; TROOP 1699
Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out
Your Federal Quarterly Tax Payments are due April 15th Get Help Now >>

TROOP 1699

VIEWS: 27 PAGES: 51

  • pg 1
									                  Houston, Texas
   Polaris District, Sam Houston Area Council,
          Boy Scouts of America


A Guide for the New Scout and His
             Parents




               “ On my honor…”
                              A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                   Page 2 of 51                 15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                               Revision 1.1
                                        A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents


                                                      Table of Contents
Welcome New Scout ......................................................................................................................5
INTRODUCTION ..........................................................................................................................7
  Aims of Scouting ........................................................................................................................7
    Character ............................................................................................................................... 7
    Citizenship ............................................................................................................................. 7
    Fitness .................................................................................................................................... 7
  Scouting Method ........................................................................................................................7
  Community Service ....................................................................................................................8
  Values .........................................................................................................................................8
JOINING THE TROOP .................................................................................................................9
  New Scout Registration ..............................................................................................................9
  New Scout ..................................................................................................................................9
  Transferred Boy Scout................................................................................................................9
Troop 1659 Organization .............................................................................................................10
  Patrols .......................................................................................................................................10
  Patrol Leaders Council .............................................................................................................10
  Scoutmaster and Assistant Scoutmasters .................................................................................11
  Troop Committee .....................................................................................................................12
  Chartering Organization ...........................................................................................................12
THE PROGRAM .........................................................................................................................12
  Troop Meetings ........................................................................................................................12
  Camp Outs ................................................................................................................................13
  Summer and Winter Camp .......................................................................................................13
  High Adventure Camps ............................................................................................................13
  Patrol Leader Council Meetings ...............................................................................................13
  Committee Meetings ................................................................................................................14
  Advancement ............................................................................................................................14
    Scout Rank Advancement ................................................................................................... 14
    Merit Badge Program .......................................................................................................... 14
    Merit Badge Counselors ...................................................................................................... 15
  Recognition ..............................................................................................................................15
    Order of the Arrow .............................................................................................................. 15
    Religious Award .................................................................................................................. 15
  Financial ...................................................................................................................................16
    Dues/Fees ............................................................................................................................ 16
    Expenses .............................................................................................................................. 16
    Fund Raising........................................................................................................................ 16
    Scout Accounts .................................................................................................................... 16
    Scout Scholarships .............................................................................................................. 16
  Training ....................................................................................................................................17
  Discipline Policy ......................................................................................................................17
HISTORY of BOY SCOUTS.......................................................................................................19
  History of Troop 1659 ..............................................................................................................20



Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                                 Page 3 of 51                                                  15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                                                              Revision 1.1
                                       A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents

Appendix 1 - Sources Of Additional Information ........................................................................22
  Troop 1659 Contact Info ..........................................................................................................22
  Web sites ..................................................................................................................................22
Appendix 2 - Uniform ..................................................................................................................23
  Field Uniform (Formally “Class A”)........................................................................................23
  Activity Uniform (Formally “Class B”) ...................................................................................23
  Where to Find Scout Equipment ..............................................................................................24
Appendix 3 – Official Boy Scout Uniform Insignia Placement ...................................................25
Appendix 4 - Camping Gear ........................................................................................................27
Appendix 5 – Medical Forms .......................................................................................................28
Appendix 6 – Discipline Policy Guidelines – Revised – 12/05 ...................................................29
  Consequences of Discipline Rules Violations..........................................................................30
  Discipline Policy Signature form .............................................................................................31
Appendix 7 – Parent Permission and Talent Release Forms ........................................................33
  PARENT/GUARDIAN PERMISSION SLIP ..........................................................................35
  Talent Release Form .................................................................................................................36
Appendix 9 – Abbreviation Explanations ....................................................................................37
Appendix 9 – Troop Calendar ......................................................................................................40

Troop 1659 Program Policies Supplement ...................................................................................41
  PARENTAL / GUARDIAN INVOLVEMENT.......................................................................44
  TROOP RESOURCE SURVEY ..............................................................................................45
  CAMPING and ACTIVITY POLICY .....................................................................................47
  ADVANCEMENT POLICY ....................................................................................................48
  BOARD OF REVIEW POLICY ..............................................................................................49




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                                Page 4 of 51                                                15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                                                           Revision 1.1
                              A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents

                           Welcome New Scout to Troop 1659


Dear Scout,
        I am proud to welcome you and your parents/guardians to Boy Scout Troop 1659.
Troop 1659 has been an inspiration to many youth and adults in the Houston Northwest FM
1960 area since its founding in 1975. I hope that your time with Troop 1659 will be an
inspiration to you as well.
        My goal for you in Troop 1659 is to have fun, while you learn the ways of a good Boy
Scout! Your Scouting experience will bring you many happy moments, new friends, new skills
while having fun in the outdoors. Along the way, my Assistant Scoutmasters and, I will help
you grow into a fine young man with skills that will serve you for the rest of your life. It will
make me and your parents very proud to stand with you at your Eagle Court of Honor in a few
years. So once you read this, it‟s time to get started on your road to Eagle. If I can ever be of
assistance to you please do not hesitate call upon me.


                                              Yours in Scouting,




                                             Mark Rennick
                                         Scoutmaster Troop 1659




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                   Page 5 of 51                         15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                       Revision 1.1
                              A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                   Page 6 of 51                 15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                               Revision 1.1
                              A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents


INTRODUCTION
The building blocks of Scouting have formed a solid foundation for more than 100 million
young men in the Boy Scouts of America‟s 95+ year history. Every aspect of that foundation
serves as an important part of the whole program. From character building and personal fitness,
the outdoors and personal growth, to leadership development and learning values, Scouting
helps a boy develop into a well-rounded young man while having fun.

Aims of Scouting
Boy Scouting works toward three aims: character, citizenship, and fitness.

Character
The first aim of Boy Scouting is growth in moral strength and character. We define this as what
the boy is himself: his personal qualities, his values, and his outlook.

Citizenship
A second aim of Boy Scouting is participating in citizenship. Used broadly, citizenship means
the boy‟s relationship to others. He comes to learn of his obligations to other people, to the
society he lives in, to the government that presides over that society.

Fitness
A third aim of Boy Scouting is development of physical, mental, and emotional fitness. Fitness
includes the body (well-tuned and healthy), the mind (able to think and solve problems), and the
emotions (self-control, courage, and self-respect).

Scouting Method
Scouting uses the following eight methods to achieve its aims.

1. IDEALS: The ideals of Boy Scouting are spelled out in the Scout Oath, Scout Law, motto,
   and slogan. The Scout measures himself against these ideals and continually tries to
   improve. The goals are high and as he reaches for them, he has some control over what he
   becomes. “Show Scout Spirit”, a requirement for rank advancement, means living up to
   these ideals.

2. PATROLS: The patrol method gives Boy Scouts an experience in group living and
   citizenship. It places a certain amount of responsibility on young shoulders and teaches boys
   how to accept it. The patrol method allows Scouts to act in small groups where they can
   easily relate to each other. These small groups help determine Troop activities through their
   elected representatives.

3. OUTDOOR PROGRAM: Boy Scouting is designed to take place in the outdoors. It is in
   the outdoors that Scouts share responsibilities and learn to live with each other. It is here
   that the skills and activities practiced at Troop meetings can be put to practical use. Being
   close to nature helps Boy Scouts gain an appreciation for God‟s handiwork and mankind‟s
   place in it. The outdoors is the laboratory for Boy Scouts to learn ecology and practice
   conservation of nature‟s resources.


Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                   Page 7 of 51                       15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                     Revision 1.1
                              A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents

4. ADVANCEMENT: Boy Scouting‟s advancement program provides a series of goals that a
   Scout can achieve. The Boy Scout plans his advancement and progresses at his own pace as
   he overcomes each challenge. The Boy Scout is rewarded for each achievement, which
   helps him gain self- confidence. He also gains knowledge in a variety of areas through his
   work on certain skills and merit badges. The steps in the advancement method help a boy
   grow in self-reliance and the ability to help others.

5. PERSONAL GROWTH: As Boy Scouts plan their activities and progress toward their
   goals, they experience personal growth. The Good Turn concept is a major part of the
   personal growth methods of Boy Scouting. Boys grow as they participate in community
   service projects and do Good Turns for others. There is probably no device so successful in
   developing a basis for personal growth as the daily Good Turn. The religious awards
   program also plays a large part in the personal growth methods. In addition, frequent
   personal conferences with his Scoutmaster help each Boy Scout to determine his growth
   toward Scouting‟s aims.

6. ADULT ASSOCIATION: Boys learn from the example set by their adult leaders. Troop
   leadership may be male or female, and association with adults of high character is
   encouraged at this stage of a young man‟s development. Troop 1659 encourages all parents
   to become involve with their sons and the Troop.

7. LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT: The Boy Scout program encourages boys to learn and
   practice leadership skills. Every Boy Scout has the opportunity to participate in both shared
   and total leadership situations. Understanding the concepts of leadership helps a boy accept
   the leadership roles of others and guides him toward the citizenship aim of Scouting.

8. UNIFORM: The uniform makes the Boy Scout Troop visible as a force of good and creates
   a positive youth image in the community. Boy Scouts is an action program, and wearing the
   uniform is an action that shows each Boy Scout‟s commitment to the aims and purposes of
   Scouting. The uniform gives the Boy Scout identity in world brotherhood of youth who
   believe in the same ideals. The uniform also provides a way for Boy Scouts to wear the
   badges that show what they have accomplished. The uniform requirements are attached in
   Appendix 1.

Community Service
Members of the Boy Scouts of America have always provided service to other. It begins with
the Scout slogan “Do a good turn daily” and continues through the Eagle Scout leadership
service project.

Values
Scouting is a values-based program with its own code of conduct. The Scout Oath and Law
help instill the values of good conduct and honesty. A boy who spends time in a Scout Troop
will learn skills that will serve him for life. He will learn basic outdoor skills, first aid,
citizenship training, leadership skills, self-reliance, and how to get along with others. Scouting
will prepare him to live a more productive and fulfilling life.



Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                   Page 8 of 51                        15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                      Revision 1.1
                              A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents

JOINING THE TROOP

New Scout Registration
A boy may register as a new member of Troop 1659 at any time during the year. A boy can join
the troop provided he has earned his Arrow of Light Award as a Webelos, or completed the fifth
grade, or is 11 years old and is under 18 years old.

Scouts traditionally join early in the spring after completing their Webelos rank and achieving
their Arrow of Light award. Boys advancing from Webelos will form a "new Scout" patrol. If
the new scout is older than 11 years or has previous Scouting experience, he will be placed in a
patrol with others of his age or skill level. To give these new Scouts the initial attention they
deserve the Assistant Scoutmaster – First Class Emphasis, will work directly with the new
scouts.

New Scout
A parent or guardian should accompany his/her son to a Troop meeting at the time the decision
is made to join Troop 1659 a membership packet will be given to the parent(s) for review and
for completion of the necessary forms. The Membership Packet includes:

           Scoutmaster Welcome Letter
           A Guide for the New Scout and His Parents w/ Supplement
           Troop Discipline policy
           Boy Scout Application
           Medical Release Form
           Parent Resource Questionnaire
           Adult Application

Each Scout must fill out the membership form and return it to the Troop Committee along with
the specified registration fee. All Scouts must have a medical form on file with the Troop
before they may attend any Troop-related events. There are two reasons for having this medical
form. First, it provides us with information on any special problems a Scout may have (hay
fever, medicine restrictions, etc.). In addition, it gives a doctor permission to treat an injured
Scout if a parent cannot be reached in a time of emergency.

Transferred Boy Scout
If a Scout is transferring into Troop 1659 from another Boy Scout Troop, the registration
process is slightly different than for a new Scout. These differences are as follows:

1. The transfer is noted on the registration form (along with the nominal fee to National
   Offices).
2. The advancement records, signed by the previous Troop's advancement chairperson/SM.
   This record must include dates for all rank advancements, merit badges, leadership
   positions, and service hours. The ability to verify these records is very important for the boy
   to be able to advance to Eagle.
3. A Medical Release Form is provided by the Scout.
4. Completion of the Troop‟s discipline policy form.

Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                   Page 9 of 51                        15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                      Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents

Troop 1659 Organization
Troop 1659 is organized in accordance with Boy Scout of America (BSA) guidelines, and is
sponsored by the Friends of Whitney Lodge. Troop 1659 is part of the Sam Houston Area
Council, Polaris District. The following descriptions highlight the Troop's organization:


Patrols
The Scout Troop is made up of patrols. A patrol is a grouping of boys who work together. The
patrol method gives Scouts an experience in group living and participatory citizenship. The
patrol method builds patrols into strong active units. This is best accomplished through long-
term association with shared, common experiences from camping or special events. It places a
certain amount of responsibility on the scouts and teaches them accountability. There are four
reasons for using the patrol method:

        1.   Patrols permit a Scout to be with his friends.
        2.   The Patrol‟s small size allows each boy to get involved.
        3.   Every Scout gets the chance to learn and practice responsibility.
        4.   Patrols provide real experience in the democratic way of doing things.

When a boy joins the Troop, he will be assigned to a specific patrol. Each patrol has a patrol
elected Patrol Leader and Assistant Patrol Leader, Quartermaster, and Scribe. The patrol also
has an Assistant Scoutmaster assigned who provides overall guidance. Each Patrol meets to
prepare for Troop activities, or to plan their activities for upcoming Troop outings.

The Troop‟s goal is to maintain a patrol's integrity through as much of a Scout's career as
possible. Sometimes that is not always possible. If it becomes necessary to reorganize patrols
for any reason, then the Scoutmaster with input from his Assistant Scoutmasters will determine
a new patrol organization.


Patrol Leaders Council
Troop 1659 is a boy run troop! The Patrol Leaders Council (PLC) or Green Bar is the
governing body of the Troop that develops and carries out the program. The PLC is composed
of the Senior Patrol Leader (SPL), Assistant Senior Patrol Leader (ASPL), Scribe, and the
Patrol Leader from each Patrol. The Quartermaster, Troop Guides, Librarian, Den Chiefs, and
other junior leaders appointed by the SPL are also members of the PLC.

The PLC is responsible for planning the daily, weekly, and monthly events. The PLC makes
recommendations about programs and locations for camp outs and special events. The
Scoutmaster and /or the Troop Committee may modify the program choices if the program is
dangerous or does not follow the aims and methods of Scouting as described in the
Scoutmaster's Handbook.

The Scouts depend upon their elected Patrol Leaders to attend the PLC and communicate
information to them. It is also the responsibility of the PLC members to make sure that Troop
programs and events are communicated to the Scouts. This communication system is based
primarily on a telephone tree. In this system, once a week the Senior Patrol Leader will have

Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 10 of 51                         15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                      Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents

the responsibility of insuring that these communications get passed to the troop members via his
Green Bar and/or the Patrol Leaders, who will in turn need to communicate with the members
of their patrol.

If, for some reason, the Senior Patrol Leader or his designate cannot contact the Patrol Leader,
he must call the Assistant Patrol Leader, who will in turn contact all members of his Patrol. If a
Patrol Leader has not received a phone call from his Senior Patrol Leader by midweek then he
should take the initiative to contact his Senior Patrol Leader. Likewise, if a Scout has not heard
from his Patrol Leader by Wednesday evening then he should take the initiative to call his
Patrol Leader.

A scout should also check the Scouting Hotline regularly for last minute updates:
(281) 315-1035

The Green Bar elections and appointments are usually made on a semiannual basis (twice a
year), ensuring each boy an opportunity to participate in a leadership position, which is a Scout
advancement requirement beyond First Class rank. The Scouts will elect the Senior Patrol
Leader and in turn, the new Senior Patrol Leader will appoint, with the consent of the
Scoutmaster, the new PLC positions.

Scouts are encouraged to seek junior leader positions and help as much as possible and
whenever needed. If for any reason a Scout is incapable or unwilling to do his job, he will be
counseled and if necessary removed from the leadership position. Should removal be required
he will not be credited with completing that leadership position for rank advancement. We urge
all Scouts who accept leadership positions to fulfill their obligations. All junior leaders are
given written descriptions of their responsibilities and are supported by the Scoutmaster and
Assistant Scoutmasters.


Scoutmaster and Assistant Scoutmasters
The Scoutmaster is the unit leader and the one adult with the responsibility of relating directly
to the boys. The Scoutmaster trains, coaches, and guides the PLC (i.e., boy leaders) in planning
their troop program to run their Troop. He helps the boys to grow by encouraging them to learn
the Scouting methods. The Scoutmaster has the responsibility to the Scout to be sure that he has
learned the objectives set forth in the various ranks and is ready for advancement. This is
accomplished via the Scoutmaster‟s Conference which is requested by the Scout before his
board of review for each of his rank advancements.

The Assistant Scoutmasters have specific patrol responsibilities, program responsibilities, or
other duties as assigned by the Scoutmaster.

Boy Scouts of America has a policy called Two Deep Leadership. This policy states that there
will be at least two adult leaders who are registered in Scouting on all, campouts, outdoor
programs, or anytime there is an organized Troop Function.




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 11 of 51                         15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                      Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents

Troop Committee
The Troop Committee is the administrative body of the Troop. The Troop Committee is
responsible for managing the business and financial affairs of the Troop, supporting the BSA
Scouting principles, recruiting merit badge counselors, providing advancement for Scouts,
ensuring Troop camping equipment is sufficient, and recruiting of adults into Scouting.

The Committee Chairman is the presiding officer and appoints officers and subcommittee
chairpersons to oversee various aspects of the Troop Committee‟s responsibilities (e.g., finance,
fund raising, advancement, Board of Reviews, training, equipment, etc.).


Chartering Organization
„Friends of Whitney Lodge‟ is the chartering organization for BSA Troop 1659. The chartered
organization chooses a Chartered Organization Representative (COR) who will represent the
Chartered Organization in any Troop functions and / or meetings as needed. The primary
function of the chartering organization is to provide guidance for the Troop‟s adult leaders and
ensure that Troop 1659 maintains the high standards of the unit and the Boy Scouts of America
and the long term goals of the unit. The Chartered Organization approves the Scoutmaster of the
Unit. The Chartering Organization is responsible for background checks of all adult applicants
and will have the final approval for adults filling positions with the Troop.



THE PROGRAM
Troop 1659's program consists of Troop meetings, camp outs, summer camp, Patrol
Leader Council meetings and service projects. It is through these events and using the Scouting
Method that the Troop helps your son achieve the aims of Scouting. While we understand that
you may be busy with other activities, it is important that he make as many Troop meetings and
camp outs as he can and attends summer and/or winter camp. This is especially true for new
Scouts. Attendance of troop functions is part of the advancement requirements for all ranks and
all positions of responsibility. Regular troop attendance is required in order to attend Summer /
Winter camps with Troop 1659.

More information on program policies can be found in the supplement “Troop 1659 Program
Policies”.

Troop Meetings
The Troop meets Sunday nights from 5:00 - 6:30 p.m. except following a camp out. The troop
meetings are held at the wooden Scout Hut - Whitney Lodge, located next to Oak Creek
Elementary School 3975 Gladeridge Dr, Houston, TX 77068. Scouts are required to wear their
Filed uniform and bring their Scout Handbook to the Troop meetings. During the summer
months, the Scoutmaster, at his discretion, may allow the Scouts to wear their Activity uniform.

During the Troop Meetings, Scouts will work on advancements, merit badges, or Scouting
skills. Troop meetings are also used for Scoutmaster Conferences and Boards of Review, which
are necessary for advancements. Electronic equipment (e.g., handheld games, MP3 players,


Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 12 of 51                        15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                     Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents

CDs, etc.) or toys do not have a place in scouting, and should not be brought to the meetings or
outings.


Camp Outs
The Scout program is designed for outdoor fun. The Troop will make every attempt to have at
least one outdoor activity per month, (minimum of 10 per year). The activities planned for
these events will reinforce the skills and ideals of Scouting. The Troop will camp in all types of
weather. Scouts will be given the opportunity to test their skills in a variety of real life
situations. However, unnecessary risks are never taken and safety is of the utmost concern.
The Scoutmaster will be the final authority on whether camp outs will be canceled due to
dangerous conditions.

The Troop provides tents, ground clothes, and cooking equipment that a Scout and Adult Leader
will need for camping. Therefore, Scouts and Adult Leaders only need to provide their personal
gear (see Appendix 4).


Summer and Winter Camp
This is an excellent opportunity for Scouts to earn several merit badges and participate in a long
term camping. Information on the specific camp's rules and regulations are given to the Scouts
well in advance of departure. All fees involved with camp are the responsibility of the Scout.
The Patrol Leaders Council, with the approval of the Scoutmaster and Troop Committee,
decides which camp to attend each year. Scoutmaster approval is required to attend any long
term camping with Troop 1659.


High Adventure Camps
High adventure camp outs are usually one week long. Scouts participating in high adventure
camping must be a minimum of 13 years old, have achieved the First Class rank, attended 2
other Summer camps, and have Scoutmasters approval. The Scoutmaster at his discretion may
allow a Scout not meeting all these requirements to attend, provided the High Adventure Camp
allows it. Scouts are responsible for their own expenses. The Patrol Leaders Council, with the
guidance of the Scoutmaster, plan High Adventure camp outs.


Patrol Leader Council Meetings
The Patrol Leader Council (PLC) meets as designated by the Senior Patrol Leader. The PLC
meetings are usually held at the Scout Hut. Only Scouts serving on the PLC attend the PLC
meeting. Scouts are required to wear a correct uniform to the meetings. The meeting is
centered on planning agendas for Troop meetings, camp outs, day activities, community
services, Webelos Den activities and fundraisers.




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 13 of 51                         15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                      Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents

Committee Meetings
Committee meetings are usually held the 2nd Sunday of the month at the Scout Hut from 3:30
pm to 5:00 pm before the regularly scheduled troop meeting. The meetings are open to all
parents.
This is the regular business meeting of the troop and a time when all committees report their
status as well as the Scoutmasters report as to the status of the program, the boys, and the troop.
These meetings are the time that all business as related to the functions of the troop are
discussed and / or voted on. We encourage all parents to attend the Committee meetings and
become involved in the Troop as committee members and adult leaders.

If you have a skill, special interest that you want to share or just want to be with your boy just
contact the Committee Chairman and he will find a job for you.


Advancement
Boy Scouts provides each boy with the opportunity to learn skills and receive recognition in the
form of rank advancement and merit badges. This advancement in the Scouting program
rewards achievement and allows a Scout to be recognized for his work. The requirements for
each of the seven ranks from Scout through Eagle and the required merit badges are contained
in the Boy Scout Handbook. The Scout through his participation in Troop meetings, campouts,
and other activities earns requirements toward his rank advancement. Advancement is not
mandatory in Troop 1659, but it is encouraged to meet the aims of Boy Scouts.


Scout Rank Advancement
As Scouts advance in rank, they learn new skills. Your son will begin at the rank of Scout once
he has completed his joining requirements. In his first year of Scouting, the Troop will help
him advance through the ranks of Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class. While advancing
in these ranks, your son will learn outdoor skills, first aid, physical fitness, citizenship, and
water safety. Boys who reach the rank of First Class by the end of their first year of Scouting
have a better chance of staying in Scouting and advancing to the higher ranks. After reaching
the rank of First Class, your son can advance to the rank of Star, Life, and Eagle Scout. To earn
advancement in these ranks, your son will have to earn merit badges, serve in a leadership
position, participate in Troop activities, perform service projects, and demonstrate that he is
living according to the Scout Oath and Law. The Eagle Scout rank requires your son to plan
and carry out a service project for his community, church, or school.

Merit Badge Program
The merit badge program helps Scouts develop physical skills, self-confidence, and social
skills. Scouting offers merit badges in a wide variety of skills, interests, and life skills. Merit
badges are earned thorough participating in Troop meetings, summer, and winter camp.
Usually the Troop will have a merit badge session in the fall and spring of each year. Summer
and winter camps are excellent times to earn merit badges as the Scout can usually earn 3 to 5
merit badges. Occasionally, special sessions will be offered for a specific merit badge. Merit
badges are necessary for rank advancement (see the Scout Book).



Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 14 of 51                           15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                        Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents

The merit badge requirements are defined in the Merit Badge Books. Troop 1659 has a library
of merit badge books, which can be checked out by the Scout or his parents. If the Troop does
not have the merit badge book in its library, the books can be purchased at the Scout Shop or the
requirements can be looked up online at http://www.meritbadge.com.

Before beginning work on a merit badge, the Scout must visit with the Scoutmaster. Only after
the Scoutmaster has given permission to the Scout by handing the Scout a “Blue Merit Badge
Card” can the Scout begin work on the merit badge. All Merit Badge work requires a Merit
Badge Counselor and a buddy. The Merit Badge Counselor will mark the requirements
completed on the “Blue Card” and return it to the Committee Advancement Chairperson.


Merit Badge Counselors
Merit Badge Counselors are always needed. The Troop is always looking for merit badge
counselors who can provide Scouts with guidance through merit badge requirements. If you are
interested in working as a merit badge counselor, please contact the Committee Advancement
Chair. This is an excellent way for parents to help the Scouts.

Recognition
Awards and advancements are earned throughout the year. All advancements and special
awards are recognized at a Court of Honor, which is usually held twice a year. The Troop also
holds special Eagle Courts of Honor to honor the achievement of a Scout earning the rank of
Eagle Scout. All Scouts are expected to attend the Court of Honor. All Scouts should be
dressed in Field uniform. A Court of Honor is a family affair parents, grandparents, and
siblings are encouraged to attend.


Order of the Arrow
The Order of the Arrow is Scouting‟s national honor society. It focuses on leadership
development, membership extension, adventurous programming, and broader service to
Scouting and the community. Other Scouts in the Troop elect Scouts into Order membership,
making it an honor to receive. Requirements for election are that Scout not be 18 years old at
the time of election; earned First Class rank; have spent 15 days and nights camping, including
at least one long-term camping experience; be approved by the Scoutmaster; and be elected by
at least 50% of the active registered Scouts present at the election. Once elected, the candidate
must complete his “Ordeal” (induction weekend) within one calendar year.


Religious Award
In developing the character of our youth, each Scout is encouraged to express his faith in his
God according to the practice of his family and religious organization. The Boy Scouts
recognize this and provide an opportunity for each Scout to further explore and be recognized
for their interest in their own religious beliefs and how they related to their own Scouting and
spiritual growth. Religious awards are available for all faiths and involve each Scout working
with his religious leader and family to explore his own faith and character. The Boy Scout
Handbook has more details on these awards.


Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 15 of 51                         15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                      Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents

Financial
All checks should be payable to "Troop 1659." Checks and other payments are to be
given to the Committee Treasurer or appointee.


Dues/Fees
Troop dues are collected in January of each year or when the Scout joins the Troop. The Troop
Committee sets the amount of dues each Scout must pay. This will include all national dues and
fees as required by the Boy Scouts of America. The Troop will not let scouts who have not paid
their dues, to attend Troop activities *. Funds in the Scouts account from fundraising events
maybe used to pay any and all Troop dues/fees (see below).
        *The Troop will not turn away a Scout, for financial reasons, funds and/or scholarships
        (below) are available should they be needed, however they must be requested see
        Scoutmaster or Committee Chairman for more information.

The costs of each camping trips are determined by the cost of each event or trip, and whether or
not food is provide by the Troop. The Troop Committee and or Scoutmaster may set a small fee
in addition to each event costs to help offset transportation costs, troop common consumables,
and the cost to maintain and repair Troop equipment.

Expenses
The Committee Treasurer will pay all Troop expenses. Receipts are required for all expenses
and the Treasurer will not pay any expenses without a receipt. The Committee must approve
any expenditure of $100.00 or more. On camp outs, the Scoutmaster can authorize expenses of
up to $500.00.

Fund Raising
Throughout the year, the Troop conducts several fund raising activities including selling
Scout popcorn, Scout Fair Tickets, car washes, US flag, etc. Scouts are required to participate
in these activities or at the Committee‟s discretion, pay a buy out fee for not participating. A
portion of the sales may be applied to the Scout‟s account.

If you have any ideas for fund raising or have any questions, please contact the Fund Raising
Committee Person. Details of each fundraiser will be made available as to how the money
raised will be distributed to scouts and the troop.

Scout Accounts
The Troop maintains Scout Accounts for each Scout. A portion of money raised by a Scout
during fund raising may be credited to the Scout‟s account. The Scout can use the money in his
account to pay for camping trips, dues, or to replace damaged camping equipment which
belonged to the troop. If a Scout leaves the Troop and there is money in the Scout‟s account the
money will be transferred to the Troop‟s general banking account.


Scout Scholarships
If a Scout does not have the money to go on a particular camp out, the parents or guardians
should speak with the Scoutmaster or Committee Chairman. The Scoutmaster and the

Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 16 of 51                        15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                     Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents

Committee Chairman will review the request and if necessary inform the committee, as to any
action necessary, which in its sole discretion may, by majority vote at a regular or specially
convened Committee meeting, agrees to pay all or a portion of the fee. Additionally, Sam
Houston Area council offers campership funds for council camps, applications are available on
line.

Likewise, if a boy cannot afford to purchase the Field and or Activity uniform, the parents or
guardians should speak with the Scoutmaster. Gently used items are sometimes available as the
boys outgrow their uniforms, again check with the Scoutmaster.


Training
One goal of Scouting is to teach leadership to Scouts. However, Adult Leaders, too, need to
develop or hone their leadership skills. In an effort to achieve this goal, BSA offers Adult
training consisting of: Fast Start (video tape and online), Basic Adult Training, Introduction to
Outdoor Leader Skills, Wood Badge, and Youth Protection Training (available online). Any
adult who wishes to take a role in the Troop must take Youth Protection Training and should
attend Fast Start and Basic Adult Training.

Training is not limited to the Adults. Scouts serving on the PLC will be given an opportunity to
attend Junior Leadership Training, which seeks to teach Scouts leadership skills including
planning and executing programs. The Troop, District, and Council may offer other training
courses including a Junior Leader Training Camp.

If you have any questions regarding training, please contact the Scoutmaster.

Medical Forms

Physicals and doctors approval are required for adults and scouts to attend camps and outdoor
events over 74 hours in duration, and events on BSA properties. Forms are good for 36 months
for youth and adults under 40 years of age. Over 40 years of age, annual physicals are required.
The Troop maintains a current copy of all medical forms for this purpose. See Medical forms in
APP 5.


Discipline Policy
Scouts are expected to live by the Scout Law - A Scout is Trustworthy, Loyal, Helpful, Friendly,
Courteous, Kind, Obedient, Cheerful, Thrifty, Brave, Clean, and Reverent.

The Troop will discipline Scout‟s who fail to live by the Scout law or who disrupt Troop
meetings, camp outs, and other Scouting activity. The Troop will use progressive discipline in
an attempt to solve any behavior problems, and retains the right to ask a boy to leave the Troop
if at the Scoutmaster‟s sole discretion it should become necessary. All Scouts must sign Troop
1659‟s Disciplinary Policy in Appendix 6 as requirement for joining the Troop.




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 17 of 51                         15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                      Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 18 of 51                 15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                              Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents




HISTORY of BOY SCOUTS
Lord Robert S.S. Baden-Powell first took a group of boy to the first Boy Scout camp on
Brownsea Island off the English coast in 1907. After that first camping experience in 1907,
Baden-Powell began writing a handbook for the boys and the Scoutmasters. In 1908, the
handbook, Scouting for Boys, was published and the rest is history.
In 1908, the United States began to see the formation of Boy Scout troops in several locations.
The official birthday for the Boy Scouts of America is February 8, 1910. William D. Boyce, a
Chicago, Illinois publisher, incorporated the Boy Scouts of America in 1910. It was on a trip to
London, England in 1909 that Mr. Boyce became lost in a fog and young boy offered assistance
to help him. The boy was a Scout in Baden-Powell‟s Boy Scout organization. Mr. Boyce was
so inspired with the boy and his attitude to help that upon his arrival back to Chicago he set out
to form the Boy Scouts of America.
Mr. Boyce with the help of Ernest Thompson Seton, Daniel Carter Beard, and James E. West
began the development of the Boy Scouts of America and the “scouting movement”. Their
efforts generated such interest in Scouting that there were 5,000 Boy Scout troops in the United
States by 1911. Mr. Seton was the primary author of the Handbook for Boys published in 1911.
Mr. Beard, the leader of a boys group called the Society of the Sons of Daniel Boone, merged
his organization into the Boy Scouts of America as well as writing and illustrating books on
nature and the outdoors. Mr. West, an attorney, became the Executive Secretary of the Boy
Scouts of America and remained until his retirement in 1943.

During 1917, 300,000 Boy Scouts sold over $3.5 million in Liberty Bonds, raised $43 million
by selling war stamps, and distributed over 30 million pieces of government literature. With
these efforts, Boy Scouts of America became a household name and part of the American way
of life.

To keep the boys and the adult leaders informed about Scouting, two magazines were developed
one for each group. Boys Life was first published in 1912 for the boy and Scouting was first
published in 1913 for the adults. Both of these magazines are still published today and
distributed to Scouts and Scouters.

Membership in Boy Scouts of American since 1910 has totaled more than 110 million boys and
adult leaders.

Boy Scout has grown beyond the borders of England and America. Today, there are more than
28 million Scouts, youth and adults, boys and girls, in 216 countries and territories.




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 19 of 51                        15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                     Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents


History of Troop 1659
The Boys Scouts of America chartered Troop 1659 on July 31st, 1975. The Oak Creek Village
Civic Association was the initial Charter Organization. The current Charter Organization is The
Friends of Whitney Lodge.

Troop 1659 is located in the Polaris District of the Sam Houston Area Council of the South-
Central Region of the Boy Scouts of America.

The Scout Hut was built in 1978 and was dedicated on October 20, 1979. On the corner post,
you will find inscriptions of those boys that helped build the building including names, dates,
and favorite football teams. The Northwest Kiwanis Club became the sponsoring organization
shortly before opening of the Scout Hut. The land on which the Scout sits was donated to the
Scouts by Spring Independent School District. The Scout Hut was financed by Troop fertilizer
sales and donations from Texaco, Owens-Corning, United Parcel Service, Oak Creek Women‟s
Club, and Mr. Charles Perryman. We have been meeting in the Hut weekly since it was built.
There are rewards from many years of fun and hard work on the walls and rafters as well as
patrol flags and memories from the various events and outings. Please spend a few moments
look over our past, and with your help, we will continue to have many more years of memories
and achievements to add to the walls and ceiling.


Scoutmaster                               Committee Chairman
Mike Edwards 1975-1977                    Howard Wilson 1975-1976
Tiperton French 1977-1980                 Bob Joyce 1976-1977
Bill Comer 1981-1984                      Norm Young 1977-1978
Herbert Marker 1984-1985                  Joseph Pouge 1978-1979
Tom Boaz 1985-1988                        Bill Linderman 1981-1984
Richard Este 1988-1990                    Toy Smith 1984-1985
Larry Connor 1990-1992                    M. Leonard 1985-1988
Glen Ivey 1992-1993                       Richard Crowley 1988-1989
Dale Anderson1993-1996                    R. “Doug” Whitney 1989-1992
Jerry Long 1996-2001                      Dale Anderson1992-1993
Bryan Talley 2001-2005                    John Benz, Sr.1993-1997
Mark Rennick 2005 - Present               Steve Nichley 1997-2005
                                          Marcus Scxton 2004- Present


Troop 1659 Eagle Scouts
There have been over 40 Eagle Scouts who completed the requirements while with the Troop
over the last 31 years. We proud of all the boys who have become Eagles via Troop 1659, so
visit the Eagle Display in Whitney Lodge for the names and years of all the Eagle Scouts of
Troop 1659.




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 20 of 51                       15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                    Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 21 of 51                 15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                              Revision 1.1
                                A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents

Appendix 1 - Sources Of Additional Information
Troop 1659 Contact Info
      Scouting Hotline:                                             (281) 315-1035
        Remember to check regularly for last minute updates

        Scouting 1659 Web site :                              http://www.scouting1659.org/

        Scoutmaster Mark Rennick                                     (713) 252-7027
                                                              Email: scoutmaster@scouting1659.org

        Committee Chairperson Marcus Sexton                   (281) 376-1788
                                                              Email:

Note: ALL emails to Youth and Adult Members must have prior approval by the Committee
Chairman and / or the Scoutmaster. This includes, but is not limited to, notifications of up
coming events and suggestions for events to be considered in our regular schedule.


Web sites
        Boy Scouts of America, National Council http://www.scouting.org, this is the primary Web site
        for the National Council.

        Sam Houston Area Council http://www.samhoustonbsa.org

        Polaris District      http://www.polaris bsa.org

        Merit Badge requirements http://www.meritbadge.com

        Boys' Life http://www.boyslife.org, a promotional site for Boys' Life magazine.

        Scouting magazine http://www.scoutingmagazine.org, Web site for Scouting magazine -
        contains full content (except ads) back to 1998.

        Give 2 BSA http://www.give2bsa.org, this site accepts online donations, routing them to the
        appropriate local council according to the ZIP code entered.

        International Scouting, http://www.scout.org

        Scout Store https://scoutnet.scouting.org/BSASupply/, this is Boy Scouts of America Retail
        Store

        Supply Division, BSA http://www.scoutstuff.org, a separate stand-alone site for Supply
        Division, contains information on items in the Official Catalog and BSA Library of Literature.

        National Scouting Museum http://www.bsamuseum.org, a promotional site for the museum.




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 22 of 51                              15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                           Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents


Appendix 2 - Uniform
        Troop 1659 has two required uniforms: Field and Activity.
        The uniform shirt will be neatly tucked into the pants and buttoned up to the second
        button from the top. The Activity shirt will be neatly tucked in. All uniforms will be
        clean and neat in appearance.

Field Uniform (Formally “Class A”)
The Field uniform is worn to the Troop Meetings and all outings, unless directed
otherwise by the Scoutmaster.
       1. BSA short or long sleeve shirt with:
              a. Sam Houston Area Council patch
              b. “1659” unit numbers
              c. Rank patch
              d. Patrol patch
              e. Arrow of Light (if earned as a Cub Scout).
              f. Current “Quality Unit” patch
              g. World Crest Symbol
              h. Order of the Arrow pocket patch for Order of the Arrow members
              i. Latest Activity Patch (optional)
       2. Scout shorts or pants
       3. BSA belt
       4. BSA socks (green with red strip at top)
       5. Troop hat (optional) or BSA Hat
       6. Scout Hand Book

For Court of Honor and formal occasions (e.g., Memorial Day, Veterans Day, Labor Day,
Scouts Sunday, etc.) the Scout should wear his Field Uniform, plus
       1. BSA / Merit Badge Sash * worn over the right shoulder (NOTE: for Order of the
           Arrow functions the merit badge sash is worn on the belt).
               Only Merit Badges are to be worn on the FRONT of the SASH.
               The Badges may be worn in any order you choose. Three merit badges should be worn in a row.
                Traditionally, scouts wear them in the order they were received, but there is no rule about this.
               On the back of the sash, temporary insignia may be sewn. "Temporary insignia" is defined by the
                BSA as special insignia for participating in unit, District, Council or national events or
                programs. The back of the sash is NOT home to previous rank patches, your old year pins, or
                any other pins.
        2. Troop neckerchief and slide.

Activity Uniform (Formally “Class B”)
The Activity uniform is worn on outdoor outings and at Summer Troop Meetings at the
discretion of the Scoutmaster.
        1. Troop or BSA T-shirt
        2 Scout shorts or pants
        3. BSA belt
        4. BSA socks
        5. Troop hat (optional)


Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 23 of 51                                    15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                                 Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents


Troop 1659’s Field uniform is required, as a minimum, for the following:
   1.       Troop meetings*
   2.       Transportation to and from all campouts and summer camp
   3.       Evening meals on all campouts
   4.       Scouting events, such as Scout Fair, Scout Training, Junior Leader Training (JLT),
       etc.

* For Troop meetings only:
Field uniforms are required for the months of September through May. Activity uniforms may be
allowed for the months of June through August, at the Scoutmasters discretion. Similar color
“Green” pants may be substituted, for general scout hut meetings only.

For Troop Service Project, the required uniform is either the Field or Activity uniform, as
directed by the Scoutmaster and / or Senior Patrol Leader.


Multiple Unit Members - Uniform Note
Unit leaders will determine the uniform for that unit. If a member of multiple units, then the
uniform of the unit you are representing is the require uniform and either Field or Activity, as
the event requires. In other words, if you are a member of the Ship, or Crew and are officially
representing that unit at a Troop meeting/function you would be required to wear the Ship or
Crew uniform at that Troop event.

If a boy cannot afford to purchase the Field or Activity uniform, the parents and/or
guardians should speak with the Scoutmaster or one of the Assistant Scoutmasters.


Where to Find Scout Equipment
The following stores carry Scout equipment:
       1. Scout Shop – FM 1960
       2. Boy Scouts of America National Supply http://www.scoutstuff.org
          P.O. Box 7143, Charlotte, NC 28241-7143
          1-800-323-0736

        A diagram showing the proper location for Scout patches is attached as Appendix 3.




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 24 of 51                         15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                      Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents

Appendix 3 – Official Boy Scout Uniform Insignia Placement




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 25 of 51                 15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                              Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 26 of 51                 15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                              Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents


Appendix 4 - Camping Gear

Do not rush out and spend lots of money on camping equipment. Start by reading pages 51
through 53 in your Scout's Boy Scout handbook. Ask fellow Scouts or Adult leaders for advice
of what they like and do not like about it and why. Have your Scout go on a camping trip using
old or borrowed equipment and have him look around at the various types to see what may
work best for him before buying any new equipment.

Personal Camping Equipment (Required)

Sleeping Bag
Sleeping Mat (recommended)
Toiletries
Eating utensils and plate (mess kit)
Flashlight
Drinking Container
Change of Clothes
Shoes (closed toe only - sandals are not permitted)
Rain Gear
First Aid Kit
Knife with Totin‟ Chit
Insect Repellant
Sunscreen
Compass
Rope (clothes line type)
Duffel Bag or Backpack (required for backpacking trips)
(before purchasing a new backpack check for recommendations and or availability of used
equipment from the troop leadership)




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 27 of 51                      15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                   Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents




Appendix 5 – Medical Forms

Visit our web site as listed below for the most current medical forms

WWW.scouting1659.org




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 28 of 51                 15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                              Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents


Appendix 6 – Discipline Policy Guidelines – Revised – 12/05

Every Scout has made a pledge to live by the Scout Law, Scout Oath, Scout Motto, Scout
Slogan, and the Outdoor Code. Scouts are especially expected to live up to this pledge at ALL
scouting events. These include the following:

I will treat Troop Leaders and fellow Scouts with respect. I will respect property rights
of others.
1. I will demonstrate respect for the Troop, Ship, Crew, camp property, and/or the property of
    others.
2. I will be personally responsible for cleanliness and any loss, breakage or vandalism of
    properly.
3. I will not enter another Troop's or units site without permission.
4. I will avoid any action that could be damaging to the natural environment.
5. I will not be disruptive at meeting / outings as to prevent others from enjoying themselves.
6. I will set a good example, by keeping myself neatly dressed and presentable.
7. I will proudly wear the Scout uniform to all activities, as outlined in the Troop uniform policy.
8. I will be responsible for keeping my tent and personal gear clean and neat.
9. I will adhere to all Troop or Camp policies and regulations.
10. I will respect the privacy of others.
11. I understand that contact of a violent or sexual nature with anyone is strictly forbidden.
12. In considerations of other Troop participants, I agree to follow the bedtime and sleep
    schedule of the Troop. If I choose to 'Stay awake after lights out, I will stay in my tent and
    keep voices quiet.

I will follow Instructions given by Troop Leaders and Senior Scouts Leaders and carry
out reasonable duties assigned by the Senior Patrol Leader.
1. I will obey all safety rules and instructions of the Troop / Camp and its leaders or
    supervisors.
2. I understand that throwing objects at another person is prohibited.
3. I understand that fires, candles, use of matches, etc. are not allowed in or near tents.
4. I agree to not to play with liquid or pressurized (propane) fuels.
5. I agree that gambling, in any form is prohibited.
6. I agree not to posses or detonate any fireworks.
7. I agree not to have any firearms or weapons (martial arts or otherwise) in my possession.
8. I agree not to use any tool or object in a threatening manner toward another.
9. I agree not to have any pornographic material in my possession.
10. I clearly understand that the purchase, possession, use or consumption of alcoholic
    beverages, tobacco products or illegal drugs, is prohibited.
11. I understand that personal prescribed medication will be given over to the care of the
    Scoutmaster and/or Medical ASM, and will not be given to others.
12. I clearly understand that serious and/or repetitive violations including use of tobacco, cheat,
    stealing, dishonesty, swearing, fighting, and cursing will result in expulsion from
    meetings/camp or serious disciplinary actions and loss of privileges.

I will participate in organized activities unless excused by the Senior Patrol Leader or
Adult Leader.
        When at Troop functions, I will attend all scheduled programs and participate as
        required in cooperation with other Troop members and leadership.


Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 29 of 51                          15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                       Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents


I will avoid any action that takes away from another Scout's opportunity to enjoy any
activity.
        I agree that hazing has no place in Scouting. I will act to prevent any Scout from being
        "initiated" by anyone with a hazing activity. I understand that I am expected to inform
        the senior Patrol Leader or adult leader of any problem that I observe.

Consequences of Discipline Rules Violations

1. For minor rules infractions, Scouts will be given verbal warning and possible work duties
   assigned by the Scoutmaster or his delegate. If the behavior is repeated, at the direction of
   the Scoutmaster, a decision will be made by a committee of adult leaders at the event, as
   to whether or not the Scout’s parents will be contacted and / or asked to pick up the Scout
   immediately. In the event that the parents cannot be contacted, the committee will decide if
   adult leadership is available to transport the scout home.
2. For negative behavior or repetitive negative behavior where the scout is not sent home, the
   Scout may be denied rank advancement and permission to attend the next scouting
   event(s) or campout(s). A telephone call may be made to the scout’s parents or a letter
   may be sent to the Scout and to his parents. The Scout, along with his parents may be
   required to attend a special Board of Review before he is eligible to attend future activities
   and / or camp outs.
3. If a Scout is suspended from a second activity or event in less than six months, he must
   demonstrate significant improvement in his behavior, before being eligible for credit for the
   “Scout Spirit” advancement requirement. He may also be declared ineligible for a
   leadership position or removed from a current position at the discretion of the Troop 1659
   Committee or Scoutmaster.
4. A serious violation is defined, as an action which results or could result in injury, threaten
   the safety of an individual (including the Scout), property damage (including public
   property), and damage to the natural environment or of a nature that disrupts the
   continuation of the troop event / activity / campout or the enjoyable participation by fellow
   scouts. If a serious violation occurs or is about to occur, additional and immediate
   consequences will occur.
5. A SERIOUS VIOLATION COULD RESULT IN YOU BEING ASKED TO LEAVE THE
   TROOP IMMEDIATELY.

The Scoutmaster and or the ASM Group have the responsibility to determine whether any
action, mentioned or not in this document, is of a nature serious enough to warrant further
action. All Adult Leaders have the responsibility to stop any serious violation in progress or
about to occur and to report it to the Scoutmaster.

At a minimum, any Scout sent home from an event or campout or committing a serious
violation will be suspended from campouts for two months, will be suspended from troop
meetings / troop functions for one month and on probation at troop meetings for one additional
month. In order to participate in troop functions / events while on probation, the scout must be
accompanied by one of his parents, for the duration of the meeting / event. In addition, the
scout’s parents must accompany their son on the first campout that he is allowed to attend. A
letter will be sent to the Scout and his parents. The Scout, along with his parents will be
required to have a conference with the Scoutmaster and a special Board of Review before
being eligible for future overnight events. During Suspension, the scout will not advance in rank
and will not receive credit for leadership toward advancement. Additional requirements may
apply.

Any property damage must be fully reimbursed or repaired (to the satisfaction of the
Scoutmaster or Adult Committee) before the Scout may return to any Scouting activity.

Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 30 of 51                         15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                      Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents




Discipline Policy Signature form


           ACKNOWLEDGMENT BY SCOUT AND PARENT
I have read, understand and will obey the uniform policy, discipline policy all Troop
policies. I further agree to follow the Scout Law, Scout Oath, Scout Motto, Scout Slogan,
and Outdoor Code to the best of my ability.
____________________________________, Scout’s Name

____________________________________, Scout’s Signature                  _____________Date

I have read and understand the above policies and agree to support the Troop in, a
“positive manner”, all its policy/discipline efforts. If the Troop Leaders decide that my
son needs to be removed from any activity, I agree to come and pick him up, from the
activity site as soon as possible.

____________________________________, Parent’s Name                 ________________Phone

____________________________________, Parent’s Signature                 _____________Date




    This page must be signed and turned in to the Troop Leadership before a Scout will be
    allowed to participate, in Troop Activities




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 31 of 51                      15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                   Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 32 of 51                 15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                              Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents




Appendix 7 – Parent Permission and Talent Release Forms

The troop may require a permission slip and/or Talent release form for outings or
events.

                                 The current forms are attached.




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 33 of 51                 15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                              Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 34 of 51                 15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                              Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents

                                  BOY SCOUT TROOP 1659

                       PARENT/GUARDIAN PERMISSION SLIP
I herby give my permission for Scout
        Name
        Address
        City/State/Zip
        Phone Number

To participate with Troop 1659 in a Council/District/Troop approved Scouting activities that will
be supervised by registered, adult Scout Leaders.

I, or a person who can contact me, may be reached at the phone numbers listed below during
these activities.

In the event I cannot be contacted at the listed numbers; or, I did not provide a telephone
number, I authorize the adult Scout Leader/s in charge to provide medical treatment to the above
minor by a licensed Medical Doctor/s selected by the Scout Leader/s. This treatment is
authorized in the event of a medical emergency which, in the opinion of the attending medical
physician, may endanger the life of the above minor, or cause disfigurement, physical
impairment, or undue discomfort if treatment is delayed.

In consideration of the services rendered in providing this opportunity, I as parent or guardian of
the above minor, and as the duly authorized agent of my spouse, do hereby, on behalf of myself,
my spouse, and the above minor, release and forever discharge the Boy Scouts of America, Sam
Houston Council, Polaris District, the Chartering Organization and the leaders of Troop 1659 ~
each of them from any and all claims, demands, or cause of action which may occur to the above
minor, or damage to property during the course of events for which this permission is given.

I further agree to defend, indemnify, and hold harmless the Boy Scouts of America, Sam Houston
Council, Polaris District, the Chartering Organization and the leaders of Troop 1659 ~ each of
them from any and all claims, demands suits or judgments that may be asserted, brought by a
third person/s because of acts of the above minor arising from any occurrence during the
activities for which this Permission is granted.

DATE:         /     / 2006
                                                             Parent/Guardian Signature



Home Phone Number                                            Cell / Business Phone Number



Other/s to be Contacted & Phone Numbers in event of your absence.

Note: Please supply a photocopy of the Scout’s insurance Card, and attach a completed Class II
physical form with the date of his last physical.




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 35 of 51                          15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                       Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents

                                   Talent Release Form
I hereby assign and grant to the Boy Scouts of America the right and permission to use and
publish the photographs/film/video tapes/electronic representations and/or sound recordings
made of me this date by the Boy Scouts of America, and I hereby release the Boy Scouts of
America from any and all liability from such use and publication.
I hereby authorize the reproduction, sale, copyright, exhibit, broadcast, electronic storage and/or
distribution of said photographs/ film/video tapes/electronic representations and/or sound
recordings without limitation at the discretion of the Boy Scouts of America and I specifically
waive any right to any compensation I may have for any of the foregoing.

                                 PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY
Name: _______________________________________________________________
Address: _____________________________________________________________
City: ___________________________ State: ____________ Zip: __________
Phone Number: _______________________________________________________
Signed: ______________________________________________________________
Guardian: ____________________________________________________________
                                (if under the age of 18)
Witness: _____________________________________________________________
Session Date: ___________________

      Council Use Only:
    Image file name: ______________________________________




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 36 of 51                         15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                      Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents


                   Appendix 9 – Abbreviation Explanations

APL             Assistant Patrol Leader - Youth second leader of a patrol. Appointed by
                the PL to help him and take his place in his absence. An alternate
                member of the PLC which runs the troop.

ASM             Assistant Scoutmaster - A commissioned volunteer, 18 or older,
                appointed by the chartered organization, who helps the SM administer
                the troop program. The term SA is used on applications and other
                literature. See Also: SA

ASPL            Assistant Senior Patrol Leader - Appointed by the SPL with the SM's
                advice and consent, he helps to run the troop with the SPL and the PLC.
                See Also: SPL

BOR             Board of Review - A review held to determine if a Boy Scout has
                satisfactorily completed rank advancement requirements. May also be
                held as an incentive for Scouts not advancing. For first 5 ranks, BOR is
                held by the troop committee, for the Eagle Scout rank, the council
                decides whether district or council advancement committee is
                responsible. See Also: COH

Camporee        Derived from two words: camp and jamboree. A district of council troop
                activity to demonstrate techniques of living in camp. Involves a one- or
                two-night camping experience. May involve Scoutcraft competition.

CC              Committee Chair- The adult leader of the troop committee, may also be a
                member of the chartered organization. Provides the motivation and
                direction to the committee to get the Troop Program implemented, as
                decided by the PLC.

CO              Chartered Organization - A religious, civic, fraternal, educational, or other
                community-based organization that has applied for and received a
                charter to operate a BSA Scouting unit. For Troop 1659 this is “Friends
                of Whitney Lodge” commonly referred to as FOWL.

COH             Court Of Honor- A ceremony to honor and recognize Scouts for their
                achievements and rank advancements. A special COH is used when a
                Scout reaches Eagle. See Also: BOR

COR             Chartered Organization Representative- An adult representative of the
                group or organization that currently holds the BSA Charter. Reports
                information to and from the chartered organization, and the Troop.
                Represents the organization with the local council.

Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 37 of 51                     15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                  Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents


Crackerbarrel            Quick snack before bedtime usually on campout

DC              Den Chief - A Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, or Explorer who helps direct the
                activities of a den. Appointed by the SPL, with SM advice and consent.
                Also Webelos den chief, who provides the same function for a Webelos
                den.

FCE             First Class Emphasis – When a new Scout joins, his main goal is to work
                towards getting his First Class Rank.

FCE Coordinator          VOLUNTEER in charge of organizing and running the FCE Program.

JASM            Junior Assistant Scoutmaster - Scouts, 16 to 18 years old, who help the
                SPL. Appointed by the SPL with the advice and consent of the SM.

JLT             Junior Leader Training (1st) – also called TJLT - A training course for
                junior leaders conducted by the troop, featuring Scoutcraft and
                leadership skills. Taught by the PLC and SM shortly after Troop elections.

NJLIC           National JLT (3rd) now called Red Wolf. Focus is on training Scouts to
                teach NYLC. Used to be taught at Philmont but now taught by the
                Council. Usually one week long.

NYLC            Council JLT, (2nd) now called Grey Wolf. (formerly NJLT) Intense
                leadership training taught by the Council. Focus is to train scouts to bring
                leadership back to the troop and to teach TJLT. Usually one week long.

Philmont        Philmont Scout Ranch - The 136,000 acre scout reservation near
                Cimmaron, MN. Each year Philmont hosts Scouts and other groups
                participating in high-adventure hiking and treks. A rugged, outback
                experience usually lasting 11 days.

PL              Patrol Leader - Youth leader of a patrol consisting of between 5-8 other
                boys. As a member of the PLC he helps make the decisions that run the
                troop. He appoints his APL

PLC             Patrol Leaders Council - The youth leaders of a BSA troop. The PLC
                consists of the SPL, ASPL, PLs, APLs, & Troop Scribe. They should be
                trained by the SM, through Troop JLT, to do the planning and running of
                the troop. Planning, Leadership, Communications.

SM              Scoutmaster- Adult leader head of the troop. A commissioned
                VOLUNTEER, 21 or over, appointed by the chartered organization.
                Provides direction and training to the Scouts so they can run a troop

Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 38 of 51                    15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                 Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents

                more effectively. Works with the troop committee and the chartered
                organization representative to provide program opportunities and
                direction.

SPL             Senior Patrol Leader - Youth Leader of the troop. He is elected by the
                members of the troop and is the head of the PLC. He appoints his ASPL.

TC              Troop Committee - A group of adult volunteers led by the CC to get the
                troop program implemented, as decided by the PLC.

Wood Badge A training award granted upon completion of the Wood Badge course. A
           leather thong with two wooden beads, a special neckerchief, and a slide
           (woggle) are worn by those who have completed training. This Course is
           highly recommended for all active unit leaders

YPT             Youth Protection Training - Guidelines and policies, in place, to help fight
                child abuse. This BSA Emphasis fights child abuse by teaching youth the
                "three R's": Recognize, Resist, and Report child abuse; by helping
                parents and Scouters learn to recognize indicators of child abuse; and by
                teaching them how to handle child abuse situations




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 39 of 51                    15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                 Revision 1.1
                             A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents


Appendix 9 – Troop Calendar

Current Troop Calendar is an attachment to this document, and available on-line on the
Troop’s Web site.


The Troop Calendar is updated yearly during the summer planning meeting




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 40 of 51                 15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                              Revision 1.1
     Troop 1659 Program
           Policies




              A Supplement to
A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents
             Supplement – Program Policies - A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 42 of 51                    15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                 Revision 1.1
             Supplement – Program Policies - A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents


Contents

Parental / Guardian Participation
Camping & Activity Policy
Advancement Policy
Board of Review Policy

   (The information contained in this packet is in addition to and supersedes information
  contained in the “A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents”. This is a living document
           and subject to change by the Scoutmaster and / or Troop Committee.)




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 43 of 51                    15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                 Revision 1.1
              Supplement – Program Policies - A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents


 PARENTAL / GUARDIAN INVOLVEMENT

 It is the policy of Troop 1659 to not only foster an environment where the boys can grow and mature
 in their confidence, moral values and community involvement, but also to succeed in their goals.
 While Scouting recognizes the necessity for Scouts to experience and conquer on their own and to
 “have their own space,” it also recognizes the value of family and the value of parental wisdom and
 encouragement. While our troop has a Staff of dedicated Adult Leaders, it is not the same as a
 member of one’s own family. Statistics show that approximately 4% of Boy Scouts achieve
 Scouting’s highest rank of Eagle Scout. Of those 4%, virtually all have had the benefit of Direct
 Adult parental / guardian participation and support, on our Troop’s activities and campouts. In
 contrast, the remaining 96% of Scouts are dropped off to have fun. While FUN is one of the
 primary objectives in Scouting, statistics show that approximately half of these Scouts quit Scouting
 within the first 2 years.

 The Reason: They do not learn sufficient skills or advance in rank at the same pace as their peers
 and, consequently, their friends pass them up in many areas, particularly ability and confidence.
 We want your son to not only have fun, but to maintain a position of responsibility and respect with
 his peers, thereby having a sense of pride in not only his accomplishments, but in those around
 him. We want him to have every opportunity to achieve his highest goals.

      It is pursuant to this end that the Scoutmaster and Committee of Troop 1659 highly
    encourages you to become active as an Adult Leader (Old Goats Patrol Member) of our
  Troop, as an Assistant Scoutmaster, Committee Member, Activity Counselor (Merit Badges,
                       Fundraising, Community Service) or just a camper.

 Your participation sends a Big message to your son; you really care!

 Mention to any Adult Leader that . . . . . . You want to help, we will find an area for you to help as
 much or as little as you can.

  The Troop Resource Survey form should be completed and that way we will know your interest and
skills to assist when we have needs.




 Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 44 of 51                          15 March 2006
 Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                       Revision 1.1
             Supplement – Program Policies - A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents

TROOP RESOURCE SURVEY




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 45 of 51                    15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                 Revision 1.1
             Supplement – Program Policies - A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 46 of 51                    15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                 Revision 1.1
             Supplement – Program Policies - A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents


CAMPING and ACTIVITY POLICY

BSA Sam Houston Area Council (SHAC) allows parental / adult guardian participation in all
Scouting activities. For the purpose of this policy, all non-registered youth are considered Guests.
BSA Sam Houston Area Council (SHAC) prohibits Guests from attending Boy Scout camping
events while on Boy Scout property. This extends to Camp Strake and summer camps on SHAC
Property.

Troop 1659 encourages parental / guardian participation in ALL Scouting Campouts and Activities.
All adults who attend Scouting campouts and camp with the troop must be registered leaders as
defined by the BSA, with the minimum leader training. All Guests must contact the Scoutmaster,
prior to attending Troop Campouts and Activities. *

On campouts, all Registered Leaders will sleep in the area selected for adults. Scouts must sleep in
the area selected for youth. Adults may only sleep with a Scout that is their son.

If guests are to attend an event or a campout, as permitted and defined above, at least one
parent / adult guardian must constantly monitor the Guest. The Guest must be in the adult’s
full view at all times. All registered Scouts must remain with their troop / patrol, must eat
and sleep with their troop / patrol, and must participate in all events with his troop / patrol.
The Guest and adult guardian may visit and participate in troop activities*, but must eat,
sleep and use shower / bathroom facilities separate from or at different times than the troop/
patrol.

No Scout is allowed to leave the immediate camping area without permission from the
Scoutmaster or his delegate. Scouts must be on the buddy system at all times and must
adhere to the troop discipline and other troop policies.

Guest transportation, medical needs, and all necessary expenses are the responsibility of the Adult
Guardian.

*The Scoutmaster or his delegate reserves the right to have final approval or modification of all
guest participation.




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 47 of 51                        15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                     Revision 1.1
             Supplement – Program Policies - A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents

ADVANCEMENT POLICY

The Troop’s Advancement Chairman will monitor all youth Merit Badges and Rank Advancement.

Rank Advancement
It is BSA’s recommendation and Troop 1659’s position that new Scouts are to have the opportunity
to advance to the rank of First Class Scout, approximately within the Scout’s first year in scouting.
Our program is designed to achieve this goal. The Scout’s participation in meetings, campouts and
special events is necessary to meet these goals.

Scouts must purchase the latest edition of the Official Boy Scouts of America Handbook and must
record the completion of all requirements for rank advancement in this Handbook. Scouts must
bring their Handbook to all Troop Meeting, Campouts and Boards of Review.
Requirements for Ranks up to First Class may be worked on (started, completed and signed off) at
the same time, but they must be awarded in the order listed in the Scout Handbook. There are no
time constraints for the rank of First Class or under. The ranks of Star, Life and Eagle must be
worked on one at a time, in the order listed in the Scout Handbook. Scouts may wear only one rank
at a time. Scouts must wear the highest rank awarded.

Only Registered Adult Leaders (ASM, SM, Advancement Chair), may sign off requirement in the
Scout Handbook.
JASM, Youth Troop Guides, or Scoutmaster-designated youth may sign off on an advancement
requirements from First Class and under with ASM or SM supervision and agreement.

Parents or Family members (including parents who are BSA Registered Leaders) may NOT
sign off on their own son’s Rank requirement completion.

Requests for signatures in the Scout Handbook, Scoutmaster Conferences, and Boards of Review
should be made during Troop meeting and / or outings. These requests might require a scheduled
time as some items take time to complete. However ever effort will be made to accommodate the
request as soon as possible.

The Troop’s “Scout to First Class” Advancement Chair or Vice Chair will coordinate all Scout
advancement to the rank of First Class.

Merit Badges (MB)

Before a Scout can start any Merit Badge:
1. He must be Personally approved by the Scoutmaster or his delegate,
2. He must then obtain a Merit Badge blue card signed by the Scoutmaster and then
3. He must have the Troop’s Advancement Chairman record his starting the MB Start.

After the above requirements are met, the Scout must have a buddy and meet with the MB
Counselor to start the MB. The Scout is not allowed to start any MB until he meets with a
Registered SHAC MB Counselor, approved by the Troop Scoutmaster. The Scoutmaster may
delegate this to the Advancement Chairman.

A Scout must be Life Rank or at least 14 years old prior to starting the following Merit Badges:
      Family Life, Personal Management and Citizenship in the World.

Credit may be denied to Scouts failing to meet the above requirements.

Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 48 of 51                        15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                     Revision 1.1
             Supplement – Program Policies - A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents

BOARD OF REVIEW POLICY


                                      Purpose of a Board of Review

The members of a Board of Review should have the following objectives in mind:

       To verify the Scout has completed the requirements for the rank.
       To evaluate the quality of the experience the Scout is having in Troop 1659.
       To encourage the Scout to progress further.
       To provide quality control on advancement within the Troop.
       To provide an opportunity for the Scout to develop and practice interview skills.
       To provide an opportunity for the Scout to review his accomplishments.
       Is the Scout having fun?
       Does he desire any changes?
       Is he having any problems?

The Board of Review is NOT a re-test; the Scout has already been tested on the skills and
activities required for the rank. However, the Chairperson of the Board of Review should
ensure that all the requirements have been signed off in the Scout's handbook. Additionally,
the Chairperson should ensure that leadership and merit badge records are consistent with
the requirements for the rank.

The Board of Review is an opportunity to review the Scout's attitudes, accomplishments and his
acceptance of Scouting's ideals. All members of the board should strive for a “positive” and cheerful
conclusion to each BOR.

Other purposes of the BOR may be to assist the Scoutmaster, in discussing a Scout’s lack of
advancement, a Scouts behavior or a Scouts attitude, etc.


Composition of a Board of Review

For all ranks (except Eagle) and Eagle Palms, the Board of Review consists of at least three
members (max of 6) of the Troop Committee, all of who have participated in a Board of
Review Orientation Session. Committee Members and members of the community (both in
and out of Scouting) may serve on a Board of Review. The Chairperson of the Board of
Review should have experience sitting on several previous Boards of Review. Relatives or
guardians may not serve as members of a Scout's Board of Review. The Scoutmaster and
Assistant Scoutmasters should not participate in a Board of Review.

Board of Review Candidate Requirements

The Troop 1659 Class “A” uniform is required for ALL Board of Reviews. See Troop Uniform Policy
for definition of the Class “A” uniform. If the Scout is out of uniform (this includes missing a required
item), he may not attend the Board of Review.

Prior to a Board of Review, all Scouts must attend a Scoutmaster Conference. The Scoutmaster or
his delegate must sign off on the completion of this requirement in the Scout’s handbook. In
addition, the Scout must bring his Scout handbook to the Board of Review. The Board may
examine his records, but, as stated above, may not retest the Scout on requirements already

Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 49 of 51                          15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                       Revision 1.1
             Supplement – Program Policies - A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents

signed off. The Scout’s handbook is his personal record and is his personal property. As such,
only completion initials and date are to be entered in the Scout’s handbook. The BOR members
may NOT write in or remove from the Scout’s handbook.

                                          Board of Review Decision

When the Board of Review has completed its interview, the Scout is excused from the room.
The Board members then consider whether the Scout is ready for the next rank; the Board's
decision must be unanimous. While failure to pass a Board of Review is unusual, Scouts should
never be given the impression that passing is automatic. Nervous “jitters” and less-than-perfect
responses to interview questions should NOT disqualify the Scout from advancing to the
next rank. The Board of Review should decline to approve the Scout’s advancement in rare
cases where:

           The Scout’s deficiency in the skills and knowledge required for the rank is so
            pronounced the Board members question whether the sign-off and Scoutmaster
            Conference were properly carried out; or
           The Scout demonstrates a complete lack of understanding and acceptance of
            Scout Spirit and Scouting ideals, such that the Board members feel the Scout’s
            advancement would be a disservice both to the Scout and to the Troop.

Once the decision is made, the Scout is invited back into the room, and the Chairperson
informs the Scout of the Board's decision. If the Scout is approved for the next rank, there
are general congratulations and handshakes all around, and the Scout is encouraged to
continue advancing. If there are issues that prevent the Scout from advancing to the next
rank, the Board must detail the precise nature of the deficiencies. The Scout must be told
specifically what must be done in order to be successful at the next Board of Review.
Typically, an agreement is reached as to when the Scout may return for his subsequent
Board of Review. The Chairperson must send a written follow up, to both the Scout and the
Scoutmaster, regarding the deficiencies and the course of action needed to correct them.


The Board of Review (BOR) may be used for several purposes. One purpose is to ensure that the
Scout has met the requirements for the rank he is being reviewed on and is ready to advance to the
next rank. It is NOT to be a retest of his requirements. Though a Scout may sometimes not pass
an initial BOR, it is not intended to be a pass / fail evaluation. The Board of Review is used as a
gauge to evaluate the effectiveness of the troop program, i.e.: Has the Scout completed all the
requirements? Is the Scout having fun? Does he desire any changes? Is he having any
problems? In the rare circumstance that the Board of Review finds that the Scout is not ready to
advance to the next rank, the Board must inform the Scout what he needs to do to complete his
requirements. The Board MUST follow up with a letter to the Scout, restating the reasons for its
decision. Toward the end of each BOR, the Advancement Chairman or designated board
chairperson should excuse the Scout candidate for a few minutes. The BOR members will use this
time to discuss their decision. When a decision is reached, the Chairperson will ask the Scout
candidate to return and inform him of the board’s decision.




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 50 of 51                      15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                   Revision 1.1
             Supplement – Program Policies - A Guide for the New Scout and his Parents




Troop 1659 – Houston, Texas                 Page 51 of 51                    15 March 2006
Sam Houston Area Council – Polaris District                                 Revision 1.1

								
To top