ETHICAL THEORIES by MikeJenny

VIEWS: 163 PAGES: 5

									                                          Ethics ‐ Ethical Theories Review




                                                                  Socrates

                                                                    Greece (470 to 400 bC)
                                                                    Was Plato’s teacher
                                                                    Didn´t write anything
                                                                    Died accused of corrupting the youth and not 
   ETHICAL THEORIES                                                  believing in the gods of the city
                                                                    Creator of the mayueutic method of teaching
                                                                    He is considered as the father of Ethics
                    Review
                    week 6 session 11
                                                                                                                       2




                                                                Socrate’s chain of injustices
  Socrate’s theory of virtue

    Virtue relates to the science of good.                      It is better to suffer an injustice than to 
    Evil or bad actions are a result of ignorance,               commit one.
     because people would do good actions if they                High moral value.
     knew what is right and how much good they can 
     do
     do.                                                         Is not against self defense, but against 
    Mankind with free will always have the                       committing a new injustice to defend yourself.
     possibility to choose between several different             There’s no way to cut a chain of injustices but 
     goods.                                                       with this principle.
    Knowing good is not enough. The righteous use 
     of freedom is needed to pick the correct good               Only with the use of free will in the opposite 
     under some given circumstances.                              way of injustice will we be able to rise human 
                                                                  relations to an essentially human level.
                                                        3                                                              4




Sophism and moral relativism                                    Sophism and moral relativism 

                                                                 The positive side or this moral relativism is the 
 Sophists are capable to defend the pro and the                  fact that conscience is a subjective norm of 
  con of any proposition, and often propose the                   morality, so each man must be guided by his 
  fake as true.                                                   own conscience.
 Main representatives: Protagoras and Calicles.                 On the negative side, it denies that there is a 
 P                id   h                h  d 
  Protagoras considers that every truth and                       criterion and an absolute value (objective 
  every value depend on each person and his/her                   norms) to which every human and every 
  own criterion, and that values change                           conscience judgment must abide. 
  according to places and epochs.                                Moral relativism overvalues humans’ abilities, 
 Calicles considers that authority corresponds to                knowledge and criterion.
  the one that oversteps the others, either by a                 One quality defines authority: to know how to 
  force that is physical, thought, influence, etc.                capture and promote the common good.
                                                        5                                                              6




                                                                                                                           1
                                             Ethics ‐ Ethical Theories Review




    Plato’s idealism                                                 Plato’s values and virtues

     Greece. (427‐347 bC)                                            The main value is the spiritual Idea.
     Socrates' disciple, he wrote his  famous                        The top of all ideas is the idea of goodness.
      dialogues. 
     Each person exists since before he is born in this 
                                                                      Virtues are the perfection of the soul.
      world. Spiritual souls live in the world of Ideas.              The four main virtues are: prudence, 
      The gods punished men and gave them a                            fortitude, justice and temperance.
      material body. With this new body, men forgot 
      the Ideas. The objective of this life is to purify the          Prudence is about reason, fortitude is the 
      material body, several times (reincarnation) until               virtue of will, temperance is the virtue for 
      men remember the ideas after being perfectly                     desire, and justice is the harmony between all 
      purified.                                                        the parts of the soul. 
                                                                 7                                                          8




    AristotlE’s eudaemonism                                          AristotlE’s eudaemonism
 Greece (384‐322 bC)
                                                                      The man looks for his own good. That is the 
 His specialty is in Biology.                                         ultimate goal: his happiness, his own 
 All beings are made of material and shape.                           perfection…
              g                         p
  Human beings are made of these two parts                            Eudemonism means happiness in Greek.
  (body and soul)
                                                                      Reason allows man to act according to his
 Both parts are intimately joined together.                           own nature, and to achieve the development
 Men are born without knowledge. Everything                           of all his potential.
  must go by through the senses.
                                                                      For Aristotle is the same to be happy, to be
 Our senses let us be in contact with the                             perfect, to develop owns potential and to act
  material and to create ideas and universal                           with moral value.
  concepts.
                                                                9                                                           10




    Aristotle's virtues                                              Stoicism and hedonism

     A virtue is a perfection of a human faculty.                    Stoic is a person who governs himself exclusively 
                                                                         by his reason, not letting impulses or passions 
     A virtue is like a good habit, so is a stable and                  influence him.
      acquired disposition that makes it easier to                                                       q y
                                                                         Reason leads the man to an adequacy of his own 
         t  i ht
      act right.                                                         nature, and with the nature of the cosmos.
     There are moral and intellectual virtues.                         Hedonism have the pleasure as the supreme 
     Right actions produce happiness, specially in                      value. 
      a life governed by reason rather than                             To produce the greater pleasure with the 
                                                                         minimum pain.
      pleasure.
                                                                        Virtues are subordinated to pleasure.

                                                                11                                                          12




                                                                                                                                 2
                                           Ethics ‐ Ethical Theories Review




    christianity                                                    Thomism
 Is a conceptual system based on the life of                      St. Thomas Aquinas (1225 –1274)
    Christ.                                                        Men come from God, and their end is also God.
   God is love. Men have free will to correspond to 
    the love of God. Men’s talents belong to God                   God is all good, objective, absolute and perfect. 
    and were given by Him
    and were given by Him.                                         God is the operative objective of men  and in 
                                                                    God is the operative objective of men, and in 
   All the pain, death, sadness, failure,                          Him men find happiness.
    contradictions, humiliation, poverty, etc., help               A human act should be: it must be voluntary, 
    to elevate humans to transcendental values.                     and be free.
   Forgiveness is an essential part.                              The sources of morality are: the object, the 
   Unification of all human beings in only one                     purpose and the circumstances. 
    body.
                                                             13                                                           14




    Thomism’s righteous reason                                      Kant
                                                                   A man should place a moral norm upon himself 
     The norm of morality is the righteous reason. It is           and obey it. This is his duty. 
      faithful to its own essence, works according to its 
                                                                   An action is morally right if it is in agreement 
      own laws, its own objective, instead of adapting              with moral rules/norms.
      to strange laws and ends.
                                                                   Goodness is subordinated to duty. The 
     Reason is the immediate measure of all human                  universality of a law flows from the intrinsic 
      actions, and it is regulated or guided by the                 goodness of the law.
      natural laws.                                                Autonomy, a core concept, means that a man  
     Also considers the conscience as a subjective                 should, on his own, be able to determine 
      norm of morality. Each person has his/her own                 through reasoning what is morally correct.
      conscience, which must be molded to judge                    Ethics is “a priori”, so it is independent of any 
      righteously.                                                  empiric goods known a posteriori. 
                                                             15                                                           16




Marx                                                                Marx’s ethics

     His doctrine is the base of communism.                          God doesn’t exist.
     According to Marxism, the matter part                           The foundation or base to distinguish right 
      creates the spirit, and not the other way                        from wrong is loyalty to communism.
      around.                                                         Burgesses and capitalists are the moral stain 
     Material is the objective being that exists                      of humanity. 
      independent from the conscience.                                The ideal and mystic of the party is the social 
     Conscience and thought, as they are                              justice.
      immaterial, are a property, a function and a                    Moral is a form of social conscience, thus it 
      product of the matter.                                           depends of the economic‐social relations of 
     There aren’t any spiritual beings (no God)                       the time.
                                                             17                                                           18




                                                                                                                               3
                                       Ethics ‐ Ethical Theories Review




Sartre’s existentialism                                        sartre

 Man is freedom. He transcends the material                    In practice, the use of freedom leads to a 
    order. His freedom precedes the essence.
                                                                 state of anxiety: the one of the responsibility 
   What you already lived, is in the past, and is 
    called the essence. But what is essentially human            that brings a completely free choice.
    is his existence or freedom
    is his existence or freedom.                                M   h     th ti  li                   i h d lif  
                                                                 Men who are authentic, live an anguished life. 
   Values are created by human freedom. 
                                                                The rest of them, seek for refugee in already 
   The man creates the value when he acts with 
    freedom, with absolute autonomy.                             made rules and regulations, not using their 
   Each person’s worth depends on his/her free                  freedom and avoiding their responsibility.
    actions, and not in the submission to a hierarchy           Human relations are like a fight for the 
    of values already made.
                                                                 other’s freedom.
                                                         19                                                          20




Pragmatism and sociologism                                     Freud’s psychoanalysis

 Pragmatism considers as truthful that which                   His great discovery is the subconscious. 
    produces success in practice.                               Freud’s Super‐ego relates to Ethics.
   It is only good if it leads efficiently to the 
                                                                The Super‐ego is the set of rules and conduct 
    achievement of a goal or objective.
                                                                 guidelines that the kid receives (passively) 
   Sociologism is the exaggeration of the role of 
    sociology in sciences.                                       from his parents and other authorities.
   It considers that our moral conscience is                   He considers that moral conscience of every 
    molded by the society and is the society’s                   man has its origin in the Super‐ego and all the 
    way of expressing.                                           norms learned by the child. 
   Society is the only source of moral authority.
                                                         21                                                          22




Scheller’s axiology                                            Scheller’s values

 Values are independent of the experience.                    Values are:
 They are known with the intuition, and are                    Ideal qualities.
  not accessible from the reason.                               Not logical.
 There are two kinds of intuition: eidetic and                 K          i i
                                                                 Known a priori
  emotional.                                                    Objective
 Eidetic intuition is rational and deals with                  Transcendent
  logical essences like math and axioms.                        Material
 Emotional intuition deal with values.                         Distinguish from the goods, that are de ones 
                                                                 which have the value.
                                                         23                                                          24




                                                                                                                          4
                                     Ethics ‐ Ethical Theories Review




utilitarianism                                               Natural laws

 The moral worth of an action is determined by                The law of nature is one whose content is set by 
  the happiness it provides.                                    nature and that therefore has validity 
                                                                everywhere.
 It is a form of consequentialism, because the 
  worth is determined by the outcome of an 
                           y                                   Natural laws refers to the use of reason to 
                                                                analyze human nature and deduce binding rules 
  action.                                                       of moral behavior.
 “The greatest food for the greatest number of               Some principles are:
  people”: either pleasure (hedonistic                         There are certain natural tendencies or purposes 
  utilitarianism), pluralistic goods (friendship,               in things.
  knowledge, beauty), or preference utilitarianism.            What is natural is, in general, to be followed.
 Majority vs. minority interests                              Natural goals are to be achieved.

                                                      25                                                              26




Finnis’ Personal values                                      Basic Values: 
                                                           1. Life (including bodily and sexual integrity, health, 
 Based not on the natural purposes of our human 
  organs and faculties, but on the basic values of            procreation and nurturing of children) 
  the human person.                                        2. Play 
 Human persons have deep seated inclinations 
  Human persons have deep‐seated inclinations              3. Aesthetic experience
  towards a whole range of goods and values,               4. Knowledge of the truth in all its forms
  which are judged to be both desirable and                5. Conformity of action to practical reason (including 
  humanly fulfilling.                                         self‐determination and authenticity) 
 Our potential, then, for personal growth and             6. Friendship with other human persons (including 
  integral human fulfilment is realised by                    various kinds of love and community) 
  participation in these personal goods and values
                                                           7. Friendship with God (religion).
                                                      27                                                              28




                                                                                                                           5

								
To top