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					3.      Program Outcomes and Assessment

                                             Executive Summary

        On May 12, 2000, the Mechanical Engineering Department graduated its 28 seniors after each met
        all curricular and university graduation requirements through four years of study. As of the date of
        this writing, nearly all of these graduates have been placed in industrial positions or graduate school.
         All have been well prepared for their individual pursuits.

        Here we summarize the program‟s goals and its evaluation of student learning outcomes. The
        purposes of the assessment process are to: 1) improve student learning and development, 2) improve
        teaching and the curriculum, 3) provide a context for departmental planning, and 4) evaluate the
        students‟ achievement of the criteria related to program outcomes and assessment.

        The mission of the Mechanical Engineering Program is to serve the program‟s constituencies and
        produce effective engineers ready for the workplace or graduate studies, while maintaining
        consistency with the College‟s and the University‟s missions. The faculty believe that this is
        achieved through the following six (6) Program Goals:

        I.      Create well-rounded engineers who possess theoretical and practical skills, and understand
                the significance of humanities and social sciences.

        II.     Produce graduates who have the necessary teamwork and leadership skills to excel in
                multidisciplinary team environments.

        III.    Develop innovative and creative thinkers with an understanding of entrepreneurship.

        IV.     Develop science, mathematics, analytical, computational, and experimental skills and apply
                them to formulate and solve engineering problems.

        V.      Instill in students an appreciation of the impact of engineering solutions in a global and
                societal context, including the broad implications of professional ethics.

        VI.     Develop the flexibility to adapt to changing technology and the understanding of the need for
                continuous improvement and lifelong learning.

        The primary means by which students achieve the desired outcomes is through the curriculum, in
        which specific skills and knowledge are learned in classes and laboratories, and then practiced in
        other courses and projects. In addition, students gain knowledge and experience important to
        achieving the Program Goals through the educational environment. This environment includes
        classroom, departmental, college, or institutional practices to create an environment necessary to
        help students achieve and demonstrate the performance criteria.

        Assessment methods are methods of gathering evidence to demonstrate that those outcomes
        important to the missions and objectives are being measured. The criteria by which the outcomes
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        are assessed were determined by the department faculty with input from industrial representatives,
        students, assessment consultants, and other College of Engineering programs. Some program
        outcomes can be measured using “devices” administered by the department, while others depend on
        external assessment. In addition, while some program outcomes can be assessed using direct
        measures, others are inferred by observing student behavior or by indirect measures such as student
        self-reporting. A variety of assessment methods were selected by this department to measure
        students‟ achievement of Program Outcomes.

        Program improvement in the ME department consists of two processes. The first is an assessment
        of semester-to-semester performance data from individual courses, evaluations of Clinics and
        internship surveys, as well as other minor department-wide policy changes (e.g., student advising
        policy). We consider this to be a “low-level” assessment designed to effect minor programmatic
        changes. The second process for program improvement is a “high-level” assessment of performance
        relative to our established program objectives. The changes resulting from this process are expected
        to be program-wide and more substantial than those from the low-level assessment process.

        Based on the department‟s first program-wide assessment (after graduating the first class of Rowan
        Engineering), all 12 Program Outcomes were achieved. Six (6) of the 12 Outcomes were achieved
        by meeting all criteria set, while the remaining six met all but one or two of multiple criteria set by
        the department. The mechanical engineering faculty will be meeting in summer 2000 to discuss
        these results, and possibly to implement changes in the program or the assessment criteria.


        a.      Introduction

                This section contains information supporting and regarding the Program Outcomes and
                Assessment Plan, as well as the Outcomes and Assessment results. The following
                paragraphs provide a brief overview of the assessment plan in this department, and include a
                brief summary of our philosophical approach toward outcomes assessment, as well as a
                description of the materials on Program Outcomes and Assessment that will be available for
                review during the evaluation visit.

                We believe that just as engineers must continually gather data about the quality of an
                engineering product or process and use these data to improve it, faculty must assess student
                learning and the educational process to improve the educational program. We define
                assessment as an ongoing evaluative process to aid faculty in determining what students
                have achieved by linking departmental objectives and curriculum to multiple measures of
                student achievement. The faculty is concerned with the effectiveness of the educational
                program and experiences. Assessment is a process through which this faculty may better
                understand student learning and improve the program. We are interested in documenting the
                causes of positive changes in our students‟ learning and development. Assessment requires
                a formal statement of high expectations and chosen assessment measures as well as a
                systematic gathering and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data. Assessment requires
                faculty to use these interpretations to make meaningful changes where necessary. This
                faculty fully understands and expects that assessment is, by its very nature, an imperfect
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                process that requires continual modifications.

                The purposes of this assessment plan include the following:

                1.      to improve student learning and development;

                2.      to improve teaching and the curriculum;

                3.      to provide a context for departmental planning;

                4.      to evaluate the level of achievement of the criteria related to program outcomes and
                        assessment as specified by ABET under Engineering Criteria 2000 and this
                        department.

                In order to construct a comprehensive assessment plan, the faculty, student representatives,
                and the assessment consultant compiled and prepared items deemed necessary to understand
                and administer the plan. This packet contains copies of relevant mission statements to aid in
                understanding the goals of the program. This plan includes the timeline followed for
                developing this plan for documentation purposes. A timeline for assessment activities and a
                description of departmental roles are also included to help the faculty maintain organization.
                 Relevant policy information is included. Good practices that directly contribute to achieving
                the stated criteria are included to demonstrate that this program includes many opportunities
                for students to achieve the desired outcomes. The core of this plan – assessment methods,
                measures and the improvement process – are provided. Finally, various assessment
                instruments are included to provide examples of how the needed information will be
                collected.

                Available materials during the evaluation visit will include abbreviated course portfolios for
                all ME courses taught in the ‟99 – ‟00 academic year and select ME courses taught in the ‟98
                – ‟99 academic year. Also available will be Freshman Clinic portfolios, Sophomore Clinic
                portfolios and project web pages for Freshman and Sophomore Clinics. These materials
                were collected from the ME-led sections of Freshman and Sophomore Clinics. Finally, ME-
                sponsored Junior/Senior Clinic project web pages will be available; these served as a
                repository for the Clinic deliverables. For all Clinics, hardware will be available for
                inspection.

        b.      Mission Statements

                The following three relevant mission statements are included to show the context in which
                the assessment plan was developed and operates.

                i.      Mission of Rowan University
                        The mission of Rowan University stipulates several criteria on which graduates may
                        be assessed. The applicable section of the mission reads:

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                        Rowan provides an exceptional environment of achievement and fulfillment in a
                        dynamic society through rigorous intellectual effort and vigorous personal
                        interaction among all members of its diverse learning community. As a regional
                        public university committed to teaching, Rowan combines liberal education with
                        professional preparation and offers undergraduate through doctoral programs. The
                        Rowan ambition: knowledge through study; responsibility through service; and
                        character through challenge.

                ii.     Mission of the College of Engineering

                        The mission of the College of Engineering at Rowan University stipulates several
                        criteria on which graduates may be assessed. The applicable section of the mission
                        reads:

                        The mission of the College of Engineering is to provide programs that are effectively
                        responsive to regional aspirations and that address the needs and changing
                        characteristics of the leading-edge engineers of the future. The College aims to
                        educate students prepared to apply technology for the betterment of society and to
                        serve as change agents for the future. Rowan University also recognizes that the
                        College of Engineering will aid in the economic and cultural development of
                        Southern New Jersey, while generating opportunities for its diverse graduates in
                        local and national industries.

                iii.    Goals of the Undergraduate Programs in the College of Engineering

                        The goals of the undergraduate engineering programs are to enable students to:

                        1. understand and apply the core science and mathematics principles that form the
                           basis of engineering disciplines,

                        2. work individually and in teams to identify and solve complex engineering
                           problems and develop an understanding of interdisciplinary problems solving,

                        3. understand and apply advanced technology (computers and laboratory
                           equipment) to solve complex engineering problems,

                        4. understand the importance of the humanities and social sciences as part of a well
                           rounded education and the practice of engineering,

                        5. have a strong sense of the importance of ethics in an engineering setting as well
                           as other aspects of their lives,

                        6. develop communication skills so that they can perform engineering functions
                           effectively.

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                iv.     Mission/Objectives of the Mechanical Engineering Program

                        The mission of the Mechanical Engineering Program is to serve the program‟s
                        constituencies and produce effective engineers ready for the workplace or graduate
                        studies, while maintaining consistency with the College‟s and the University‟s
                        missions. The faculty believe that this is achieved through the following six Program
                        Goals:

                        I.     Create well-rounded engineers who possess theoretical and practical skills,
                               and understand the significance of humanities and social sciences.

                        II.    Produce graduates who have the necessary teamwork and leadership skills to
                               excel in multidisciplinary team environments.

                        III.   Develop innovative and creative thinkers with an understanding of
                               entrepreneurship.

                        IV.    Develop science, mathematics, analytical, computational, and
                               experimental skills and apply them to formulate and solve engineering
                               problems.

                        V.     Instill in students an appreciation of the impact of engineering solutions in a
                               global and societal context, including the broad implications of professional
                               ethics.

                        VI.    Develop the flexibility to adapt to changing technology and the understanding
                               of the need for continuous improvement and lifelong learning.

                        These six overarching Goals of our program manifest as 17 Program
                        Objectives, which are:

                        A.     an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and
                               engineering;

                        B.     an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze
                               and interpret data;

                        C.     an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired
                               needs;

                        D.     an ability to function in multidisciplinary teams;

                        E.     an ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems;

                        F.     an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility;
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                        G.     an ability to communicate effectively;

                        H.     the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering
                               solutions in a global and societal context;

                        I.     a recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in life-long
                               learning;

                        J.     a knowledge of contemporary issues;

                        K.     an ability to use the techniques, skills and modern engineering tools
                               necessary for engineering practice;

                        L.     knowledge of chemistry and calculus-based physics with depth in at
                               least one;

                        M.     an ability to apply advanced mathematics through multivariate
                               calculus and differential equations;

                        N.     a familiarity with statistics and linear algebra;

                        O.     an ability to work professionally in both thermal and mechanical
                               systems areas including the design and realization of such systems;

                        P.     an ability to think creatively and innovatively;

                        Q.     a knowledge of entrepreneurial practices.

                        The reader will recognize Objectives A-K as the ABET Engineering Criteria
                        2000 Program Objectives. The additional six Program Objectives are derived
                        from a combination of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers
                        (ASME) Program Criteria and the Rowan mechanical engineering faculty‟s
                        ambitions.

                        The 17 Program Objectives are finally condensed to 12 Program Outcomes;
                        this number results from combining some Program Objectives which lead to a
                        single Outcome. The Program Outcomes state that “Students who complete
                        the Mechanical Engineering program at Rowan University will:

                        1.     be able to solve problems using mathematics, science, and
                               engineering knowledge;

                        2.     be able to design a system, component, or process;

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                        3.     be knowledgeable of contemporary issues;

                        4.     work effectively in multidisciplinary teams;

                        5.     be effective communicators;

                        6.     be bold and creative problem solvers;

                        7.     have entrepreneurial skills;

                        8.     possess broad scientific, mathematical and analytical knowledge;

                        9.     be able to apply scientific, mathematical and analytical knowledge to
                               identify, formulate and solve engineering problems;

                        10.    understand the need for professional and ethical responsibility;

                        11.    understand and consider the consequences of engineering solutions on
                               society;

                        12.    recognize that learning is a continuous process.



        c.      Practices to Achieve Desired Outcomes
                The primary means by which students achieve the desired outcomes is through the
                curriculum, in which specific technical skills are learned in classes and laboratories,
                and then applied through other courses and projects. Table (a) below shows all
                engineering courses required for the degree in mechanical engineering and their
                contributions toward achieving the 12 Program Outcomes. While some outcomes
                achieved in a course are assessed in the course (through graded assignments, for
                example), others simply provide students in the course with an exposure. The
                differences are denoted in Table (a) with an “A” for assessed outcome, and with “E”
                for exposure to outcome. The contribution of the required non-engineering courses
                to achieving the Program Outcomes are shown in Table (b). The reader will observe
                that students are continuously provided the opportunity throughout their academic
                career to demonstrate achievement of the Program Outcomes. Repetitive
                achievement of specific outcomes throughout a student‟s academic career
                demonstrates that students are reaching a higher level of achievement for the
                outcome.




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                            Table (a): Outcomes Achievement through the curriculum.




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                     Table (b): Contribution of non-engineering courses to Program Outcomes.
        Mechanical Engineering Program                                                          1/1/00

                                                                                                                                                                                       Program Outcomes:
                                                                                                                                                                              ME graduates will possess the skill set to:




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Understand and consider the consequences of
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Identify, formulate, and solve engineering
                                                                                                                                     Design a system, component, or process




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Apply broad scientific, mathematical and




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Recognize that learning is a continuous
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Understand the need for professional
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Be bold and creative problem solvers
                                                                                                 science and engineering knowledge



                                                                                                                                                                               Be knowledgeable of contemporary
                                                                                                 Solve problems using mathematics,




                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Work effectively in multidisciplinary




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         engineering solutions on society
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Apply entrepreneurial skills




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  and ethical responsibility
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Communicate effectively




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          analytical knowledge


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     problems




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       process
                                                                                                                                                                               issues


                                                                                                                                                                                                                  teams
                     Elective
        Level        Course     Description
        Freshman                Calculus I                                                               A                                                                                                                                                                          E
                                Calculus II                                                              A                                                                                                                                                                          E
                                Composition I                                                                                                                                                                                                             A
                                Chemistry I or Advanced College Chemistry                                A                                                                             E                                                                                            E                                                                               A
                                Physics I                                                                A                                                                             E                                                                                            E                                                                               A
                                Computer Science and Programming                                         A                           A                                                 E                                                                                            E                                                                               A                                          A
        Sophomore               Math for Engineering Analysis I                                          A                                                                                                                                                                          E                                                                               A                                          A
                                Math for Engineering Analysis II                                         A                                                                                                                                                                          E                                                                               A                                          A
                                Physics II                                                               A                                                                             E                                                                                            E                                                                               A
                                Public Speaking (Class of 2000 only)                                                                                                                   E                                                                  A
        Junior                  Microeconomics                                                           A                                                                             E                                                                                                                                   E                                        E                                                                                                                           E
        Senior                  'Math/science elective' (3 credits)                                      A                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          A                                                                                                                                                                            E
        Taken at any level      'Social, behavioral science' cluster (3 credits)                         A                                                                             E                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         E
                                'Multicultural or global' cluster (3 credits)                                                                                                          E                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        E                                                E
                                'Arts, Music Theater' cluster (3 credits)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        E
                                'History and Humanities' cluster (6 credits)                                                                                                                                                                              E                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      E




                                Program Goals:
                                  Create well-rounded engineers who possess theoretical and practical skills, and
                                          understand the significance of humanities and social sciences.

                                      Produce graduates who have the necessary teamwork and leadership skills to excel in
                                                            multidisciplinary team environments.


                                               Develop innovative and creative thinking with an understanding of entrepreneurship.


                                 Develop science, mathematics, analytical, computational, and experimental skills and apply them to formulate and solve
                                                                               engineering problems.

                                   Instill in students an appreciation of the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context, including the broad implications of
                                                                                                 professional ethics.


                                      Develop the flexibility to adapt to changing technology and an understanding of the need for continuous improvement and lifelong learning.




                   A student‟s experiences during the educational program are often called the
                   educational environment. The following are classroom, departmental, college, or
                   institutional practices offered as strategies to create an environment necessary to help
                   students achieve and/or demonstrate the performance criteria. The letters listed in
                   the parentheses refer to those ABET Engineering Criteria (A - K) and Rowan
                   University Department of Mechanical Engineering (L-Q) Program Objectives
                   addressed by each practice. Also indicated is whether the items are required or
                   optional components of the educational experience.

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                1)      Mechanical Engineering Curriculum. (A-Q)
                        Required (elective courses are Optional)

                2)      Freshman Clinic. (A, B, D-H, J-Q)
                        Required

                3)      Sophomore Clinic. (A-G, I-Q)
                        Required

                4)      Junior Clinic. (A-Q)
                        Required

                5)      Senior Clinic. (A-Q)
                        Required

                6)      Major/Technical/Math-Science Elective Courses. (A-Q)
                        Required (specific courses are not specified)

                7)      Internship. (A, E-K, P)
                        Optional

                8)      Fund. of Engineering (FE) Exam. (A, E, F, G, K, L, M, N, O)
                        Optional

                9)      General Education Requirements. (G, H, J, P)
                        Required

                10)     Plant Trips. Students have visited a variety of plants such as the Naval
                        Surface Warfare Center, Boeing and Inductotherm Industries. These plant
                        trips provide students with direct exposure to industry, industrial practices,
                        contemporary issues, and societal ramifications. (F, G, H, I, J)
                        Optional

                11)     ASME Student Chapter. Students are encouraged to join and hold
                        leadership positions in this organization. ASME provides an opportunity for
                        Mechanical Engineering students to learn more about prospective workplaces
                        and professional practice, provide networking opportunities, and receive
                        Mechanical Engineering related information. Monthly meetings take place to
                        plan social and service activities, and for travel to local professional
                        meetings, plant tours, and the Regional Student Conferences. (F-J)
                        Optional

                12)     Society of Women Engineers (SWE). Women students of all engineering
                        departments are invited to participate in this organization. The mission of the
                        SWE Chapter at Rowan University are to: stimulate women to achieve full
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                        potential in careers as engineers and leaders; expand the image of the
                        engineering profession as a positive force in improving the quality of life;
                        demonstrate the value of diversity. (F-H, J)
                        Optional

        d.      Assessment Methods

                Assessment methods are methods of gathering evidence to demonstrate that those outcomes
                important to the missions and objectives are being measured, i.e., outcomes indicators. The
                following items outline the methods used to collect evidence of desired outcomes as
                suggested by ABET as well as those selected by this department.

                Some program outcomes can be measured using “devices” administered by the department,
                while others depend on external assessment. In addition, some program outcomes can be
                assessed using direct measures while others will probably have to be inferred by observing
                student behavior or by indirect measures such as student self-reporting.

                The assessment methods listed below were selected by this department. A description of
                each method‟s process is outlined on the following pages.

                        i.      Junior/Senior Clinic projects
                        ii.     Freshman and Sophomore (other) Clinic data
                        iii.    Portfolios or specific course assignments
                        iv.     Nationally normed examination: Fundamentals of Engineering
                        v.      Alumni surveys
                        vi.     Employer/recruiter surveys
                        vii.    Placement data
                        viii.   Student exit interviews
                        ix.     Course evaluations
                        x.      Participation in professional society
                        xi.     Internships
                                A. Supervisor evaluation
                                B. Student self-assessment

                i.      Junior/Senior Clinic Projects

                        The Junior/Senior Clinic is described in detail in Criterion 4: Professional
                        Component, section (e): Engineering Design Experience, and Criterion 8: Program
                        Criteria. Briefly, the Junior/Senior Clinic is a project-based course requiring
                        multidisciplinary teamwork with the added dimensions of year-long projects and the
                        organization of Junior- and Senior-level students into teams of 3-5 students each.
                        Each team works closely with two professors (usually from two disciplines) who act
                        as Project Managers to guide the team. In Mechanical Engineering our mantra for
                        the Junior/Senior Clinic is “Design, Build, Test”. The Junior/Senior Clinic projects
                        have been inspired by a mix of industry-sponsored activities and professors‟ interests
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Program Self-Study Report
                        and typically centered around a technical problem, product or process. Each
                        Mechanical Engineering student is “tracked” by the ME Discipline Manager to
                        ensure that he/she receives a balance of experience working in mechanical and
                        thermal (energy) systems, as well as the opportunity (to the extent possible) to work
                        out of discipline on a non-ME project. Funding for Junior/Senior Clinic thus far has
                        come mainly from government and private sources in the form of industry and
                        research-grant sponsorship. This contributes to the education of the students by
                        providing real-world engineering problems and ensures that our programs maintain
                        currency in engineering challenges facing industry.

                        The project deliverables from the Junior/Senior Clinic are used in various ways to
                        assess the achievement of Program Outcomes, as described in the following section
                        (Program Goals, Objectives and Outcomes). The deliverables include:

                         Societal Impact Statement (considers issues such as environment, safety, quality
                          of life, cost)

                         Student generated proposal, if applicable

                         Preliminary Design Report

                         Preliminary Design Review presentation

                         Final Report (reviewed by Project Manager(s) (faculty member) and by one team
                          of peers)

                         Final Presentation (reviewed by all ME faculty on Technical Merit [80%] and
                          Presentation [20%])


                         Clinic project web page (in addition to project description, project deliverables
                          will be available via this site)

                         Hardware and/or software

                        In addition, a Peer Assessment instrument is used to evaluate certain Program
                        Outcomes, as described in the following section.

                        Coordinator‟s Responsibilities: Each Project Manager ensures that teams perform
                        the work and meet deadlines for deliverables. If necessary, funding is secured for the
                        project from the department if it is not provided by an external source (industry,
                        research grant, Rowan Engineering Venture Capital fund).

                        Mechanical Engineering has one Discipline Manager (currently Dr. Clay Gabler)
                        who interacts with the Discipline Managers from the other programs to assign
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                        students to Clinic projects. In addition, the DM tracks the assignment of students to
                        ensure a broad and diverse experience for all ME students.

                        The Peer Assessment is administered by the Junior/Senior Clinic Coordinator, who
                        distributes the instrument to each Project Manager for his/her team members. The
                        College of Engineering Assessment Coordinator (Dr. Heidi Newell) compiles the
                        results for each program.

                ii.     Freshman and Sophomore (other) Clinic data

                        The Freshman and Sophomore Clinics are described in detail in Criterion 8: Program
                        Criteria, so they are only described briefly here. In the first semester of the freshmen
                        year, students learn basic engineering skills (problem solving, teamwork
                        fundamentals, engineering measurements) and are introduced to the variety of
                        activities in each of the four disciplines at Rowan. This is followed in the second
                        semester by intense study of engineering design through reverse engineering
                        (“dissection”) and competitive assessment (instrumentation, testing and side-by-side
                        comparison of technical performance) of a consumer product. In this manner,
                        students are introduced to design by studying the (good and bad) designs of other
                        engineers. Past products examined have included hair dryers, water filters, electric
                        toothbrushes, beer brewing processes and remote-control cars. “Soft” topics
                        included in this semester are engineering ethics and intellectual property, both of
                        which complement the course themes of reverse engineering/competitive assessment.

                        In the sophomore year, the emphasis of the Clinics shifts to technical
                        communications skills and the application of design. The students are organized into
                        “corporations” that design and build products using advanced engineering tools, and
                        they develop speaking and writing skills through embedded assignments. Past
                        projects have included nondestructive, electromechanical devices for crack detection
                        in aircraft skins, guitar special-effects pedals, and a baseball stadium. Sophomore
                        Clinic is team-taught by faculty from all four disciplines and from Speech
                        Communications and College Composition.

                        Coordinator‟s Responsibilities: Engineering students sign up for various sections of
                        Freshman and Sophomore Clinics without regard to their major. In this way, the
                        students gain experience working on multidisciplinary teams. These Clinics include
                        a large variety of deliverables including homeworks, quizzes, various writing and
                        presentation assignments, and web page development. For the Freshman Clinic,
                        representative comprehensive course portfolios from the ME-led section will be
                        available for inspection by the ABET evaluator, along with team web pages. For the
                        Sophomore Clinic, project deliverables of the ME-led sections are available for
                        viewing via the team web pages.




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                iii.    Portfolio or specific course assignments

                        Course portfolios have been compiled for each course taught in the ME program in
                        the „99-‟00 academic year. Portfolios for select courses prior to this time have also
                        been compiled. Each portfolio contains representative (good, satisfactory, poor)
                        samples of homeworks, quizzes, tests, laboratory assignments and reports, as
                        applicable for each course. In addition, some project hardware are also available.
                        While the portfolios were not used for assessment purposes, they will be available for
                        inspection by the ABET evaluator. In certain instances, specific assignments (e.g.
                        design projects and reports) are used for assessment purposes, as described in the
                        following section (Program Goals, Objectives and Outcomes).

                        Coordinator‟s Responsibilities: The professor for each course was responsible for
                        collecting and compiling the sample coursework.

                iv.     Nationally-normed Examinations: Fundamentals of Engineering

                        The Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) examination was chosen as a tool to assess
                        the students‟ mathematics, science and engineering knowledge and their ability to
                        formulate and solve engineering problems. This was deemed a more desirable
                        assessment method than evaluating student performance in specific courses because
                        the FE examination is (1) easier to implement and collect data, (2) comprehensive in
                        topical coverage, and (3) nationally administered, which provides a measurement
                        relative to another group of examinees.

                        Coordinator‟s Responsibilities: All ME faculty encouraged the ME Seniors to
                        register for the examination by describing the potential benefits of attaining
                        professional registration. Three faculty members (Drs. Clay Gabler, John Chen and
                        Carlos Sun (Civil Engineering)) conducted an informational session for students to
                        describe the process and purposes of the FE examination, and aided with the
                        students‟ registration. The ASME student chapter took responsibility for ordering
                        the FE examination review books from a publisher and reselling the books to
                        students at a substantial discount from the list price. Finally, the ME ABET
                        coordinator (Dr. John Chen) has responsibility for collecting the examination results
                        in the summer of 2000 for assessment purposes.

                v.      Alumni Surveys

                        The department does not currently have alumni. A survey has been developed by the
                        College of Engineering to collect data on students‟ post-baccalaureate experiences.
                        This tool was not used for assessment this year.




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                vi.     Employer/Recruiter Surveys

                        This year is the first in which Rowan engineering students have been hired for
                        permanent positions. Due to the hectic pace of preparation for various activities
                        during recruiting time, recruiter survey was not developed. In the future, we plan on
                        developing this tool in addition to a similar one for employers/supervisors of ME
                        graduates. This tool was not used for assessment this year.

                vii.    Placement Data

                        Student placement data (employer/industry, graduate engineering studies, other
                        graduate studies, alternative career) is used to assess the career paths chosen by the
                        program‟s students. In particular, this instrument is used to measure the number of
                        students who choose to pursue full-time graduate studies in engineering or another
                        field.

                        Coordinator‟s Responsibilities: Placement data for all students in the College of
                        Engineering are collected by the Internship/Employment Coordinator, Ms. Melanie
                        Basantis. The information is transmitted to the ME department at the end of the
                        Spring semester.


                viii.   Student exit interviews

                        Graduating students conduct an exit interview with the department chairperson. The
                        written results of the interview are recorded by the chairperson and are anonymous.
                        The interviews are conducted in private (chairperson and student only) to ensure an
                        environment suited for frank discussions. This instrument is used to gauge the
                        student‟s self-assessment of attainment of certain program outcomes.

                        Coordinator‟s Responsibilities: The department chairperson requests that all
                        graduating ME students schedule a 15-minute period for conducting the interview.
                        The student is asked a series of questions regarding his/her perception of technical
                        achievement relative to program objectives, quality of advising and teaching, and
                        professional preparation. The student‟s responses are recorded by the chairperson.
                        The results are compiled by the ME ABET coordinator for assessment purposes.


                ix.     Course Evaluations

                        Course evaluations are conducted near the end of each semester according to
                        university guidelines. The data are collected by a faculty member other than the
                        professor of the course and is given to the department chairperson for review. The
                        professor of the course receives the evaluations once the final grades have been
Mechanical Engineering                                                                                           34
Program Self-Study Report
                        submitted to the Registrar‟s office at the end of the semester. Course evaluations are
                        not used directly in the assessment process for this department, but are considered by
                        each faculty member as he/she composes the Course/Instructional Reflection for the
                        course just completed. The Course/Instructional Reflection is a self-evaluative tool
                        that can be found in the course portfolios described in (iii) above.


                x.      Participation in Professional Society

                        This instrument is used to assess students‟ commitment to continuous improvement
                        and lifelong learning. The student chapter of the ASME maintains a membership list
                        to track the level of participation of ME students. Also included here is student
                        involvement in the annual ASME Regional Student Conference and local ASME
                        professional meetings.


                xi.     Internships

                        ME students are strongly encouraged by faculty and administrators to obtain summer
                        internships in engineering industries. The College of Engineering has an Internship
                        Coordinator who acts as a liaison between students and industries seeking interns.
                        Internships provide opportunities for students to gain experience in their chosen
                        profession, develop connections in industry, and apply skills learned in school.
                        Internships allow us to assess the students‟ abilities in technical skills relative to
                        program outcomes in two ways: Evaluations of student completed by a supervisor,
                        and student self-assessment of the internship.

                        A.     Supervisor Evaluation

                               Evaluations of student skill level and performance are distributed to
                               supervisors of ME students by the College of Engineering Internship
                               Coordinator early in the fall semester. The supervisors are provided a one-
                               page evaluation that can be completed and mailed or faxed back to the
                               College. The evaluation may also be completed on-line via a web site
                               maintained by the College. The results are compiled by the College of
                               Engineering Assessment Coordinator (Dr. Heidi Newell).

                        B.     Student Self-Assessment
                               Students perform a self-evaluation of their internship experience early in the
                               Fall Semester. The evaluations are distributed by the Internship Coordinator,
                               and the results are compiled by the College of Engineering Assessment
                               Coordinator (Dr. Heidi Newell).


        e.      Assessment Glossary
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Program Self-Study Report
                Mission: A paragraph or series of paragraphs outlining the purpose of the program.

                Goal: A statement outlining the broad ideals of the program. The University and College
                goal statements are examples of goals. Goals show where you want to go. There should
                only be a few of these because they are your major program goals. For example, you might
                think of these key words when writing your goal statements: theory/knowledge (of
                engineering principles), practice/application (of engineering principles), awareness (of role
                in society), and communication (of engineering principles; interpersonal).

                Objective: A statement derived from a goal that is a more specific application of that goal
                and explains what will occur in terms of knowledge, skills, or abilities if an objective is met.
                 An objective is a statement of how a department is to support the institutional, college and
                program missions. Objectives are maps of how you are going to get where you want to go.
                ABET‟s Criteria 2000 (A-K), engineering societies‟ criteria, and unique program criteria are
                examples of objectives. You will probably have more than one objective per goal.

                Outcome: A statement derived from an objective that describes what specific result will
                occur if the objectives are met. Typically, outcomes are student related and state what
                knowledge and skills are to be acquired and demonstrated by each student by the end of the
                department's program.

                Indicator: A measurable example of an outcome either through observation, self-report, or
                score. Think of these as a rubric to tell you if your outcomes were achieved. You might wish
                to develop phrases that could be answered with “yes” or “no.” An item on an instrument
                would be an example of an outcome indicator.

                Practice: An activity that may be a part of a student's educational experience and provides
                opportunities to learn.

                Assessment Method: An instrument or other type of data collection technique designed to
                elicit evidence to measure an outcome indicator or series of outcome indicators. Portfolios,
                alumni surveys, peer surveys, nationally-normed examinations, employer surveys, rubrics,
                faculty rating forms, course evaluations, focus groups, pre- and posttests, senior design
                projects, placement data, self-assessments, documented anecdotal evidence, exit interviews,
                classroom assessment techniques, etc. are examples of assessment methods.

                Assessment Criteria: Stated levels of performance for each assessment method that will be
                used to guide decisions and set priorities for improvement.

        f.      Program Goals, Objectives and Outcomes

                In this section, we describe in detail the Mechanical Engineering program‟s Goals,
                Objectives and Outcomes. Also included are descriptions of Indicators of outcome
                achievement, Practices that promote their achievement within the program, and the
Mechanical Engineering                                                                                        36
Program Self-Study Report
                Assessment Methods and Assessment Criteria for evaluating the achievement of each
                outcome. Finally, Table (c) summarizes the Program Outcomes and the assessment tool(s)
                applied to evaluation each outcome.




Mechanical Engineering                                                                               37
Program Self-Study Report
        Goal I:      Create well-rounded engineers who possess theoretical and practical skills, and
                     understand the significance of humanities and social sciences.

        Objective 1: ME graduates will possess the ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and
                     engineering (Obj. A), as well as the ability to use the techniques, skills and modern
                     engineering tools necessary for engineering practice (Obj. K). These include the
                     design and conduct of experiments, as well as the analysis and interpretation of data
                     (Obj. B).

        Outcome:       Students who complete the ME program at Rowan University will be able to solve
                       problems using mathematics, science, and engineering knowledge.

        Indicators: – Is able to apply one solution to another similar problem;
                    – Can apply both theory and practice;
                    – Can “think on their feet”;
                    – Can see the “Big Picture”.

        Practices:     1. Clinic sequence;
                       2. Internship experience;
                       3. Oral examinations;
                       4. Poster and/or oral presentations;
                       5. Homeworks, examinations, projects, and laboratory exercises in all science and
                       math courses, and all required and elective engineering courses.

        Assessment Methods: 1. Nationally normed examination;
                            2. Junior/Senior Clinic projects;
                            3. Student exit interviews;
                            4. Internship surveys.

        Assessment Criteria: – 70% of registered examinees will pass the FE exam.
                             – 100% will be rated as “satisfactory” and 80% will be rated as “good” or
                             better on technical merit of final Junior/Senior Clinic oral presentations.
                             This applies to all ME-sponsored Clinic projects.
                             – 80% of graduating students will answer in the positive for this objective
                             on the Student Exit Interview.
                             – 100% rated as “average” and 80% as “good” or better of all employers‟
                             survey responses for this objective.




Mechanical Engineering                                                                                     38
Program Self-Study Report
        Goal I:      Create well-rounded engineers who possess theoretical and practical skills, and
                     understand the significance of humanities and social sciences.

        Objective 2: ME students will possess the ability to design a system, component, or process in both
                     thermal and mechanical systems to meet desired needs (Obj. C & O).

        Outcome:       Students who complete the ME program at Rowan University will be able to design a
                       system, component, or process.

        Indicators: – Is able to solve open-ended problems;
                    – Can generate multiple solutions;
                    – Recognizes alternative solutions to problems.

        Practices:     1. Clinic sequence;
                       2. Internship experience;
                       3. Design projects, and examinations in all required and elective engineering courses.

        Assessment Methods: 1. Design project assignments evaluated by faculty;
                            2. Junior/Senior Clinic projects;
                            3. Other Clinic data;
                            4. Student exit interviews.

        Assessment Criteria: – 100% of students in the Mechanical Design and Synthesis class will have
                             designed, built and tested a mechanism (e.g. walking mechanism,
                             compressor).
                             – 100% of students in Thermodynamics class will have designed, built and
                             tested a thermal system (e.g. compressor).
                             – 90% of sophomore ME students will design, build and test a
                             electromechanical device (e.g. guitar effects pedal).
                             – 100% will be rated as “satisfactory” and 80% will be rated as “good” or
                             better on technical merit of final Junior/Senior Clinic oral presentations.
                             This applies to all ME-sponsored Clinic projects.
                             – 100% of ME-sponsored Junior/Senior Clinic projects will have a major
                             design component.
                             – 80% of graduating students will answer in the positive for this objective
                             on the Student Exit Interview.




Mechanical Engineering                                                                                     39
Program Self-Study Report
        Goal I:      Create well-rounded engineers who possess theoretical and practical skills, and
                     understand the significance of humanities and social sciences.

        Objective 3: ME students will possess a knowledge of contemporary issues relevant to
                     Mechanical Engineering (Obj. J).

        Outcome:       Students who complete the ME program at Rowan University will be knowledgeable
                       of contemporary issues.

        Indicators: – Appreciates the impact of technology on society
                    – Appreciates the importance of the humanities and social sciences.

        Practices:     1. Clinic sequence;
                       2. Internship experience;
                       3. Design and development experiences in select engineering courses.

        Assessment Methods: 1. Courses taken to satisfy graduation requirements;
                            2. Junior/Senior Clinic projects;
                            3. Other Clinic data;
                            4. Student exit interviews.

        Assessment Criteria: – 100% of ME students will satisfy the university‟s General Education
                             model, which specifies broad categories of courses that must be taken
                             (multicultural/global, literature, social and behavioral science,
                             art/music/theatre, history/humanities/languages requirements) outside of the
                             required curriculum.
                             – 100% of freshmen ME will do an engineering achievement/failure
                             research paper as part of Freshman Clinic.
                             – 100% ME-sponsored Junior/Senior Clinic projects will include a societal
                             impact statement.
                             – 80% of graduating students will answer in the positive for this objective
                             on the Student Exit Interview.




Mechanical Engineering                                                                                 40
Program Self-Study Report
        Goal II:     Produce graduates who have the necessary teamwork and leadership skills to excel
                     in multidisciplinary team environments.

        Objective 1: ME graduates will possess the ability to function in multidisciplinary teams (Obj. D).

        Outcome:       Students who complete the ME program at Rowan University will work effectively in
                       multidisciplinary teams.

        Indicators: – Demonstrates group leadership;
                    – Participates actively;
                    – Has good attendance record;
                    – Recognizes the need for division of labor;
                    – Understands and appreciates individual and group accountability;
                    – Participates in out-of-discipline teams and/or multidisciplinary projects.

        Practices:     1. Clinic sequence;
                       2. Internship experience;
                       3. Homeworks, laboratory and design experiences in select, multidisciplinary
                       engineering courses.

        Assessment Methods: 1. Junior/Senior Clinic peer assessment;
                            2. Junior/Senior Clinic projects;
                            3. Other Clinic data;
                            4. Student exit interviews;
                            5. Internship surveys.

        Assessment Criteria: – 100% of ME students will be part of a multidisciplinary Junior/Senior
                             Clinic team.
                             – 75% of ME-sponsored Junior/Senior Clinic teams will be
                             multidisciplinary (include at least one non-ME student working in a
                             significant role).
                             – 60% of students participating in ME-sponsored Junior/Senior Clinic
                             projects will rate their team as “somewhat functional” or better;
                             – 100% of sophomore ME students will participate in a multidisciplinary
                             clinic project.
                             – 100% will be rated as “competent” and 70% of ME student respondents
                             will be rated as “highly competent” or better as judged by their peers as
                             effective team members on Junior/Senior Clinic survey.
                             –70% of all applicable ME students‟ employers‟ survey responses will
                             indicate at least a “good” rating for this objective.
                             – 80% of graduating students will answer in the positive for this objective
                             on the Student Exit Interview.




Mechanical Engineering                                                                                   41
Program Self-Study Report
        Goal II:     Produce graduates who have the necessary teamwork and leadership skills to excel
                     in multidisciplinary team environments.

        Objective 2: ME students will possess the ability to communicate effectively (Obj. G).

        Outcome:       Students who complete the ME program at Rowan University will be effective
                       communicators.

        Indicators: – Is able to produce reports, presentations, and other deliverables;
                    – Has ability to teach others;
                    – Mentors other members.

        Practices:     1. Clinic sequence, including College Writing and Public Speaking;
                       2. Oral and poster presentations in select engineering courses;
                       3. Professional society competitions and presentations;
                       4. Proposal preparation for student competitions;
                       5. Internship experience;
                       6. Interactions with industry.

        Assessment Methods: 1. Evaluation of presentations and proposals by faculty;
                            2. Evaluation of submitted composition assignments;
                            3. Junior/Senior Clinic projects;
                            4. Other Clinic data;
                            5. Internship surveys.

        Assessment Criteria: – 100% will be rated as “satisfactory” and 80% will be rated as “good” or
                             better on presentation rating of final Junior/Senior Clinic oral presentations.
                              This applies to the presentation component of all ME-sponsored clinic
                             projects.
                             – 100% of all ME students will pass Composition I
                             – 100% of all ME students will pass Sophomore Clinic I and II (these
                             incorporate Public Speaking and College Writing).
                             – 100% of all ME-sponsored Junior/Senior Clinic projects will include an
                             oral presentation, a final project report, and a project web page.
                             – based on internship supervisors‟ surveys, 70% of students will rate
                             “Good” or better for verbal communications and 60% will rate “Good” or
                             better for written communications.




Mechanical Engineering                                                                                   42
Program Self-Study Report
        Goal III: Develop innovative and creative thinking with an understanding of
                  entrepreneurship.

        Objective 1: ME graduates will possess the ability to think creatively and innovatively (Obj. P).

        Outcome:       Students who complete the ME program at Rowan University will be bold and
                       creative problem solvers.

        Indicators: – Generates multiple solutions/alternatives;
                    – Considers non-traditional solutions;
                    – Uses creative problem solving methods.

        Practices:     1. Clinic sequence;
                       2. Internship experience;
                       3. Professional society competitions;
                       4. Homeworks, laboratory exercises, and design projects in all required and elective
                       engineering courses.

        Assessment Methods: 1. Course work evaluated by faculty;
                            2. Junior/Senior Clinic projects;
                            3. Other Clinic data;

        Assessment Criteria: – at least two ME-sponsored Junior/Senior Clinic projects per semester
                             will be student originated ideas/inventions/products.
                             – 100% of students in the Mechanical Design and Synthesis course will be
                             required to submit a sales/design proposal for a commercial product.
                             – 90% of ME sophomores will develop a commercial electromechanical
                             device as part of Clinic.
                             – 100% of ME freshmen will complete Freshman Clinic I (which includes a
                             creative problem solving component).




Mechanical Engineering                                                                                        43
Program Self-Study Report
        Goal III: Develop innovative and creative thinking with an understanding of
                  entrepreneurship.

        Objective 2: ME graduates will possess a knowledge of entrepreneurial practices (Obj. Q).

        Outcome:       Students who complete the ME program at Rowan University will have
                       entrepreneurial skills.

        Indicators: – Understands patents/intellectual property;
                    – Realizes the need and importance of a business plan and market analysis;
                    – Understands management structure;
                    – Is willing to take risks.

        Practices:     1. Clinic sequence;
                       2. Proposal preparation for project funding;
                       3. Venture capital fund;
                       4. Industry-sponsored or product-development projects.

        Assessment Methods: 1. Reports and presentations evaluated by faculty;
                            2. Proposals evaluated by project sponsors;
                            3. Junior/Senior Clinic projects;
                            4. Other Clinic data.

        Assessment Criteria: – at least two ME-sponsored Junior/Senior Clinic projects per semester will
                             be student originated ideas/inventions/products.
                             – 90% of ME sophomores will develop a commercial electromechanical
                             device as part of Clinic and will do a patent search as part of the project.
                             – at least two ME-sponsored Junior/Senior Clinic projects per year will
                             require a student-prepared proposal to an external agency or corporation for
                             funding/sponsorship.




Mechanical Engineering                                                                                 44
Program Self-Study Report
        Goal IV: Develop science, mathematics, analytical, computational, and experimental skills
                 and apply them to formulate and solve engineering problems.

        Objective 1: ME graduates will possess a knowledge of chemistry and calculus-based physics with
                     depth in at least one (Obj. L), will be able to apply advanced mathematics through
                     multivariate calculus and differential equations (Obj. M), and be familiar with
                     statistics and linear algebra (Obj. N).

        Outcome:       Students who complete the ME program at Rowan University will possess broad
                       scientific, mathematical and analytical knowledge.

        Indicators: – Generates problem formulation and solution;
                    – Uses analytical tools;
                    – Performs design calculations and engineering analyses;
                    – Can develop governing equations or qualitatively explain each term in a governing
                    equation.

        Practices:     1. Clinic sequence;
                       2. Internship experience;
                       3. Homeworks, examinations, projects, and laboratory exercises in science and math
                       courses, and all required and elective engineering courses.

        Assessment Methods: 1. Course work evaluated by faculty;
                            2. Courses taken to satisfy graduation requirement;
                            3. Nationally normed examination;
                            4. Student exit interviews.

        Assessment Criteria: – 90% of registered examinees will score at least 50% correct on the
                             mathematics and chemistry portions of the FE exam; 75% will score 70%
                             or better on these subjects.
                             – 100% of ME students will take and pass Math for Engineering Analysis I
                             & II or equivalent (linear algebra, differential equations, multivariate
                             calculus) and Quality and Reliability in Manufacturing and Design
                             (statistics and experimental design).
                             – 80% of graduating students will answer in the positive for this objective
                             on the Student Exit Interview.




Mechanical Engineering                                                                                  45
Program Self-Study Report
        Goal IV: Develop science, mathematics, analytical, computational, and experimental skills
                 and apply them to formulate and solve engineering problems.

        Objective 2: ME graduates will possess the ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering
                     problems (Obj. E).

        Outcome:       Students who complete the ME program at Rowan University will be able to apply
                       scientific, mathematical and analytical knowledge to identify, formulate and solve
                       engineering problems.

        Indicators: – Generates problem formulation and solution;
                    – Can model and simulate problems;
                    – Uses computational tools;
                    – Uses analytical tools;
                    – Uses experimental tools;
                    – Can develop governing equations or qualitatively explain each term in a governing
                    equation.

        Practices:     1. Clinic sequence;
                       2. Internship experience;
                       3. Homeworks, examinations, projects, and laboratory exercises in science and math
                       courses, and all required and elective engineering courses.

        Assessment Methods: 1. Design project reports evaluated by faculty;
                            2. Nationally normed examination;
                            3. Course work evaluated by faculty;
                            4. Other Clinic data;
                            5. Student exit interviews.

        Assessment Criteria: – 70% of registered examinees will pass the FE exam.
                             – 100% will be rated as “satisfactory” and 80% will be rated as “good” or
                             better on technical merit of final Junior/Senior Clinic oral presentations.
                             This applies to all ME-sponsored projects.
                             – 100% of ME students will use computational tools in Quality and
                             Reliability in Manufacturing and Design, Thermodynamics II, Mechanical
                             Design and Synthesis.
                             – 90% of sophomore ME students will use 3-D solid modeling in
                             Sophomore Clinic II.
                             – 80% of graduating students will answer in the positive for this objective
                             on the Student Exit Interview.




Mechanical Engineering                                                                                      46
Program Self-Study Report
        Goal V:      Instill in students an appreciation of the impact of engineering solutions in a global
                     and societal context, including the broad implications of professional ethics.

        Objective 1: ME graduates will possess an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
                     (Obj. F).

        Outcome:       Students who complete the ME program at Rowan University will understand the
                       need for professional and ethical responsibility.

        Indicators: – understands professional ethics;
                    – behaves professionally.

        Practices:     1. Internship experience;
                       2. Interactions with industry and personnel from other schools;
                       3. Clinic project sequence.

        Assessment Methods: 1. Internship surveys;
                            2. Junior/Senior Clinic projects;
                            3. Other Clinic data;
                            4. Student exit interviews.

        Assessment Criteria: – 90% of internship supervisors will rate students as “Good” or better on
                             reliability/dependability, and 90% of students will self-rate as “Good” or
                             better on reliability/dependability.
                             – 100% of sophomore ME students will do societal impact paper as part of
                             Clinic.
                             – 100% ME-sponsored Junior/Senior Clinic project will write a societal
                             impact statement.
                             – 90% of graduating students will answer in the positive for this objective
                             on the Student Exit Interview.




Mechanical Engineering                                                                                   47
Program Self-Study Report
        Goal V:      Instill in students an appreciation of the impact of engineering solutions in a global
                     and societal context, including the broad implications of professional ethics.

        Objective 2: ME graduates will possess the broad education necessary to understand the impact of
                     engineering solutions in a global and societal context (Obj. H).

        Outcome:       Students who complete the ME program at Rowan University will understand and
                       consider the consequences of engineering solutions on society.

        Indicators: – can write (technology) impact statements;
                    – considers the global marketplace.

        Practices:     1. Clinic project sequence;
                       2. Internship experience;
                       3. Select courses taken.

        Assessment Methods: 1. Courses taken to satisfy graduation requirement;
                            2. Junior/Senior Clinic projects;
                            3. Other Clinic data;
                            4. Student exit interviews.

        Assessment Criteria: – 100% of ME students will satisfy the university General Education model
                             upon graduation.
                             – 100% of sophomore ME students will do societal impact research paper
                             as part of Clinic.
                             – 100% of freshmen ME will do engineering achievement/failure research
                             paper as part of Clinic.
                             – 100% ME-sponsored Junior/Senior Clinic will write a societal impact
                             statement.
                             – 90% of graduating students will answer in the positive for this objective
                             on the Student Exit Interview.




Mechanical Engineering                                                                                   48
Program Self-Study Report
        Goal VI: Develop the flexibility to adapt to changing technology and an understanding of
                 the need for continuous improvement and lifelong learning.

        Objective 1: ME graduates will possess a recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in
                     life-long learning (Obj. I).

        Outcome:       Students who complete the ME program at Rowan University will recognize that
                       learning is a continuous process.

        Indicators: – Participates in professional societies;
                    – Attends graduate school;
                    – Pursues licensing and certification;
                    – Participates in continuing education;
                    – Takes courses for professional development;
                    – Actively participates in teaching/mentoring/training;
                    – Pursues second degree;
                    – Reads and/or publishes in trade journals.

        Practices:     1. Participation in professional society activities;
                       2. Participation in Fundamentals of Engineering examination;
                       3. Attendance in graduate school;

        Assessment Methods: 1. Placement data;
                            2. Participation in professional society activities;
                            3. Nationally normed examination.

        Assessment Criteria: – 75% of all ME seniors will take the FE Exam prior to or within one year
                             of graduation;
                             – 15% of all ME seniors will pursue full-time graduate studies;
                             – 50% of ME juniors and seniors will be ASME members;
                             – at least two student presentations per year will be made at professional
                             society meetings.




Mechanical Engineering                                                                                     49
Program Self-Study Report
                       Table (c): Summary of Program Outcomes and assessment tools.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Be able to apply science, math, and analytical knowledge to solve problems
                                                    Be able to solve problems using math, science engineering knowledge
                             Program Outcomes:




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Possess broad scientific, mathematical and analytical knowledge




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Understand the need for professional and ethical responsibility

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Understand and consider the impact of engineering solutions
                       Students who complete the
                           ME program at Rowan
                                 University will:




                                                                                                                          Be able to design a system, component or process




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Recognize that learning is a continuous process
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Work effectively in multidisciplinary teams
                                                                                                                                                                             Be knowledgeable of contemporary issues




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Be bold and creative problem solvers
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Be effective communicators




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Have entrepreneurial skills
             Assessment tool applied

       Junior/Senior Clinic Projects                X                                                                     X                                                  X                                         X                                             X                            X                                      X                                                                                               X                                                                            X                                                                 X
       Freshman and Sophomore (other) Clinic data                                                                         X                                                  X                                         X                                             X                            X                                      X                                                                                               X                                                                            X                                                                 X
       Course portfolio or specific assignments                                                                           X                                                                                                                                          X                            X                                                                    X                                                                 X                                                                                                                                              X
       Nationally normed examination: FE exam       X                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  X                                                                 X                                                                                                                                                                                                            X
       Alumni surveys
       Employer/recruiter surveys
       Placement data                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 X
       Student exit interviews                      X                                                                     X                                                  X                                         X                                                                                                                                               X                                                                 X                                                                            X                                                                 X
       Course evaluations
       Participation in professional society                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          X
       Internships:
          Supervisor‟s evaluation                   X                                                                                                                                                                  X                                             X                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                X
          Student self-assessment                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     X

                      Goal I outcomes

                      Goal II outcomes

                     Goal III outcomes

                      Goal IV outcomes

                      Goal V outcome

                      Goal VI outcomes




Mechanical Engineering                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  50
Program Self-Study Report
        g.        Outcomes Assessment Results

        Goal I:           Create well-rounded engineers who possess theoretical and practical skills, and
                          understand the significance of humanities and social sciences.

        Outcome                  Assessment criteria                     Results                     Comments
        1. Be able to solve      - 70% will pass FE exam                 - TBD (To Be                - based on exam results in July
        problems using                                                   Determined)
        mathematics, science,
                                 - 100% “satisfactory” & 80% “good”      - fall ‟99: 97% “satisf.”   - criterion NOT met completely
        and engineering
                                 on technical merit in J/S Clinic oral   or better, 69% “good”       in either semester, but close in
        knowledge
                                 presentation                            or better                   both semesters
                                                                           spr ‟00: 92% “satisf.”
                                                                         or better, 80% “good”
                                 - 80% answer in affirmative on Exit     - 100% answered in          - criterion met
                                 Interview                               affirmative
                                 - 100% “average” & 80% “good” or        - 1998: 100% “average”      - criterion achieved both years
                                 better on intern supervisor survey      or better, 90% “good”       (good = 4 out of 5 scale)
                                                                         or better
                                                                           1999: 100% “average”
                                                                         or better, 87% “good”
                                                                         or better.
        2. Be able to design a   - 100% in Mech. Des. & Syn. design,     - 100% achieved             - criterion met
        system, component,       build and test a mechanism
        or process
                                 - 100% in Thermodynamics design,        - 100% achieved             - criterion met
                                 build and test a thermal system
                                 - 90% of sophomore ME design, build     - 75% achieved              - criterion NOT met; remaining
                                 and test a electromechanical device     criterion                   15% of ME students designed
                                                                                                     Baseball Stadium in 2nd project
                                 - 100% “satisfactory” & 80% “good”      - fall ‟99: 97% “satisf.”   - criterion NOT met completely
                                 on technical merit of J/S Clinic oral   or better, 69% “good”       in either semester, but close in
                                 presentation                            or better                   both semesters
                                                                           spr ‟00: 92% “satisf.”
                                                                         or better, 80% “good”
                                 - 100% of ME J/S Clinic projects have   - 100% of projects had      - criterion met
                                 major design component                  major design
                                 - 80% answer in affirmative on Exit     - 100% answered in          - criterion met
                                 Interview                               affirmative
        3. Be knowledgeable      - 100% of graduates satisfy Gen. Ed.    - 100% satisfied            - criterion met
        of contemporary          model
        issues
                                 - 100% of freshmen ME will do paper     - 100% satisfied in fall    - criterion met
                                 on engineering achievement/failure      „99
                                 - 100% of ME J/S Clinic include         - 100% satisfied in         - criterion met after full
                                 societal impact statement               spring ‟00 semester         implementation in Spr. „00 sem.
                                 - 80% answer in affirmative on Exit     - 93% answered in           - criterion met
                                 Interview                               affirmative




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Program Self-Study Report
        Goal II:          Produce graduates who have the necessary teamwork and leadership skills to
                          excel in multidisciplinary team environments.

        Outcome                  Assessment criteria                       Results                     Comments
        1. Work effectively in   - 100% of ME students will be part of     - 100% of graduating        - criterion met for seniors
        multidisciplinary        multidisciplinary J/S Clinic project      seniors; 55% of juniors     (monitored via tracking sheet)
        teams
                                 - 75% of ME J/S Clinic teams will be      - 83% in fall ‟99, 73%      - criterion met
                                 multidisciplinary                         in spring „00
                                 - 60% of students will rate team as       - 67% in spring ‟99,        - criterion met
                                 “somewhat functional” or better           66% in fall „99
                                 - 100% of sophomore ME students on        - 100% in spring ‟00        - criterion met
                                 multidisciplinary project
                                 - 100% “competent” & 70% “highly          - 99% “competent” or        - criterion met
                                 competent” or better on peer              better, 79% “highly
                                 assessment in J/S Clinic survey           competent” or better
                                 - 70% of intern supervisor survey rate    - 1998: 70% “good” or       applies to “ability to work in
                                 at least “good”                           better                      teams” (remainder (30%) N/A)
                                                                             60% “good” or better      “ability to work in mult. teams”
                                                                                                       (remainder (40%) N/A)
                                                                            1999: 92% “good” or        “ability to work in teams”
                                                                           better                      (remainder (8%) N/A)
                                                                             74% “good “ or better     “ability to work in mult. teams”
                                                                                                       (remainder (26%) N/A)
                                                                                                       - criterion met (good=4 out of 5)
                                 - 80% answer in affirmative on Exit       - 100% answered in          - criterion met
                                 Interview                                 affirmative
        2. Be effective          - 100% “satisfactory” & 80% “good”        - fall ‟99: 100% “satisf”   - criterion met in spring ‟00;
        communicators            or better on quality of presentation in   or better, 76% “good”       very close to being met in fall
                                 J/S Clinic oral presentation              or better                   „99
                                                                             spring ‟00: 98%
                                                                           “satisf” or better, 85%
                                                                           “good” or better
                                 - 100% will pass Composition I            - 100% passed
                                                                                                       - criterion met
                                 - 100% will pass Soph Clinic I & II       - 100% passed
                                                                                                       - criterion met
                                 - 100% of ME J/S Clinic to include        - 100% completed these
                                 oral pres., final report, web page        deliverables                - criterion met
                                 - 70% “good” or better for verbal         - 1998: 90% “good” or
                                 communications and 60% “good” or          better-verbal, 60%          - (good = 4 out of 5 scale)
                                 better for written communications on      “good” or better-written      criterion met both years
                                 internship supervisor survey                1999: 87% for verbal,
                                                                           59% for written




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Program Self-Study Report
        Goal III:          Develop innovative and creative thinking with an understanding of
                           entrepreneurship.

        Outcome                  Assessment criteria                        Results                   Comments
        1. Be bold and           - at least two ME J/S Clinic projects      - 4 in fall ‟99           - criterion met
        creative problem         per semester will be student originated      3 in spring „00
        solvers
                                 - 100% in Mech Des & Synth will            - 100% completed          - criterion met
                                 submit sales/design proposal
                                 - 90% of ME sophomores will develop        - 75% achieved            - criterion NOT met; remaining
                                 commercial e/m device in Clinic            criterion                 ME students designed Baseball
                                                                                                      Stadium in other Clinic project
                                 - 100% of ME freshmen will complete        - 100% completed          - criterion met
                                 Freshman Clinic I


        2. Have                  - at least two ME J/S Clinic projects      - 4 in fall ‟99           - criterion met
        entrepreneurial skills   per semester will be student originated      3 in spring „00
                                 - 90% of ME sophomores will develop        - 75% achieved            - criterion NOT met; remaining
                                 commercial e/m device and do patent        criterion                 ME students design Baseball
                                 search in Clinic                                                     Stadium in other Clinic project

                                 - at least two ME J/S Clinic project per   - 2 in „99-‟00 academic   - criterion met
                                 year will include proposal to agency       year




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Program Self-Study Report
        Goal IV:          Develop science, mathematics, analytical, computational, and experimental skills
                          and apply them to formulate and solve engineering problems.

        Outcome                  Assessment criteria                      Results                     Comments
        1. Possess broad         - 90% will score at least 50% correct    - TBD                       - based on exam results in July
        scientific,              on math and chemistry portion of FE
        mathematical and         exam; 75% will score 70% or better
        analytical knowledge
                                 - 100% will pass Math for Engineering    - 100% passed               - criterion met
                                 Analysis I & II and Quality & Reliab.
                                 - 80% answer in affirmative on Exit      - 100% answered in          - criterion met
                                 Interview                                affirmative
        2. Be able to apply      - 70% of examinees will pass FE exam     - TBD                       - based on exam results in July
        scientific,
                                 - 100% “satisfactory” & 80% “good”       - fall ‟99: 97% “satisf.”   - criterion NOT met completely
        mathematical, and
                                 or better on technical merit of J/S      or better, 69% “good”       in either semester, but close in
        analytical knowledge
                                 Clinic oral presentation                 or better                   both semesters
        to identify, formulate
                                                                            spr ‟00: 92% “satisf.”
        and solve engineering
                                                                          or better, 80% “good”
        problems
                                 - 100% will use computational tools in   - 100% used (EES,           - criterion met
                                 Quality & Reliability, Thermo. II, and   spreadsheet, Working
                                 Mech. Design & Synthesis                 Model)
                                 - 90% of sophomores will use 3-D         - 75% achieved              - criterion NOT met; remaining
                                 modeling in Clinic II                                                ME students designed Baseball
                                                                                                      Stadium in other Clinic project
                                 - 80% answer in affirmative on Exit      - 100% answered in          - criterion met
                                 Interview                                affirmative




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Program Self-Study Report
        Goal V:            Instill in students an appreciation of the impact of engineering solutions in a
                           global and societal context, including the broad implications of professional
                           ethics.

        Outcome                  Assessment criteria                       Results              Comments
        1. Possess an            - 90% of intern supervisors rate          - 1998: 100% rated   - criterion met (good = 4 out of 5
        understanding of         “good” or better on reliability/depend.   “good” or better     on rating scale)
        professional and                                                     1999: 100% rated
        ethical responsibility                                             “good” or better
                                 - 90% of students will self-assess as     - 1999: 100% rated   - criterion met (good = 4 out of 5
                                 “good” or better on reliability/depend.   “good” or better     one rating scale)
                                 - 100% of sophomore ME will do            - 100% completed     - criterion met
                                 societal impact paper in Clinic
                                 - 90% answer in affirmative on Exit       - 85% answered in    - criterion NOT met; remaining
                                 Interview                                 affirmative          15% cited lack of treatment of
                                                                                                ethics
        2. Understand and        - 100% satisfy Gen. Ed. model             - 100% satisfied     - criterion met
        consider the
                                 - 100% of sophomore ME will do            - 100% completed     - criterion met
        consequences of
                                 society impact research paper in Clinic
        engineering solutions
        on society               - 100% of freshman ME will do             - 100% completed     - criterion met; assignment in all
                                 engineering achievement/failure paper                          Freshman Clinic sections
                                 - 100% of ME J/S Clinic projects          - 100% completed     - criterion met; monitored by all
                                 include societal impact statement                              Project Managers
                                 - 90% answer in affirmative on Exit       - 100% answered in   - criterion met
                                 Interview                                 affirmative




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Program Self-Study Report
        Goal VI:           Develop the flexibility to adapt to changing technology and an understanding of
                           the need for continuous improvement and lifelong learning.

        Outcome                Assessment criteria                      Results                  Comments
        1. Possess a           - 75% of ME seniors will take FE         - 19 of 28 (68%) took    - based on final results in Fall
        recognition of the     exam prior to or within one year of      exam in April; several
        need for and an        graduation                               to take in Fall
        ability to engage in
                               - 15% of ME seniors will pursue          - 21% (6 out of 28)      - criterion met
        life-long learning
                               graduate studies full time               pursuing
                               - 50% of ME juniors and seniors will     - 60% (28/47) in „99-    - criterion met
                               be ASME members                          ‟00 acad. year
                               - at least 2 student presentations per   - 6 presentations made   - criterion met
                               year at professional society meeting     in ‟99-„00




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Program Self-Study Report
        h.      Improvement Processes

                Program improvement in the ME department consists of two processes. The first is an
                assessment of semester-to-semester performance data from individual courses, evaluations
                of Clinics and internship surveys, as well as other department-wide policy changes (e.g.,
                student advising policy). We consider this to be a “low-level” assessment designed to effect
                minor programmatic changes, and this process is conducted after the completion of each
                semester (summer, fall and spring) in a Program Assessment Marathon.

                The Program Assessment Marathon is led by the department assessment-activities
                coordinator (currently John C. Chen, Associate Professor). The coordinator develops the
                agenda for the meeting, which usually lasts for 3 to 5 hours, and ensures that any data
                collection, analysis and summary are completed prior to the meeting. In addition to
                discussing performance data from courses and internship surveys, general department
                activities and policies, such as student advising, are covered as well. Finally, the Program
                Assessment Marathons have served well in informing faculty of accreditation-related
                activities and status.

                The first Program Assessment Marathon occurred in Summer ‟99 for the Spring ‟99
                semester. Prior to this inaugural Assessment Marathon, programmatic changes were decided
                on and implemented as the needs arose, and often were not documented. Attachment 1 of
                this section of the self-study report contains a summary of all pre-Spring-1999 program
                changes. It should be noted that this summary is generated without the aid of detailed
                documentation, and thus the level of detail is not substantial. Attachment 2 of this section of
                the self-study report contains a summary of activities from the Spring „99 semester.
                Attachments 3 and 4 contain similar summaries from the Fall ‟99 and Spring „00 Program
                Assessment Marathons, respectively.

                The second process for program improvement is a “high-level” assessment of performance
                relative to our established program objectives. The changes resulting from this process are
                expected to be program-wide and more substantial than those from the Program Assessment
                Marathons. This process includes two instruments: (1) an Industrial Affiliates Meeting, and
                (2) a department-wide assessment of program outcomes relative to assessment data. The
                first Industrial Affiliates Meeting was conducted on May 3, 2000, and will be conducted on a
                biannual basis. The persons involved, the purpose, methods and summary of findings are
                detailed in Attachment 5.

                The department-wide assessment of program outcomes occurs once per year after conclusion
                of the spring semester, usually in late summer. The first by this department will occur in
                Summer 2000. The results (data) are gathered from the various assessment methods and
                instruments (with the exception that results from the Fundamentals of Engineering
                examination are not available until the summer) and compared to the outcomes assessment
                criteria set by the faculty. Once this evaluation has been conducted, the faculty will use the
                following process to ensure that changes are implemented to improve the program.
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Program Self-Study Report
                Step #1:       Review assessment results. If an assessment result indicates that no change is
                               required for practices related to a particular criterion, they will so document
                               “no change required.” If the faculty finds a deficiency in an indicator, they
                               will proceed to step #2.

                Step #2:       The faculty will determine whether the results are accurate. If not, the faculty
                               stops the improvement process and reassesses or disregards the finding by
                               indicating no change required. If the indicator is accurate, proceed to step #3.

                Step #3:       The faculty will determine possible causes for a deficiency. Proceed to step
                               #4.

                Step #4:       The faculty will determine the severity of a deficiency in terms of how
                               serious it is and its scope (e.g., how many goals are affected). Proceed to step
                               #5.

                Step #5:       The faculty will select one or more of the following strategies to correct the
                               deficiency, depending on what was determined from steps #3 and #4.

                        Strategies:
                            – modify “unwritten” department policies or recommendations
                            – modify one or more assessment methods or instruments
                            – modify one or more goals, objectives, performance criteria, or desired
                                outcomes
                            – modify a class or sequence of classes
                            – modify departmental policies
                            – modify faculty professional development to include additional training
                            – modify faculty advising and/or student monitoring
                            – modify mission statement
                            – modify admissions policy
                            – modify faculty practice
                            – modify curriculum
                            – modify faculty workload
                            – modify number of faculty

                Step #6:       The faculty will document this process (findings from all steps) and transmit
                               this to the Dean and Associate Dean of the College of Engineering. With the
                               support of the Dean and Associate Dean, the programmatic changes identified
                               in step #5 will be implemented. Future program-wide assessment will be
                               modified to integrate and consider these changes.


        i.      Departmental Roles in Assessment Activities


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Program Self-Study Report
                Responsibilities are assigned to various departmental personnel so that someone is
                accountable for data collection. Each coordinator will ensure that the data for the
                assessment tool(s) assigned to him or her are collected at the designated time(s) and are
                properly stored. A typed summary and a statistical presentation of the data, if applicable,
                will be prepared for all data collected through the various assessment methods. All faculty
                members participate in the evaluation of the assessment data and discussion of program
                changes.


                i.      John Chen, Department ABET-Activities Coordinator

                        As the department ABET-activities coordinator, he is responsible for ensuring that
                        data collection is carried out by each member of the department in a timely manner.
                        He also leads the Program Assessment Marathon at the conclusion of each semester.
                         In preparation for this activity, he develops the agenda, compiles all program-wide
                        assessment data (not including individual courses) and reviews the results for the
                        department. After the Assessment Marathon, he summarizes the group‟s discussions
                        and plan of improvement, and ensures that the improvements are implemented.
                        Throughout the year, the coordinator is continually updating and maintaining
                        assessment data for the program. Multiple copies of all data are stored on the
                        College of Engineering servers to ensure data integrity.

                ii.     T.R. Chandrupatla, Chair

                        As the Department Chair, he is responsible for compiling data on program-wide
                        activities other than outcomes assessment; e.g., laboratory facilities, program
                        expenditures, faculty (Criterion 5). He is also responsible for securing funding to
                        complete all assessment-related activities.


                iii.    Jennifer Kadlowec

                        As a member of the College-wide Engineering Assessment Committee (along with J.
                        Chen), she assisted with the collection, summary and analysis of program-wide
                        outcomes assessment data.


                iv.     Clay Gabler

                        As the department‟s representative to the College of Engineering Curriculum
                        Committee, he is responsible for implementing changes in the curriculum, including
                        proposals for new courses and course minor changes. He is also the department‟s
                        Discipline Manager for the junior/Senior Clinic.


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Program Self-Study Report
                v.      Dottie Stiles, Administrative Assistant

                        Ms. Stiles is responsible for updating student tracking sheets (see Criterion 1 –
                        Students) at the end of each semester. The tracking sheets are used to ensure that
                        each student follows the program curriculum, including the University‟s General
                        Education requirements (see Criterion 1 – Students, for details). In addition, Ms.
                        Stiles provides general office support for each faculty member in completing his or
                        her assessment data-collection duties.


                vi.     All Mechanical Engineering Faculty

                        All faculty are responsible for collecting, summarizing and evaluating course
                        evaluations completed by students in each of his or her course(s). These data are a
                        part of each faculty‟s Course/Instructional Reflection, which is a written summary of
                        the conduct of the just-completed course(s), including changes to be implemented in
                        a future offering of the course(s). Furthermore, each faculty member is responsible
                        for compiling a summary portfolio for each of his or her course(s) from each
                        semester. Such portfolios include examples of homework, quizzes, tests, reports,
                        laboratory write-ups, and design projects, as appropriate. A range of quality of
                        materials is included to provide a broad perspective of student performance. The
                        Course/Instructional Reflection is included with each course portfolio, and will be
                        available for the ABET evaluation team during the visit. All ME faculty participate
                        in evaluating the Senior Design Project (from the Junior/Senior Clinic) near the end
                        of each semester. Finally, all faculty members participate in the Program Assessment
                        Marathon conducted at the conclusion of each semester to provide input for program
                        changes and improvements.

        j.      Timeline: Assessment Activities

                The faculty sets aside time in May after the spring semester to review all assessment data
                from the year just completed (Summer, Fall, and Spring) and make program changes. The
                following is a schedule of data collection. If the outcomes are met or exceeded, the faculty
                may elect to stagger collection times in subsequent years. If an outcome is not met or if a
                change that affects data collection is made, the regular schedule will be followed.

                Summer Semester: Data collected include internship surveys received from employers
                (supervisors) of our students, and assessments of summer experiences by our students. In
                future summers, data from employers, recruiters, alumni and FE exam will be collected for
                assessment purposes.

                Fall Semester: Review assessment data from (1) Junior/Senior Clinic projects, (2) student
                portfolios for Freshman and Sophomore Clinics, (3) student portfolios for all ME-taught fall-
                semester courses, and (4) course evaluations. An evaluation of the data was made during a
                “Program Assessment Marathon” in January 2000, and changes were documented and
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Program Self-Study Report
                implemented. Summaries of the Program Assessment Marathon are in the Attachments
                section at the end of this section of the report.

                Spring Semester: Review assessment data from (1) Junior/Senior Clinic projects, (2) student
                portfolios for Freshman and Sophomore Clinics, (3) student portfolios for all ME-taught
                spring-semester courses, and (4) course evaluations. An evaluation of the data was made
                during a “Program Assessment Marathon”, and changes were documented and implemented.
                 Summaries of the Program Assessment Marathon are in the Attachments section at the end
                of this section of the report. In addition, placement data and exit interviews will be
                completed prior to the Seniors‟ graduation. Performance data from the Fundamentals of
                Engineering (FE) examination will be received in mid-summer and evaluated immediately.
                This information will be supplied to the ABET evaluation team during Summer 2000, and
                will be available during the fall accreditation visit.


        k.      Projected Annual Cost Analysis

                $95.15/year for materials and postage
                36 hours/faculty member
                72 total hours for preparation of mailings, collection and/or data entry

                1. New Mechanical Engineering Student Questionnaire
                cost=$6.00  time=2 hrs/faculty member; 12 hours for preparation

                -the cost for materials would be four pages per student @.05/page X thirty students
                -the time commitment for each faculty member to review and discuss data for this
                assessment method would be approximately two hours/year

                2A. Senior Design Projects - Faculty Assessment
                cost=$1.75   time=2 hrs /faculty member; 4 hours for preparation

                - the cost for materials (review forms) would be one page per student @ $.05/page X seven
                groups X five faculty members
                - the time commitment for each faculty member to review and discuss data for this
                assessment method would be approximately two hours/year

                2B. Senior Design Projects - Student Assessment
                cost=$2.10    time=2 hr/faculty member; 4 hours for preparation

                - the cost for materials (review forms) would be one page per student @ $.05/page X twenty-
                one students X two forms/student
                - the time commitment for each faculty member to review and discuss data for this
                assessment method would be approximately three hours per year



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Program Self-Study Report
                3. Portfolio Assessment
                cost=$0        time=15 hrs/faculty member

                - the time commitment for the faculty to review and assess each item in the portfolio as well
                as discuss the data for this assessment method would be three hours per year (selection and
                reviewing of forty-eight samples each year)

                4. Nationally-normed exams
                cost=$0       time=2 hrs/faculty member

                - FE exam scores are submitted free to the College of Engineering
                - the time commitment for each faculty member to review and discuss data for this
                assessment method would be approximately two hours per year

                5. Alumni Surveys
                cost=$48     time=2 hrs/faculty member; 22 hours for preparation

                - the cost of paper (two pages @.05/page) and postage (.32/outgoing + .38/return) would be
                approximately $.80/survey X sixty surveys per year
                - the time commitment for each faculty member to review and discuss the data for this
                assessment method would be approximately two hours per year

                6. Employer/Recruiter Surveys
                cost=$25.80 time=2 hrs/faculty member; 10 hours for preparation

                - the cost of paper (one page @ .05/page), postage (.38/return) would be approximately
                $.43/survey X sixty surveys
                - the time commitment to review and discuss the data for this assessment method would be
                approximately two hours per year

                7. Placement Data/Exit Interview
                cost=$6.00   time=2 hrs./faculty member; 10 hours for preparation

                - the cost of paper for sixty surveys @ .05/page X two pages per survey would be
                approximately $3.00
                - the time commitment to review and discuss data for this assessment method would be
                approximately two hours per year

                8. Course Evaluations
                cost=$0      time=3 hrs/faculty member

                -the cost for conducting these evaluations is nothing if done through regular student
                evaluation channels
                -the time to commitment for each faculty member to review and discuss the data for this
                assessment method would be approximately three hours per year
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Program Self-Study Report
                9A. Internship Supervisor Assessment
                cost=$1.50    time=2 hrs./faculty member; 10 hours for preparation

                -the cost for the regular evaluation form is nothing because it is already required for
                internship program
                -the cost for each survey is one page @ .05/page
                -the time commitment for each faculty member to review and discuss the data for this
                assessment method would be approximately two hours per year.

                9B. Internship Student Assessment
                cost=$0       time=2 hrs./faculty member

                -the cost for this is nothing because it is already required for internship program
                -the time commitment for each faculty member to review and discuss the data for this
                assessment method would be approximately two hours per year.




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Program Self-Study Report
        Attachment 3.A – Summary of Programmatic Changes Implemented Prior to Spring „99

        The following represents a summary list of programmatic changes that were adopted in the ME
        Department and College of Engineering (Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior/Senior Clinic) prior to
        Spring 1999. These changes were not documented in detail, and are thus this list is generated
        largely from recollection. Where possible, the date of implementation is included.

        Curriculum

        –   The ME curriculum underwent revisions in each year from 1996 to 1999. The changes were
            more dramatic in the early years and rather minor in the final two years. The curriculum for
            each year can be viewed on the College of Engineering web site at
            <http://engineering.rowan.edu/advising/advising.html>.

        –   Quality and Reliability in Manufacturing and Design was added as a new course to allow for the
            engineering application of statistics and probability (1996).

        –   Mechanical Design and Synthesis was a new course developed as the first major mechanical
            design experience for Junior ME students (1996).

        –   The course “Public Speaking” was eliminated from the curriculum since speaking was
            incorporated into Sophomore Clinic II (summer/97).

        –   Mechanical System Dynamics and Control was moved from second semester of Junior year to
            first semester of Senior year. Concurrently, Machine Design was moved from first semester of
            Senior year to second semester of Junior year. This change reflected a better flow of the design
            theme in mechanical systems (summer/97).

        –   The total credit hours for graduation increased from 129 to 130 semester hours as a result of the
            above changes.

        –   The course sequence Engineering Materials I and II were changed to Material Science and
            Manufacturing Processes, respectively, to better reflect the course content (summer/98).

        –   Microscale Systems was conceived as a new required course in the final semester of Senior year.
             The rationale is that the course covers a topic of current technological interest, involves both
            mechanical and thermal/fluids aspects of mechanical engineering, and is multidisciplinary in
            nature (fall/98).

        –   Machine Design was conceived as a new course required for the Junior year (fall/98)

        –   Vibrations was moved from second semester Sophomore year to second semester Junior year.
            Concurrently, Machine Design was moved from second semester Junior year to second semester
            Sophomore year. In this way, Machine Design becomes the first course in mechanical design
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Program Self-Study Report
            for ME majors. The change was brought about by two factors: (1) having Machine Design prior
            to Junior Clinic would be more useful in terms of student capabilities and contributions to the
            Clinic, and (2) the difficulty with subject content in Vibrations for Sophomores (spring/99).

        –   The total credit hours for graduation decreased from 130 to 128 semester hours as a result of the
            above changes.

        –   Chemistry I was replaced by Advanced College Chemistry I, a newly developed course for
            engineering students. The course contains more depth of subject coverage than the original
            course and also includes new material normally covered in Chemistry II (summer/99).

        Freshman Clinic

        –   Freshman Clinic I and II were reduced in credits from 3 to 2 semester hours (summer/98).

        –   The format of Freshman Clinic I was decided to allow every student to gain exposure to each of
            the four programs. This is accomplished by series of four modules through which the students
            will rotate during the semester (08/96).

        –   The ME module was selected to focus on machine shop processes and methods. The project
            involved the manufacture of an aluminum flashlight (08/96).

        –   The ME module was conducted at Camden County College to make use of the extensive
            manufacturing capabilities existing there and due to the lack of existing facilities at Rowan
            (08/96).

        –   Freshman Clinic II was decided to focus on the theme of Reverse Engineering and Competitive
            Assessment of commercial products (fall/96).

        –   The ME-led section will examine the hairdryer, thus switching from the coffee maker project
            (fall/97).

        Sophomore Clinic

        –   The engineering design component of Sophomore Clinic I was changed from 4 three-week
            Sophomore Clinic I was changed from 3 semester hours to 4 semester hours, incorporating 1
            credit hour of engineering design and 3 credit hours of technical writing. Sophomore Clinic II
            was similarly changed to reflect 1 credit hour of engineering design and 3 credit hours of Public
            Speaking (summer/97).

        –   The engineering design component of Sophomore Clinic II was changed to allow students to
            choose one of two semester-long projects, each of which is sponsored jointly by two of the
            engineering programs (Spring/99).

        –   The engineering design component of Sophomore Clinic I was changed from 4 three-week
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Program Self-Study Report
            modules sponsored by each of the four engineering programs to allow students to choose one of
            two semester-long project sponsored, each of which is sponsored jointly by two of the
            engineering programs (Summer/99).

        Junior/Senior Clinic

        –   Junior and Senior Engineering Clinic (both I and II) was reduced in credits from 3 to 2 semester
            hours each (summer/98). The additional 4 credits recovered was distributed to two new courses:
            Microscale Systems (2 credits) and Machine Design (2 credits).

        –   Junior and Senior Clinics were combined to permit both horizontal (cross-disciplinary) and
            vertical (inclusion of juniors and seniors) integration on Clinic projects (05/99).

        –   Junior/Senior Clinic II was petitioned to and designated by the University as a Writing Intensive
            course, and the project deliverables were modified to reflect this requirement (05/99).




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        Attachment 3.B – Summary of ME Assessment Meeting for Spring ‟99 semester

        June 3, 1999

        In attendance: TR Chandrupatla, John Chen, Clay Gabler, Anthony Marchese
        The faculty in Mechanical Engineering met to discuss issues and policies concerning the program,
        and to assess the state of the program. An abridged summary of the significant discussion items,
        their proposed solution(s), and the follow-up activities are presented below.
        Advising
        The general advising policies of the College of Engineering was reviewed, and a draft ME Program
        advising policy was discussed. Several significant issues were discussed and resolved. They were:
        1. The need for a „progression web‟ for faculty and especially for students. This document would
           show all required technical courses and their prerequisite relationships to one another. For
           example, a student planning to take Thermodynamics I would see that Chemistry I and Physics I
           are both prerequisites, and that these courses have several mathematics courses as prerequisites
           as well.
        2. The adoption of an “Advising Feedback” form, which was previously developed and distributed
           for comment. This form will be used by students to provide anonymous feedback on their
           advising experience and advisor.
        3. The need for training new faculty (ME as well as other programs) on advising policies,
           University and curricular requirements, and resources. We will develop a seminar for our
           faculty in September, and will explore the possibility of including other programs‟ faculty.
        4. A system to ensure that graduating seniors meet all University and Program requirements for
           graduation. Beginning next September, the Program Chair will conduct this audit.
        Course – Learning Outcomes Matrix
        A ME Program course versus student-learning-outcomes matrix was presented and discussed. The
        faculty agreed that the matrix is a good method to represent the student learning outcomes to be
        achieved upon successful completion of our curriculum. One change implemented was to adopt a
        system of coding using “A” and “E”, rather than a simple check mark to denote the achievement of
        a particular outcome for a particular course. The “A” represents that the students‟ attainment of the
        outcome was “assessed”, while the “E” represents that the students received “exposure” to the
        outcome, but it is either not assessed or could not be assessed.
        Another issue discussed is the development of a second course–learning outcomes matrix to show
        the mapping of non-engineering courses into the ME Program‟s goals and outcomes. The courses to
        be included are the required General Education courses (art, literature, multicultural/global, social
        and behavioral sciences, and humanities), mathematics, physics, and chemistry. This task will be
        completed shortly.
        ME Program Goals, Objectives
        The ME Program goals, objectives, outcomes and practices (how and when are students provided
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        the opportunities to practice and achieve these outcomes) were drafted early in the spring semester
        and finalized by the faculty. What remains is for the faculty to detail the assessment methods and
        criteria for evaluating the extent of achievement of the program outcomes. We began this process in
        the meeting, and completed the assessment methods. We will complete the assessment criteria in
        our August meeting so that the methods may be implemented for the fall 1999 semester.
        Data from Spring ’99-semester Clinics
        Dr. Heidi Newell led a discussion of the data compiled from the three Clinic surveys, the Peer
        Assessment survey conducted in the Junior Clinic, and the Internship survey. All data were applied
        only to ME students.
        There were no obvious program-specific problems based on the data. Some minor issues were
        raised regarding the coordination of all three Clinics, and these concerns and suggestions were given
        to Heidi to bring to the Clinic Committees since they were not specific to ME.
        Finally, the ME faculty decided that the Junior-Senior Clinic will be a separate topic of discussion at
        our next retreat, to be held in August 1999, prior to the start of the new academic year. One item of
        discussion is the tracking of all ME Juniors and Seniors to ensure program balance and achievement
        of program outcomes. For example, it was the consensus that all ME students will work on at least
        one out-of-discipline project before graduating, and all ME students will work on a Clinic project
        dealing with a product, system, or process, in order to have opportunities for gaining entrepreneurial
        experience.
        Other Matters
        1. The ME faculty discussed and agreed that for our program, a nationally normed exam such as
           the Fundamentals of Engineering Exam, would be an excellent assessment tool for gauging our
           students‟ preparedness for work and for graduate studies. We will further develop this idea to
           include ways, means, and incentives to achieve a near 100% rate of participation by all ME
           graduating students.
        2. The ME faculty discussed and agreed that for each course that we teach in the future, we will
           prepare a document to describe the perceived weaknesses and strengths of that course offering,
           and method(s) to improve it. All issues regarding the course, including homeworks, exams,
           laboratories, student or faculty behavior, projects and course evaluations, will be considered.
           These documents will be collected in a separate program binder as evidence of continuous
           improvement.




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Program Self-Study Report
        Attachment 3.C – Summary of ME Assessment Marathon Activities for Fall ‟99 semester

        The ME faculty met on January 18, 2000, to discuss ABET-associated activities from the Fall ‟99
        semester and in preparation for the Spring ‟00 semester. Following is a summary of the discussion
        items and the follow-up actions.

        Advising

        1. Currently, all but two ME faculty have received SIS training for student advising purposes. The
           remaining two faculty members will be trained early in this semester.

        2. Faculty discussed the need for a system to ensure that all students visit their faculty advisor prior
           to registration for the following semester. This need arises from the observation that a
           significant number of advisees simply do not respond to the advisors‟ request (mainly by email
           or telephone) for a meeting prior to the registration period.

        3. The faculty were given a demonstration of the pre-/co-requisite web page that has been
           developed to assist with course advising. The web page can be found at:
           http://engineering.rowan.edu/~jchen/curriculum/curr_advising.html Alternatively, the page may
           be accessed through the engineering homepage by choosing “Advising”, and then “Major Core
           Courses”.

        4. The faculty discussed the difficulty that some freshmen advisees are having with two courses:
           Advanced College Chemistry and Computer Programming. The difficulty mainly arises from
           the students not having had any high-school chemistry or programming prior to Rowan. Two
           possible solutions were posed and will be discussed with the Associate Dean:

            a. For students with no prior chemistry courses, is it possible to have these students take
               Chemistry I and II (two one-semester long courses) in place of the one-semester Advanced
               College Chemistry? Alternatively, can these students be advised (or forced) to take a
               chemistry course in the summer prior to enrolling as a freshmen engineering student?

            b. For students with no prior programming experience, can these students be advised (or
               forced) to take a programming course in the summer prior to enrolling as a freshmen
               engineering student?

            An “Advising Feedback Form” has been developed to receive student feedback regarding their
            advising experience. This anonymous voluntary form will be made available to students, and
            students will return the form in a collection box in the ME office. The forms are meant to be
            purely informational (not for evaluation purposes) and will be seen only by the advisor.

        Collection of Materials for ABET Evaluator



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Program Self-Study Report
        1. ME faculty will collect 4 samples (1 good, 1 poor, 2 average) of homework, test, and project
           report (if applicable) from all ME-faculty taught courses. This effort began in earnest with the
           fall '99 semester and will continue through spring '00, although some materials were collected
           from fall '98 and spring '99 as well. These materials will be organized into folders to be stored
           in the ME kitchen area cabinets for now, and will be displayed for the evaluator during the visit.
            Faculty whose course required hardware construction are keeping these in a storage cabinet in
           Rowan 101. They will be displayed during the evaluator visit, along with the accompanying
           reports. This task will be completed by February 11, 2000.

        2. Chen is collecting sample portfolios from Freshmen Clinic I and II, and Marchese is collecting
           materials from Sophomore Clinic I and II. All faculty are being asked to save junior/senior
           clinic project deliverables, preferably in electronic form, which will be stored on a
           web-accessible location for the evaluator. The materials being collected from the junior/senior
           clinics include: preliminary design report and presentation, final design report and presentation,
           poster presentation, and project web page.

        3. In a related matter, the faculty agreed that the ME homepage that is currently linked to the
           College of Engineering homepage needs to be updated and to contain more information for
           prospective students. In addition, this page will serve as the main link for accessing electronic
           materials to be collected from Freshmen and Sophomore Clinic sections taught by ME faculty,
           as well as Junior/Senior Clinic projects originating in the ME department.

        Program Goals, Objectives, Outcomes & Assessment

        1. Faculty, especially new members, were briefed on the ABET accreditation process and the need
           for programs to establish goals, objectives, outcomes and assessment methods and criteria.

        2. No changes were made to the program goals and objectives from their last revision in May 1999.


        3. Changes were made to the assessment methods in that ME seniors‟ participation in and
           performance on the FE Exam (to be administered in April 2000) will be used as an additional
           assessment method.

        4. The assessment criteria were discussed at length and changes were made. These changes to the
           assessment methods and criteria are being incorporated into our Self-Study Packet.

        5. Faculty were assigned the task of completing ABET-format course syllabi for the courses they
           teach. This will be completed in view of the program objectives, as the ABET format
           specifically asks the relation between the course and program objectives. This task will be
           completed by the end of February 2000.

        Course/Instructional Reflection



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        1. ME faculty agreed that at the end of each semester, a course/instructional reflection will be
           composed by the responsible professor for each course taught. The reflection may be in prose or
           list format, and will reflect on the content, instructional methods, and changes/improvements.
           This will obviously be done in view of the course and program objectives the course is aiming to
           achieve. Also suggested is the inclusion of a table showing data from the end-of-semester
           course evaluations completed by the students.

        2. A template for this reflection will be developed and distributed to all ME faculty.

        Clinic Improvements

        The ME faculty considered the Clinic sequence separately and suggested improvements.

        1. The ME module of Freshmen Clinic I should be moved from Camden County College (CCC) to
           Rowan. The manufacturing facilities at Rowan currently are as well equipped as CCC, and the
           savings in travel time will allow for more instructional content. There is a concomitant travel
           cost saving as well.

        2. Sophomore Clinic I and II will include a “software development” component. This arises from
           faculty concerns that there is a significant time lag between the students‟ learning programming
           and their application in other courses, which usually does not occur until their Junior year.

        3. All ME-sponsored Junior/Senior Clinic projects will require a “Societal Impact” statement to be
           written. This essay will consider the societal and global impact of the project, including safety,
           environmental and economic issues. This activity is an integral part of our assessment methods
           and criteria for the associated program outcome.

        Data from Fall ’99 Assessment Activities

        The data collected from Fall ‟99 (clinic surveys, peer assessments, internship surveys) were not
        compiled in time for this meeting. It will be summarized and distributed to ME faculty shortly, and
        a future department meeting will be held to discuss it and to develop action items for improvement.




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Program Self-Study Report
        Attachment 3.D – Summary of ME Assessment Marathon Activities for Spring ‟00 semester

        The ME faculty met on May 15, 2000, to discuss ABET-associated activities from the Spring „00
        semester and in preparation for the Fall ‟00 semester. Following is a summary of the discussion
        items and the follow-up actions.

        New ME homepage

        1. Paris von Lockette, John Chen and one ME student, Nick Jankowski, have revamped the ME
           homepage to better deliver information to the department and the public. The new homepage
           also serves as a “clearinghouse” for archiving information regarding the Engineering Clinics
           (Freshman, Sophomore and Junior/Senior), including course description, course content and
           materials for the ME ABET evaluator in the upcoming Fall-semester visit. The new site has
           been linked to and can be accessed from the College of Engineering homepage.

        Summary of Industrial Affiliates meeting

        1. ME faculty were briefed on the results of the Industrial Affiliates meeting held on May 3, 2000
           (see Summary of Industrial Affiliates meeting). In response to the weaknesses identified by our
           industrial affiliates, the following action items (see next page) were agreed upon by the group to
           be implemented beginning in Fall ‟00.




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Program Self-Study Report
         Identified weakness       Actions to correct weakness                           Persons involved

         Awareness of safety       Safety will be emphasized more in Freshman            Chen (Freshman Clinic),
         issues                    Clinic I and in all Junior/Senior Clinic projects.    all faculty (Junior/Senior
                                    Also, Industrial Affiliates will be asked to         Clinic)
                                   emphasize safety issues and training for their
                                   interns.
         Drafting, tolerancing     Freshman Clinic I will place more emphasis on         Chen (Freshman Clinic),
         skills                    drafting and tolerancing. This was already            Chandrupatla (Quality &
                                   proposed as a result of last semester‟s               Reliability in Design &
                                   assessment meeting. Two other upper-level             Manufacturing), Constans
                                   ME courses will further reinforce these               (Machine Design)
                                   concepts and provide practice to the students.
         Attention to details of   Emphasize neatness, completeness and clarity          All faculty (all courses)
         job                       of solutions in all courses. This will provide
                                   practice and reinforce importance to students.

         Unrealistic expectation   ME faculty believe this may be an industry            All faculty (all courses)
         of technology and/or      and/or company dependent problem. We have
         tools in workplace        no solution for this except to discuss with
                                   students the possibility that it may occur at their
                                   work place.

         Professionalism (use of   Chen will discuss with Melanie Basantis               Chen, Melanie Basantis
         sick leave, long lunch    (Internship Coordinator) the implementation of        (Intern coordinator)
         break)                    a document of “professionalism” for summer
                                   interns who obtained jobs through the College
                                   of Engineering.


        Collection of Materials for ABET Evaluator

        1. ME faculty were reminded to collect 4 samples (1 good, 1 poor, 2 average) of homework, test,
           and project report (if applicable) from all ME-faculty taught courses from the Spring ‟00
           semester. This task will be completed by May 31, 2000.
        2. Chen collected sample portfolios from Freshmen Clinic II, and Marchese is collecting materials
           from Sophomore Clinic II. All faculty are being asked to save junior/senior clinic project
           deliverables in electronic format on the project‟s web page, which will be stored on a
           web-accessible location for the ABET evaluator. All project web sites are linked from the new
           ME homepage. The materials being collected from the junior/senior clinics include: preliminary
           design report and presentation, final design report and presentation, and project web page.

        Course/Instructional Reflection




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Program Self-Study Report
        1. ME faculty were reminded to complete a course/instructional reflection for each course taught
           during the Spring ‟00 semester. The reflection will be included in the folder of course materials
           for that course.
        2. A template for this reflection was distributed to all ME faculty

        ABET self-study report status

        1. ME faculty were informed that the self-study report is progressing satisfactorily. First drafts of
           all sections of the report are complete except for Criterion 3: Program Outcomes and
           Assessment. This section still needs the assessment data from the Spring ‟00 semester, as well
           as the overall outcomes assessment data for the graduating class (e.g., FE exam participation
           rate, graduate school attendance rate, etc.). The self-study report is expected to be completed by
           June 1, with one final revision prior to submission to ABET in mid-June.

        Clinic Improvements

        The ME faculty considered the Clinic sequence separately and suggested improvements.
        1. The ME module of Freshmen Clinic I will be moved from Camden County College to Rowan in
           the Fall ‟00 semester. The savings in time will be used to include drafting and tolerancing skills
           development. Freshman Clinic II proceeded well this semester. Chen will discuss with the
           entire Freshman Clinic faculty the possibility of including “Advising sessions” within formal
           Freshman Clinic meeting times.
        2. Sophomore Clinic II proceeded well this semester. Sophomore Clinic I will include a significant
           programming project in the Fall ‟00 semester.
        3. The uniformity and completeness of Junior/Senior Clinic project web pages was discussed. It
           was agreed that in the future, all project web pages will contain, as a minimum, the following:
           – Introductory page describing project goals and expected outcomes;
           – Societal Impact statement
           – Preliminary Design Report
           – Preliminary Design Review presentation
           – Final Design presentation
           – Final Design Report
            ME faculty agreed that, in order to ensure a broad and diverse experience in Junior/Senior
            Clinic, all students should be tracked via a “tracking sheet”. This is especially important given
            that for ME students, Junior/Senior Clinic represents a major design experience. The tracking
            sheet will be developed shortly and will be implemented in Fall ‟00 semester with retroactive
            tracking beginning with the „99-‟00 academic year.




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Program Self-Study Report
        Attachment 3.E – Summary of Mechanical Engineering Industrial Affiliates Meeting

        Introduction

        Over 20 industry personnel were invited to participate in the department‟s Industrial Affiliates
        “focus group study” on May 3, 2000, at Rowan Hall, Rowan University. The affiliates invited were
        immediate supervisors of Mechanical Engineering students during the summer of 1999, and thus
        had a first-hand familiarity with the students‟ abilities and work preparedness. The following list
        shows those who committed to attending the focus group study. In all, 12 persons attended the
        meeting, and a wide spectrum of organization – including small and large, manufacturing and
        consulting, private and government – were represented.

                         Name                                 Company/Agency
            Harold Bernard                   Kimble Glass
            Neil Sachetti*                   Kimble Glass
            Andy Simkins                     Mannington Mills
            John Ververelli*                 Dimitri J. Ververelli, Inc.
            Mike Hagner*                     Otis Elevator Co.
            Lou Madonia                      Electric Mobility
            Chuck Wolfe                      Sony Music
            Dave Bewick                      Sony Music
            Rick Theriault                   Pactiv (formerly Tenneco Packaging)
            Mike Porcelli                    FP Developments
            Fred Pfleger                     FP Developments
            Steve Schwaber                   Naval Air Warfare Center - Lakehurst
            Mike Buppert                     Naval Air Warfare Center - Lakehurst
            Bill Arseneau*                   Naval Surface Warfare Center - Philadelphia
            Alan Karpovitch                  Naval Surface Warfare Center - Philadelphia
            John Ruth                        Boeing
            John Bondi*                      Boeing
        *
            Did not attend due to last-minute commitment




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Program Self-Study Report
        Purpose

        The purposes of the meeting are three-fold:

        1. To transmit to the affiliates, whom we define as one of our program‟s constituencies, the
           Mechanical Engineering program goals and objectives;

        2. To conduct a focus group study with this group (explained in detail below); and

        3. To describe for the attendees the various ways in which they can and should be involved with
           our program.

        Summary

        The meeting began with dinner provided for the attendees and the ME faculty. After dinner, all
        faculty departed from the meeting except for John Chen, who facilitated the meeting with the
        affiliates. The exclusion of most faculty members is to provide an environment in which the
        affiliates may speak in an open and frank manner about their experiences with Rowan ME students.

        A brief presentation was made to the affiliates describing the program goals and objectives, the ME
        curriculum, and the status of the program, including preparations for ABET accreditation, the
        employment outlook of the first graduating class, and the Junior/Senior Clinic projects. The main
        purpose of the meeting, the focus group study, was then described for the group. The affiliates were
        asked to form themselves into groups of three, with no group having any persons from the same
        organization in order to ensure heterogeneity. Each group was assigned the same task, which was:
        List one good trait of the Rowan ME student that you supervised, and also describe one aspect about
        him or her that needs improvement.

        Each group completed this focused task by generating one list each of good and bad traits, and then
        discussing each list until a consensus was reached as to the most significant positive trait, and the
        most significant poor aspect of our students. The entire group was then brought back together to
        compile a master list of positive and negative traits and to discuss the findings in detail. The
        following table lists the final results.




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Program Self-Study Report
                            Positive trait               Aspect needing improvement
                   Self-motivating                     Awareness of safety issues in the
                                                         work place
                   Focused for work; ready to take       Unrealistic in expectation of
                    on a project                           technology and/or engineering
                                                           tools available in industry
                   Productive                            Drafting skills, familiarity with
                                                           tolerancing and standards
                   Bright, enthusiastic team player      Attention to details
                   Work ethic                            Professionalism (use of sick
                                                           leave, long lunch break)

        These findings will be shared with the ME faculty during the upcoming (May 15, 2000) Assessment
        Marathon meeting, and solutions and processes for correction will then be generated and
        implemented. A follow-up letter summarizing the changes implemented in the program was sent to
        the industry representatives.




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