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digital storytelling in organizations

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					                                                                                                                 Dush/wrd530-­‐nms509/WQ11	
  



digital	
  storytelling	
  in	
  organizations	
  
	
  
instructor:	
  Lisa	
  Dush	
  
email:	
  ldush@depaul.edu	
  
office	
  hours:	
  T	
  4-­‐5:30	
  and	
  R	
  2:30-­‐4	
  
office	
  location:	
  McGaw	
  219	
  
course	
  time/place:	
  T	
  6-­‐9:15,	
  McGaw	
  143	
  
course	
  web	
  site:	
  http://lisadush.com/depaul/courses/wrd530/wq11/	
  
	
  
course	
  overview	
  &	
  goals	
  
In	
  this	
  class,	
  you	
  will	
  learn	
  how	
  to	
  produce	
  digital	
  stories,	
  short	
  videos	
  that	
  feature	
  a	
  story-­‐driven	
  
autobiographical	
  voiceover	
  and	
  personal	
  photographs.	
  In	
  recent	
  years,	
  many	
  organizations	
  
worldwide	
  have	
  used	
  the	
  digital	
  storytelling	
  method	
  to	
  create	
  powerful	
  stories	
  for	
  outreach,	
  
advocacy,	
  fundraising,	
  and	
  training.	
  	
  
	
  
We	
  will	
  learn	
  the	
  digital	
  storytelling	
  process—including	
  relevant	
  writing,	
  audio	
  recording,	
  and	
  audio	
  
and	
  video	
  editing	
  techniques—by	
  creating	
  our	
  own	
  digital	
  stories.	
  Concurrently,	
  we	
  will	
  examine	
  
some	
  of	
  the	
  key	
  practical	
  and	
  theoretical	
  issues	
  related	
  to	
  digital	
  storytelling,	
  including	
  how	
  stories	
  
constitute	
  personal	
  identity,	
  the	
  challenges	
  of	
  teaching	
  technology	
  to	
  diverse	
  populations,	
  and	
  the	
  
ethical	
  implications	
  of	
  using	
  personal	
  stories	
  for	
  organizational	
  purposes.	
  We	
  will	
  also	
  survey	
  some	
  
other	
  forms	
  of	
  organizational	
  new	
  media	
  storytelling,	
  such	
  as	
  blogs	
  and	
  advocacy	
  videos.	
  
	
  
WRD	
  530/NMS	
  509	
  will	
  also	
  give	
  you	
  the	
  opportunity	
  to	
  learn	
  firsthand	
  about	
  the	
  potential	
  of	
  digital	
  
storytelling	
  in	
  organizations	
  through	
  its	
  service	
  component,	
  which	
  will	
  have	
  us	
  working	
  with	
  five	
  
Chicago-­‐area	
  nonprofits	
  throughout	
  the	
  term.	
  We	
  will	
  work	
  in	
  small	
  teams	
  with	
  these	
  community	
  
partners	
  early	
  in	
  the	
  term,	
  to	
  help	
  clarify	
  the	
  potential	
  role	
  of	
  digital	
  storytelling	
  in	
  each	
  organization.	
  
Later	
  in	
  the	
  term,	
  we	
  will	
  deploy	
  an	
  on-­‐campus	
  training	
  workshop,	
  in	
  which	
  you	
  and	
  your	
  classmates	
  
will	
  teach	
  the	
  digital	
  storytelling	
  process	
  to	
  representatives	
  from	
  these	
  nonprofits.	
  	
  
	
  
              After	
  successfully	
  completing	
  this	
  course,	
  you	
  should	
  be	
  able	
  to	
  do	
  the	
  following:	
  
              	
  
              • Conceive	
  of	
  production	
  plans	
  for	
  new	
  media	
  stories	
  that	
  are	
  produced	
  using	
  a	
  range	
  of	
  
                   tools,	
  which	
  may	
  include	
  hardware	
  to	
  capture	
  digital	
  audio	
  and	
  visuals,	
  and	
  editing	
  
                   software	
  such	
  as	
  Photoshop,	
  Audacity,	
  and	
  Final	
  Cut	
  Express.	
  
              • Describe	
  the	
  features	
  of	
  a	
  variety	
  of	
  new	
  media	
  storytelling	
  genres	
  and	
  determine	
  which	
  
                   genres	
  might	
  be	
  useful	
  for	
  a	
  particular	
  kind	
  of	
  organizational	
  work.	
  
              • Explain	
  the	
  nature	
  of	
  work	
  in	
  nonprofit	
  and	
  public	
  service	
  organizations	
  and	
  identify	
  
                   professional	
  opportunities	
  in	
  these	
  fields.	
  
              • Act	
  professionally	
  and	
  ethically	
  as	
  a	
  communications	
  or	
  new	
  media	
  consultant	
  to	
  an	
  
                   organization.	
  
	
  


                                                                              1	
  
                                                                                                                         Dush/wrd530-­‐nms509/WQ11	
  


service	
  learning	
  	
  
Service	
  learning,	
  or	
  coursework	
  that	
  benefits	
  both	
  the	
  students	
  and	
  the	
  community,	
  is	
  an	
  important	
  
component	
  of	
  WRD	
  530/NMS	
  509.	
  You	
  will	
  need	
  to	
  make	
  at	
  least	
  one	
  visit	
  to	
  the	
  site	
  of	
  one	
  of	
  our	
  
community	
  partners	
  early	
  in	
  the	
  course,	
  and	
  we	
  will	
  devote	
  three	
  class	
  days	
  and	
  the	
  final	
  exam	
  class	
  
period	
  to	
  applying	
  the	
  skills	
  we	
  have	
  learned	
  in	
  an	
  on-­‐campus	
  digital	
  storytelling	
  training	
  workshop	
  
with	
  these	
  community	
  partners.	
  This	
  workshop	
  will	
  give	
  you	
  the	
  chance	
  to	
  gain	
  valuable	
  training	
  
experience	
  and	
  to	
  make	
  contacts	
  in	
  the	
  nonprofit	
  community.	
  The	
  workshop	
  will	
  give	
  the	
  trainees	
  an	
  
opportunity	
  to	
  learn	
  digital	
  storytelling	
  and	
  to	
  produce	
  stories	
  that	
  they	
  can	
  use	
  in	
  their	
  
organizations’	
  outreach,	
  advocacy,	
  fundraising,	
  and/or	
  training	
  efforts.	
  	
  
	
  
After	
  WRD	
  530/NMS	
  509	
  is	
  complete,	
  there	
  will	
  be	
  an	
  opportunity	
  for	
  interested	
  students	
  to	
  
continue	
  working	
  with	
  these	
  nonprofits	
  as	
  paid	
  follow-­‐up	
  consultants.	
  
            	
  
course	
  materials	
  
book	
  
           Lambert,	
  J.	
  (2010).	
  Digital	
  storytelling	
  cookbook.	
  Digital	
  Diner	
  Press.	
  Order	
  PDF	
  copy	
  online:	
  
                http://www.storycenter.org/cookbook.html	
  
	
  
articles	
  and	
  chapters	
  	
  
All	
  available	
  from	
  our	
  course	
  web	
  site.	
  For	
  access	
  via	
  the	
  library	
  e-­‐reserves	
  use	
  username	
  and	
  
password	
  distributed	
  in	
  class.	
  
           Aufderheide,	
  P.,	
  Jaszi,	
  P.,	
  &	
  Mridu,	
  C.	
  (2010).	
  Honest	
  truths:	
  Documentary	
  filmmakers	
  on	
  
                    ethical	
  challenges	
  in	
  their	
  work.	
  Retrieved	
  from	
  American	
  University	
  School	
  of	
  
                    Communication	
  Center	
  for	
  Social	
  Media	
  website:	
  
                    http://www.centerforsocialmedia.org/making-­‐your-­‐media-­‐matter/documents/best-­‐
                    practices/honest-­‐truths-­‐documentary-­‐filmmakers-­‐ethical-­‐chall	
  
           Boje,	
  D.	
  (2001).	
  Introduction.	
  In	
  Narrative	
  methods	
  for	
  organizational	
  &	
  communication	
  
                    research	
  (1st	
  ed.).	
  London:	
  Sage	
  Publications	
  Ltd.	
  
           Cizek,	
  K.	
  Storytelling	
  for	
  advocacy:	
  Conceptualization	
  and	
  pre-­‐production.	
  In	
  Video	
  for	
  change:	
  
                    A	
  guide	
  for	
  advocacy	
  and	
  activism	
  (pp.	
  74-­‐118),	
  Eds.	
  S.	
  Gregory	
  et	
  al.	
  London:	
  Pluto	
  
                    Press.	
  Retrieved	
  from	
  Witness	
  website:	
  www.witness.org	
  
           Couser,	
  G.	
  T.	
  (2003).	
  Auto/biographical,	
  biomedical,	
  and	
  ethnographic	
  ethics.	
  In	
  Vulnerable	
  
                    subjects:	
  Ethics	
  and	
  life	
  writing	
  (pp.	
  14-­‐33).	
  Ithaca,	
  NY:	
  Cornell	
  University	
  Press.	
  	
  
           Kenyon,	
  G.	
  M.	
  (1997).	
  Introduction.	
  In	
  Restorying	
  our	
  lives:	
  personal	
  growth	
  through	
  
                    autobiographical	
  reflection	
  (pp.	
  1-­‐13).	
  Westport,	
  CT:	
  Praeger.	
  
           Meadows,	
  D.	
  &	
  Kidd,	
  J.	
  (2009).	
  ‘Capture	
  Wales’:	
  The	
  BBC	
  digital	
  storytelling	
  project.	
  In	
  Story	
  
                    circle:	
  Digital	
  storytelling	
  around	
  the	
  world	
  (pp.	
  91-­‐117),	
  Eds.	
  J.	
  Hartley	
  &	
  K.	
  McWilliam.	
  
                    West	
  Sussex,	
  UK:	
  Wiley-­‐Blackwell.	
  
	
  
equipment	
  &	
  online	
  accounts	
  
You	
  should	
  plan	
  to	
  bring	
  a	
  pair	
  of	
  headphones	
  to	
  every	
  class	
  meeting,	
  including	
  the	
  first	
  class.	
  Also,	
  
bring	
  a	
  flash	
  drive	
  to	
  back	
  up	
  your	
  work.	
  This	
  drive	
  should	
  be	
  at	
  least	
  1G,	
  and	
  bigger	
  if	
  you	
  plan	
  to	
  



                                                                                    2	
  
                                                                                                                         Dush/wrd530-­‐nms509/WQ11	
  


work	
  with	
  video.	
  If	
  you	
  wish	
  to	
  make	
  your	
  life	
  easier	
  during	
  the	
  duration	
  of	
  this	
  class	
  and	
  if	
  you	
  have	
  
any	
  intention	
  of	
  continuing	
  to	
  work	
  with	
  video	
  after	
  the	
  class,	
  I	
  would	
  recommend	
  purchasing	
  a	
  
portable	
  firewire	
  drive.	
  This	
  one	
  is	
  an	
  excellent	
  choice.	
  
	
  
You	
  will	
  also	
  need	
  access	
  to	
  photographs	
  to	
  complete	
  your	
  digital	
  story,	
  either	
  prints	
  that	
  you’ll	
  scan	
  
or	
  digital	
  photos	
  you	
  have	
  taken	
  or	
  will	
  take	
  (it	
  will	
  be	
  helpful	
  if	
  you	
  have	
  access	
  to	
  a	
  digital	
  camera).	
  
The	
  department	
  has	
  a	
  scanner	
  and	
  a	
  variety	
  of	
  equipment	
  that	
  you	
  may	
  check	
  out	
  to	
  work	
  on	
  your	
  
project,	
  including	
  Flip	
  video	
  cameras,	
  a	
  digital	
  camera,	
  and	
  audio	
  recorders.	
  
	
  
course	
  policies	
  
attendance	
  
Attendance	
  is	
  mandatory.	
  	
  Absences	
  equal	
  to	
  20	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
  class	
  (2	
  classes)	
  will	
  result	
  in	
  
reduction	
  of	
  your	
  term	
  grade	
  by	
  one	
  full	
  letter	
  grade.	
  	
  For	
  example,	
  an	
  A-­‐	
  would	
  become	
  a	
  B-­‐.	
  	
  
Missing	
  more	
  than	
  20	
  percent	
  will	
  result	
  in	
  failure.	
  	
  
               	
  
academic	
  integrity	
  
DePaul’s	
  Academic	
  Integrity	
  Policy	
  defines	
  your	
  responsibilities	
  as	
  a	
  student.	
  Of	
  particular	
  concern	
  to	
  
any	
  NMS	
  course	
  are	
  issues	
  of	
  copyright	
  —	
  we	
  will	
  discuss	
  appropriate	
  use	
  of	
  protected	
  material.	
  
However,	
  documented	
  cases	
  of	
  intentional	
  plagiarism	
  —	
  the	
  overt	
  misrepresentation	
  of	
  another’s	
  
work	
  as	
  your	
  own	
  —	
  will	
  be	
  grounds	
  for	
  failure	
  of	
  the	
  course.	
  	
  
                 	
  
learning	
  disabilities	
  
Students	
  with	
  a	
  documented	
  learning	
  disability	
  should	
  notify	
  me	
  so	
  I	
  may	
  make	
  accommodations.	
  
               	
  
completing	
  the	
  course	
  
This	
  course	
  is	
  structured	
  to	
  enable	
  successful	
  completion	
  of	
  assignments	
  in	
  the	
  time	
  allotted.	
  I	
  will	
  
not	
  consider	
  issuing	
  an	
  “Incomplete”	
  for	
  this	
  class	
  except	
  in	
  the	
  most	
  extreme	
  circumstances.	
  
	
  




                                                                                    3	
  
                                                                                                            Dush/wrd530-­‐nms509/WQ11	
  


	
  
wrd	
  530	
  /	
  nms	
  509	
  |	
  assignments	
  &	
  grading	
  
30%	
           your	
  digital	
  story	
  
                community	
  partner	
  packet	
  that	
  includes:	
  1)	
  evaluation	
  of	
  your	
  community	
  partner’s	
  
                communication	
  genres	
  and	
  the	
  possible	
  role	
  of	
  story	
  in	
  the	
  organization,	
  2)	
  analysis	
  of	
  
30%	
  
                the	
  nonprofit	
  sector	
  and	
  relevant	
  opportunities	
  in	
  this	
  sector,	
  3)	
  team	
  project	
  plan,	
  
                and	
  4)	
  feedback	
  on	
  community	
  partner	
  story	
  draft.	
  	
  	
  
                final	
  project	
  from	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  following	
  two	
  topic	
  choices	
  or	
  another	
  written	
  or	
  
                multimedia	
  project	
  of	
  your	
  design:	
  1)	
  a	
  paper	
  or	
  web	
  text	
  discussing	
  key	
  aesthetic,	
  
                ethical,	
  and/or	
  technical	
  issues	
  associated	
  with	
  digital	
  storytelling	
  in	
  organizations,	
  
30%	
           including	
  analysis	
  of	
  stories	
  produced	
  by	
  community	
  partners	
  through	
  lens	
  of	
  course	
  
                readings,	
  or	
  2)	
  a	
  paper	
  or	
  web	
  text	
  discussing	
  promising	
  organizational	
  storytelling	
  
                methods,	
  including	
  presentation	
  and	
  analysis	
  of	
  samples	
  and	
  discussion	
  of	
  feasibility	
  
                based	
  on	
  your	
  experience	
  with	
  community	
  partners	
  and	
  course	
  readings.	
  
10%	
           participation;	
  in-­‐class	
  exercises	
  
	
  
All	
  assignments	
  will	
  be	
  graded	
  on	
  an	
  A-­‐F	
  scale.	
  
	
  




                                                                                4	
  
                                                                                                              Dush/wrd530-­‐nms509/WQ11	
  


	
  
class	
  schedule	
  
	
  
week	
  01:	
  introduction	
  to	
  digital	
  storytelling	
  
       class,	
  1/4	
  
       •      introduction	
  to	
  digital	
  storytelling	
  and	
  overview	
  of	
  Stories	
  at	
  Work	
  
       •      introduction	
  to	
  service	
  in	
  WRD	
  530/NMS	
  509	
  
       •      strategies	
  for	
  generating	
  stories	
  
       •      introduction	
  to	
  nonlinear	
  editing;	
  exercise	
  
       	
  
       homework,	
  for	
  1/11	
  
       • read	
  Lambert,	
  ch.	
  1-­‐4;	
  read	
  Kenyon,	
  ch.	
  1	
  (see	
  the	
  accompanying	
  reading	
  questions	
  on	
  our	
  
          course	
  web	
  site)	
  
       • draft	
  your	
  written	
  story;	
  bring	
  hard	
  copy	
  and	
  e-­‐copy	
  to	
  class	
  on	
  1/11	
  
       • read	
  the	
  applications	
  (on	
  D2L)	
  and	
  visit	
  the	
  websites	
  of	
  community	
  partners	
  
       • explore	
  digital	
  story	
  links	
  on	
  Resources	
  >	
  Storytelling	
  page	
  of	
  course	
  site	
  
	
  
	
  
week	
  02:	
  shaping	
  stories	
  
       class,	
  1/11	
  
       • discuss	
  methods	
  of	
  giving	
  feedback	
  
       • discuss	
  readings	
  
       • story	
  circles	
  
       • in-­‐class	
  writing	
  about	
  community	
  partners	
  
       • storyboarding	
  
       	
  
       homework,	
  for	
  1/18	
  
       • finalize	
  your	
  written	
  story;	
  bring	
  hard	
  copy	
  to	
  class	
  on	
  1/25	
  
       • collect	
  photographs	
  and	
  bring	
  to	
  class	
  on	
  1/18	
  
       • read	
  Lambert,	
  ch.	
  5;	
  read	
  Meadows	
  &	
  Kidd	
  (see	
  the	
  accompanying	
  reading	
  questions	
  on	
  our	
  
          course	
  web	
  site)	
  
	
  
	
  
week	
  03:	
  audio	
  recording	
  and	
  editing/image	
  prep	
  
       class,	
  1/18	
  
       •      introduction	
  to	
  audio	
  recording	
  and	
  editing;	
  practice	
  exercises	
  
       •      record	
  story	
  scripts	
  
       •      discuss	
  readings	
  
       	
  
       homework,	
  for	
  1/25	
  
       • read	
  Lambert,	
  ch.	
  6-­‐7	
  
       • choose	
  or	
  create	
  your	
  story	
  music	
  
       • complete	
  draft	
  of	
  task	
  #2	
  for	
  Community	
  Partner	
  Packet,	
  upload	
  to	
  D2L	
  prior	
  to	
  start	
  of	
  class	
  
          on	
  1/25	
  
       • record	
  and	
  edit	
  story	
  audio	
  before	
  1/25,	
  if	
  not	
  completed	
  in	
  class	
  on	
  1/18	
  	
  


                                                                            5	
  
                                                                                                                 Dush/wrd530-­‐nms509/WQ11	
  


week	
  04:	
  video	
  editing	
  
       class,	
  1/25	
  
       • introduction	
  to	
  image	
  and	
  video	
  editing;	
  exercises	
  
       • watch	
  FCE	
  training	
  videos	
  
       • discuss	
  community	
  partner	
  story	
  drafts	
  
       • draft	
  group	
  project	
  plan	
  
       	
  
       homework,	
  for	
  2/1	
  
       • visit	
  community	
  partner	
  
       • watch	
  FCE	
  training	
  videos	
  
	
  
	
  
week	
  05:	
  video	
  editing,	
  pt.	
  2	
  
       class,	
  2/1	
  
       • complete	
  your	
  story	
  
       • complete	
  feedback	
  on	
  community	
  partner	
  drafts	
  and	
  email	
  this	
  feedback	
  
       	
  
       homework,	
  for	
  2/8	
  
       • complete	
  your	
  story	
  for	
  presentation	
  in	
  class	
  on	
  2/8	
  –	
  lab	
  is	
  open	
  every	
  day	
  from	
  4:30-­‐6	
  
	
  
	
  
week	
  06:	
  presenting	
  complete	
  stories	
  
       class,	
  2/8	
  
       • showing	
  our	
  stories	
  –	
  community	
  partners	
  attend	
  
       • story	
  circle	
  with	
  community	
  partners	
  
	
  
       homework,	
  for	
  2/15	
  
       • read	
  Cizek;	
  review	
  other	
  organizational	
  storytelling	
  projects	
  on	
  our	
  course	
  web	
  site	
  
	
  
	
  
week	
  07:	
  beyond	
  digital	
  storytelling	
  –	
  other	
  forms	
  of	
  organizational	
  storytelling	
  
       class,	
  2/15	
  
       • discuss	
  other	
  forms	
  of	
  organizational	
  storytelling	
  
       • discuss	
  final	
  project	
  
       • plan	
  train-­‐the-­‐trainer	
  
       	
  
       homework,	
  for	
  2/22	
  
       • work	
  with	
  community	
  partners	
  to	
  finalize	
  story	
  scripts	
  
       • community	
  partner	
  packet	
  due	
  by	
  start	
  of	
  class	
  on	
  2/22	
  
       • read	
  Aufderheide	
  &	
  Jaszi;	
  read	
  Boje	
  
	
  
	
  




                                                                              6	
  
                                                                                                    Dush/wrd530-­‐nms509/WQ11	
  


week	
  08:	
  ethics	
  of	
  personal	
  storytelling	
  
       class,	
  2/22	
  
       • discuss	
  readings	
  
       • final	
  project	
  work	
  time	
  	
  
       • train-­‐the-­‐trainer	
  planning	
  time	
  
       	
  
       homework,	
  for	
  3/1	
  
       • final	
  project	
  draft	
  due	
  on	
  3/1	
  
       • read	
  Couser	
  
	
  
	
  
week	
  09:	
  teaching	
  digital	
  storytelling	
  to	
  others	
  
       class,	
  3/1	
  
       • in-­‐class	
  train-­‐the-­‐trainer	
  workshop	
  
       • final	
  project	
  Q	
  &	
  A	
  
       	
  
       homework,	
  for	
  3/8	
  
       • work	
  on	
  final	
  project	
  
	
  
	
  
week	
  10:	
  teaching	
  digital	
  storytelling	
  to	
  others;	
  the	
  uses	
  of	
  stories	
  
       class,	
  3/8	
  
       • in-­‐class	
  train-­‐the-­‐trainer	
  workshop	
  
       • final	
  project	
  Q	
  &	
  A	
  
	
  
       homework,	
  for	
  3/15	
  
       • in-­‐class	
  train-­‐the-­‐trainer	
  workshop/showing-­‐celebration	
  during	
  normal	
  class	
  meeting	
  time	
  on	
  
          3/15	
  
       • final	
  projects	
  due	
  3/15	
  




                                                                     7	
  

				
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