emphasize activities that support the DOD Field Studies Program for
IMS. Examples of such activities are visits to state legislative offices, public works, educational institutions, industrial
plants, and historical sites.
   b. Constraints.
   (1) When routine queries on IMS are received from federal government agencies it is permissible to provide them
routine STL information for the current FY. If the requesting agency desires additional information they must request
through the Military Service.
   (2) No cumulative figures will be released except through the Military Service Public Affairs Office.
   (3) No news releases will be made when in violation of applicable agreements between the USG and the foreign
government.
   (4) No press coverage will be initiated for orientation tour participants without their prior consent.

Section V
Military Matters

10–20. Warrant officers, midshipmen, and cadets
The U.S. equivalent warrant officers, midshipmen, and cadets will be considered officers unless otherwise indicated on
the IMS ITO, and are eligible to be accommodated in officers quarters while in training at DOD installations.

10–21. Clothing, uniforms, and equipment
The Security Cooperation Organization should familiarize themselves with courses requiring special clothing and
equipment.
   a. Organizational clothing and equipment. Organizational clothing and equipment required by IMS for a prescribed
training course are authorized for issue. Maintenance costs of equipment, replacement costs of clothing, and issue
expenses are normally included in course costs. Issue to IMS will be as authorized for officers and enlisted personnel
of the Military Service. Lost, damaged, or destroyed property will be accounted for, to include cash collection from
IMS, if determined appropriate.
   b. Individual clothing and equipment. Individual clothing and equipment required for prescribed training courses
will be made available to IMS as required. Issue expenses are normally included in the course costs. Issued individual
clothing and equipment will be collected from IMS on completion of their training at each installation. Items that
cannot be returned for hygienic or aesthetic reasons may be retained by the IMS. However, retention of other items by
IMS will vary with Military Service policy.
   c. Clothing purchases. Installation commanders may extend to IMS the privilege of purchasing nondistinctive
clothing for cash from Military Service clothing stores. Nondistinctive clothing will be sold in reasonable amounts to
comply with the requirements of the individual concerned. Distinctive items of the Military Service uniform other than
those authorized by Service regulations will not be sold.
   d. Wearing of United States uniforms. IMS may wear the basic U.S. uniform if the country concerned does not
provide a uniform suitable for climatic conditions in the United States. The U.S. buttons, insignia, and distinguishing
marks must be removed and replaced by the distinguishing marks of the country concerned. Authorized uniforms may
be purchased by the country or by individual IMS.

10–22. Laundry
Laundry service may be available to IMS on a cash basis. Collections will be made by the local laundry officer at the
rates charged U.S. military personnel.




172                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
10–23. Grooming standards
  a. The determination of appearance and grooming standards is a U.S. Military Service requirement. IMS are
expected to comply with Military Service regulations. It is a mandatory responsibility of the Security Cooperation
Organization to brief each IMS prior to departure for U.S. training.
  b. To ensure operational efficiency and safety, IMS undergoing U.S. military training must comply with the host
U.S. Military Service regulations pertaining to that training.
  c. Noncompliance with Military Service regulations may subject the IMS to disciplinary action. Situations that
cannot be resolved at training installation level will be referred to the Military Service.

10–24. Name       tags
The wearing of    a name tag by the IMS while in training is of significant assistance to all personnel connected with the
training. Name    tags provide easy identification and ensure proper treatment of IMS. Name tags will indicate the
equivalent U.S.   grade or rank, name, and country of the individual. U.S. equivalent rank may also be issued/purchased
and worn next     to the name tag.

Section VI
Academic Matters

10–25. Officer and enlisted courses
   a. Officer and warrant officer IMS are permitted to attend enlisted courses. These IMS will be thoroughly briefed
before departing that they are to attend enlisted courses. They will be informed that their officer status does not entitle
them to special treatment or academic privileges while attending these courses. These IMS will be given officer
privileges when not participating in training.
   b. Enlisted IMS are not authorized to attend officer courses.

10–26. Physical training
All IMS will be encouraged to participate in physical training. IMS are required to participate in physical training when
successful course completion depends on physical condition (for example, ranger and airborne training), or when
physical training is a part of the program of instruction and is considered necessary for leadership development. See
MILDEP specific sections for additional information.

10–27. Graduation, diplomas, certificates of attendance, and awards
   a. Upon successful completion of a formal course of instruction, each IMS will be issued a certificate or diploma.
Diplomas issued IMS will be identical to diplomas issued to U.S. students.
   b. Diplomas for graduation from U.S. formal courses of instruction will be given to IMS only when they have met
the established training standards. It is not the intent of this policy that only numerical grades be used in determining
whether the IMS has achieved the standards set for U.S. military personnel. The determining factor is whether IMS can
accomplish satisfactorily the objectives for which they were trained. This determination will be influenced by aptitude,
application, practical effort, and demonstrated understanding, as well as by numerical grades. Classified hours of
instruction not available to IMS will not be considered in this determination.
   c. In most cases, certificates of attendance in U.S. formal courses of instruction will be given IMS when they do not
meet the minimum established training standard but have attended the complete course and have been diligent and
sincere in their training efforts. The reasons for issuance of a certificate of attendance should be fully explained in the
IMS academic report.
   d. For pay purposes, some foreign governments require their embassies to report the actual training period of IMS in
the United States. When embassy officials request such information concerning an IMS—
   (1) The IMSO should include the actual training dates in the ITO final endorsement.
   (2) The IMS will be provided a certificate of study confirming the dates of training.
   e. Special awards for superior academic achievement, such as school plaques, may be awarded to outstanding IMS
as determined appropriate by the installation commander. Commanders have the authority to establish and authenticate
these awards and are encouraged to do so. Other acts of recognition might include special commendation letters, signed
appropriately by the installation commander or school commandant, and special remarks on the IMS academic report.
Annual cost of special awards is properly chargeable to the Field Studies Program.
   f. The military attaché of the country may be invited to the award or graduation ceremony; however, the invitation
must state that an approved official visit request is required.
   g. Copies of letters of appreciation, recognition of exceptional performance, and similar documents will be included
in the IMS personnel and training record. Additionally, the IMSO should note if the IMS was a Distinguished Graduate
in the Remarks section of the Completion/Departure Report in the Security Assistance Network IMSO Web.
   h. The presentation of departure mementos (such as coins, school emblems, and other commemorative items) is
authorized under the following conditions:


                               AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                 173
  (1) Each item should be of a permanent nature, with the exception of photographs. Ball caps and T-shirts are not
considered to be of a permanent nature.
  (2) Presentation is limited to one item per IMS at each training installation at a cost not to exceed a limit set forth
by each Military Service. Annual cost of departure mementos is properly chargeable to the Field Studies Program.
Exceptions must be approved by the appropriate Military Service.

10–28. Academic reports
   a. The academic report is the major source of information available to the Security Cooperation Organization and
the foreign government to assess the overall IMS selection program and the individual IMS academic accomplishment.
In addition, countries often use it for promotion and assignment considerations.
   b. An DD Form 2496 (International Student Academic Report) must be prepared for each IMS as they complete a
course of instruction. A sample of a completed DD Form 2496 is provided in figure 10–1, and instructions for
completing the DD Form 2496 are provided in figure 10–2. Once completed and signed, the International Student
Academic Report will be scanned and uploaded to the IMSO Web by the IMSO. This will streamline the overall
reporting process, eliminate the need to mail a hard copy, and will make the report available to all those who are
authorized to receive it.
   c. The written comments in DD Form 2496, blocks 15 and 16 are very important, and they should be provided for
every IMS at the conclusion of a course. Faculty members and IMSO should ensure that these comments are included
in the DSAMS final DD Form 2496. Comments from one academic report should not be duplicated on another report.
Reports that do not meet the above criteria may be returned by the Security Cooperation Organization to the preparing
installation for revision as appropriate with info to appropriate Military Service.
   d. Occasions may arise when an IMS cannot complete a course because of injury, illness, or personal hardship.
When such an event occurs and is confirmed, the IMS should be disenrolled, and the circumstances surrounding the
disenrollment should be documented in the Academic Report. If completed and signed, the IMS may be provided a
copy of the Academic Report upon departure from the training site.
   e. The IMS numerical grades or class standing will not be released by training installations except as listed below.
Other exceptions must be authorized by the appropriate Military Service.
   (1) An individual IMS may be provided their grade and class standing. The academic report can be used as a guide
for counseling the IMS.
   (2) Training installations may release class standing of IMS who are first in class standing.
   f. For special classes of IMS from a single country, and at the discretion of the training installation concerned, an
academic report may be given on the class as a whole rather than on each IMS. A separate report will be submitted on
IMS who do not complete the course.
   g. Requests for IMS academic records and reports or information relating to them, from an activity or organization
outside the Security Cooperation Education and Training framework, will be referred to the appropriate Military
Service.




174                          AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
Figure 10–1. Sample of DD 2496 International Student Academic Report, page 1




        AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                175
      Figure 10–2. General instructions for DD Form 2496 completion




176   AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
                       Figure 10–2. General instructions for DD Form 2496 completion–Continued



10–29. Reporting of international military student academic problems
   a. Timely reports on academic deficiencies should be addressed to the appropriate Military Service. Often these
deficiencies can be corrected by the foreign representative or by programming other training. The objective is to train
the IMS at the least expense to the United States or country concerned.
   b. The IMS who fail to meet the training standards set for U.S. personnel may be dismissed from the school. When
it is apparent that an IMS should be withdrawn from training, the appropriate Military Service will be advised
immediately of the full particulars of the case. This will include recommendations on suitability for other training or
disposition of the IMS. The IMS will not be relieved for cause without authority from the responsible Military Service.
Pending receipt of this authority, suspension is authorized at the discretion of the installation commander. Disposition
instructions are provided in each Service specific section of this chapter.




                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                177
Section VII
Money Matters

10–30. Commissary and exchange privileges
   a. Commissary, exchange, and other privileges ordinarily available to U.S. military personnel in CONUS will be
extended to IMS of equivalent rank and their authorized accompanying dependents.
   b. Privileges extended to IMS in overseas areas will be according to applicable international agreements. When there
is no agreement between the USG and host government authorizing the USG to grant these privileges, they may be
granted nonetheless to IMS unless the host country objects.

10–31. Indebtedness
   a. The following procedures are to be implemented by the IMSO to avoid IMS indebtedness to the USG or a non-
appropriated fund, such as billeting fees or medical charges:
   (1) Make arrangements with the installation billeting office, and other facilities as deemed appropriate, to ensure the
IMSO is immediately notified of delinquent IMS accounts.
   (2) Discuss procedures for payment of billeting fees or laundry during IMS inprocessing to ensure the IMS is aware
of how and when payments are to be made.
   (3) Include a check with the billeting office, as part of the IMS out-processing, to ensure their account has been
paid.
   (4) When an IMS is responsible for payment of medical charges for themselves or their authorized dependents,
discuss procedures for payment during IMS inprocessing to ensure the IMS is aware of how and when these payments
are required.
   b. Upon notification of IMS indebtedness, meet with the IMS, CLO, or senior representative at the training activity
to determine the reason for the indebtedness.
   (1) If the reason for indebtedness is beyond the IMS control, notify the appropriate Military Service immediately.
   (2) When it appears that a medical condition for the IMS or authorized dependents will result in extensive medical
charges, counsel the IMS regarding responsibility for payment. If it appears the IMS will not be able to make the
required payment, notify the appropriate Military Service for disposition instructions. Include the diagnosis, prognosis
and estimated cost of medical care.
   (3) If the indebtedness is determined to be within the IMS control, take the following actions:
   (a) Counsel the IMS. Taking into consideration the amount of debt and the financial support received by the IMS,
set up a payment plan to ensure past and future payment requirements are satisfied.
   (b) If the IMS does not agree to the arrangement or does not adhere to a payment plan, refer the matter of
indebtedness to the training installation commander, designated representative, or training school commandant.
   (c) Notify the appropriate Military Service through the chain of command if the problem is not resolved after
counseling by the training installation commander.
   (d) Diploma will not be issued until IMS has paid all outstanding bills.
   (e) If the IMS departs the training activity before resolving the indebtedness problem, and is scheduled for FDT,
notify the IMSO at the gaining activity. Notify the sponsoring Military Service through the chain of command if the
IMS is to return to their home country. In the latter event, the Military Service will notify the IMS embassy or the
Security Cooperation Organization.

10–32. Off-duty employment
The IMS or their alien dependents are not permitted to hold employment during their stay in the United States. The
U.S. Embassy or Security Assistance personnel should explain this to students at predeparture briefings. Security
Cooperation Organization should ensure passports with A–2 Visas or related documents concerning students and their
alien dependents are NOT annotated with “Employment Authorized.”

10–33. Public benefits
   a. In general IMS and their family members are ineligible for federal public benefits and state and local public
benefits with the following exceptions:
   (1) Medical care and services that are necessary for the treatment of an emergency medical condition and are not
related to an organ transplant procedure, if the alien involved otherwise meets the eligibility requirements for medical
assistance under the approved State Medicaid Plan.
   (2) Short-term, non-cash, in-kind emergency disaster relief.
   (3) Public health assistance for immunizations with respect to immunizable diseases and for testing and treatment of
symptoms of communicable disease whether or not such symptoms are caused by a communicable disease.
   (4) Programs, services, or assistance, which deliver in-kind services at community level, including through public or
private nonprofit agencies and do not condition the provision of assistance, the amount of assistance provided, or the



178                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
cost of assistance provided on the individual recipient’s income or resources and are necessary for the protection of life
or safety.
   b. Medicaid plans vary from state to state. IMSO must check with local authorities on medicaid criteria for their
state. In reporting income for qualification IMSO must ensure that the IMS includes salary received from home country
and living allowance.

10–34. Purchase and possession of firearms
The IMS who desire to bring personal firearms or ammunition into the United States or to purchase such items must
comply with federal, state, and local laws and regulations, including training installation regulations, governing the
possession, use, and transportation of firearms. IMSO should check with the installation Staff Judge Advocate to
determine current laws and regulations governing firearms prior to briefing IMS.

10–35. Purchase and use of privately-owned vehicles
   a. The IMS who want to purchase a POV will be advised to consult the IMSO before signing any purchase contract.
   b. Purchase of power-driven vehicles by orientation tour participants will be deferred until completion of the tour.
   c. The IMS must comply with training installation and state regulations for the registration and operation of such
vehicles. IMS will be required to purchase and maintain public liability and property damage insurance. This insurance
will be in the amount required by law in the state in which the vehicle is registered, or in the amount required by the
military installation on which the vehicle is registered, whichever is higher. IMS are encouraged to consult U.S.
authorities for additional insurance information.
   d. The IMSO must maintain close coordination with training installation authorities to ensure that vehicle registra-
tion is issued only to IMS who meet all requirements for owning and operating a power-driven vehicle.
   e. The IMS and/or dependents from countries that are parties to NATO/PFP SOFA, Article IV, or to other
international agreements may be entitled to use the civilian or military driver’s license issued by their own countries.
IMS should be encouraged to bring their valid international driver’s license. A translated copy in English of the
driver’s license should be provided to the IMSO.

10–36. Purchase of duty-free and tax-exempt articles and liquor
   a. In general, members of the armed forces of any foreign country on duty in the United States are authorized to
have certain articles entered duty-free and tax-free. This is true if the articles are for the member’s personal use or the
use of any member of their immediate family. (See 19 USC 1202 and section 8, part 2, items 820.40 and 822.20,
Revised Tariff Schedule.)
   b. Unless prohibited by state or local laws, alcoholic beverages may be introduced under the authority in paragraph
10–36a, above. Amounts cannot exceed one case per month for persons entitled to this privilege. The servicing judge
advocate will be consulted on state and local laws on the introduction, possession, and use of alcoholic beverages.
   c. All IMS will be given a complete orientation on the foregoing personal exemptions. It will be explained that this
privilege is extended solely for the convenience of IMS. It will also be explained that abuse of the privilege by the sale,
gift, or trade of duty-free and tax-free articles to U.S. personnel is unlawful and can result in withdrawal of the
privilege, administrative penalties, and disciplinary action against all concerned.

Section VIII
Leave, Holidays, and Temporary Duty

10–37. Leave and holidays
   a. Leave during training.
   (1) An IMS may request leave for short periods to travel in CONUS. This leave may take place between certain
courses or phases of instruction (such as non-applicable phases or classified phases of instruction). The IMS request for
leave may be jointly approved by the commander and CLO or by the Military Service with the concurrence of the
country representative by telephone. Continuation of IMET living allowance is authorized during these periods.
   (2) Leave or leave extensions are granted to USG-funded IMS only when authorized in the original ITO or if the
Security Cooperation Organization amends the ITO via the Security Assistance Network Web. The written communica-
tion must be completed no later than 15 days prior to completion of scheduled training.
   (3) Except for emergency leave, leave granted IMS will not interfere with, nor prolong, the period of training.
   (4) Holiday leave is covered in paragraph 10–37f, below.
   b. Leave between training periods. Between consecutive courses, the commander of a training installation or their
designated representatives may authorize leave, with living allowance, not to exceed 7 days. It is not the intent of this
provision that leave be given or used indiscriminately to occupy the IMS during the period between courses of
instruction.
   c. Emergency leave. Requests for emergency leave will be submitted electronically directly to the Security Coopera-
tion Organization concerned, with copies to the appropriate Military Service, cognizant Combatant Command, and


                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  179
others as appropriate. Requests will reflect the IMS present course of instruction, graduation date, and scheduled
additional training and information necessary to substantiate the request. The student or the student’s government must
pay the round trip transportation cost to return home on emergency leave if the student is to return to the United States
to continue training.
   d. Leave outside the continental United States.
   (1) The IMS wishing to travel outside the United States in excess of 72 hours must obtain prior approval from their
home country leave-approval authority. The U.S. officials are not authorized to approve leave in any country other than
the United States.
   (2) The IMS are responsible for making their own travel arrangements including visa, travel, accommodations and
re-entry requirements. IMS must also comply with all immigration regulations, and meet any other requirements that
may be imposed on travel to the country desired.
   (3) USG-funded living allowances are authorized during international leave periods, in order for the IMS to maintain
their quarters at the training site.
   e. Leave at the completion of training.
   (1) The IMS are not authorized to receive USG-funded living allowance during periods of leave authorized by
student’s government following completion of training courses.
   (2) The IMS are authorized to receive up to a maximum of 7 days USG-funded living allowance following
completion of training, provided that the IMS departure is delayed through no fault of their own.
   (3) Leave at an IMS request between the last training installation and the point of CONUS departure is not
authorized. The foreign country may authorize leave in the U.S. between the last training installation and the point of
CONUS departure for IMS upon completion of training before returning to home country. Leave should be approved
before the IMS departs from their home country and authority included in the IMS ITO. Requests for leave or leave
extension upon completion of scheduled training, will not be granted unless the Security Cooperation Organization has
amended the ITO by written communication with school(s)/training installations not later than 15 days prior to the
completion of scheduled training. No USG-funded living allowance will be paid for such leave.
   (4) Homeward travel for USG-funded IMS leaving the United States will be the most direct route using U.S. flag
carriers. When an IMS is permitted by their government to deviate from the most direct route to visit other countries,
USG-funded sponsorship will be suspended during such deviation. Further, if a USG-funded IMS elects to remain at a
point enroute to their country beyond the time normally required to make travel connections, funding of allowances
during that excess time is not authorized. The ITO will be endorsed by the training installation to indicate the foregoing
provisos, as appropriate.
   f. Holidays.
   (1) Installation commanders or their designated representative are authorized to grant nonchargeable holiday leave,
and USG-funded IMS are authorized living allowance during—
   (a) Authorized holidays observed by the U.S. MILDEP.
   (b) Major national and religious holidays of the IMS country not to exceed 1 academic day for each holiday
authorized. IMS are authorized not more than 2 of their country’s religious or national holidays in one calendar year.
Academic progress will be the deciding factor in each case. The MILDEP will advise training installations of the
holidays to be observed.
   (c) The Christmas holiday period when activities at training installations have been curtailed.
   (2) If additional training is scheduled at another installation immediately following the Christmas holiday period, the
losing installation will be responsible for IMS during the holiday period.

10–38. Temporary duty
Orders authorizing TDY may be published for IMS participating—
   a. As team members in an organized Military Service sports activity away from the IMS training installation.
Permissive orders at no expense to the USG may be issued.
   b. In programmed trips that are a scheduled part of the formal course curriculum. All identifiable costs, including
TDY required by the course curriculum, are included in the tuition cost. Trips as part of a regular curriculum will not
affect the IMS USG-funded living allowance.

Section IX
Security

10–39. International military student security clearance
In-country U.S. officials will perform a security screening of each student prior to issuance of the ITO regardless of the
level of classification of the training. The level of security clearance will be shown in item 11 of the ITO by selecting
either statement (a) or statement (b) as shown below—
   a. “U.S. security screening has been accomplished. All training will be conducted on an unclassified basis.”
   b. “U.S. security requirements have been complied with. The home government has granted the IMS a security


180                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
clearance. This in and of itself does not permit the disclosure of classified U.S. information. Such disclosure must be
specifically authorized by an official delegated authority and U.S. foreign disclosure regulations or directives.” The
level of the security classification granted by the home government will be indicated in block 11 (1) of the ITO and the
U.S. equivalent classification level will be shown in block 11(2) of the ITO.

10–40. Disclosure of classified military information and controlled unclassified information
Personnel involved with SCETP must be familiar with MILDEP and DOD policies concerning the disclosure of
classified military information (CMI) and controlled unclassified information (CUI) to IMS. CUI is unclassified
information to which access or distribution limitations have been applied in accordance with national laws, policies,
and regulations of the originating country. All official information not cleared for public release must be reviewed and
subsequently approved for release to a foreign government or organization.
   a. The CMI and CUI will only be disclosed or released to IMS according to MILDEP regulations and only on a
need-to-know basis.
   b. Training that involves the disclosure of classified information must be reviewed and approved by the appropriate
U.S. disclosure authority before the training can be programmed. The release of classified information to a country that
is not currently eligible for access will be denied.
   c. The T–MASL identifies those formal courses that require a security clearance for attendance; however, this
designation does not mean that all countries can attend the course. Only those countries that have been specifically
authorized can be programmed for these courses; individual IMS attendance depends on specific Military Service
authorization.
   d. Instruction on a weapon system or equipment the country does not have or has not shown a firm intent to acquire
is not authorized.
   e. Courses may cover more than one weapon system. If so, IMS will be retained in class for instruction only on
those weapon systems that their country has in its inventory or has shown a firm intent to acquire.
   f. Disclosure of communications security information will be according to MILDEP regulations and NSA approval.
   g. Access to NATO classified information may be provided to IMS from NATO nations upon receipt of access
certifications by the respective training installations as prescribed by treaty regulations and properly cleared by HQ,
NATO. Each certification should show the highest level of NATO access granted to the IMS. Granting of this access
will allow NATO IMS to receive NATO classified information and briefings available during the course.

10–41. Restricted courses
Many courses are not available to IMS due to security limitations or due to the orientation of course content to U.S.
standards. MILDEP maintain the T–MASL as a current listing of courses that may be available to IMS. The
availability of any known course not included in the T–MASL can be requested from the Military Service on a case-
by-case basis.

10–42. Release of instructional related material
Release of instructional related material to IMS is authorized as outlined below. Other than as stated in paragraphs a, b,
or c, below, training installations are not authorized to release U.S. military documents directly to foreign requesters.
   a. Unclassified material. Commanders of training installations may authorize the release of unclassified student
notes and locally prepared training materials to IMS at the conclusion of training. These may be included in RIM.
   b. Controlled unclassified materiel. Controlled unclassified material within the parameters of the MILDEP disclo-
sure authorization. IMS participating in training may be issued CUI publications and training material during the
training. IMS must be briefed that all CUI provided to them must remain under their control at all times; that it may
not be copied, reproduced, or distributed to anyone else, and that all controlled unclassified material must be returned
to the school at the conclusion of the training course. Publications may then be shipped to the appropriate Security
Cooperation Organization in accordance with appropriate release procedures.
   c. Classified materiel. Classified material within the parameters of the MILDEP disclosure authorization. IMS
participating in classified training may be issued classified publications used as texts and schematics during the
training. All notes, including those written in the student’s language, and other classified publications will be collected
at the end of the training and shipped to the appropriate Security Cooperation Organization in accordance with
appropriate release procedures.

Section X
Special Circumstances

10–43. Marriage
An IMS desiring to marry while undergoing training will comply with local U.S. laws and will be encouraged to
comply with the instructions of their government. The IMSO will furnish pertinent information directly to the Military
Service concerned, with information copies to the Security Cooperation Organization, on each IMS who plans marriage



                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  181
or who is married while in training. IMSO will refer all questions regarding ITO, dependent authorizations, medical
coverage, and authorized privileges to the Security Cooperation Organization and Military Service.

10–44. Political asylum
Requests by IMS for political asylum in the United States, or for temporary refuge, must be treated with urgent and
careful attention to the procedures, established by DODD 2000.11, and implementing instructions of the MILDEP. (See
AR 550–1, SECNAVINST 5710.22, and AFI 51–704.) The IMSO should advise the IMS that Security Cooperation
sponsorship, to include enrollment in training and all associated applicable living allowances terminates once the IMS
applies for political asylum.

10–45. Disciplinary action
   a. Within prescribed limitations concerning access to and security of classified or protected USG information, IMS
will be treated in the same manner as DOD personnel. In this regard, IMS will be subject to pertinent laws of the
United States concerning the safeguarding of military and other Government information affecting the national defense.
IMS will also be expected to comply with U.S. MILDEP administrative regulations governing access to and security of
such information.
   b. Any IMS involved in serious breaches of military discipline or incident within civilian jurisdiction may be
temporarily suspended from training by local military authorities pending resolution. As more details become available
following the initial report, they will be reported through the chain of command, along with recommendations.
Incidents such as those below may not appear serious at first, but may develop into situations with international
implications.
   (1) Confrontations between IMS and local authorities.
   (2) IMS involved in civil disturbances.
   (3) Hostile acts between IMS of different nationalities.
   c. The principles in paragraphs (1) through (5), below, will be observed by U.S. personnel exercising control over
IMS. These instructions will not conflict with action that Federal, State, or local authorities may elect to take with
respect to acts committed in violation of civil law or authority.
   (1) When an IMS is involved in a situation requiring immediate action to prevent bodily injury or any breach of the
peace on or off a military installation, the military authorities will take steps within their legal competence to restore
order. Where the offense committed by an IMS does not involve the necessity of restoring order, the military
authorities may, depending on the seriousness of the offense, detain the IMS for the protection and safety of the
installation. When confinement is appropriate, the IMS will be promptly delivered to civilian authorities unless military
confinement is authorized by competent military authority. When a breach of the peace involving civil law occurs off a
military installation, appropriate action will be taken to inform civilian authorities.
   (2) The punishment of IMS in connection with military offenses committed by them will be the responsibility of the
foreign military Service of which the IMS are members.
   (3) In disciplinary cases, U.S. installation commanders may conduct an investigation and forward it through
channels to determine whether the conduct of the IMS warrants a recommendation that they be returned to the home
country. This action should be coordinated with the appropriate CLO if assigned. Concurrence of the CLO is desirable
but not mandatory and should be addressed in the implementing correspondence or message traffic. The Military
Service will be advised of the recommended action, together with a recommendation for substitute training or
disposition. The Security Cooperation Organization, Combatant Command, and foreign representative will be included
as information addressees, as appropriate.
   (4) Military authorities will follow the same procedures with respect to breaches of the peace or other incidents
involving IMS dependents as they would in the case of dependents of U.S. military personnel. However, installation
commanders will investigate serious incidents involving IMS dependents to determine whether circumstances warrant a
recommendation, through channels, that the IMS sponsor and dependents be returned to their home country. In all
cases where dependents are involved in breaches of the peace or other incidents involving either civil or military
authorities, the cognizant installation commander will have the IMS informed that—
   (a) They are administratively accountable for the conduct of all dependents.
   (b) Misconduct may be cause for a recommendation that the IMS and their Family members be returned to the home
country.
   (5) Breaches of discipline in overseas areas will be reported as directed by the overseas commander.

10–46. Sexual harassment laws and policy and fraternization
   a. The IMS should be briefed on U.S. sexual harassment laws and policy and fraternization policies, both by the
Security Cooperation Organization prior to departure from their home nation, and by the IMSO upon arrival at the first
training installation. Confirmation of this briefing should be included in appropriate briefing checklists.
   b. Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination that involves unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual
favors and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when—


182                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   (1) Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of a person’s job, pay or
career; or
   (2) Submission to, or rejection of, such conduct by a person is used as a basis for career or employment decisions
affecting that person; or
   (3) Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work performance or
creates an intimidating, hostile or offensive working environment.
   c. It is the policy of the DOD that any person in a supervisory or command position who uses or condones any form
of sexual behavior to control, influence, or affect the career, pay, or job of a military member or civilian employee is
engaging in sexual harassment.
   d. Any military member or civilian employee who makes deliberate or repeated unwelcome verbal comments,
gestures or physical contact of a sexual nature in the workplace is also engaging in sexual harassment.
   e. Fraternization involves an improper superior-subordinate relationship which detracts from the authority of the
superior and thereby adversely effects good order and discipline. Fraternization is gender neutral. It does not have to
involve intimate relationships between members of the opposite sex. Fraternization can be between officers, between
officers and enlisted Service members, and between enlisted Service members. For purposes of this regulation,
fraternization can also be between members of a foreign military force/forces, and between foreign military members
and U.S. forces.
   f. Fraternization should not be confused with normal unit/team building functions or normal social interaction
between people, such as, community functions, religious activities, unit social functions, and athletic events. Also,
fraternization does not include routine, limited business transactions such as, landlord/tenant relationships, or one-time
transactions like the sale of a vehicle, or home.
   g. The following are examples of prohibited fraternizing activities:
   (1) Dating.
   (2) Cohabitation - except in situations of operational necessity.
   (3) Intimate/sexual relationships.
   (4) Gambling.
   (5) Loaning/borrowing money.
   (6) Business partnerships - Service members of different ranks cannot go into business together.
   (7) Commercial solicitation - if a higher ranking Service member operates or is affiliated with a private company,
they cannot solicit business for that company from a lower ranking Service member.
   h. Sexual harassment and fraternization policy also apply to IMS who receive education or training at a U.S.
military training installation or through a contractor employed by the U.S. Armed Forces to carry out international
education and training. Any IMS who engages in conduct that could be considered sexual harassment or fraternization
will be subject to appropriate administrative action and/or disenrollment.

10–47. Unauthorized absence
  a. When an IMS is absent from scheduled activities for more than 24 hours without proper authorization, the IMS
will be considered in an UA status. IMSO will carefully check before making a determination of UA to ensure that the
IMS is not absent because of misunderstanding the schedule, sick in quarters, or for other plausible reasons.
  b. When it has been determined that an IMS is UA, the IMSO will immediately—
  (1) Notify appropriate school/installation personnel, ICE (both the local office and the national office at alrceu@dhs.
gov) and the appropriate Military Service country program manager, including the following information:
  (a) IMS name and country.
  (b) Effective date and time of absence
  (c) Date of birth.
  (d) Place of birth.
  (e) Last known location.
  (f) Case identification number/WCN.
  (g) Type of training and any previous and/or programmed follow-on training.
  (h) Known travel circumstances (flight arrangements, layovers).
  (i) Information pertaining to events that may have contributed to IMS absence.
  (j) Known variations in name spelling.
  (k) Known relatives in the United States.
  (l) Information on U.S. driver’s license (if any), including number, issuing state, and expiration date.
  (2) Notify the issuing DOD ID card office to ensure ID card is cancelled.
  (3) Notify the local DFAS facility/local finance officer to post UA information to the IMS DD Form 1588 to
preclude unauthorized payments.
  (4) Notify appropriate installation facilities to ensure no unauthorized services are provided.



                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                 183
   (5) Ensure the proper progress message (absent without leave–TG) is entered in the Security Assistance Network.
   (6) Hold personal effects of UA IMS for 7 days; then forward to the nearest foreign country representative or
dispose of in the same manner as prescribed for deceased IMS (see para 10–48). Cost of shipping personal effects is
the responsibility of the foreign government.
   (7) If a UA IMS voluntarily returns to U.S. military control or is known to be detained by local authorities, notify
the personnel indicated in paragraph 10–47b(1), and await disposition instructions. The ITO fund cite for an IMET
IMS may be used for required transportation of the IMS to their proper station and for living allowances until
disposition instructions have been made.
   c. The Military Service will—
   (1) Forward IMSO-provided information to the relevant Security Cooperation Organization, Commanders of Com-
batant Commands, and DSCA.
   (2) Notify the appropriate military criminal investigative organization.
   (3) Provide disposition instructions received from DSCA to the IMSO for any UA IMS who voluntarily returns to a
DOD installation.
   d. The Security Cooperation Organization will—
   (1) Amend the student’s ITO to cancel all training, all authorizations including dependants and terminate DOD
sponsorship.
   (2) Notify the consular section of the U.S. embassy that issued the student’s visa.
   (3) Notify the Ministry of Defense in the student’s country.
   e. Personal effects of the IMS will be held for 30 days. Personal effects will then be forwarded to the nearest foreign
country representative or disposed of in the same manner as prescribed for deceased IMS (see para 10–48j).

10–48. Casualty report, death, and disposition of remains
   a. If an IMS under SCETP sponsorship dies, the activity at which death occurs will immediately notify the
appropriate Military Service.
   b. The Military Service will notify DSCA, the foreign attaché, public affairs office, and others, as appropriate.
   c. The activity will furnish a casualty report according to MILDEP regulations. The following additional information
will be included in the remarks section of the casualty report:
   (1) The IMS ITO number and date, WCN, and country.
   (2) Request for instructions for disposition of remains.
   (3) Request for permission to perform autopsy if required.
   (4) Identification and location of next of kin if available.
   d. Funeral or memorial services will not be conducted for IMS until instructions concerning the disposition of the
remains have been received from the appropriate Military Service. The Military Service will obtain special instructions
on the disposition of remains from the IMS government.
   e. The training installation will coordinate the preparation and transportation of the remains of IMS according to
authorized disposition instructions. If a local funeral home is utilized to assist in the arrangements for preparation and
transportation of the remains, the IMSO at the current training installation (or last training installation if the IMS was
on leave when the death occurred) should coordinate payment of the funeral home expenses. Under IMET, the
appropriate MILDEP financial office should ensure funds are issued to the training installation financial office. Under
FMS, the home country government should provide the funds. In all cases, IMSO should refer to the Health Affairs
Handbook, chapter 6 for specific guidance.
   f. If an escort is desired, the official representative of the country concerned may designate a staff member or an
IMS to accompany the remains. U.S. personnel are not authorized for escort assignment.
   (1) Per diem and travel costs of the escort accompanying the remains of an USG-funded IMS within the U.S. are
chargeable to USG funds.
   (2) Travel and transportation expenses for escorts accompanying the remains of an FMS IMS will be borne by the
foreign government concerned.
   g. The IMET fund cite in the IMS ITO will be used to defray preparation expenses and costs for transportation of
the remains to the home country. Overseas return transportation costs will be paid from IMET funds only for deceased
IMS from countries for which travel costs are defrayed from IMET funds. For transportation to a country which
defrays all or part of the IMS travel costs, the country concerned must arrange and pay for that portion, either through
the CLO or the official foreign government representative.
   h. Expenses involved in the death of FMS IMS are the responsibility of the foreign government; however, the
activity concerned will offer all assistance possible. If the assistance of the installation mortuary officer is desired by
the foreign government, that officer will, without charge and as a matter of courtesy, negotiate with a civilian mortuary
on behalf of the foreign government for the preparation of the remains for burial or shipment. All related charges are
the responsibility of the foreign government. Arrangements for other U.S. agency-sponsored IMS will be handled by
the sponsoring agency.


184                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   i. Expenses involved in the death of dependents of IMS are the responsibility of the IMS or the foreign government,
and will be handled in the same manner as stated in paragraph h, above.
   j. The activity concerned will appoint an individual to officially handle the deceased IMS affairs; for example,
obtaining final IMET allowances due, settling valid debts, disposing of an automobile, and inventorying personal
effects. Unless otherwise directed, personal effects of deceased IMS will be forwarded with the inventory list to the
appropriate Security Cooperation Organization for release to the next of kin.
   k. An investigative report of death as a result of accident or homicide will be forwarded to the Military Service. The
report can be in letter format. It should—
   (1) Address all circumstances surrounding the IMS death.
   (2) Contain copies of all necessary supporting documents; for example, accident report, medical reports, and death
certificate.

10–49. Reporting of international military student special circumstances
   a. Timely reports on academic deficiencies should be addressed to the appropriate Military Service. Often these
deficiencies can be corrected by the foreign representative or by programming other training. The objective is to train
the IMS at the least expense to the U.S. or country concerned.
   b. An IMS who fails to meet the minimum training standards set for U.S. personnel may be disenrolled and returned
to home country. When it is apparent that an IMS should be withdrawn from training, the appropriate Military Service
will be advised immediately of the full particulars of the case. This will include recommendations on suitability for
other training or disposition of the IMS. The IMS will not be relieved for cause without authority from the responsible
Military Service. Pending receipt of this authority, suspension is authorized at the discretion of the installation
commander or school commandant. The Military Service will advise the Security Cooperation Organization, Combatant
Command concerned, and the appropriate foreign representative in Washington, DC, when authority has been given to
terminate an IMS.
   c. The following incidents involving IMS will be reported initially to the Military Service by phone. Before making
recommendations on disposition of IMS, priority message summarizing the incident will be sent to the Military
Service, Combatant Command, and Security Cooperation Organization.
   (1) Hospitalization. Include date of hospitalization, diagnosis, prognosis, and probable date of release. Reports on
Family members are not required unless illness, injury, or condition affects IMS training or has political implications or
will result in extensive medical charges, which are beyond the IMS ability to pay. See paragraph 8–8 for further
information.
   (2) Requirement to reschedule training due to academic deficiency.
   (3) Accident reports involving IMS or their Family members.
   (4) Emergency leave or other significant items affecting IMS welfare.
   (5) UA status.
   (6) Any event involving an IMS that may have international implications. This will include any complaint by an
IMS, or behavioral attitude indicated or reported, revealing the IMS dissatisfaction with their environment or social
acceptance.
   d. Following initial notification, the Military Service will be kept informed. Written reports will be provided when
appropriate.
   e. When IMS attending training at OCONUS installations fail to meet standards, they will be released and returned
to their home country upon authority of the overseas commander. The Security Cooperation Organization will be fully
advised of all details in the case.

Section XI
International Military Student Departure

10–50. Departure to the next training installation
The IMSO will inform the appropriate gaining activity of the departure and itinerary of all IMS. This notification will
include information about the IMS in paragraphs (a) through (g), below. If the gaining activity is not identified on the
ITO, the sponsoring Military Service must be contacted for this information.
   a. Name, grade, country, and Service.
   b. Date and hour of departure and scheduled arrival.
   c. Name of carrier.
   d. Flight or train number.
   e. Information that the IMS is traveling by POV.
   f. Ensure that each departing IMS has the original ITO with all amendments and, if applicable, a copy of the last pay
voucher.




                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                 185
  g. Advance TLA payments and TLA payment history (if any).

10–51. Departure from final training installation
   a. Military Service specific checklists should be utilized in the process of coordinating the departure of an IMS from
their final training installations. These Service specific checklists may be supplemented by locally prepared checklists.
   b. At a minimum, the following items should be covered during the departure of an IMS from the final training
installation. The corresponding sections and paragraphs in this regulation should be reviewed to ensure all essential
issues are addressed.
   (1) Administrative—
   (a) Student ITO reviewed - all amendments and endorsements signed.
   (b) Collect/destroy ID card(s) collected and destroyed.
   (c) Training records complete, forwarded, as required.
   (d) Classified material disposition confirmed.
   (e) Medical records/health insurance matters reviewed/confirmed.
   (f) Security Cooperation Organization notified of IMS return to home country.
   (2) Financial—
   (a) Final pay/allowance confirmed.
   (b) Outstanding debts resolved.
   (c) Final billeting payments complete.
   (3) Travel—
   (a) Flight Reservations confirmed.
   (b) Request port calls for IMS returning to their home country according to MILDEP regulations.
   (c) Baggage complies with USG limitations.
   (d) Shipment of personal goods arranged.
   (e) The RIM packed separately.
   (f) Leave enroute confirmed.

10–52. Retainable instructional materials
The RIM will consist only of unclassified books, pamphlets, maps, charts, or other course material issued to and
retained by the IMS and their U.S. classmates. It also includes official Field Studies Program materials. It will not
include articles procured by the IMS for personal use and not directly related to the course of instruction. A shipment
weight allowance is authorized for each IMS for their RIM. The cost of shipment of RIM is included in the tuition
rates for all formal courses based on standard rates set by DOD 7000.14–R, volume 15.
   a. Materials will be packaged and labeled at the training installation and shipped via fourth-class mail to the country
Security Cooperation Organization for delivery to the student, or to the official address for classified material. A copy
of the student’s ITO will be placed inside the box. Use of the Army and Air Force Post Office or Fleet Post Office
address of the sponsoring Security Cooperation Organization is authorized. Boxes must be addressed to the Security
Cooperation Organization (student’s name must not be entered on address label) and include (on the side of the
package) the WCN and Program Year for IMET students and the WCN and FMS case for FMS students.
   b. Personal items and household goods will not be packed or shipped as RIM; cost of packing and shipping these
items will be borne by the IMS. The IMS is also not permitted to ship these items with RIM by paying for excess
charges over the authorized weight.
   c. An endorsement to the ITO will cite the weight shipped. The following RIM weight allowances will apply:
   (1) Up to 200 pounds for each course the Military Service consider to be in the PME category (see MILDEP
sections in this chap.)
   (2) Up to 50 pounds for all other courses. IMS wishing to send RIM via international mail or over the total
authorized weight allowance will do so at their own expense.

10–53. In-country debriefings
The Security Cooperation Organization should debrief IMS upon their return to the home country to determine their
impressions of the United States, the quality of training received, and suggestions for improvements that should be
made for subsequent IMS. Noteworthy data will be forwarded to the appropriate Military Service, with an information
copy to the combatant command.

10–54. Follow-up on graduates
School commandants are encouraged to maintain contact with graduates of career and similar top-level courses after
the IMS return to their home country. Such contact may include the following:
   a. Letters from the commander, along with the annual school newsletter or similar school publications, and informal
correspondence among classmates.


186                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
  b. Professional publications subscriptions for IMS enrolled in CONUS staff and career courses. Each subscription
must be appropriate to the course taken by the IMS and will be initiated before the IMS leaves the United States. The
subscription will be for a maximum of 1 year and can be funded under the Field Studies Program.

Section II
Department of the Army

10–55. International military student officer
   a. Staffing.
   (1) Staffing levels and grades for the IMSO are predicated on the annual international military student through put
as well as established quantitative and qualitative manpower requirements based on the performance of regular,
repetitive and non-repetitive tasks within an IMSO. It’s normally stated as a mathematical equation relating required
IMSO man-hours to execute the mission to the number of IMS that come on an annual basis. This system referenced is
called the Manpower Staffing Standard System. It is periodically reviewed via studies to ensure continued validity. An
expression of the number of personnel required to run the IMSO is developed through the Manpower Staffing Standard
System process and is incorporated into a TDA, which lists the number of personnel, job series, and appropriate grades.
IMSO will be staffed according to the results of the Manpower Staffing Standard System process and resultant TDA. If
a dramatic fluctuation in the student throughput occurs, it may be necessary to either add or remove personnel from the
IMSO.
   (2) Notify SATFA P4 as soon as a determination is made to adjust IMSO staffing levels so specific guidance can be
obtained on proper procedure, possible alternatives, and to ensure funds will be both approved by Director, SATFA,
and made available through course tuition costs to pay for an increase, if appropriate, in personnel costs.
   (3) Should government transportation, including IMSO leased vehicle, not be available to support and execute the
IMSO mission to include the Field Studies Program, IMSO personnel are authorized to use their POV for the mission
and be compensated for doing so. An official designation letter must be prepared allowing named IMSO individual to
use their POV for administrative and support functions, to include for the Field Studies Program. Mileage only
compensation at current JTFR rates is permissible. Copy of designation letters and all payment vouchers with
substantiating documentation is to be kept on file in accordance with AR 25–400–2.
   b. Training.
   (1) Training and orientation opportunities for the IMSO, their staff and chain of command include paragraphs (a)
through (e), below.
   (a) A one week course, the Security Assistance Management-Training Officer (SAM–TO) Course, conducted at
DISAM at Wright-Patterson AFB, OH. Quotas for this course are allocated by SATFA P4.
   (b) An orientation visit to SATFA will be coordinated and scheduled by SATFA P4 shortly after assignment as an
IMSO Chief.
   (c) Conferences and regional reviews/workshops conducted on an as needed basis by SATFA for IMSO personnel
and immediate chain of command.
   (d) Liaison visits to other installations to exchange ideas and information will be coordinated with SATFA P4.
   (e) The Cross Cultural Communication Course and regional orientation courses conducted at Hurlburt Field, FA.
   (2) Except for the SAM–TO course, the costs of these orientations, visits, and conferences should be charged to
IMSO administrative funds captured in the course tuition costs. If such funds are not available, costs for these activities
may be charged to Field Studies Program funds.
   c. Responsibilities. (see para 10–6). The name, office, and telephone number of assigned IMSO personnel will be
reported semiannually to SATFA P4. Changes will be furnished as they occur. IMSO responsibilities fall into three
primary categories, which are not mutually exclusive—
   (1) IMSO administrative and support functions. These are clearly delineated throughout chapter 10 of this regula-
tion. Army IMSO have the following specific responsibilities: Keep the IMSO Training Web information up to date.
The Security Assistance Network IMSO Web provides for the entry of IMSO point of contact information, detailed
training location information, and any other international only information. This information is entered by the IMSO
(not by SATFA) and must be kept current by the IMSO. In addition, IMSO can enter specific international notes and
prerequisites that pertain to specific courses of instruction at their training activity. Again, this information is entered
by the IMSO and is thus tailored to a need to provide specific information for the international community on their
courses. SATFA pulls scope and prerequisites from the Army Training Resource and Requirements System. The IMSO
should periodically check this information to ensure it is current. The IMSO will prepare STL report for servicing
resources management personnel to assist their efforts to accurately project earnings from course tuition rates. Execute
an orientation program for IMS and include the training installation briefing as outlined in paragraph 10–13.
   (2) IMSO training functions. These include—
   (a) Briefing IMS on general U.S. Army training procedures, to include the U.S. Army honor code, small group




                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                   187
instruction, computer based training, practical exercises, field training exercises, physical training requirements, interac-
ting with NCOs, female and civilian instructors, use of training schedules, and other topics which will assist IMS in
fitting into their courses.
   (b) Monitoring academic progress of IMS throughout their stay at the installation. This requires constant coordina-
tion with instructional departments and early intervention for IMS that may experience academic difficulties. IMSO
will notify appropriate SATFA country program manager if student is experiencing continuing academic difficulty or is
in danger of failing.
   (c) Coordinating with appropriate agency personnel to execute distributed learning (DL) courses in residence for
IMS.
   (d) Ensuring that U.S. students in courses with IMS are briefed on the SC Program.
   (e) Ensuring that instructors are briefed on the SC Program and on interacting with IMS.
   (f) Implementing an academic or in-class sponsor program, including briefing both IMS and academic or in-class
sponsors on their responsibilities and on the SC Program.
   (3) IMSO Field Studies Program. These are detailed in chapter 11 of this regulation.

10–56. Channels of communication and correspondence
   a. When an IMSO communicates directly with Security Cooperation Organization on routine administrative matters
concerning IMS, information copies will be sent to the SATFA country program manager, and other training com-
mands as appropriate. Initial reports of a disciplinary nature should not include Security Cooperation Organization as
information addressee. IMSO will immediately initiate action through Director, SATFA chain of command when
unique or controversial situations arise that might be detrimental to the IMS successful completion of training. SATFA
country program manager will provide information copies to the combatant commands and Security Cooperation
Organization on controversial IMS matters.
   b. Foreign attaches and liaison offices in the Washington, DC area are authorized to communicate with schools/
training activities only on routine administrative matters. Other issues regarding IMS, training, and so forth will be
coordinated with SATFA. Schools receiving unauthorized telephone or written communication will notify SATFA
country program manager.
   c. Foreign officers such as TRADOC Foreign Liaison Officers (FLO) and exchange instructors have no official role
in the SCETP. They may communicate informally with IMS from their countries, but do not have roles in issues
pertaining to the training of IMS.

10–57. Arrival and departure arrangements
The following actions are taken by the IMSO:
   a. Student arrival information. Obtain student arrival information from the Security Assistance Network IMSO Web.
The Security Assistance Network IMSO Web system should be routinely screened to determine reporting/arrival data
available for each scheduled IMS. If arrival information is not available 15 days before a student’s report date the
IMSO should communicate by message directly with the appropriate Security Cooperation Organization. The IMSO
should notify the appropriate SATFA country program manager if a particular country is habitually late with student
arrival information. If the IMS does not arrive as scheduled, the IMSO should contact the appropriate SATFA country
program manager as soon as feasible.
   b. IMS arrival. As soon as projected IMS arrival has been determined by information provided by the Security
Cooperation Organization in Training Management System and the Security Assistance Network Training Web, the
IMSO will communicate advance information packets by either hard copy or electronic media such as on a CD or a
Web site URL to the Security Cooperation Organization of each country for dissemination to IMS. The information
should be sent as early as possible, but NLT 60 days before student’s projected arrival. Content should include
information that is interesting and useful to a student traveling to the United States for the first time. Items that should
be included are: general information about the installation; maps of the local area; estimates of living costs; types of
clothing required; housing facilities and availability; information concerning family members; amount of American
currency required for the initial period; a general address for forwarding mail to the United States; and reporting
instructions. Be sure to include instructions to the Security Cooperation Organization on procedures to be followed
regarding timely notification of the IMS travel itinerary. Also, include instructions to IMS on reporting in the event
they are not met at the arrival point. In addition, a special text containing the terminology, along with applicable
acronyms, peculiar to the course should be included to help the IMS prepare for training. This text provides most IMS
their first insight into U.S. military training and is an indispensable part of their orientation.
   c. Initiate student file. The IMSO will initiate a student file for each IMS. The student file will include arrival
notice, ITO, biographical information and any other pertinent IMS information or correspondence that will transpire
during training. The ITO contains personal information that potentially may be used in identity theft and should be
protected and covered with a DA Label 87 Form (For Official Use Only Sheet). The ITO or forms with sensitive
personal IMS information including their foreign identification number will be shredded versus discarded in a waste
receptacle. The final CONUS training installation IMSO will retain the student file in the current files area until no



188                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
longer needed for conducting business, but not longer than 6 years, then destroy in accordance with the record retention
schedule as stated in AR 25–400–2.
   d. Student arrival at installation.The IMSO or designee should take IMS to the temporary lodging facility, give
them welcome packets, and advise them when they will be picked up to begin in-processing. If possible, IMS should
be given time to rest and obtain basic subsistence for the first few hours on the installation. IMSO staff will provide
information in the student welcome packets such as, items of local interest, such as, special events, bus schedules, taxi
rates, hotels, and local community organizations established to assist IMS. If IMS have religious or national dietary
requirements, the person meeting them should provide them with a list of local restaurants that meet these require-
ments. If the sponsor is available, they can be of great assistance during this time.
   e. IMSO at initial training installation.This installation will review passports and visas upon arrival of IMS and
authorized Family members, if applicable. Visas other than A–2, conflict of names with ITO and other discrepancies
will be immediately reported through the SATFA country program manager to Security Cooperation Organization for
resolution. IMSO will encourage IMS to contact their embassies at least 60 days prior to departure to determine any
transit visa requirements or country travel restrictions.
   f. Billeting arrangements. The IMS should be housed in the same quarters as U.S. students, rather than in separate
quarters or language groups. If IMS from several countries are at the same training location and U.S. personnel cannot
be billeted with them, the students should be quartered in heterogeneous groupings. If possible, IMS should occupy
unaccompanied personnel housing equivalent to that for U.S. personnel of the equivalent rank. If students are to stay in
the temporary lodging facility, the IMSO should notify the billeting office prior to the students arrival.
   g. Sponsors. The IMSO should provide sponsors with student arrival dates, country notes/culture-grams, and
background information on the student if available. If possible, the IMSO should arrange for the sponsor to meet with
the IMS during the in-processing period, particularly if the student is accompanied by family members.
   h. Departure. Advise the IMS to report to the IMSO in sufficient time before departure to ensure that arrangements
for transportation to the airport, final pay, tickets and baggage are complete. Ensure that the driver/escort personnel are
aware of all requirements and that any special transportation/vehicle needs are addressed in advance. IMSO personnel
escorting IMS to the airport are to remain with the IMS through the entire check-in process. Once the IMS has checked
their baggage and received their boarding pass, the IMSO escort is free to depart the airport.
   i. Shipment of retainable instructional material. The IMSO assists students in packing, labeling, and shipping RIM,
and ensures that no personal effects are packed with the instructional materials when they inspect the contents of the
mailing box. Students who wish to send instructional materials over the authorized weight allowance must do so at
their own expense.
   (1) Refer to student’s ITO to make sure that the correct address is included on the mail label. Failure to refer to the
ITO is the main cause of misrouted RIM.
   (2) Each RIM container will be clearly marked in the lower left-hand corner of the label showing IMS ITO number,
WCN, and FMS case, if applicable. Do not include IMS name on either the outside of the box or on the mailing label.
   (3) Place a copy of the IMS ITO inside of each package of RIM.
   j. Other requirements. The IMSO will ensure that the IMS has returned any issued equipment, and that the IMS ID
card and meal card, if applicable, have been turned in. The ID card will be turned in and disposed of at the last training
site.

10–58. Biographical data
Submission of biographical data for enlisted personnel attending the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy (USASMA)
shall be done by the Security Cooperation Organization using the Training Management System IMS information
function which is then uploaded to the Security Assistance Network at least 60 days prior to student arrival.

10–59. Legal status and claims
   a. See AR 27–20 for information about the jurisdiction of service courts regarding treatment specific to members of
the Australian forces in the United States.
   b. The servicing judge advocate will contact HQDA (DAJA–IA), Washington, DC 20310–2214, for information
about the diplomatic or other status of the IMS concerned.
   c. See AR 27–20 for information about claims arising in the United States due to the activities of IMS from
countries that have ratified the NATO SOFA..
   d. See AR 27–20, chapter 11, for the status of IMS in training. Also see AR 27–20 chapters 3 and 4, for proper
party claimant status. See AR 27–20, chapter 3, for baggage claims.
   e. Any incident that may lead to the exercise of some form of jurisdiction by local authorities should be reported
immediately to Director, SATFA and the appropriate SATFA country program manager.

10–60. Family members
For in-depth information on Family members, refer to paragraph 10–16 and table 7–1 in this regulation. It should be
noted that just because a dependent is “authorized” on an ITO does not mean that they are “encouraged.” The


                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                  189
allowances for each are not the same. For clarification of “encouraged” Family members, please refer to the SAMM,
table C10.T3.
   a. Should the commander of the training installation determine that the length and nature of the course and the
availability of housing and other amenities support the presence of Family members, they may forward a request for
approval for a specific course to Director, SATFA. If the request is approved, exceptions will apply to all IMS for the
approved course.
   b. When IMS choose not to live in available government provided quarters, whether accompanied by Family
members or not, all living allowances will be forfeited. A statement of non-availability will not be issued to IMS with
Family members when government quarters for unaccompanied students are available. The exception to this is if
Family members are “encouraged” as stated above.
   c. Scheduled reporting or departure dates and routing will not be altered merely to accommodate IMS travel with
Family members. The use of government owned vehicles in the reception and departure of bona fide Family members
of IMS, as listed on the ITO, is authorized, subject to local vehicle availability.
   d. The Security Cooperation Organization will notify training installations one month before the arrival of IMS
accompanied by Family members. Names and ages of authorized Family members will be annotated in the ITO to
facilitate administrative/logistical coordination. Failure to give adequate notice may cause embarrassing situations as to
initial reception and the availability of quarters and sponsors.

10–61. Commissary and exchange privileges
Commissary and post exchange privileges will be extended to IMS and their authorized accompanying Family
members.

10–62. Clothing, uniforms, and equipment
   a. Organizational clothing and equipment. Lost, damaged, or destroyed property will be accounted for according to
AR 735–5.
   b. Individual flying equipment. Flying equipment issued to an IMS at the initial aviation training facility may be
retained throughout the IMS CONUS pilot training. This equipment will be turned in at the issuing facility.
   c. Clothing purchases. The sale of distinctive uniforms or items of uniforms listed in AR 670–1 is prohibited unless
specifically authorized by the installation commander.
   (1) Installation commanders may extend to IMS the privilege of purchasing non-distinctive clothing from the
clothing sales store. IMSO should tell IMS about the policy at their installation. When an IMS reports for training, the
IMSO should check personal items of equipment and clothing to ensure they are adequate for the prescribed training
course. Before commencement of training, the IMSO is required to conduct an inventory of these items, noting any
shortages and immediately make provisions for purchase from an on-post source if available. Unless otherwise
specified in the course information included in the IMSO Web, the following minimum clothing allowance must be
considered before the IMS is sent to CONUS for training:
   (a) Two complete winter uniforms and four complete summer uniforms.
   (b) One raincoat.
   (c) One winter topcoat or jacket (if appropriate).
   (d) Two work uniforms battle dress uniform (if appropriate).
   (e) One pair of work shoes (safety shoes/combat boots) (if appropriate).
   (f) Other necessary items such as dress shoes, socks, gloves, underwear, caps, and military insignia.
   (2) The use of tuition cost to fund the purchase of personal items of clothing for IMS is not authorized. Exceptions
to this policy must be approved by SATFA. IMS without sufficient clothing/uniforms or funds sufficient to purchase
these items to meet climatic conditions at the training site are subject to return to country.
   (3) Unresolved problems should be brought to the attention of the appropriate SATFA country program manager at
the earliest possible time.

10–63. Rank insignia
To help identify IMS equivalent U.S. rank, IMS are authorized to wear the equivalent U.S. rank insignia directly below
their name tags. The cost of IMS U.S. rank insignia is properly chargeable to the IMSO administrative funds earned
through course tuition rates.

10–64. Grooming standards
The IMS will maintain acceptable standards of appearance, conduct, health and hygiene so as not to affect the
discipline or morale of U.S. personnel or negatively impact ability to successfully complete training. Strict adherence to
AR 670–1 will be required in courses in which safety is an issue. IMSO will include applicable grooming standards
within IMS requirements for courses in the IMSO Web.




190                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
10–65. Disclosure of classified military information and controlled unclassified information
   a. The CMI and CUI will only be released to IMS according to AR 380–10.
   b. Disclosure of CMI and CUI to IMS will be addressed on a case-by-case basis according to AR 380–10. A DCS,
G–2/DCS, G–3/5/7 clearance will be obtained for each request for training that includes CMI/CUI, unless a prior
blanket clearance has been granted. All appropriate clearances will be obtained before offering the training to the
requesting country.

10–66. Graduation, diplomas, certificates of attendance, and awards/badges
   a. In general, IMS should complete the same requirements and meet the same standards as U.S. students to be
awarded a diploma in a U.S. Army course. Exceptions other than for classified instruction will be justified. IMS will
complete all other course requirements, including field training exercises and blocks of instruction that appear to
pertain only to U.S. students. Schools may substitute appropriate training for blocks of instruction unavailable to IMS.
Standards are not compromised by allowing IMS additional time to complete written exams, or by allowing them to
have translating aids/dictionaries. Flexibility and common sense should prevail when considering course requirements
and standards.
   (1) The IMS will participate in the class graduation ceremony. It is highly encouraged that country flags for
graduating IMS be displayed at the graduation ceremony if the U.S. Flag is displayed.
   (2) Any school wishing to grant additional special IMS recognition is encouraged to do so. It is important to
remember that IMS attending military schools face academic challenges far greater than U.S. students, for they must
overcome barriers such as language and cultural differences while maintaining academic competitiveness. Theirs is a
special accomplishment, and should be recognized as such.
   b. If an IMS is eligible for early graduation, the IMSO will notify the appropriate SATFA country program
manager. Actions should not be taken to return student back to country early until approval is obtained in writing from
the country program manager. IMS completion report in the IMSO Web should reflect actual dates of training.
   c. Should a student fail their course of instruction, notify appropriate country program manager. They will in turn
notify Security Cooperation Organization of such. Country may elect, with course manager’s approval, to let student
remain in course for a certificate of attendance. A certificate of attendance is a locally developed certificate which
attests to the fact that the student attended the training but is not eligible for a graduation diploma. Completion report
in the IMSO Web should reflect that the student did not graduate from the course but received, if applicable, a
certificate of attendance instead.
   d. Special badge qualifications normally given graduates of certain courses will be awarded to IMS upon successful
completion and graduation from the attended course. These special badge qualifications such as jump wings, aviator
wings, and aviation crewmember wings are permissible for IMS to wear on their uniforms, and are authorized by
special orders. Completion report in the IMSO Web should reflect the authorization for the student to wear the badge.

10–67. Physical training
Except for mandatory requirements listed in paragraph 10–26, all other IMS will be encouraged to participate in
MILDEP physical training programs and tests. Local commanders may require participation in formations and physical
training to the best of an individual’s ability. However, in some instances, passing the U.S. Army Physical Fitness Test
(APFT) is a requirement for attendance and/or graduation.

10–68. Serious incident reporting
The IMSO will comply with established school/installation notification procedures in the event of a serious incident
involving an IMS or IMS Family member. Incidents include but are not limited to DUI, incarceration, theft, security
violations, serious illness, or injury, hospitalization, and any incident that could cause removal of student from course/
training. IMSO will report immediately via e-mail to the respective SATFA country program manager with info copies
to the respective branch chief and the Regional Operations Division Chief.
   a. Very serious incidents involving felony crime, life threatening injury or death will be immediately reported to the
Director, SATFA via telephone with e-mail follow up to the Director and the Regional Operations Division Chief (dual
hatted as the SATFA Deputy).
   b. If the incident occurs during off-duty hours, contact the SATFA Duty Officer (follow the contact protocol listed
on the SATFA Web site under “Contact Information.”)
   c. In the event of a conflict concerning notification procedures, IMSO will follow established school policy. IMSO
will document incidents in the Security Assistance Network IMSO Web by selecting the appropriate progress message
and completing details.

10–69. Disciplinary actions
See paragraph 10–45 for general information. In the absence of standard agreements with countries involved in SC
training, IMS cannot be disciplined according to the UCMJ. Disenrollment should be considered as the last disciplinary
option available in the case of an IMS who has demonstrated a refusal to conform to the rules and regulations at the



                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                 191
command where training takes place. The following should be used as a guideline when disciplinary action(s) is
required:
   a. Warning.
   (1) Disenrollment of an IMS indicates that the mission of training contracted for under the Security Cooperation
Training Program has not been accomplished. Experience has shown that contact with IMS by officials of their own
government can resolve most disciplinary problems. In many cases such contacts can also have a positive influence on
academic problems, especially where the cause may be the IMS attitude in pursuing the course of instruction. Notify
appropriate SATFA country program manager as early as possible.
   (2) When an IMS indicates nonconformity to established standards of behavior or has failed to achieve required
academic progress, the IMSO will formally counsel the IMS concerning these shortcomings. The IMS will be advised
of the exact nature of the behavior or performance that has failed to meet established or required standards. The IMS
will be advised that an official warning is being provided and that change is required to avoid placement on probation
(the last stage before disenrollment). The IMS will be advised of the exact nature of the change required, and of the
time period the IMS is being given to make the required change.
   (3) The IMSO will make an official record of the counseling session and enter it into the IMS training record. The
IMS will be informed that if the required changes in either behavior or academic performance are made within the time
period specified, the official record of the counseling session will be removed from the IMS training record upon
successful completion of the current course of instruction.
   b. Probation.
   (1) When an IMS fails to make the changes in either behavior or academic performance required as a result of being
formally placed on warning status, or when an IMS indicates serious nonconformity to established standards of
behavior, the IMS will officially be placed on probation.
   (2) If the IMS is placed on probation, the IMSO will formally counsel the IMS. The IMS will be advised of the
exact nature of the behavior or performance that has failed to meet established or required standards and as a result the
IMS is officially being placed on probation. The IMS must change to avoid recommendation for disenrollment. Inform
IMS that their Washington, DC based attaché or government official will be notified of this action. The details will be
recorded in an official letter to the IMS from the IMSO during the official counseling session. A copy of this letter will
be placed in the IMS training record and will remain in the record.
   c. Disenrollment. When an IMS fails to make changes in either behavior or academic performance required as a
result of being formally placed on probation, or when an IMS exhibits behavior prejudicial to good order and
discipline, the commandant of the training activity or the commanding officer of the installation, or both, as appropri-
ate, are authorized to recommend disenrollment. This recommendation will be forwarded to SATFA country program
manager, P4, and Director, SATFA.

10–70. Casualty report, death and disposition of remains
See paragraph 10–48 for general information.
   a. If an IMS under DA sponsorship dies, the U.S. Army activity at which the death occurs will immediately notify
appropriate SATFA country program manager, branch chief and Director, SATFA. Notification information can be
found on the SATFA Web site under “Contact Information.” If the death occurs during off duty hours, follow contact
protocol listed in the aforementioned section labeled “Contact Information.” SATFA will notify the appropriate foreign
attaché at HQ, TRADOC and HQDA (DASA (DE&C)). The initial report will include as much information as possible
on the Fatal Accident Notification and Interim Report. In addition to the initial report and the operations reporting
required, a follow-up interim report must be submitted to HQ, TRADOC via Director, SATFA, within 72 hours. The
interim follow-up report will address any additional information obtained since the initial notification.
   b. The training activity or installation will furnish a casualty report according to AR 600–8–1; SATFA (AT-
TG–TRI–SR) will be included as an action addressee. HQDA (DASA (DE&C)), the combatant commands, and the
Security Cooperation Organization will be included as information addressees to the casualty report.
   c. The senior mission commander will convene a Fatality Review Board and conduct a fatality after action review
within 14 days of the incident. A copy of the final review report of an accidental death or homicide will be forwarded
to the Director, SATFA.

10–71. School crests
The IMS will be presented with a special crest with an accompanying locally developed authorization certificate. The
crest will consist of the distinctive insignia for each school superimposed on a background identical for all schools. The
gold-colored metal background consists of a star with rays surmounted by a wreath of leaves encircled by a wavy
continuous scroll with the words: U.S. ARMY SCHOOLS. The time of issue for the crest and accompanying certificate
will be determined by the school commandant. Exceptions to the standard school crest are authorized for CGSC and
AWC.




192                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
10–72. Academic reports
Academic reports should accurately reflect IMS achievement and performance. DD Form 2496 (International Student
Academic Report) must be prepared for IMS upon completion of each course of instruction (except preparatory
courses). If the school commandant determines the same academic and grading standard can be applied to follow-on
courses in a series, one academic report will be prepared for that series of training. (See fig 10–1 for a sample of the
completed form and fig 10–2 for instructions.) If an IMS has follow-on training at another installation, a copy of the
academic report for the previous training will be forwarded to the next installation IMSO for information and guidance.
   a. Signed academic reports on IMS will be scanned and uploaded to the Security Assistance Network IMSO Web
student information page within 60 days after graduation.
   (1) The Security Cooperation Organization will download the academic report from the Security Assistance Network
Web. The Security Cooperation Organization will release academic reports to foreign governments as appropriate,
taking into consideration the possible political or military implications of the academic report.
   (2) The foreign government may choose to have the academic reports for FMS IMS delivered to the country’s
embassy in Washington, DC. In such cases, the foreign government must forward an official request through the
Security Cooperation Organization to SATFA.
   (3) The IMSO may provide a copy of the academic report to the IMS if it is complete and signed at time of
departure.
   b. The distribution list will not be shown on DD Form 2496.

10–73. Public affairs
   a. Public affairs activities will be conducted under the provisions of AR 360–1.
   b. Requests for IMS interviews or other IMS-related public affairs activities will be referred to the installation
Public Affairs Officer, who will coordinate with OASD Public Affairs. Security concerns may preclude IMS from
certain countries from participating in media events.
   c. Hometown-type release of stories and pictures of IMS and visitors are governed by a separate message issued
annually by the Adjutant General (TAG).
   d. Inquiries regarding IMS via the Freedom of Information Act shall be dealt with in accordance with AR 25–55.
Director, SATFA should be notified immediately of any official Freedom of Information Act requests regarding IMS
and concurrence to release information obtained prior to doing so.
   e. Routine requests for IMS information from other Federal Government agencies may be received and it is
permissible to provide the requestor with routine STL information for the current FY. If the requestor desires additional
information IMSO must first notify Director, SATFA and receive the Director’s concurrence to release the additional
information.

10–74. Visits (see para 12–3 for foreign personnel not enrolled in a training program)
The IMSO will refer visit requests to the installation protocol office.

10–75. Release of maps
Release of official maps is restricted and will be in accordance with AR 115–11.

Section III
Department of the Navy (U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Coast Guard) (Student
Administration)

10–76. International military student officer
   a. The IMSO will be appointed for a minimum of 2 years, when possible, and will receive the necessary training to
perform this important function. Training of Navy command IMSO will be coordinated by Naval Education and
Training Security Assistance Field Activity, training of Marine Corps IMSO will be coordinated by USMC/CG,
SECTC MCCDC, and training of Coast Guard IMSO will be coordinated by USCG International Affairs (G–CI).
   b. The IMSO name, office, and telephone number (both commercial and defense switched network (DSN), must be
reported to Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity for Navy, USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC
for Marine Corps training activities, and USCG International Affairs (G–CI) for Coast Guard training activities.
   c. The IMSO will be responsible for the administration of IMS while assigned to the training activity.
   d. The IMSO will maintain biographical records on IMS. The IMSO must report infractions, incidents of a serious
nature, or serious medical conditions or emergencies involving either IMS or their Family members. The initial report
will be by telephone followed immediately by a priority message. For Navy- sponsored IMS, reports will be made to
Navy IPO via the chain of command and Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity. For Marine
Corps-sponsored IMS, reports will be made to USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC via the chain of command, with
information copies to Navy IPO and Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity. For Coast



                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                 193
Guard-sponsored IMS, reports will be made to USCG International Affairs (G–CI) via the chain of command, with
information copies to Navy IPO and Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity.
   e. The IMSO will be the commanding officer’s principal advisor for the Field Studies Program.

10–77. Correspondence procedures
   a. The Security Cooperation Organization should consult cognizant Commanders of Combatant Commands direc-
tives for specific details on their correspondence routing requirements.
   (1) For Navy or predominantly Navy-sponsored training, Security Cooperation Organization should address corre-
spondence to Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity with information copies to Navy IPO,
the Commanders of Combatant Commands, and other addressees, as appropriate.
   (2) For Marine Corps or predominantly Marine Corps- sponsored training, Security Cooperation Organization should
address correspondence to CG SECTC MCCDC with information copies to Navy IPO, the unified commander, Naval
Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, and other addressees, as appropriate.
   (3) For Coast Guard or predominantly Coast Guard-sponsored training, Security Cooperation Organization should
address correspondence to USCG International Affairs (G–CI) with information copies to Navy IPO, Naval Education
and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, the Combatant Commanders, and other addressees as appropriate.
   b. Training activities should address correspondence to Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field
Activity for Navy or predominantly Navy-sponsored training, to CG SECTC MCCDC for Marine Corps or
predominantly Marine Corps-sponsored training, and to USCG International Affairs (GCI) for Coast Guard sponsored
training. In each instance, information copies should be sent to Navy IPO, Naval Education and Training Security
Assistance Field Activity, the Security Cooperation Organization, and other addressees, as appropriate.
   c. Direct correspondence for routine matters relating to IMS administration is authorized between Security Coopera-
tion Organization and training activities and between training activities. Training activities may also forward command
generated information packages to Security Cooperation Organization for forwarding to prospective students.
   d. The “Subject” line of all correspondence relating to DON SC training should contain as a minimum five critical
elements - FY of training discussed, type of program (IMET or FMS), country concerned, WCN, and (for FMS
training) FMS case designator. Additionally, a short narrative description of the contents and the T–MASL number (if
applicable) may also be included.
   e. When the subject line of record correspondence is not suited to the system outlined in d above, care should be
taken to ensure that the subject is clearly identified.

10–78. Family members
  a. Although IMS are generally discouraged from bringing their Family members to CONUS while attending
courses, they are encouraged to bring their Family members while attending the following:
  (1) Joint Forces Staff College.
  (2) Naval Command College.
  (3) Naval Staff College.
  (4) Marine Corps Command and Staff College.
  (5) Marine Corps Expeditionary Warfare School.
  (6) Marine Corps School of Advanced Warfighting.
  (7) Long-term resident postgraduate courses at NPS
  b. The Security Cooperation Organization will notify training installations 1 month before the arrival of IMS
accompanied by dependents. Failure to give such notification may cause embarrassing situations during initial reception
and in the availability of quarters and sponsors.
  c. The IMS reporting to the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA; Naval War College, Newport, RI; and
Marine Corps Command and Staff College, Expeditionary Warfare School, and School of Advanced Warfighting,
Quantico VA, will be advised that Family members should obtain A–2 visas instead of B–1 or B–2 visas, as the latter
require renewals and fees.

10–79. Student control number assignment procedures
Most IMS undergoing training in the United States will receive a foreign identification number, in accordance with
BUPERSINST 1750.10. In exceptional circumstances when a foreign identification number cannot be issued, the IMS
will receive a student control number. The student control number is issued by Naval Education and Training Security
Assistance Field Activity.

10–80. Public affairs and information
Current policy regarding public affairs and information for the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps are contained in
SECNAVINST 5720.44B.




194                          AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
10–81. Visits
Procedures for the approval of visits by representatives of foreign governments or international organizations to DON
commands, activities, or facilities, are outlined in SECNAVINST 5510.34A. IMS desiring to visit a DON command,
activity, or facility for a purpose not related to their SCETP, must submit a request to Navy IPO for such a visit,
through normal country visit request channels.

10–82. Shipyard training
Before any commitment is made to perform training in United States shipyards or repair facilities, permission must be
obtained from the Commander, Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEASYSCOM). Facilities involved in naval
nuclear propulsion will provide training only after approval has been given and then only rarely. When it is imperative
that an IMS receive training in a shipyard engaged in work on nuclear-powered vessels, the following applies:
   a. The requester must provide complete justification for the proposal to train in such a facility. This justification will
address the following items:
   (1) Specific need for such training.
   (2) Reasons why the training cannot be provided elsewhere.
   b. Procedures for obtaining approval are outlined in the SECNAVINST 5510.34A.
   c. A full-time escort will be required if training is permitted. The requester must address provisions for reimburse-
ment of appropriate charges incurred.

10–83. Distributive/distance learning
The Navy has transformed many legacy systems and business processes through the implementation of the ILE to
enable access to a growing number of DL courses for sailors and marines that are delivered through a variety of
formats that includes the Internet, the Intranet, CD–ROM, and DVD, as well as, automated electronic classrooms
(AEC). Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity will monitor the training delivery method
(TDM), or the methodology the Navy uses to provide training to ensure T–MASL notes are updated and reflect the
most current course delivery method to facilitate IMS selection and preparation for the classroom environment. The
training location may be at the traditional training location, or at a Distance Learning Center, but will be reflected in
the T–MASL.
   a. The IMET IMS may attend DL courses in CONUS, but require DSCA waiver for OCONUS delivery. FMS IMS
may attend courses in CONUS or OCONUS. DL courses delivered OCONUS will have a “P4” MASL per DSCA
guidance.
   b. Procedures for DL course attendance generally mirrors processes for all other courses, with the following
exceptions.
   (1) Prerequisites. All prerequisites, whether for DL or traditional classroom courses, will apply.
   (a) ECL. The IMS must meet the established ECL for all DL courses. In fact, English reading comprehension is
vital to successful completion of DL courses.
   (b) Basic computer skills. IMS must be proficient in basic computer and internet navigation skills, including
keyboard and mouse familiarization, start menu, minimize/maximize/close buttons, copy/cut and paste text, save and/or
save as, print command, web browser navigation. Management Information Systems (PDET002) is a prerequisite for all
DL courses unless IMS has a requisite level of proficiency.
   (2) Minimum computer requirements for OCONUS courses.
• An IBM-compatible PC which runs Windows 95/98/ME with 64 Mb RAM, or which runs Windows 2000/NT with
  128Mb RAM.
• An internet connection of at least 56 Kb.
• Internet Explorer 4.0 or later.
• A 256-color monitor capable of a resolution of 800 x 600.
• A current version of apple QuickTime and Adobe Acrobat Reader.

   (3) Distance learning registration. The Navy designated POC will establish IMS access to authorized course(s) after
proper ITO authorization to ensure standardized and consistent procedures are followed in the establishment of learning
accounts for the IMS. The IMSO at the traditional training site or at the Distance Learning Center will request IMS
access by submitting IMS full name, foreign identification number, and date of birth to the Navy designated POC who
will then proceed with the registration process.
  (4) Student administration. If course is locally managed by a facilitator or instructor, all student administration
functions will be performed at the training location. If course is delivered at a Distance Learning Center, the designated
POC will be responsible for the student administration functions. In all cases, IMS information must be communicated
to the country program manager at Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, CG SECTC
MCCDC or USCG International Affairs (G–CI). The DL student administrative functions include the following tasks in
the Learning Management System:



                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                    195
  (a) Finding and moving learner from a waitlist to a roster.
  (b) Assigning a “job” (content).
  (c) Assigning a seat if tracking seats.
  (d) Creating transcripts for any labs/tests that are not CBT.
  (e) Creating and/or editing transcripts for CBT under special circumstances.
  (f) Verifying all content, labs, and tests required for curriculum completion are completed, and transcripts are in the
system.
  (g) Removing the seat assignment and job from learner.
  (h) Dropping the learner from a roster and creating a roster transcript that indicates the number of days the learner
was on the roster going through training.
  (5) A cancellation penalty will be applied if course is cancelled after establishment of the IMS learning account.
  c. See the Marine Corps Desktop Guide for current information on requirements for the Marine Corps Distance
Education Programs.

10–84. Contractor training
NAVYIPOINST 4950.1 of 6 April 2004 provides policy guidance for DON and Coast Guard organizations through
which contractors provide training to IMS under the security assistance training program (SATP). This includes
training provided by contractors in USG facilities by USG and contract instructors, and contractor training provided in
non-USG facilities by non-USG personnel.
   a. ITO shall be issued for each IMS attending contractor-provided training.
   b. When the training is provided by a contractor in non-USG facilities, the contract SOW must include requirements
to provide students the same basic student management and life support afforded international students attending
training on a USG installation, to include payment of TLA (when applicable); travel arrangements; lodging; dining
facilities; daily transportation between IMS quarters, training facility and dining facility; student reporting; medical
support; general administration; and Field Studies Program if training is 4 weeks or longer. The cost of these
administrative services will be included in the cost of the contract.

10–85. On the job training
   a. The OJT is usually follow-on technical training devoted to practical application of skills and knowledge gained
during a formal course of study. This training is planned in advance as part of the country’s training program.
   (1) The Security Cooperation Organization should provide a summary of the general goals and objectives of the
OJT, and ensure that OJT is included as a training line on the IMS ITO.
   (2) The Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity/CG SECTC MCCDC/G–CI will confirm
the specific goals and objectives of the OJT, determine the location, dates and costs for the OJT, and will ensure that
sufficient funds are available to conduct the training.
   b. When there is no IMSO at the OJT site, an IMSO will be designated by the Military Service to coordinate the
IMS administrative requirements, including—
   (1) Pay living allowance, if authorized (based upon berthing/messing availability).
   (2) Brief IMS on OJT program.
   (3) Request transportation/airline ticket.
   (4) Coordinate excess baggage (as required).
   (5) Provide student arrival/departure information to OJT unit/site.
   (6) Coordinate with the OJT command for the IMS travel.
   c. The OJT command will—
   (1) Meet student at airport or upon arrival at OJT unit/site.
   (2) Verify ITO (retain copy).
   (3) Arrange/ensure follow on transportation has been completed (may be arranged in advance by the IMSO).
   (4) Brief student on OJT program/schedule and expectations.
   (5) Conduct OJT.
   (6) If the OJT includes a Field Studies Program event:
   (a) Request from Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity/Security Cooperation Education
and Training Center/G–CI to conduct Field Studies Program activities.
   (b) Provide report of Field Studies Program activity conducted to the Receiving Training Command or the Security
Cooperation Organization, as appropriate.
   (7) At the end of the OJT:
   (a) Complete and present appropriate OJT completion certificate to the IMS.
   (b) Have student complete an IMS OJT evaluation form.
   (c) Complete an IMS academic report (DD Form 2496) to document the IMS performance during the OJT. Forward



196                          AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
the IMS OJT evaluation and the DD Form 2496 to the IMSO at the Receiving Training Command or the Security
Cooperation Organization as appropriate.
   (d) Mail RIM to the IMS home country via the Security Cooperation Organization office or embassy.
   (e) If the OJT is the last line of training, collect the IMS ID card and destroy.
   (f) Deliver IMS to the departure airport.

10–86. Department of the Navy foreign disclosure policy
   a. SECNAVINST 5510.34A provides DON policy with regard to the disclosure of CMI and CUI to foreign
nationals by DON personnel. This directive also assigns responsibilities within DON with respect to the control of
foreign visitors, liaison officers, exchange personnel, cooperative program personnel, and other foreign nationals or
their representatives who may have contact with the DON.
   b. SECNAVINST 5510.34A, paragraph 7.1(2) of is particularly important for DON training activities, and is
restated here: DON activities responsible for the development of training materials, particularly computer-based
training, shall develop the material keeping in mind that the training may be provided to foreign nationals. In those
instances where there is a reasonable expectation of foreign participation in the training, to the greatest extent possible,
the training should be designed in a modular fashion or in a fashion that may easily be tailored or sanitized.
   c. Security and political screening of IMS will be accomplished by the appropriate activity before issuing any ITO
authorizing DON Security Cooperation Training. If there is any concern that an IMS might be a security risk, full
particulars will be forwarded to Navy IPO, USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC, or USCG International Affairs (G–CI) as
appropriate. USCG International Affairs (G–CI) coordinates disclosure through Navy IPO following all procedures as
outlined below.

10–87. Classified training
The IMS are permitted to participate in classified training if disclosure has been authorized by Navy IPO, Commandant
USMC, or by a commander delegated authority in the SECNAVINST 5510.34. Under no circumstances will classified
training be provided without a disclosure authorization.
   a. Proposals for enrollment of IMS in formal classified courses conducted by the U.S. Navy must be submitted to
Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity for coordination. Proposals for enrollment of IMS in
formal classified courses conducted by the U.S. Marine Corps must be submitted to USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC for
coordination. Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity or USMC/SECTC will coordinate with
Navy IPO as required. Disclosure authorization will be provided to the appropriate commands upon notification that
the training is definitely scheduled. Proposals for unclassified training involving U.S. submarine-related information
will also be forwarded to Navy IPO for approval.
   b. When the annual Security Cooperation Education and Training Working Group requirements are submitted, the
information listed below should be forwarded to Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity (for
U.S. Navy training) or USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC (for U.S. Marine Corps training) for advance planning coordina-
tion. Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity and USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC will coordi-
nate with Navy IPO, as required.
   (1) Training commands at which classified training is desired.
   (2) The T–MASL identification number, course identification number, and course title.
   (3) Countries scheduled to attend.
   (4) Classification of course.
   (5) Class convening data.
   c. Approval for programming classified training will not constitute a disclosure authorization. A minimum of 45
working days is required for disclosure processing. Upon completion of the processing, the appropriate commands will
be given the necessary disclosure authorization. USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC or other commands delegated this
authority will advise Navy IPO by record correspondence of all disclosure authorizations granted.
   d. Training installations are required by SECNAVINST 5510.34A to submit an up-to-date list of classified informa-
tion and materials used both in regular DON courses in which IMS can be enrolled and in courses specifically designed
for IMS. These listings of classified information and materials are submitted to Naval Education and Training Security
Assistance Field Activity (for Navy courses) or USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC (for Marine Corps courses). Naval
Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity or USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC will coordinate with Navy
IPO as required. When course content changes from the previous submission, training installations will submit to Navy
IPO (info Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity for Navy courses or USMC/CG, SECTC
MCCDC for Marine Corps courses) a revised listing of classified information and materials proposed for use in the
course. Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity and USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC will
coordinate with Navy IPO as required. In this submission, an asterisk should be used to identify new information or
materials. A listing of classified information and materials to be used in classified courses subsequently proposed for
the training of IMS will be provided to Navy IPO (info Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field
Activity for Navy courses or USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC for Marine Corps courses) at least 45 working days before


                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                   197
the start date of the proposed training. Again, Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity and
USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC will coordinate with Navy IPO as required. All listings of classified information and
materials used in classified courses will be in the format outlined in the SECNAVINST 5510.34A by 15 March
annually. Advise Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity or USMC/CG SECTC MCCDC as
to the latest listings of classified information and materials used in classified courses remain valid. If they are not, a
new listing of classified information and materials must be submitted for each course where there is a change. Naval
Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity and USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC will coordinate with Navy
IPO as required.
   e. In the case of classified OJT, disclosure authorization by Navy IPO (or USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC or another
command acting under a disclosure delegation set forth in SECNAVINST 5510.34A) cannot be granted until Navy IPO
(or the appropriate command) has been informed of the classified content of the training by the activity conducting the
training. This applies whether OJT was arranged through the annual training program or by other means. A minimum
of 45 working days must be allowed for processing the disclosure authorization.

10–88. Release of course catalogs
SECNAVINST 5510.34A requires requests for the release of course catalogs to be relayed to Naval Education and
Training Security Assistance Field Activity for Navy courses or USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC for Marine Corps
courses. Training installations are not authorized to issue course catalogs direct to foreign requesters unless approved
by Navy IPO or USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC, as appropriate.

10–89. Release of international military student training notes
   a. Only student notes and locally prepared course materials can be provided by DON training activities to the
pertinent Security Cooperation Organization with appropriate release forms. Other classified publications used during
instruction of the classified course such as texts and schematics must be requested by the foreign government through
normal channels in accordance with SECNAVINST 5510.34A.
   b. Before shipping classified student notes and locally prepared course materials, the training activity will ensure
these materials are reviewed and bear the appropriate U.S. security classification markings. Student notes and course
materials that cannot be reviewed because they are written in a foreign language should be marked with the highest
classification of information disclosed during the course. All classified materials will be conspicuously marked by
stamp or other means, to indicate- highest classification of included material, date of review, name, and rank of
reviewing official, name of cognizant activity and course of training involved. The “Third Country” marking required
by SECNAVINST 5510.34A will also be applied to the cover of each classified document. After the appropriate
markings are applied, the material will be forwarded to the Security Cooperation Organization for transmittal to the
foreign government. (If the authorized address in the Standard Navy Distribution List is other than the Security
Cooperation Organization, passing instructions should be included.) In the case of ship’s crew training, classified
student notes and locally prepared material may be delivered directly to the ship if it is accessible.
   c. Classified material that contains communications security information must be forwarded via Commander, Naval
Security Group Command (COMNAVSECGRU) to the Security Cooperation Organization for transmittal.

10–90. Incident reporting
   a. Infractions or incidents of a serious nature, or serious medical conditions or emergencies, involving either IMS or
their Family members will be reported immediately. The initial report will be by telephone followed immediately by a
priority message. For Navy-sponsored IMS, reports will be made to Navy IPO via the chain of command and Naval
Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity. For Marine Corps-sponsored IMS, reports will be made to
Security Cooperation Education and Training Center with information copies to CMC, Navy IPO and Naval Education
and Training Security Assistance Field Activity. For Coast Guard-sponsored IMS, reports will be made to USCG
International Affairs (G–CI) with information copies to Navy IPO. Due to the sensitive nature of such reports,
distribution will be limited to only these organizations or activities. Refer to paragraph 10–48 for further instructions.
   b. The following will be immediately reported as outlined in paragraphs a, above:
   (1) Serious breaches of discipline.
   (2) Matters involving civil authorities.
   (3) Incidents considered having politico-military implications.
   (4) Situations considered outside the purview of local commands or installations.
   (5) Death.

10–91. Unauthorized absence
When an IMS is on UA for more than 24 hours, notify Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field
Activity (for Navy training) or USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC (for Marine Corps training), or USCG International
Affairs (G–CI) (for Coast Guard training.) See paragraph 10–47 for more information.




198                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
10–92. Decedent affairs
   a. For United States Navy and United States Marine Corps.
   (1) When a USG-funded IMS under DON sponsorship dies while undergoing training with U.S. forces or while
traveling in relation to the training, the repatriation of remains is the responsibility of the DON. Refer to Descendent
Affairs Manual (NAVMEDCOMINST 5360.1) for guidance. Detailed instructions on actions to be taken with respect
to the remains will be provided by Navy Mortuary Affairs (Medical Support Office), Great Lakes, IL after coordination
with Navy IPO (for USN sponsored IMS) or USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC (for USMC sponsored IMS).
   (2) Statements of expenses for services in connection with the disposition of a deceased IMS under a USG-funded
program will be submitted to Navy Mortuary Affairs for certification. The statements will then be forwarded to Naval
Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity for addition of the appropriate accounting data before
submitting for payment. Statements for services in connection with the disposition of remains of a FMS IMS in a
training status will be submitted to Navy Mortuary Affairs for certification and forwarded to the appropriate embassy
for payment.
   b. For USCG. Contact USCG International Affairs (G–CI) for guidance.

10–93. Disenrollment
   a. In the absence of standard agreements with countries involved in SC training, IMS cannot be disciplined
according to the UCMJ. Disenrollment is the only disciplinary option available in the case of an IMS who has
demonstrated an inability to conform to the rules and regulations at the command where training takes place.
Disenrollment is also the only option available in the case of an IMS who cannot succeed academically.
   b. Authority to disenroll IMS will be executed by the Deputy Director, Navy IPO for Navy sponsored IMS.
Authority to disenroll IMS will be executed by the Commanding General, Training and Education Command (CG,
TECOM) for Marine Corps sponsored IMS.
   c. Disenrollment of an IMS indicates that the mission of training contracted for under an IMET or FMS training
program has not been accomplished. Therefore, disenrollment must be viewed as the last resort. Experience has shown
that contact with IMS by officials of their own government can resolve most disciplinary problems. In many cases such
contacts can also have a positive influence on academic problems, especially where the cause may be the IMS attitude
in pursuing the course of instruction. To effect this contact, disciplinary and academic problems must be brought to the
attention of SC training points of contact within the chain of command and either Naval Education and Training
Security Assistance Field Activity, or USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC, as appropriate, should be contacted as early as
possible.
   d. To facilitate the proper documentation, reporting, and resolution of academic and disciplinary problems, the
following system will be implemented by all DON activities providing SC training to IMS:
   (1) Warning.
   (a) When an IMS indicates nonconformity to established standards of behavior or has failed to achieve required
academic progress, the IMSO will formally counsel the IMS concerning these shortcomings. The IMS will be advised
of the exact nature of the behavior or performance that has failed to meet established or required standards. The IMS
will be advised that an official warning is being provided and that change is required to avoid the IMS placement on
probation (the last stage before disenrollment). The IMS will be advised of the exact nature of the change required, and
of the time period the IMS is being given to make the required change.
   (b) The IMSO will make an official record of the counseling session and enter it into the IMS training record. The
IMS will be informed that if the required changes in either behavior or academic performance are made within the time
period specified, the official record of the counseling session will be removed from the IMS training record upon the
IMS successful completion of the current course of instruction.
   (2) Probation.
   (a) When an IMS fails to make the changes in either behavior or academic performance required as a result of being
formally placed on warning status, or when an IMS exhibits serious nonconformity to established standards of behavior
or conduct creating a safety risk, the IMS will officially be placed on probation.
   (b) If an IMS is placed on probation, the commanding officer will formally counsel the IMS. The IMS will be
advised of the exact nature of the behavior or performance that has failed to meet established or required standards,
that the IMS is officially being placed on probation, that the IMS must change to avoid recommendation for
disenrollment, of the exact nature of the change required, of the time period in which the change must occur, and that
the IMS Washington, DC, based attaché or other government official will be notified of this action. These details will
be recorded in an official letter to the IMS from the commanding officer that will be provided to the IMS during the
official counseling session. A copy of this letter will be placed in the IMS training record and will remain in that
record until the IMS successfully completes all CONUS based training. If the IMS conduct or academic progress so
warrants, the IMSO at the last activity or installation providing training to the IMS will remove this letter from the
training record prior to forwarding the training record to the Security Cooperation Organization.
   (c) Navy IPO, USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC, or USCG International Affairs (G–CI) as appropriate, will notify the
Washington, DC, based representative of the IMS government.


                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                199
   (3) Disenrollment.
   (a) When an IMS fails to make the changes in either behavior or academic performance required as a result of being
formally placed on probation, or when an IMS exhibits behavior prejudicial to good order and discipline or conduct
creating a safety risk, the Commanding Officer of the training activity is authorized to recommend disenrollment. This
recommendation will be made through the chain of command to Navy IPO (info CNO (N52)) for Navy sponsored
IMS, to USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC for Marine Corps-sponsored IMS. Information copies of any correspondence
relating to disenrollment will be provided Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity. The initial
report will be by telephone followed immediately by a priority message. The report will include appropriate recommen-
dations. Copies of all record correspondence relating to disenrollment will become a permanent part of the IMS
training record and will be forwarded to the Security Cooperation Organization after the IMS return to homeland.
   (b) Navy IPO and USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDCG, as appropriate, will notify the Washington, DC based representa-
tive of the IMS Government.
   (c) Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity and USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC will provide
disposition instructions to the training activity involved. Copies will be provided to Navy IPO, CNO (N52), the
combatant command, the Security Cooperation Organization, and the Washington, DC based representative of the IMS
Government.

10–94. Political asylum
   a. Procedures to be followed when political asylum is requested are implemented within the DON by SEC-
NAVINST 5710.22A. The U.S. Navy point of contact for implementation of these policies is the Deputy Chief of
Naval Operations Information Plans (Strategy and Policy Division) The U.S. Marine Corps point of contact for
implementation of these policies is the Operational Law Branch (JAO), Marine Corps Judge Advocate General
Division, Headquarters, U.S. Marine Corps.
   b. Distribution of messages concerning this subject should be strictly limited to protect the confidentiality of the
IMS. In no case shall a training activity include in-country addresses. Message should be addressed as follows:
   (1) Navy activities should address reports to CNO (N514G), info Navy IPO, Naval Education and Training Security
Assistance Field Activity and the chain of command.
   (2) Marine Corps activities should address reports to USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC and CMC (JAO), info Navy
IPO, Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity and the chain of command.
   (3) Further dissemination of information will be determined at the SECNAV, CNO, or CMC levels.
   (4) The USCG policy for political asylum is outlined in COMDTINST M 16247.1D. Notifications for IMS attending
training at USCG training activities should be addressed through USCG International Affairs (G–CI) with info copy
through the chain of command. G–CI will provide further notification and coordination, as required.

10–95. Termination of training and security cooperation education and training program records
disposition
   a. The Navy IMSO Guide provides guidance on actions required by the IMSO when CONUS training is terminated
by graduation/completion, at the request of the IMS government, as a result of illness, as a result of disenrollment, or
for any other reason.
   b. Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity, as FMS Training Case and U.S.-funded
Program Administrator, is responsible for the disposition of all SCETP records dealing with individual IMS and
individual country training programs; USMC/CG, SECTC MCCDC has similar responsibilities for Marine Corps
SCETP records. This includes, but is not limited to, ITO, status reports, correspondence, and messages. If Naval
Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity is an info addressee on any such correspondence, activities
may destroy their copy when no longer needed. If Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity is
not in receipt, the report should be forwarded to Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity for
determination and further disposition on a case-by-case basis. Reports dealing with the IMS academic evaluation
should be included in the individual IMS training jacket that is eventually forwarded to the Security Cooperation
Organization, who in turn keeps a permanent copy. Training activities may destroy their copy of evaluation records as
directed in SECNAVINST 5212.5C, section SSIC 4950. For all other SCETP-related correspondence or reports apply
pertinent subject matter instructions from SECNAVINST 5212.5C.

Section IV
Department of the Air Force

10–96. International military student administration
A report of IMS failing to arrive as scheduled will be submitted by the gaining IMSO to the last training installation
with information copies to the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron, 315 J Street West, Randolph AFB,
TX 78150–4300, SAF/International Affairs, 1080 Air Force Pentagon, Washington, DC 20330–1080, and the appropri-
ate Security Cooperation Organization within 48 hours after scheduled arrival.



200                          AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
10–97. U.S. Air Force standards
The Security Cooperation Organization must make sure that each IMS is briefed on USAF grooming standards in AFI
36–2903.
   a. IMS will normally be required to comply with the provisions of AFI 36–2903. Training installation commanders
will expect IMS to maintain acceptable standards of appearance, conduct, health, and hygiene so as not to affect the
discipline or morale of U.S. personnel.
   b. International students enrolled in flying training courses or in other training where operational or ground safety
requirements require strict adherence to AFI 36–2903 standards must maintain those standards or face disenrollment as
no waiver will be granted.
   c. When religious precepts or national laws preclude compliance, a substantiated request for waiver to AFI 36–2903
standards will be forwarded by the Security Cooperation Organization to the Air Force Security Assistance Training
Squadron and will include a copy of the country’s proposed grooming standards. These requests will be evaluated on a
case-by-case basis; approved exemptions will be recorded and maintained by the Air Force Security Assistance
Training Squadron. The Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron will be responsible for updating and advising
CONUS IMSO of approved exemptions. Waivers do not apply to flying training courses or to courses where
operational or ground safety is a consideration.
   d. The physical standards prescribed by Air Force regulations should be enforced only when deviation from the
standard would present an operational or safety hazard or would prevent successful completion of the course.

10–98. Responsibilities of country liaison officers
   a. Air Force training units requiring a CLO to assist the USAF with IMS administration must forward a request to
the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron for review, approval, and further staffing with SAF/International
Affairs. The request will contain the following information.
   (1) Proposed position description of the CLO to include the USAF supervisor.
   (2) Justification for the position.
   (3) The USAF installation and location of the extended visit authorization (only one location may be specified.)
   (4) Other USAF or contractor facilities to be included in the position for recurring visits and justification.
   (5) Disclosure considerations, to include—
   (a) Highest level of security classification required for the position.
   (b) Methods of information disclosure.
   (c) Descriptions of military information disclosures that will be necessary including the categories of disclosure in
accordance with AFI 16–201.
   (d) Security arrangements (that is, badging, escort requirements, and so forth).
   b. After SAF/IAPD approval of the CLO position description, the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron
will forward the proposal to country. Upon country approval and identification of the officer to be assigned as CLO,
the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron will process a request for an Extended Visit Authorization to
SAF/International Affairs. Once approved, the training unit will–—
   (1) Maintain a current copy of the Extended Visit Authorization.
   (2) Insure that specific restrictions included in the Extended Visit Authorization are complied with.
   (3) Insure that the local FDO, MAJCOM/FDO, and SAF/IAPD are informed of the CLO supervisor, physical
location, or other proposed changes to the extended visit authorization.
   (4) Revalidate the CLO position NLT 60 days prior to the expiration date of the extended visit authorization.
   c. MAJCOM/FDO and local FDO which have CLO under their control will—
   (1) Insure that the USAF supervisor is adequately briefed on their responsibilities.
   (2) Insure that the CLO work environment is separated to the extent necessary to preclude uncontrolled access to
files, materials, and discussions not authorized for release.
   (3) Complete the extended visit authorization paperwork required for the CLO position.
   d. While assigned to USAF installations, CLO will comply with all USAF, MAJCOM, and local installation rules
and regulations.
   e. The use of unclassified information systems (DSN, USAF mail/distribution system, FAX machines, and so forth)
will be at the discretion of the USAF supervisor in coordination with the local FDO. When using USG information
systems, the CLO will–—
   (1) Identify themselves in conversation or writing as CLO.
   (2) Use country specific stationery (use of official USAF letterhead stationary is not authorized).
   f. Other policy issues and CLO duties are delineated in paragraph 10–8.

10–99. Designation and duties of international military student officers
  a. The installation commander or designated installation HQ directorate will designate, in writing, an individual as
IMSO to serve as the primary focal point for IMS matters and will forward the name, grade, organization, and


                             AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                201
telephone number to Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron, Randolph AFB, TX 78150–4302. Individuals
designated as IMSO should be people-oriented, possess tact, and be of an appropriate grade or rank to enable them to
deal effectively with the projected IMS. If projected IMS loads do not justify a dedicated position for the IMSO
function, it may be combined with other functions. However, IMSO duties will receive top priority in event of conflict.
The IMSO may be either military and/or civilian. IMSOs will be appointed for a minimum of 2 years, when possible,
and will receive the necessary training to perform this important function. Contact Air Force Security Assistance
Training Squadron to schedule orientation and DISAM to schedule training. IMSO will attend the USAF IMSO
conference hosted by Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron every 18 months. Installations should program
funds for IMSO to attend cross-cultural communications training at the USAFSOS. Contact USAFSOS/EDRC, Alison
Building, 357 Tully Street, Hurlburt Field, FL, 32544–5800 for quotas.
   b. IMSO will initiate action through Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron to resolve problems related to
grooming standards and religious principles that deviate from AFI 36–2903.
   c. The IMSO will maintain the IMS personnel and training record, using the four-part AF Form 10 (Unit Personnel
Record Group (Folder)). A complete personnel and training record file will be maintained on each IMS except for
those participating in OT. Specific record maintenance, transmittal, and disposition instructions are contained in other
U.S. Air Force sections. IMS records will be organized as follows:
   (1) Section 1.
   (a) DD Form 1172 (Application for Uniformed Services Identification Card Defense Enrollment Eligibility System
(DEERS) Enrollment).
   (b) ITO (two copies).
   (2) Section 2.
   (a) Student training records.
   (b) Qualification/observation/familiarization training request.
   (c) AF Form 797.
   (d) IMS academic report.
   (e) Certificates or awards.
   (f) Notification of faculty board actions.
   (g) Holdover actions, advancements, withdrawals.
   (3) Section 3.
   (a) Incident reports with final results.
   (b) Complete history of individual counseling.
   (c) Miscellaneous correspondence (for example, hospitalization, arrival, in/out processing checklists).
   (4) Section 4. AF Form 1217 (Information Program (IP Data Card).
   d. Specific Air Force records will be maintained (in accordance with AFMAN 33–363) by the IMSO; that is, flight
and personnel records for technical school IMS. IMS will hand carry their flight records between training locations.
   e. The Security Cooperation Organization is responsible for the initial preparation of biographic data. In cases where
the biographic data records are not received from the Security Cooperation Organization, base IMSO are authorized
direct communication with the Security Cooperation Organization to obtain the data required to complete this record.
An information copy will be sent to Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron.
   f. The IMS academic report (DD Form 2496 or AF Form 475 (Educational/Training Report)) will be used to record
instructor comments on the IMS’ strengths, weaknesses, idiosyncrasies, and attitude. Comments should be made during
the course of instruction as well as after completion. Instructions for completion of DD Form 2496 and AF Form 475
are contained in figure 10–2.
   g. The IMSO will transmit IMS training records to the gaining base or activity as soon as practicable (not later than
10 days) after IMS graduation date. Failure to fulfill this requirement will be explained through channels to Air Force
Security Assistance Training Squadron, 315 J Street West, Randolph AFB, TX 78150–4302.
   (1) The IMSO will collect all appropriate documents and forward the complete personnel and training record file to
the gaining installation. Every effort will be made to ensure that the file contains the final grade sheet for the course.
However, the file will not be held pending receipt of the final grades. An appropriate notation that the IMS did
complete the course and that the final grade sheet is forthcoming will suffice.
   (2) The final CONUS training installation IMSO will personally review the contents of this file. After review, the
IMSO will forward the records not later than 60 days after the IMS graduation to the appropriate Security Cooperation
Organization.
   (a) Release of information in the training record to foreign country personnel will be at the discretion of the Security
Cooperation Organization.
   (b) Records should be screened carefully to ensure that information of a sensitive nature is removed.
   (3) Personnel and training record files maintained on IMS training outside CONUS will be transmitted as directed
by the component command.



202                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   (4) Privileged medical records and classified training records will be forwarded to the appropriate Security Coopera-
tion Organization for review and disposition.
   h. Classified notebooks, workbooks, and similar documents developed by IMS attending formal training in the
United States will be transmitted to the home Service of the IMS through the Security Cooperation Organization; AF
Form 349 (Receipt for Document Released to Accredited Representation of Foreign Nations) will be obtained for this
purpose.
   i. The Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron is authorized to issue the appropriate SATP and other
cooperative programs fund citations when justified for the purposes listed in paragraph 10–7c(1) and (2). This includes
attendance at the special IMSO course conducted by DISAM, when invitations have been extended through appropriate
command channels.
   j. The IMSO will use AF Form 623 or an outline of the familiarization or qualification training provided to an IMS
(to include the type of equipment used) when applicable. The IMSO will—
   (1) Brief the project officer or NCO on the use of appropriate training and evaluation records.
   (2) Be familiar with all familiarization and qualification training being conducted on the installation as well as the
classification of that training.
   (3) Brief each IMS undergoing familiarization or qualification training and their supervisor to ensure that all
understand the method of training. The IMS must realize that they will receive only the training described on the
training detail sheet (see fig 4–2). Therefore, careful preparation of the detail sheet by the Security Cooperation
Organization is critical to avoid any misunderstanding.
   (4) Ensure that the training detail sheet and associated documents are included in the IMS personnel and training
record file upon completion of training. This file will be forwarded to the next training location or to the Security
Cooperation Organization via the Security Assistance Network Web.
   k. For familiarization or qualification training, the training activity will—
   (1) Prepare necessary training records or documents.
   (2) Brief IMS on organizational policies, procedures, and responsibilities related to their environment.
   (3) Perform an initial evaluation of IMS and brief them on the training objectives within the first full duty day after
in processing.
   (4) Evaluate and monitor the effectiveness of the training program and ensure the IMS meets the training objectives
listed on the forms. Ensure that all training is properly documented and the classification is stated and clearance
obtained prior to providing training.
   (5) Ensure that the installation IMSO is informed on the IMS progress.
   (6) Notify the installation IMSO of any interruption of or deviation from the scheduled training.
   (7) Coordinate training problems with the appropriate agency.
   (8) Forward all training records to the installation IMSO upon completion of training.
   (9) Ensure IMS receive AF Form 1256 (Certification of Training).
   l. When it has been determined that an IMS is absent without leave, the installation IMSO will advise Air Force
Security Assistance Training Squadron within 24 hours by message. See paragraph 10–47 for details.
   m. When the IMSO determines that a request for political asylum has been made, the IMSO will immediately
comply with AFI 51–704.
   n. The IMSO should be advised of intended CONUS Faculty Board Action at least ten days in advance of board
proceedings. The IMSO should advise Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron/CC by telephone of intended
board action as soon as the requirement for faculty board action is known; Air Force Security Assistance Training
Squadron will then inform the country air attaché or embassy and invite those representatives to attend the faculty
board if they wish to attend. In the notification to Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron, faculty board
action for flying students should contain the type of aircraft flown and the number of hours flown. Board proceedings
will be processed as expeditiously as possible. Immediately upon receipt of the approved proceedings, the IMSO will
forward the original to Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron for appropriate action. After processing at Air
Force Security Assistance Training Squadron, the faculty board proceedings will be forwarded to the Security
Cooperation Organization.
   (1) If the IMS is eliminated, the specific cause must be cited. English language per se will not be cited as the
specific cause of elimination; however, if it was a contributing factor, this will be noted in board proceedings. The
eliminated IMS will not receive further training without approval from the Security Cooperation Organization or the
country concerned.
   (2) If the faculty board determines that a flying training student displays a lack of aptitude or dangerous tendencies
that cannot be safely corrected, the IMS will be eliminated regardless of the number of hours flown.
   (3) The IMSO will inform the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron country program manager immedi-
ately, and the country program manager will notify the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron/CC.
   o. In the event of base evacuation or natural disaster, IMSO will adhere to the installation commander’s established
emergency evacuation plan. Evacuation procedures must address transportation, lodging and medical provisions for


                              AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011                                 203
IMS. Entitlements for international students depend on the direction given by the installation and its evacuation plan.
Students entitled to TLA would be covered the same as USG members while enroute and during safe haven.

10–100. Clothing and equipment
The Security Cooperation Organization must determine special clothing and equipment requirements, which are
generally listed in AF Education and Training Course Announcements. The AF Education and Training Course
Announcements describes the special clothing and equipment provided for undergraduate pilot training and undergradu-
ate navigator training (UNT). The AF Education and Training Course Announcements also contains a detailed listing
of the items IMS will receive, all of which are for retention whether the IMS completes the course or not. Lost,
damaged, or destroyed special clothing or individual equipment will be accounted for as stated in AFMAN 23–110.
Every attempt will be made to have the IMS use personal funds to purchase clothing or equipment not included in the
tuition rate. When the IMSO verifies that the IMS does not have funds and the items are required to accomplish the
training, the IMSO will immediately notify Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron and obtain a signed
statement from the student that the individual does not have funds to defray the cost of the items. This statement will
be submitted to Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron, along with the SF 1080 billing, student’s ITO, and a
receipt indicating charges.
   a. For FMS IMS, a “Services” WCN, T–MASL D365005 (clothing and equipment), will be established in the
applicable FMS case (if one does not already exist), and the billing will be processed. The purchasing government will
be advised of the charges and items of clothing or equipment, when charges are known. These charges will be charged
to the applicable FMS case.
   b. For IMET IMS, Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron will process the billing against available IMET
funds, taking action to increase the IMET funding by adjusting the IMET tuition rate for the specific WCN. IMS
whose Service uniforms are not suitable for CONUS climates are permitted to purchase USAF uniforms and clothing
(without distinctive buttons or insignia) on a cash-only basis from Air Force clothing sales stores. Items authorized for
purchase are listed in AFMAN 23–110. When uniforms are to be purchased in the United States, Security Cooperation
Organization will ensure that IMS have sufficient funds in their possession for such purchases.

10–101. Deceased international military students
Funeral services will not be conducted until appropriate instructions concerning the disposition of the remains have
been received from HQ, USAF (AFI 34–242). As stated in AFI 34–501 and other applicable mortuary affairs
publications, services, and supplies will be acquired from a funeral home holding a contract for care of remains, if a
contract is in effect in the area in which the death occurs. If a contract is not in effect, necessary services and supplies
will be acquired through negotiation. Funeral director invoices for services and supplies will be submitted to Air Force
Security Assistance Training Squadron/FM, Randolph AFB, TX 78150–4302. Requirements for foreign flags suitable
for covering a casket should be established under applicable Air Force instructions. Flags should be procured through
supply channels. Accounts for deceased SATP and other cooperative programs IMS will be submitted to the local
accounting and finance officer for processing according to AFR 177–103 as follows:
   a. The original plus four copies of the appropriate series of DD Form 1351 computed to show the amounts due the
deceased and certified by the personnel officer.
   b. Three copies of the current ITO, attached to the applicable DD Form 1351 series.
   c. AF Form 1122 (Personal Property and Personal Effects Inventory) to accompany the effects as listed in AFI
34–501. Articles that cannot be shipped (for example, automobiles) will be disposed of as directed, in writing, by the
appropriate country representative.

10–102. Family members
Students will not be encouraged to bring their Family members with them or to have their Family members join them
later. Exceptions to this policy are approved for CLO and for IMS attending the Air War College, Air Command and
Staff College, the Squadron Officers School, and the AFIT graduate programs, provided the IMS is financially able to
defray the cost of housing, food, and medical care for Family members in the U.S. This exception is valid for any
programmed prerequisite and follow-on training for these IMS. Authorized Family members (reference or listed in para
10–9b(12)) must be reflected in the IMS ITO and must have required medical healthcare insurance coverage listed in
Joint Security Cooperation Education and Training chapter 8. On-base housing for IMS with Family members is not
guaranteed and normally not available.

10–103. Channels of communication for reporting IMS issues/incidents
   a. The IMS issues/incidents include any situation identified in chapter 10 (for example, academic, faculty board,
political asylum, disciplinary, misconduct, medical and so forth) or any situation that may result in delayed graduation
or possible disenrollment of high profile students or any students from high interest training (for example, flight
training, PME). The goal of prompt initial and follow-on reporting is to ensure training decisions impacting and IMS
are properly coordinated/decided in an international affairs context before final implementation (for example,
disenrollment).


204                           AR 12–15/SECNAVINST 4950.4B/AFI 16–105 • 3 January 2011
   b. USAF training activities report IMS issues/incidents to Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron via
e–mail or message traffic (telephone courtesy calls are also encouraged).
   (1) Reports of issues/incidents include a brief summary of the issue/incident, any involvement by law enforcement
authorities, status of training activity resolution action and the appropriate commander’s recommendation concerning
the IMS (when recommendation is available). In accordance with paragraph 10–4b, training installation decisions
concerning safety are implemented immediately.
Note. Reports are prepared with the assistance of the servicing staff judge advocate when appropriate, and in all situations where
criminal conduct appears to have occurred.
   (2) Reports are updated as necessary to ensure current IMS status is known and appropriate decisions concerning
IMS are properly coordinated.
   (3) Reports can be made by the applicable training activity Commander directly to the Air Force Security Assistance
Training Squadron/CC or by the IMSO to the applicable Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron Country
Manager (who informs the Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron chain-of-command).
   c. The Air Force Security Assistance Training Squadron promptly takes any required notification actions within HQ
AETC and notifies the applicable SAF/International Affairs regional division (Division Chief and/or Country Director)
via e-mail with a courtesy copy to SAF/IAPX (telephone courtesy calls are also encouraged). Air Force Security
Assistance Training Squadron/CC proposed/recommended actions are always forwarded in addition to the issue/
incident summary.
   d. SAF/International Affairs regional divisions—
   (1) Report issues/incidents with serious or apparently serious international implications via the chain-of-command to
SAF/Internat