Julius Caesar Julius Caesar By William Shakespeare Tragedy – 1st element by MikeJenny

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									Julius Caesar
  By William Shakespeare
       Tragedy – 1st element
• Tragic Hero – great man of status, starts
  with everything, ends with nothing
       Tragedy – 2nd element
• Tragic Flaw –
  obsession with
  power, greed, pride,
  etc.
• Caesar’s tragic flaw:
  ________________
       Tragedy – 3rd element
• Tragic Story - death of tragic hero
      Tragedy – 4th element
• Elements of supernatural, fate/fortune
                Conflict
…the struggle between opposing forces

• Internal conflict examples:



• External conflict examples:
                Blank Verse
• Writing with regular meter (rhythm) but no
  rhyme
  – Hence! home, you idle creatures get you home:
    Is this a holiday? what! know you not,
    Being mechanical, you ought not walk
    Upon a laboring day without the sign
    Of your profession? Speak, what trade art thou?


• Characters who speak in blank verse:
                    Prose
• Writing that follows regular speech
  patterns with no specific rhythm or
  structure
  – Truly, sir, in respect of a fine workman, I am
    but, as you would say, a cobbler.


• Characters who speak in prose:
         Iambic Pentameter
• Iamb = foot                  Pent = 5



• Ten syllable line with five “feet”
• One “foot” or “iamb” = (Stressed syllable +
  unstressed syllable)
        Iambic Pentameter
• Wherefore rejoice? What conquest brings
  he home?
                Soliloquy
• Long speech by a character who is
  typically alone
• Example: Act III, Scene 1, lines 254-275
  (pg 829)
                  Aside
• Comment made by a character to
  audience or another character, typically
  not heard by others on stage
• Example: Act II, Scene 2, lines 124-end
  (pg. 815)
           Dramatic Irony
• Readers know something characters do
  not
• Example: Caesar’s death – we know it but
  he doesn’t
          Situational Irony
• Difference between what is expected and
  what actually happens; oddness or
  unfairness of a situation
• Example: Antony trying to figure out how
  to reduce Caesar’s generous will
              Verbal Irony
• Difference between what is said and what
  is meant
  – Antony: “I come to bury Caesar, not to honor
    him.”
  – Antony: “Brutus is an honorable man”
                   Climax
• Most exciting, emotional high point
• Point at which conflict begins to resolve

  – What is the major conflict in the play?
                   Climax
• Most exciting, emotional high point
• Point at which conflict begins to resolve

  – What is the major conflict in the play?


• Be able to argue why one or both is climax
  – Caesar’s assassination
  – Death of Brutus and Cassius
            Foreshadowing
• Clues an author gives us for things that
  will happen later in the story
• Examples:
               Resolution
• How the conflict is resolved
• Whose death is most noble?
  – Caesar?
  – Cassius?
  – Brutus?
              Protagonist
• Central character
• Action revolves around him/her
• Undergoes main conflict

• Who is the protagonist?
              Antagonist
• Character that opposes the protagonist

• Who is the antagonist?
                  Theme
• Lesson from story we can (realistically)
  apply to life
• Themes are more than just one word
  – justice is a topic
  – justice always prevails is a theme
• Possible themes?

								
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