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7c

VIEWS: 37 PAGES: 55

									                                                 FOR COUNCIL MEETING OF: :           June 27, 2011
                                                         AGENDA ITEM NO                  7 (c)


TO:           ~WR             AND CITY COUNCIL
             c__;Y~t\_)~
THROUGH: LINDA NORRIS, CITY MANAGER                        /

FROM:            VICKIE HARDIN WOODS, DIRECTORVfJ
                 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT

SUBJECT:          NEIGHBORHOOD PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM


ISSUE:
Status Report on Neighborhood Partnership Program

RECOMMENDATION:
Information only.

BACKGROUND:
1. The Neighborhood Partnership (NP) Program is a collaborative process that engages
   stakeholders to work together to identify and address issues in specific neighborhood
   areas.

2. In 1997, in response to an increased need for social services in the South East Salem
   Neighborhood Association (SESNA) area, the City in conjunction with area
   stakeholders, formed a Steering Committee. In 2001 the process was replicated in
   Highland. Over the years, the structure of the committees have changed, but both still
   serve to solicit neighborhood input, guide the process, set goals and coordinate a
   variety of efforts to improve neighborhood livability.

3. More than a decade of bringing neighbors, community partners and local government
   together to build stronger neighborhoods has prompted growth in citizen participation,
   facilitated numerous neighborhood improvement projects and contributed to the overall
   betterment of the physical and social conditions of the neighborhood areas.

4. In January 2011, the City restructured this program to a "Rotating Partnership" model
   giving it the flexibility to impact multiple areas of Salem within the existing budget. In
   addition, the new structure allows the City to reevaluate each year that support is going
   to neighborhood areas with a combination of the highest need and readiness.

5. The first round of applications was scored based upon demonstrated neighborhood
   need, definable measurable goals for the NP and readiness of partners to work with the
   City in addressing those needs. SESNA was chosen to continue in the Partnership
   Program at least through the end of 2011. The East Lancaster Neighborhood
   Association (ELNA) area was chosen as the first Rotating Partnership.



Neighborhood Partnership Program            Page 1                               June 27, 2011
FACTS AND FINDINGS:
1. In Highland and SESNA positive changes have included increased crime prevention
   efforts, education and empowerment of citizens, cleaner streets and parks. Neighbors
   and community partners report more neighbors talking to and watching out for one
   another, enhanced awareness of neighborhood resources and overall improved
   neighborhood livability.

2. Some indicators of community change can be found in the SESNA and Highland
   Neighborhood Profiles (Attachments A and B) such as shifts in homeownership versus
   rental housing, changes in demographics, crime trends and park vandalism.

3. The total value of the increased civic activity and positive connections made is
   incalculable. Benefits, which can extend beyond the boundary of the Partnership area,
   include tool development, community connections, lessons learned and projects that
   can be replicated in other neighborhoods. In FY 09/10, the Partnership Program
   leveraged over $126,000 in donations, volunteer and in-kind contributions.

CONCLUSION:
1. While SESNA was selected to continue receiving Partnership Support through
   December 2011 before reapplying, participants felt it was important to work on ways to
   sustain efforts of the Partnership Program should City support move to another
   neighborhood next year. The SESNA Partnership Group and the Community Progress
   Team for the South High feeder district decided to join forces. January 19 marked their
   first meeting as the new group, South Salem Connect. With a new Agenda Setting
   Team, Action Teams and meeting format, it is the hope of both groups to continue
   working on SESNA livability efforts while supporting children, families and neighborhood
   livability of all South Salem neighborhoods in the South High area. The group also
   plans to recruit members from beyond the boundaries of SESNA to include others within
   the South High feeder district.

2. East Lancaster Neighborhood Area neighbors and partners have held five regular
   meetings so far, as well as formed two project groups. The focus of one is to publicize
   Partnership Efforts and free resources and the other is working on organizing free
   activities for kids.

3. The City is not currently working with Highland through a Neighborhood Partnership
   Program. However, the North Neighborhoods Community Progress Team (N 2), where
   much of Highland Partnership program work had been taking place, continues to be
   active, as does the Highland Neighborhood Association. Highlanders continue to work
   on Latino outreach efforts; recently organized a second book fair in partnership with
   Highland School and their 18th Annual Summer Concert Series will kick off July 5 at
   Highland Park. Highland or Highland together with other north neighborhoods are
   welcome to apply for the program again next year.




                                                                                  nhancement Administrator

Attachments:                      A.          SESNA Neighborhood Profile
                                  B.          Highland Neighborhood Profile
g:lcd\compliance serviceslstaff reports\2011\status report on np_1.doc

Neighborhood Partnership Program                                         Page 2                      June 27, 2011
South East Salem Neighborhood Association

NEIGHBORHOOD PROFILE




     The Neighborhood Partnership Program
     Assets and Indicators Cf)~ 20/0


                                            ATTACHMENT A
                            TABLE OF CONTENTS


                                                                  PAGE

OVERVIEW                                                            3

SESNA DEMOGRAPHICS                                                  S

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DEMOGRAPHICS                                      7

HOUSING                                                             9

COMMUNITY ASSETS                                                   II
    Businesses                                                     II
    Faith-Based Organizations                                      II
    Parks                                                          II
    Schools                                                        12

ADDITIONAL STAKEHOLDERS AND RESOURCES                              13
      SESNA Neighborhood Partnership Program Steering Committee    13
      Bush Business Partners                                       14
      Richmond Business Partners                                   14
      Civic Groups and Associations                                14
      SESNA Medical Facilities                                     14
      Non-Profit Organizations                                     IS
      Public Buildings                                             IS

PROGRESS.JNDICATORS                                                17
     Child Well-Being                                              17
     Civic Engagement                                              17
     Crtme                                                         18

2009-20 I 0 SESNA PARTNERSHIP GOALS SUMMARY                        21

GLOSSARY                                                           23

ATTACHMENTS                                                        25
                                                 OVERVIEW


The Neighborhood Partnership Program
The Neighborhood Partnership Program engages various Cio/ of Salem departments along with communio/
members and stakeholders to identify and address neighborhood issues and enhance the q_ualio/ of life in a
specific neighborhood area. It is a process that supports neighborhood renewal through partnerships between
neighbors, landlords, the faith communio/. schools, businesses, local government, and anyone interested in
livabilio/ of a neighborhood area.

The Neighborhood Partnership Program was originaljy called the Neighborhood Response Effort or NR£. At the
start of the 08/0!J fiscal_year was renamed to Neighborhood Partnership Program in an effort to reffect that it is
an ongoing partnership process.

SESNA
SESNA, or South East Salem Neighborhood Association, is one of Salem's oldest neighborhoods dating back to
the I840s. It is home to just over 2,I 00 households and approximate!>' 800 businesses. Once an area
suspended in fear because of crime and overwhelming blight, residents and partners have been working on the
Neighborhood Partnership Program (original!>' called NRE) since I997 to create positive change.

Assets
Traditional!>'. neighborhood revitalization begins b_y focusing on the negative aspects of a communi9'. Starting b_y
pointing out the deficiencies and problems in a neighborhood area ignores its capacities and strengths. By
focusing on a neighborhood's assets- resources, skills and capacities- residents and stakeholders can discover
ways to multip!Y their power and the effectiveness of their efforts.

Indicators
The Neighborhood Partnership Program takes a communio/-established set of values and a series of actions
(guided by a Steering Committee) and weaves them together in a communio/-building process. While the total
value of the increased civic activi9' and positive connections made is incalculable, indicators of progress can
include participation levels, leveraged contributions, goals summaries, crime statistics and demographics.

The SESNA Neighborhood Profile captures some of the assets and progress indicators that are followed as part
of the Neighborhood Partnership Program. The indicators observed longest are those related to crime. Other
indicators have been followed more recent!Y.




                                For more information, contact Jessica Loewen Preis
                                 Neighborhood Partnership Program Coordinator
                                  503-588-6207 • jlpreis@cityofsalem.net




                                                         3
                                                SESNA DEMOGRAPHICS


                                                          2000 Census Data
                                                                                                           SESNA*            Salem•




Student
Information~
B=Bush
R=Richmond              2004-2005




/Salem-Keizer School District Testing
Department -- It should also be noted that
according to results of phone surveys of
SESNA neighbors prepared by DRC Research
between 2000 and 2007, an average of 73%
of respondents reported having no children at
home.




                                                                                                             36.1%            57.1%
                                                                                                             63.9%            42.9%
                                                  *Data derived from Census 2000 Summary File 3. All figures are approximate and were
                                                  derived using mathematical operations utilizing GIS spatial functions.
                                                  •Data derived from Census 2000 Fact Sheet for Salem, OR.




                                                                 s
                                                                                                           Total        Speak a language other           Speak Spanish
          2000 Census Language Data                                                                      Population     than En,glish in the home         in the home
  SALEM, OR -- Data derived [rom Census                5 years and older                                 126,426                 17.4%                         12.6%
  2000 Summary File 3 custom table [or Salem, OR.




                                                                         Total                                    Below           At or Above
       2000 Census Income Data                                           Population                            Poverty Level      Poverty Level          Median Income




           Households lncludes!iJmilyandnon-!iJmi!yunits                       50,585              12.3%             87.7%                   $38,881
           Families Includes related children under l8_yrs                     32,53 I             I0.5%             89.5%                   $46,409
     +
    E Individuals Includes 16+_years old with earnings                         74,080                                                        $20,7 45
     v
   ~
    V)
          Total Individuals                                                 128,326                  I 5%            85.0%
              Children under S years                                                               3, 148             8,796
              Children 5-17 years old                                                              3,928             17,830
  Households receiving the following                                          .. "                               "'J:jaJa_Q~flyeMr~{l'lCe_nS(.IS280qi c                 c   cCC



  ~pes of income:
                                                                     r;
                                                                                          n
                                                                                               * Salem• S(.l~!lJ3lJ6IQFk,grQup~-l"<t;and Censu~
                                                                          ·s--··_--E; s:_·_:N···- "---    >
                                                                                                                 tract;~;
                                                                                                                           Fil(!·~-:~ustQrn tablesifor(]en~(JS"L
~-"'-__._________                                                                   9-;;5""".%~o _
                                  P_u_b_li_c_As_s_is-t-an_c_e---J..I....:.-_--7_....... ..,.._-~----4-.S-%-o---1 A~:~~~~n~l~e~~&i~t~~,~· s~e· ·-· ·•·-.- •
                                    Retirement                               13~!3%'                              18.3%         .•[)~tli'dcitl~eqfr~~-~gnsu!,-200bSuliltrt~ry
l----------S-o-c-ia_I_S_e_c_u_ri-~---+...:..:..,:.,.,Z...:..:.B;;.;;.d~?...:..:.._...:..:.%~.--.4----.--%-o- - I ~:ei~ustaml:lbleforcSaleln:oRand fa~t _ ·_:
                                             _
                                                                                                                 26 1




                                                                                       6
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DEMOGRAPHICS
    From Salem-Keizer School District Testing Department




                Total Students Enrolled




                    Percentage of students able
     school
      year                 to          sh weii..Y"'




   classified as Limited




       Oregon Statewide Assessments
              From Oregon Department or Education




                                7
 school
  year
'00-'01




*all Salem-Keizer Elementary Schools




                                       8
                                                           HOUSING


Households*                        2004           2005           2006           2007           2008           2009           2010
Households                         2,358          2,369          2,374          2,381          2,381          2,404          2,138

Owner Occupied**                                1990                          2000
SESNA                                           32.4%                         36.1%
Marion Coun~                                    62.9%                         62.9%
Oregon                                          63.1%                         64.3%

Renter Occupied**                                1990                         2000
SESNA                                            67.6%                        63.9%
Marion Coun~                                     37.1%                        37.1%
Oregon                                           36.9%                        35.7%

*  Data derived From Cio/ of Salem newsletter printing records. In 20 I0 the data collection method was revised to use Geographic
   Information (GIS) soFtware therefore the change between 2009 and 20 I0 may not be as great as it appears, mere!Y more accurate.
** Data derived From Census 2000.




Residential Average Sales Price
SE*     1998 1999 2000 200 I                     2002     2003      2004      2005      2006     2007       2008      2009      20 I 0**
          147,188 151,008 156,006 157,209 165,309 172,718 181,174 207,514 243,589 276,266 256,201 225,732 221,513

* Willamette Valley Multiple Listing Service South East Area: State Street south to the cio/ limits; Commercial Street to the west; and
   Interstate 5 to the east. Includes the SESNA neighborhood and eight other neighborhoods; therefore, average sales price may not
  accurate!Y reflect the older homes Found in SESNA. See Attachment C For map of area.
**Year-to-date December information.



Salem Housing Authority Properties
Shelton Village
2500 block of Lee Street SE (28 units)

SESNA also has two scattered single fami!Y homes and two duplexes that are properties of the Salem Housing
Authorio/.


Habitat for Humanity Homes
2447 Simpson Street SE (year built, 1995)
1643 Hines Street SE (year built, 1992)
I 075 l71h Street SE (year built, 1996)
5 I 0 Ford Street SE (year built, 2008)
520 Ford Street SE (year built, 2008)


                                                                   9
                                                 COMMUNITY ASSETS
Businesses*                                      2006                  2007           2008                2009               2010
Number of Businesses                             446                    238            238                440                 829

*    Data derived from Ci\)' of Salem Newsletter Printing. In 2007 the Ci\)' performed a records audit to determine the accuracy of
     the number of businesses. In 2009, business numbers began being pulied from GIS (Geographic Information System) mapping
     data to include non-residential properties. In 20 I0 the data collection method was revised again using GIS software therefore the
     change between 2009 and 20 I 0 may not be as great as it appears, mere!Y more accurate.

Faith-Based Organizations
Capital Park Wesleyan Church &                                         Reconciliation Church
Southeast Neighborhood Communi~ Ctr.                                   I 520 Waller St SE
41 0 19th Street SE
                                                                       State Street Church of God
Korean Church of Christ                                                1760 State Street
219 Ferry Street SE
                                                                       Victory Outreach Church
Mia Chung Buddhist T em pie                                            466 Richmond Avenue SE (meets at Richmond School)
1485 Mill Street SE

New Life Communi~ Center
41 0 14th Street SE (meets at Bush School)

Nearby Faith-Based Organizations that also serve SESNA residents
Court Street Christian                                 St. john Lutheran Church
1699 Court Street NE                                    1350 Court Street NE

Outward Church
775 Front St. NE
Volunteers at Richmond School

Parks
Aldrich Park                                                           Lee Park
I 5th Street (between Mill & Bellevue Sts. SE)                         22nd Street (between Lee & Shelton Sts. SE)
Park Partners:                                                         Park Partners:
          none                                                                 Marshall Curry
                                                                                David Fletcher
                                                                               Enedelia Romero
Richmond School Park
(East side of Richmond School)                                         Mill Race Park
Park Partners:                                                         Ferry Street at 20th Street SE
         Rick and Nichole Retzman                                      Park Partners:
                                                                               Tom Franco
                                                                                Dwayne Mitzel
                                                                                john Stalnaker
-Park Partner information !iom November 20 I 0

                                                                  II
Schools
Mid-Willamette Valley Communio/                               Barbara Roberts High School
Action Agency Head Start (Pre)                                3620 State Street
219 19th Street SE                                            503-399-SSSO
503-371-8689                                                  Principal, Lorelei Gilmore

Bush Elementary School (Pre-S)                                Tokyo International Universio/ of America
410 14th Street SE                                            I 300 Mill Street SE
503-399-3134                                                  503-373-3300
Principal, Michelle Halter                                    President, Tsugio Tajiri

Richmond Elementary School (K-S)
466 Richmond Avenue SE
503-399-3180
Principal, Lizi Agular-Nelson

Salem-Keizer School District secondary schools for the neighborhood include Leslie Middle School and South
Salem High School.

NOTE: See Attachments D and E for maps of the Bush and Richmond School attendance areas.




                                                             12
                     ADDITIONAL STAKEHOLDERS AND RESOURCES


SESNA NEIGHBORHOOD PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM STEERING COMMITTEE, December 20 I 0 Roster
 AI Younger, No Meth - Not in M_}' Neighborhood         )ill Shier, SESNA Neighbor
 Austin Rowlader, Hands On Mid-Willamette Valley        Jordan Blake, SESNA Garden, M-P Food Share
 Carol Thompson, Neighbor and Capitol Park Member       Kassie DeMarsh, A. C. Gilbert's Discovery Village
 Dave Hayworth, Capital Park Wesleyan Church, SENCC     Laura Clerc, Willamette Director Service Learning
 Don Bryson, Community Volunteer                        Marcia Hoak, Neighbor and SESNA Board
 OJ Vincent, Salem Leadership Found, S Salem            Nichole Retzman, Neighbor and SESNA Board
 Connectors, Leslie After-School Pgm. Emmaus Church     Peter Nagy. SESNA Garden, M-P Food Share
 Eldon Woods, Capital Park Wesleyan Church, SENCC       Rachel Cancino, Outreach Coord Richmond School
 Emily Trussell. Neighbor, Women's Crisis Services      Rick Retzman, SESNA Neighbor
 Gregg Dart, Totally Creative Concepts                  Rob Gould, Neighbor and SESNA Board
 )an Drewes, SE Neighbors Senior Dining Center          Sarah Abe, TIUA Student Services
 )an Munsey, SESNA Neighbor and Board Member            Shawn Adams, SPD, City Liaison to SESNA
 Jed Johnson, Family Building Blocks                    Wendy Pyper, Prudential Real Estate Professional
 Jessica Loewen Preis, Neighborhood Partnership Coord



Partners h'tp MalTmg L'ISt M em bers
 Alison Kelley. Marion Co. CFC                          Luz Rivera, Juntos Podemos
 Ana Rueda, Vida )oven Young Life                       Lyn Troxell, SENCC and K/P Corp
 Annie Thorp, retired Chemeketa Teacher                 Marc & Jennifer Skipper, Outward Church
 Bill Smaldone, SESNA Chair                             Marshall Curry, Willamette U/Kaneko Commons
 Brady Rogers, City Neighborhood Enhancement Div        Melissa Austin, Americorps
 Cathy Walker, Outward Church                           Melissa Gibler, Hands On Mid-Willamette Valley
 Carol Gleason, Salem Sunset Rotary                     Michael Pargeter, Reconciliation Church
 Colin Box, Reconciliation Church                       Michelle Halter, Bush Elementary Principal
 Efrain Garcia, Cavazos Center                          Oscar Zambrano, Salem Police Department
 Federico Leon, Cavazos Center                          Rachel Hirsch, Neighborhood Economic Development Corp
 Elida Perez, Statesman Journal                         Rich Westerlund, Cavazos Center
 Jacob Pratt, Salem Police Department                   Ron Gamble, Cavazos Center
 Jeremy Crofoot, CAN-DO Board                           Sandy Whittington, Bush School Office Manager
 Jim Anglemier, SPD-Community Response Lt.              Shannon Priem, SESNA Neighbor and Board Member
 Kelley VanHook, Willamette U/Kaneko Commons            Teresa Amen, SESNA Compliance Services
 Khela Singer-Adams, Hands On Mid-Willamette Valley     Tiffani Cairo, SESNA Neighbor
 Laura Tesler, City Councilor Ward 2                    Tim Porter, Outward Church
 LeighAnn Greenfield, Kaneko Commons                    Tom McCaffrey, Chemeketa at SE Community Ctr Teacher
 Linda Woods, SENCC                                     Valente Calvillo, Head Start
 Lorenzo Lambertino, Wilamette/TIUA                     Wayne Crowder, Serving Our Veterans at Home
 Loretta Miles, Salem Cinema & SESNA Neighbor




                                                        13
Bush Elementary Business Partners                      Richmond Elementary Business Partners
Capitol Kiwanis                                        Salem Sunset Rotary
Pioneer Trust Bank                                     Capitol Workers-Visitors
Salem Hospital                                         Costco
Willamette Universi~                                   Outward Church


Civic Groups and Associations
Associated Oregon Loggers                              Oregon Tree Farm System
20 IS Madrona Avenue S/PO Box 12339                    PO Box 13556
503-364-1330                                           503-362-0242

Association of Oregon Corrections Employees
2520 19th St SE/PO Box 13357
503-370-9035


SESNA Medical Facilities
Bio-Med Testing Services                               Rodney R. Janssen, DDS
19 52 McGilchrist Street SE                            2235 Mission Street SE # 250
503-585-6654                                           503-371-3220

Brad L. Bateman Fami!Y and Cosmetic Dentistry          Salem Pediatric Clinic
I 005 13th Street SE                                   2478 13th Street SE
503-364-7232                                           503-362-2481

Cochell Fami!Y Dentistry, PC                           Santiam Foot Clinic
2225 Mission Street SE                                 2235 Mission Street SE # I SO
503-585-8688                                           503-581-2505

Dental West Associates                                 Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery
2245 Mission Street SE, Ste I 00                       2266 Mission Street SE
503-399-0220                                           503-375-2000

Marion Coun~ Health Department - Drug Treatment        Oregon Osteoporosis Center
2035 Davcor Street SE                                  1660 Oak Street SE # 240
503-588-5358                                           503-21 S-6586

Mid-Valley Behavioral Care Network                     Salem Communi~ Based Outpatient Clinic
1660 Oak Street, SE, Suite 203                         1660 Oak Street SE, Suite I 00
503-361-2647                                           800-949-1 004 (outside Portland)
                                                       503-220-8262 ext.S 1499 (local)
Retina Consultants Physicians and Surgeons
2450 I th Street SE
503-371-4350




                                                  14
Non-Profit Organizations
Catarino Cavazos Center (former!Y Street Vision)          NorthWest Senior and Disabilio/ Services
220 I 5th Street NE                                       Southeast Neighbors Senior Dining Center
503-363-7261                                              219 19th Street SE
                                                          Salem Or 9730 I
Colson Fami!Y Foundation                                  503-371-0700
2260 McGilchrist Street SE
503-586-740 I                                             Oregon Alliance of Children's Programs
                                                          707 13th Street SE, #290
Easter Seals Senior Communio/ Service Employment          503-399-9076
Program
1313 Mill Street SE                                       Oregon Foster Parent Association
503-362-1 572                                             707 13th Street SE, #275
                                                          503-361-3906
Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington
1922 McGilchrist Street SE
                                                          Oregon Rehabilitation Association
503-581-245 I
                                                          1655 25th Street SE
Habitat for Humanio/ ReStore                              503-585-3337
1249 13th St. SE
503-485-4845                                              Oregon Telecommunications Association
                                                          Scholarship Foundation
Marion Couno/ Historical Socieo/                          707 13th Street SE, # 120
260 12th Street SE                                        503-581-7430
503-364-2128
                                                          Oregon Bankers Association and Bank Source
Medical Foundation of Marion and Polk Counties            777 13th Street SE, # 130
698 12th Street SE, Ste 230                               503-581-3522
503-362-9669

Mission Mill Museum (Part ofWillamette Heritage Center)
1313 Mill Street SE
503-585-7012


Public Buildings
Oregon Department of Forestry                             State of Oregon: Adult and Fami!Y Services
2600 State Street                                         I 185 22"d Street SE

Oregon Lottery Commission                                 United States Postal Service Salem Main Office
500 Airport Road SE                                       I 050 25th Street SE

Oregon National Guard
455 (Bldg A) and 885 (Bldg P) Airport Road SE
3225 State Street
1776 Militia Way SE



                                                    IS
                                             PROGRESS INDICATORS


                                                     CHILD WELL-BEING


                                                                                        90

                                                                                        85

                                                                                        80

                                                                                        75

                                                                                        70
                                                                                        65

                                                                                        60
*Salem-Keizer School District Testing Department                                             '0 I '02 '03 '04 'OS '06 '07 '08 '09 'I 0




                                                    CIVIC ENGAGEMENT



National Night Out Block Parties*
         1998 1999 2000 2001                   2002     2003      2004     2005     2006         2007       2008      2009      2010
SESNA 3          8       4        s              3       2         3         s        2            3          4         3        4
Citywide 81     80      69      92              77       72        80       107      131          144        177       180      157

*Total number registered (with the Salem Police Department) and unregistered parties.




SESNA Neighborhood Watch Participants
Ju!Y I-June30 '02-'03   '03-'04* '04-'0S                     2006**         2007**           2008      2009           2010
Participants    13 I       74         34                      77             77              82        83              83
Block Contacts                                                6              6               s          7               6

*  In January 2004, the Salem Police Department performed a records audit to determine an accurate number of participating
   households.
** In 2006, the Salem Police Department performed another records audit and began tracking Neighborhood Watch participation by
   number of block contacts. Numbers listed here represent October of each year.




                                                                17
                                                                        CRIME

ReEorted Crime Totals
                      1999        2000      2001       2002      2003         2004         2005      2006     2007      2008     2009      2010*
Total Part I**                                                                 845          613       672      482       454     409       349
Total Part II***                                                              I 318        I 170     I 239    I 236     I Oil    I 060     923
Total Part I & II     2,174       2,054     2,029      2,402     2,114        2,163        1,783     1,911    1.718     1,465    1,469     1,272


        3000
        2500
        2000
        1500
        1000                    -ii-Part II
         500                    -&-Part I& II
            0
                    1999      2000       2001      2002       2003     2004         2005      2006     2007      2008     2009     2010




ReEorted Crimes by ~we
                     1999  2000             2001       2002      2003         2004         2005      2006     2007      2008     2009      2010*
Selected Part I Crimes
Larceny (theft)     55 7   553              574        621       552          563          407       457      303       308      256       230
Auto Theft          68     73               77         102       132          92           63        65       59        49       45        25
Selected Part II Crimes
Vandalism                                                                     301          213       189      165       142      125       121
Drugs                                                                         187          141       222      154       125      141       127
Offense Against Fami!Y****                                                    18           33        41       29        20       53        25



                                  -+-Larceny
                                  -til- Vandalism
                                  -k-Drugs

600                               --*-Auto Theft

                                                                              *            Year-to-date December information.
500                                                                           **           Part I includes: aggravated assault, arson, auto theft,
                                                                                           business burglary, justifiable homicide, larceny. murder,
                                                                                           other burglary, rape. residential burglary and robbery.
400
                                                                              ***          Part II includes: assaults, curfew, DUI, disorder!>'
                                                                                           conduct, drugs. embezzlement, escape.
300                                                                                        forgery/counterfeit, fraud, gambling. kidnapping. liQuor
                                                                                           laws, offense against fami!Y. prostitution, runaw~
                                                                                           juveniles, sex offenses, stolen properry. trespass,
                                                                                           vandalism and weapons.
                                                                              ****         Offense Against Fami!Y includes crimes such as child
                                                                                           abandonment. child neglect, endangering the welfare of a
                                                                                           child and criminal mistreatment.

        2004    2005       2006      2007       2008   2009     2010




                                                                          18
Incidents of Park Damage
        1998      1999       2000     2001     2002     2003     2004      2005     2006      2007      2008   2009    2010*
SESNA               I          0        0        I        2        2         5        6         7         4      0       2
SESNA that included graffiti                                                          5         5         3      0       I


Cirywide 99         65          113   72       81       95        101      108       146      231       265    145          147
Cirywide that included graffiti                                                      118      190       232    114          136




                      1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010


*Year-to-date December information




Compliance Services Complaints
                                                    2002                            2009*                      Difference
Propero/ Related Complaints in SESNA                 271                             243                        -10.3%
Abandoned Vehicles in SESNA                          247                             193                        -21.9%
Total Complaints Cirywide                           7,646                           6,710                       -12.2%


*2009 compliance services complaints numbers renect the most accurate estimate available with current data.




                                                                 19
     2009-20 I 0 SESNA Partnership Program Goals Summary
 '           ..   '                                                                                                          ·:

<J       MISSION:                                     To nurture neighborhood /ivabili!Y
                  ........ \                      .                                      .                                                                 .                          ·.·                   ·.                                         ..
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          I<




         ¢ Promote existing communio/ events/activities through partnership program (church bulletins, school
         calendars, SESNA Web site, SESNA listserv, garden listserv, etc.).
         ¢ Organize year-round neighborhood activities including. but not limited to:
             • Spring concert/BBQ
             • Garden Work Parties
             • National Night Out Block Parties
             • National Neighborhood Day event
             • Make a Difference D~ Project(s)
             • Fall leaf raking project


     :~~ighporhobdactMties were.·promqt~d throl{gh.news.fett~rs.the· SE~NA t~len~~r.~th~··new~,>9esignectSE&NJ\~ebs!te, ·e~:··
·.·: rnaii ·.lists and bilingual. flier di~tribution ·for thejun~. ConcertLB(3QjCelebration! ,NN[) and MJ\DI).: ····. · · ·                                                                                                                                     · ·   ·
     Nel~hborho()d <tctiviti,es. induded a Utter PiS~ Up 9/+2/09/NND 9/?0(0~, MADP .IQ/%4/0?:·}¢af:Raking ~roj~d·: Jl/2 F
... & 1215109; MLK                                                bay
                         Service Projects 1/16/10, .Earth thy Cia~den Party 4/24/ I 0 and. I JG<1rden Work Pa~tles between .•. ·
     ·Juo/2009and June.4010. Thisma~es for a. tqtal.of2l events. (GatdertWork Par!)r·cl~t~.in~luqeJu!YJ5,·22;.29, Feb\ .·:·X
       I3;2Q;'27,March9;·13.,Aprli+O;.May8.:22;.andjunel2; 2;~.}' ·· ·
                      '           ~       '                           '
                                                                               ,,; > ·.··· ·
                                                                                   "''   '        '.   '     :
                                                                                                                ·•• •'·
                                                                                                                 -' -             -   / 't      '   . --       '       ' ' ' ' ' ''         -,_   ;;__,--



      In addition the Steering ~dmniitte~s\Jppi~etl.the Ri~h~ortdyYi~ter B#ar~etdd/4;()Q, Spience Night ori4/20/ IOafjd;.;
     ··:ontlnued promotingthe·Bu~hSchQol natur~caphtg project ~ndRidimond. work partie~ and helped to promot~'avarletyof>
      Southeast Neighberhl)od~ornm~nio/; s;enter progr:flll)S and eyents. ·     · · ·          ·             · ·· ·.· · · · ·




         ¢        Increase neighborhood safe9' with activities including, but not limited to:
                   • Coordinating door to door light bulb campaign
                   • Promoting neighborhood watch
                   • Sharing crime prevention information at neighborhood and school activities
                   • Promoting fami!J' safe9' resources


     .Fire
' " ''
              sar~&~nd National. N@1t Ol1t'inforfnatio~ Wasshated with ·raltlllles .at •th~JuneB~QJC~nc:rt;Cklebrati()n'
                          '"_''       •       -   '   •   •   '   •       ~·   -         • ·, -        ,•,              ;   ; -       --   -,   -                  '      -                  "•' ' '             '   '   '   '   -'·   c -   '   - :        -




. ·.·Porch. Hght.and ()lhercrhne prevention tips were shared with nefghbdts durh1~{the MLK                                                                                                                           pay Service Prpject. >
.    Neighb~rnoodPolice Officers and Ci;Firemen were onhand to~nswer QUestioris at NND..~

                                                                                                                                                               21
         ¢            Promote educational opportunities in the neighborhood including, but not limited to:
                       • Communi~ Emergency Response Team (CERT)
                       • Garden Classes
                       • Parenting Classes
                       • Adult Education/Chemeketa at Southeast Neighborhood Communi~ Center (SENCC) Pgm .


..  t:ER,·i~rbgr~rn infcmt~atid~ ~~ss~ar~d. with fa~)lles ~t i&~Jtine~ B~Ojcon~~rt/Celebration{•Y
    Tbe.3r£w Organic;:iGve o~$R;(~.~,L.D,) Star~;qytff~~arden.Pr:gra~~c&~unu~d·tnrough.$epl~~~er,··~(¥hesect1ss~~ ,: •.. :" ....
..ta~g~~~?4th DO"' t~;gr~~ ~n..                                                                        ..~ln\~1~ .~. g<lrd~n ~~q:8rc)vidi~g f?9q~fqf.;)(@9tD:tot<l~~·hs>.ro~ an.d ~ff~r!~t·ry~tr!tl?ri ,:. vl;. ~~ .·
  ei:fuc<lus}nandwer¢·held eve.·                                                                        he~ FrldayJn.Jl1!Y't§roughS~~Jember..2qp~~t;:·                        ·   · ·· · · · · · · · · .· • •·   ·~:   ·
  .• }~. O~~~en Work· P~~tJes wet~;k~ld betweerf·.se~teffi~er.•2009;pnd ~~~~:~~·I ~~allofthe~~~~d~di~gail~ast •sq~e\J~~ent~::•.
.. ofgard~h .educatlon;{or the ~olqnteers .Involved•. ·tn aqdlticm. fl)e May .Earth D~y garderrpartf l9clude(j ?"wor~hqp op .:~;; •·
     inten~j:\(e gardening~;;    · ·                                                       · "• · ~;;                          ·


     GOAtFEngage neighbors, businesses, ~chools~ the falthr~C>rnmuniW. gtivernment. and~rioJ1·prC>tii. ag~llcie:s · irf ···· .·. ·
    Jmproving neighborh()g~livability•. ',,·J. .•. . \ . ·..          . . . ·•· .· . . .· .. ~ . . . . . .· ..
    ',:            ---      :.-            "        ',,       '                        .,   ,··          ·-         '




         ¢ Increase Communi~ Partnerships such as recruiting a business owner, youth representative and
           Bush Elementary representative to the Partnership Program Group.
         ¢ Promote SENCC, communi~ gardens, parks and other neighborhood shared spaces by recruiting
           volunteers and advertising upcoming events on the SESNA Web site, e-mail lists, SESNA
           Newsletter, etc.
         ¢ Improve cross-cultural communication .



.. ·ln<tddi(iOJJ to the even~. C()Otclitiated <Jnd prowo~edJist~d lQ· g()~ls. <me.fhrgQghthree;·.teD . ri~w ille~l?~rs"j()ineq th~ ~E$NA;L
·    Pa~tnership Ste'erlng (::om!TI~t,te€ petwe.en Ju!Y.~.~P~:and(fu!Y 20 I0:. ·•· ~~c.J i~t                        > ' ·•                                                                    · ··· ·
· ·r~ist~ertng. conlmittee alsGrrodl.lced thre;e·oiltniuar.;~~~ghb()rno9q ~artri~?sntp newsleit~M~Qitttib~te~ ··tcr~I1~l1llfngu~t~· :'
   Nelghbo(hoqd Association newsletter.-<aryg---- stveral• C.:()min l.lnl~ newsleU~rs... ' ·
     ,·_,_,;   1     - - ,- -- " , - -   ·, ,".
                                         ' '   :-    - ' .'
                                                          '  -    -   -- _---   -.-:         •    '"     •    "~;       -       > :   - . -- --   ,, -   ~-:   ; ' - '',) '




                                                                                                                                         22
                                                  GLOSSARY

Civic Engagement
The interaction of citizens with their sociery and their government.

Crime
Violations of state laws and ciry ordinances.

Crime Rate
The ratio of crimes in an area to the population (households and businesses) of the area.

Foster Care
Alternative living arrangement for children whose parents are unable to care for them at home for a period of
time.

National Night Out Block Parry
Each year on the evening of the first Tuesday in August, neighbors are encouraged to turn on outside lights and
spend the evening outdoors with fellow neighbors and police. Police agencies support the event by attending
neighborhood block parties and bringing along crime prevention information and mascots. Sponsored by the
National Association of Town Watch since 1983, it is an event celebrated in all SO states, US territories, military
bases worldwide and many Canadian cities.

Student Stabili!}' Rate
The percentage of students that maintained their enrollment the entire school year.




                                                         23
                      ATTACHMENTS


A   South East Salem Neighborhood Association Boundary Map

B   Census Block Groups and Tracts Map

C   South East Area 20 Residential Housing Market Map

D   Bush Elementary School Attendance Area Map

E   Richmond Elementary School Attendance Area Map




                                25
                                      Southeast Salem
                                  Neighborhood Association
                                          (SESNA)
                                   Salem Community DHVE<Iopn1ont Dt;-nartmont




                          Legend

~   Fire Stations   Schools   c::l Neighborhood Boundaries   ~i;;Yil Parks




                                         Attachment A
Attachment B
Attachment C
Attachment D
Attachment E
                             Comments or Questions about this document?
                           Please contact jessica Loewen Preis, Ci!)l of Salem
                            Neighborhood Partnership Program Coordinator
                              503-588-6207 • jlpreis@cio/ofsalem.net




                                           This document is available at:
www.cio/ofsalem.net/Departments/Communio/Development/NeighborhoodEnhancementDivision/neighbor/npe/documents/sprofile.pdr
Highland Neighborhood Association
NEIGHBORHOOD PROFILE




   The Neighborhood Partnership Program
    Assets and Indicators t£>~ Z0/0



                                          ATTACHMENT B
                           TABLE OF CONTENTS


                                                 PAGE

OVERVIEW                                          3

HIGHLAND DEMOGRAPHICS                             s
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DEMOGRAPHICS                    7

HOUSING                                           9

COMMUNITY ASSETS                                 II
    Businesses                                   II
    Faith-Based Organizations                    II
    Parks                                        II
    Schools                                      12

ADDITIONAL STAKEHOLDERS AND RESOURCES            13
      North Neighbors Community Progress Tearn   13
      Highland School Business Partners          14
      Non-Profit Organizations                   14
      Public Buildings                           IS
      Highland Medical Facilities                IS

PROGRESS INDICATORS                               17
     Child Well-Being                             17
     Civic Engagement                             17
     Crime                                        18

SALEM ALLIANCE COMMUNITY SURVEY                  21

2009-20 I 0 HIGHLAND PARTNERSHIP GOALS SUMMARY   23

GLOSSARY                                         2S

ATTACHMENTS                                      27
                                                OVERVIEW


The Neighborhood Partnership Program
The Neighborhood Partnership Program engages various Cio/ of Salem departments along with communio/
members and stakeholders to identify and address neighborhood issues and enhance the QUalio/ of life in a
specific neighborhood area. It is a process that supports neighborhood renewal through partnerships between
neighbors, landlords, the faith communio/. schools, businesses, local government and anyone interested in
livabilio/ of the neighborhood area.

The Neighborhood Partnership Program was originaljy called the Neighborhood Response Effort or NRE. At the
start of the 08/09 fiscal_year was renamed to Neighborhood Partnership Program in an effort to reflect that it is
an ongoing partnership process.

Highland
The Neighborhood Partnership Program began in the Highland Neighborhood Association area in 200 I.
Highland has near!Y 2,400 households and about 140 businesses. It is a neighborhood segmented into pockets
of residential and commercial because of five major arterial streets. A 16-sQuare block area of the neighborhood
known as SQuare One, receives focused efforts as a w~ to create an outward ripple of positive actions.

Assets
Traditionai!Y, neighborhood revitalization begins by focusing on the negative aspects of a communio/. Starting by
pointing out the deficiencies and problems in a neighborhood area ignores its capacities and strengths. By
focusing on a neighborhood's assets- resources, skills and capacities- residents and stakeholders can discover
w~s to multip!Y their power and the effectiveness of their efforts.


Indicators
The Neighborhood Partnership Program takes a communio/-established set of values and a series of actions
(guided by a Steering Committee) and weaves them together in a communio/-building process. While the total
value of the increased civic activio/ and positive connections made is incalculable, indicators of progress can
include participation levels, leveraged contributions, goals summaries, crime statistics and demographics.

The Highland Neighborhood Profile captures some of the assets and progress indicators that are followed as part
of the Neighborhood Partnership Program. The indicators observed longest are those related to crime. Other
indicators have been followed more .recent!Y.




                               For more information, contact jessica Loewen Preis
                                Neighborhood Partnership Program Coordinator
                                503-588-6207 • jlpreis@cityofsalem.net



                                                        3
                                                      2000 Census Data
         HIGHLAND
         DEMOGRAPHICS




H=Highland
B=Baker
D=District       H         D                               B       D                                     B       D
%Indian/
                 2.5       1.7                             2       1.6                                  3.5      1.6
Alaskan

%Black           0.6       1.1                             0       1.0                                   0       1.2


%White          26.5                                      77.8


%Hispanic       55.5                                      6.1                                            II

                 0.6      3.2                              2                                     1.7    2.1      4.1

                 6.6                                      7.1     6.5                                    2.8     3.5

                                                          5.1     6.5                                   9.7      6.3

                         District Testing
Department -- It should also be noted
that according to results of phone
surveys of Highland neighbors prepared
                                                                                                       Highland* Salem•
by DRC Research between 2002 and                                                                         continued        continued
2007, an average of 70.7% of
respondents reported having no children             Median Age                                                33.6          33.6
at home.




                                            *Data derived from Census 2000 Summary File 3. All figures are approximate and were
                                            derived using mathematical operations utilizing GIS spatial functions.
                                            •Data derived from Census 2000 Fact Sheet for            OR.




                                                                    s
                                                                                        Total               Speak a language other              Speak Spanish
           2000 Census Language Data                                                    Population          than English in the home            in the home
 SALEM, OR--         Data derived from Census 2000
 Summary File 3 custom table for Salem, OR.
                                                       Syearsandolder                         126,426                      17.4%                      12.6%

 l:lighl~ndcc:~ [)ataderi~edfr9~t,el1stls2(JOO c-• S}'earsandolder                            .•.•. ~.636 ··_ •-·•-----···-_ 35;5%• . . · ; _-· 31.996 ... ·.·.--.
                                                                                                                                             .•
 Summ~ry~ile3cus£omtablesJofCensusTract),              ~s-17ye::u;s                      --         1•,9!2·                   40;5% . _-. -·    ;J6.f% .-._.. -
 Blp(:k gro~ps J. 3ano4; and Census,Tra~t4..                 •         -. - -_ -        .<      · ··    ·      ·._ •.•     - - --            ·. ··        - -
 B.l?~kgroups-_t and 2. See.Att~ch,.me~tBfor-. •       h'l8-64years~ _-••.--... •.:i ·_•·· · ·s}J94- ••,_-..-··. . ·. 37;J%           ... l · •· c._---- 33.:8%· ·..
 map.         ·        .   >"   •   <         ·_ ·    0 764rtyear.S                 .         < 730 ... •                . . .9.2%        ;• •·· · . 4.8% . <


                                                                            Total                         Below                  At or Above            Median
        2000 Census Income Data                                             Population                 Poverty Level             Poverty Level          Income
, •.._-. ·__ -Household~rrl~''"fe$~111@-andnon~fil~~unz~·-··                ~
                                                                         3;32~ •-· · · <24.9,%                       -. 7s.J%. : ·~·- $28,389
  ·*···· EqmlliesJnc!ua'Ji~Iatedchi!drenu;derFa}l<                      2;179
                                                                        c       _              : 25~396?                   ]4.7%. ·L ._.·$A9,6J3;.·
• ] fneiyidllalslncludesl6-fye~rsold~fthiftinrngJ . · · / -~4~$~21·: .. ·•_•..•-•.·:-•··-. · _._.• \) ;r;_~-8.~-t··--·~ $11 6:,14? . -
                                                                                                     .
 •··:s. 'Totallndivi9ual& · · ·..· ••. · · ··i-:3' •.. -< ·9is~~-· ••··29;4%:c: c ";_tg;fi~f~~'~l·,< ••J·.·. · ·•· -·•-•
 ~•.=: ·   (:hjlgrei)Uilder6'ye~rs·•·•···•-. •}> .-..... _-_ ~--i·.·_ .. -~•.•. . <• ~•··c·A?9·-:::Y- 0;fF~64•;-(· .~r: 0 ; ··
  •··_ . ; C:hfldr¢n.s~ I.ZY¢~u:$ okJ/-t•····-· • L•-·- -··-·. .•                .-••·· ····~~-,-{-~~·q-LJ.l-1~~- •• ·-··. I ,03,4 .•.·.· •· ··.··•··.·E~l·1~
           Households !ndudestamijyandnon-tamijyunits                 50,585                       12.3%                    87.7%             $38,881
           Families !ndudesrelatedchildrenunder/8yrs                  32,531                       10.5%                    89.5%             $46,409
   • E Individuals Includes 16+years old with earnings
     Q.)
                                                                      7 4. 080                                                                $2 0, 7 4 5
   ('3
   V)
           Totallndividuals                                          128,326                         15%                    85.0%
                Children under S years                                                            3, 148                    8,796
                Children S-17 years old                                                            3,928                   17,830




                                                                                    6
                                 ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DEMOGRAPHICS
                                               From Salem-Keizer School District Testing Department




                                                                 Total Students Enrolled




                                               2009-2010



                                                                       Percentage of students able to
                                                 school                         kE       well/




                                              classified as Limited




                                                             Oregon Statewide Assessments
                                                            From Oregon Department Of Education

                                        Percentage of students who meet or exceed standards
                                              (combined total for all  licable




---·--·--·······   ---   ·----······---- ··············---·······---··----·--·--··············-··-··-··----····------··-·-······-············----···--······-·-·-··-···   ····-·····-·······-··-·············--·······--
                                                                                           7
        ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DEMOGRAPHICS CONTINUED


  school




'02-'03
'03-'04
'04-'05




  school




·'03-'04
 '04-'05
 '05-'06
 '06-'07
 '07-'08
 '08-'09
 '09-' 10

*all Salem-Keizer Elementary Schools




                                       8
                                                             HOUSING

Households*                     2004            2005            2006              2007            .2008             2009          2010
Number of Households            2,291           2,291           2,293             2,294            2,272            2,380         2,380

Owner OccuRied**                                   1990                         2000
Highland                                           56.2%                        45.6%
Marion Countr                                      62.9%                        62.9%
Oregon                                             63.1%                        64.3%

Renter OccliRied**                                1990                          2000
Highland                                          43.8%                         54.4%
Marion Countr                                     37.1%                         37.1%
Oregon                                            36.9%                         35.7%

*    Data derived from Ciry of Salem newsletter printing records.
**   Data derived from Census 2000.

Residential Average Sales Price
Central* 1998 1999 2000                   200 I 2002          2003       2004 2005          2006      2007      2008 2009 20 I 0**
           95,538    95,642    99,963    101,358 103,876 109,195 114,336 128,012 154,369 157,079 153,849 144,558 121,048

*    Willamette Valley Multiple Listing Service Central Area: State Street north to Salem Parkw'!}': Willamette River on the west; and
     Interstate S to the east includes the Highland neighborhood. See Attachment C for map of area.
**   Year-to-date December information.


Salem Housing Authority ProRerties
Highland Manor                                                        Southfair Apartments
(Private, Project Based Subsidized Propertr)                          1961 Fairgrounds Road NE (40 units)
 I 169 Highland Avenue NE ( 12 units)
                                                                       Highland also has two scattered single fami!Y homes
Parkway Village Apartments
3143 ih Place NE ( 124 units)



                         .
Habitat for Humanity Homes
I 145 Highland Avenue NE (year built, 2002)


Oxford Homes
Santiam House (men)                                                   Whitney House (men)
1854 Capitol Street NE                                                940 Pine Street NE

Trinib' House (women)                                                 Woodward Oxford House (men)
1798 4 1h Street NE                                                   71 5 Locust Street NE
An Oxford House is an affordable, alcohol and drug-free residential faciliy for individuals in recovery from alcoholism and/or drug
addiction. Salem has two chapters in this national organization.



                                                                     9
                                                  COMMUNITY ASSETS

Businesses*                           2006                 2007                 2008                2009               2010
Number of Businesses                  152                   251                  253                 140                148
*   Data derived from Ci\}' of Salem Newsletter Printing. In 2007 the Ci\}' performed a records audit to determine the accura<:Y of the
    number of businesses. In 2009, business numbers began being pulled from GIS (Geographic Information System) mapping data to
    include non-residential properties


Faith-Based Organizations
Iglesia Del Dios Vivo La Luz Del Mundo                                 St. Vincent de Paul Church
580 Highland Avenue NE                                                 I 025 Columbia Street NE

Immanuel Baptist Church                                                Shekina Fellowship
 1991 Hazel Street NE                                                  2465 Broadw<!)l Street NE

Mt. Olive Missionary Baptist Church                                    Salvation Army
2325 41h Street NE                                                     Fami!Y Services
                                                                       1977 Front Street NE
Salem Evangelical Church
                                                                       Homeless Shelter
455 Locust Street NE
                                                                       190 I Front Street NE
Seventh Day Adventist Salem Communi9' Center                           Transitional Housing
1860 Summer Street NE                                                  1960 Water Street NE


Nearby Faith-Based Organizations that also Serve Highland Residents
                                                        Salem Central Seventh Day Adventist Church
Salem Alliance Church                                   1330 Summer Street NE
555 Gaines St NE
                                                        The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter D<!)l Saints
Broadw<!)l Commons (of Salem Alliance Church)           570 Madison Street NE
 1300 Broadway Street NE                                Provides meeting space for Neighborhood Watch
Includes Free Medical Clinic, Broadway Coffeehouse,
Meeting Rooms, Office Space and Outdoor Plaza           Jason Lee United Methodist Church
                                                        820 Jefferson Street NE
                                                        Food bank serves Highland residents

Parks
Highland Park                                                          River Road Park
2 120 Broadw<!)l Street NE                                             3045 River Road N
Park Partners:                                                         Park Partners:
        Nomi Pearce                                                             None
        Richard Brown
        Charles and Michelle Deister
        Darlene Strozut
        Mauro Cornejo
-Park Partner information !i-om November 20 I 0

                                                                  II
Schools
Baker Charter Elementary School                                Highland Elementary (Pre-S), bilingual
999 A Locust Street NE                                         530 Highland Avenue NE
503-364-4042                                                   503-399-31 ss
Principal, Karl Paulson                                        Principal, Olga Cobb

Mid-Willamette Valley Communio/                                Oregon Deaf School (K-12 years)
Action Agency Head Start (Pre)                                 999 Locust Street NE
1961 Fairgrounds Road NE                                       503-375-3825
& 999 Locust Street NE                                         Director, Patti Togioka
503-391-5826

St. Vincent de Paul (Pre-6)                                    Head Start
I 0 IS Columbia Street NE                                      2475 Center Street
503-363-8457                                                   503-581-1152
Principal, Hector Martinez

Salem-Keizer School District secondary schools for the neighborhood include Parrish Middle School and North
Salem High School.

NOTE: See Attachment D for a map Highland School attendance area.




                                                             12
    ADDITIONAL STAKEHOLDERS AND RESOURCES
NORTH NEIGHBORS COMMUNITY PROGRESS TEAM December 201 o roster
        Name                           Affiliation
AMADOR AGUILAR         GRANT SCHOOL, MANOA MANO, ENLACE
TERI ALEXANDER         CATHOLIC COMMUNITY SERVICES
ARACELI AVILA          SALEM KEIZER COMM DEVELOPMENT CORP
JACOB BAILEY           SALEM FAMILY LITERACY PROGRAM
CHRISTIE BRAVO SCOTT   NEDCO
ANN BROWN              HIGHLAND NEIGHBOR
DOUG CARPENTER         SPD CRIME PREVENTION
ISAIAS CERVANTES       TU CASA REAL ESTATE
OLGA COBB              HIGHLAND ELEMENTARY
BILLY CORDERO          DHS CHILD WELFARE
BRIDGET DAVIS          HIGHLAND NEIGHBOR
MICHELLE DEISTER       HIGHLAND NEIGHBOR
KASSIE DEMARSH         AC GILBERT'S DISCOVERY VILLAGE
DIANA DICKEY           NORTHGATE NEIGHBOR, CITY COUNCILOR
CHUCK FISCHER          SALEM COMM DEVELOPMENT CORP
TAMI GOETTSCH          MARION CO. CHILDREN & FAMILIES
JOSE GONZALEZ          TU CASA REAL ESTATE
ISELA GUEVARA-CRUZ     GRANT ELEMENTARY
CHARLIE IKARD          N2N MEDIATION
RHODA JANTZI           HOOVER SCHOOL BASED HEALTH CTRIGRANT
 KARNA JOHNSON         HIGHLAND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
JESSICA LOEWEN PREIS   CITY OF SALEM NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES
JODI LOPER             BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB
JUSTINO LOPEZ          MANOA MANO VOLUNTEER
 KRISTEN MOZIAN        MERIT
 DWAN MULLER           NORTHGATE NEIGHBORHOOD
TERRA NAUGHT           YWCA
 DAVE OKADA            SALEM POLICE
OLIVIA ORTIZ           HIGHLAND PARENT AND VOLUNTEER
 NOMI PEARCE           HIGHLAND NEIGHBOR
 JENNIE PINO           SALEM ALLIANCE CHURCH
WES PREIS              HIGHLAND NEIGHBOR
 DUSTI POWELL          LIBERTY HOUSE
AUSTIN ROWLADER        HANDSON MID WILLAMETTE VALLEY
 LAURIE SHAW           CITY YOUTH DEVELOPMENT & PREVENTION
SAM SKILLERN           SALEM LEADERSHIP FOUNDATION
THOMAS SMITH           NESCNMCKAY CPT
YOLANDA SOLIS          HIGHLAND ELEMENTARY
 JANET SPINGATH        MARION-POLK FOOD SHARE
 DARLENE STROZUT       HIGHLAND NEIGHBOR
 JUAN TRUJILLO         HALLMAN ELEMENTARY
 DAVE VOTAW            SALEM LEADERSHIP FOUNDATION/HIGHLAND
 JANELE WALKER         CATHOLIC COMMUNITY SERVICES
 KIMBERLY WEAVER       CATHOLIC COMMUNITY SERVICES
 LAUREN WOODWARD       CATHOLIC COMMUNITY SERVICES
 JULIE YOUNG           SALEM LEADERSHIP FOUNDATION
 AL YOUNGER            NO METH NOT IN MY NEIGHBORHOOD
Highland School Business Partners
Dominos Pizza on Silverton Road                  Salem Evangelical Church
Fred Meyers North                                Salem Leadership Foundation
Groce!}' Outlet on D Street                      Starbucks-Parkway Location
Home Depot on Cheri)' Ave                        Sai!Y and Don Hopkins
Salem Alliance Church                            Bill and Gail Bonniksen



Non-Profit Organizations
AntiQue Powerland Museum Association, Inc.       Oregon Electric Railw'!)' Historical Socie~
3995 Brooklake Road NE                           3995 Brooklake Road NE
503-393-2424                                     503-888-40 14

Friends of the Salem Senior Center               Oregon Parent Training & Information Center
261 S Portland Road NE                           2288 Libero/ Street NE
503-588-6303                                     503-581-8156

Hands On Mid Willamette Valley                   Oregon School for the Deaf Alumni Association
455 Bliler Avenue NE                             999 Locust Street NE
503-363-165 I                                    503-378-3825

Homebuilders Assoc. of Marion & Polk Counties    Recovel)' Road Foundation
385 Taylor Street NE                             1235 Woodrow Street NE
so3-399-I  sao                                   503-362-4980

Life Directions                                  Salem-Keizer Communio/ Development Corp.
945 Columbia Street NE                           945 Columbia Street NE/PO Box 7364
503-581-0832                                     503-856-7077

N2N, Inc. Mediation Services                     Stepping Out Ministries
945 Columbia Street NE                           650 Locust Street NE/PO Box 12277
503-585-065 I                                    503-363-2805

Oregon Assoc. of Area Agencies on Aging &        United Way of the Mid-Willamette Valley
Disabilities                                     455 Bliler Avenue NE
341 0 Cheri)' Avenue NE                          503-363-165 I
503-463-8692




                                                14
Public Buildings
Salem Fire Department Station 2      US Post Office Hoi!Ywood Station
87S Madison Street NE                I OSO Sunnyview Road NE

Center SO+
(Salem Senior Center)
261 S Portland Road NE

Highland Medical Facilities
Fami!Y Health Center Chiropractic    Rural Metro Inc. Ambulance Center
22SO Commercial Street NE            1790 Front Street NE
S03-S81-7S90                         S03-31 S-2260

Libero/ House                        Salem Clinic Physicians and Surgeons
268S 4th Street NE                   2020 Capitol Street NE
S03-S40-0288                         S03-399-2424

Peterson Chiropractic Clinic         Willamette Spine Center
218S Libero/ Street NE               2480 Libero/ Street NE # 160
S03-371-40SS                         S03-763-3S2S




                                    IS
                                               PROGRESS INDICATORS

                                                        CHILD WELL-BEING



                                                                                          95
              '01-'02 '02-'03 '03-'04 '04-'05 '05-'06 '06-'07 '07-'08 '08-'09 '09-' 10
                                                                                          90
                                                                                           85
               77%     78%     74%     71%     72%     79%      79%     81%      78%
                                                                                           80
                                                                                           75

                                                                                           70~-
                                                                                           65~
                                                                                           60
                                                                                                '0 I '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07 '08 '09 'I 0
*Salem-Keizer School District Testing Department




                                                       CIVIC ENGAGEMENT


National Night Out Block Parties*
         1998      1999 2000 2001                2002 2003            2004 2005          2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
Highland 2           3   4     3                   2    3                    5             14   10   13   II  II
Citywide 81         80   69   92                  77   72              80   107           131  144  177  180 157

*Total number registered (with the Salem Police Department) and unregistered parties.




Highland Neighborhood Watch Participants
                   '02-'03        '03-'04*            '04-'05           2006**           2007       2008          2009           2010
Participants         120            108                 169                167           174          186         189             193
Block Contacts                                                             12             13           12          14              14
*  In January 2004, the Salem Police Department performed a records audit to determine an accurate number of participating
   households.
** In 2006, the Salem Police Department performed another records audit and began tracking Neighborhood Watch participation by
   number of block contacts. Numbers listed here represent October of each year.




                                                                      17
                                                                CRIME

Rerorted Crime Totals
                      /933      2000     2001     2002    2003       2004       200S     2006      2007     2008      200<)    20/0*
Total Part I**                                                       561         471      426       468      481        406     357
Total Part II***                                                     817         758      746       869      832        754     680
Total Part I & II     1,598     1,763    1,640    1,236   1,270      1,378      1,229    1,172     1,337     1,313     1,160    1,037

     2000

     1500

     1000                -+-Part I
                         -ill-Part II
        500
                         _._Part I & II
          0
               1999      2000     2001     2002    2003       2004       2005    2006     2007     2008     2009     2010




Rerorted Crimes by Tyre
                      1333      2000     2001     2002    2003       2004       200S     2006      2007     2008      2009      2010*
Selected Part I Crimes
Larceny (theft)      557    553          574      621     552        368        306      270       282      329       274       240
Auto Theft           68      73           77      102     132         45        59       ss        62       42        21        28
Selected Part II Crimes
Vandalism                                                             157       153      117       159      177       113       lOS
Drugs                                                                 100       95       81        78       67        76        53
Offense Against Fami\}'****                                           16        23       27        32       21        74        16




                                  --+-- Larceny


  400
  350                                                                *          Year-to-date December information.
                                                                     **         Part I includes: aggravated assault, arson, auto theft,
  300                                                                           business burglary, justifiable homicide, larceny, murder,
  250                                                                           other burglary, rape, residential burglary and robbery.
                                                                     ***        Part II includes: assaults, curfew, DUI, disorder\}'
  200~~++~~~~~~~~~~                                                             conduct, drugs, embezzlement, escape,
                                                                                forgery/counterfeit, fraud, gambling. kidnapping. liQuor
  150+-~==~~~--~L---~~~~--~
                                                                                laws, offense against fami[y, prostitution, runaway
  100                                                                           juveniles, sex offenses, stolen properry, trespass,
                                                                                vandalism and weapons.
   so+-~~~~~~~~~~~r- ~                                    .          ****       Offense Against Fami\}' includes crimes such as child
                                                                                abandonment. child neglect, endangering the welfare of a
                                                                                child and criminal mistreatment.
          2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010




                                                                     18
Incidents of Park Damage
          1998      1999       2000    2001     2002     2003         2004   2005    2006      2007      2008   2009    2010*
Highland 5           5           4      3        3        7            10     9        5         2         12     4       3
Highland that included graffiti                                                        4            2      II     3       2


Cio/Wide 99         65          I 13   72       81       95           101    109      146      231       265    145     147
Cio/Wide that included graffiti                                                       118      190       232    114     136

* Year-to-date October information.




                                            1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010




Compliance Services Complaints
                                                               2002                         2009*                Difference
Propert' Related Complaints in Highland                         156                          141                   -9.6%
Abandoned Vehicles in Highland                                  157                          99                   -36.9%
Total Complaints Cio/Wide                                     7,646                         6.710                 -12.2%

*2009 compliance services complaints numbers reflect the most accurate estimate available with current data.




                                                                  19
                                  Salem Alliance Communio/ Survey
                                                   jufy2008



In spring. 2008, Salem Alliance Church (located in nearby Grant Neighborhood) announced plans to construct a
new building on Broadway Street between Gaines and Hood Streets. The church sought to include the
surrounding communiry of Grant and Highland neighborhoods in the decision making process about what rypes
of services would be housed in the new space. The desire of the church was to make the space a combination of
meeting spaces, office spaces and businesses that would serve the needs of the communiry.

Between Ju!Y I 5 and 31, 120 volunteers went to near!Y all of the 3,562 homes in Highland and Grant
neighborhoods. 680 households completed the survey. 445 of those households were in Highland. Below is a
summary of responses from Highland neighbors to Q!.lestions that most close!Y relate to neighborhood livabiliry.


Q: What do you like most about your neighborhood?
The top six responses of the 404 Highland neighbors
who answered this open-ended QUestion included:                                                  II Friendliness
                                                                                                 II Quiet
37 .4%, Friendliness of Neighborhood
                                                                                                 lEI Resources
25.3%, Quiet
                                                                                                 DDon't Like
2 I .8%, Proximiry to Resources
                                                                                                 DAppearance
8.2%, Don't Like It
                                                                                                 II Safety
7.4%, Neighborhood's Physical Appearance
7.4%, Safery of Neighborhood




                                II Medical         Q: What businesses, ministries or social services would you
                                                   like to see Salem Alliance put in their new building?
                                IIIIIChildcare
                                                   The top ten responses of the 3 56 Highland neighbors who
                                mother             answered this multiple choice QUestion included:

                                Ill Job Skills
                                                   31 .2%, Medical Faciliry
                                D Used Clothing    24.7%, Childcare
                                                   22 .2%, Other (including swimming pool, theatre, skate
                                DCoffee
                                                            park and pl'!}'ground)
                                IIIII Grocery      21.6%, Job Skills Classes
                                                   20.2%, Used Clothing Store
                                El Fitness         19. I%, Coffee Shop
                                Ill Restaurant
                                                   17.4%, Grocery Store
                                                   16%, Fitness Center
                                IZIChildren's      I 5 .5%, Restaurant
                                   Program
                                                   I I%, Children's Program



                                                       21
Statement: I feel safe in my neighborhood. Of the
Highland neighbors who answered this multiple choice                                       Neighborhood
Question:                                                                                      Safety
                                                                                           II Strongly Agree
34.4%, Strong[y Agree
                                                                                           II Agree
28.1%, Agree
                                                                                           Ill Neutral
24.3%, Neutral
                                                                                           BDisagree
7.2%, Disagree
                                                                                           DStrongly Disagree
5.3%, Strong[y Disagree
                                                                                           DDon't Know
.7%, Don't Know



Statement: Youth in the neighborhood have ample
opportunities to be involved in healthy activities.
Of the Highland neighbors who answered this multiple
                                                                                           Opportunities
choice QUestion:                                                                             for Youth
                                                                                           Ill Strongly Agree
13.3%, Strong[y Agree                                                                      Ill Agree
13.3%, Agree                                                                               1!!1 Neutral
18.6%, Neutral                                                                             111 Disagree
17.3%, Disagree                                                                            o Strongly Disagree
19 .8%, Strong[y Disagree                                                                  o Don't Know
17.8%, Don't Know

Question: What organized activities have you participated in during the last six months?
Highland neighbors answered the following to this multiple choice Q\.lestion:

42.6%, Religious Services
29%, ChariryNolunteer
27.4%, Adult Sports
16.3%, Hobby Club
17.7%, Neighborhood Association
14.3%, Parent's Organization
12 .2%, Public Interest/Political Parry Committee
8. I%, Service Club
6%, Ethnic/Nationaliry/Civic Right
4.6%, Labor Union
3.8%, Veteran's Group

      II Religious Service
      II CharityNolunteer
      llilAdult Sports
      III Neighborhood Assoc
      DHobby Club
      0 Parent Org
      0 Public Interest/Political
      IJ Service Club
      llil Ethnic/Civic Right
      liJ Labor Union
      fiJVeteran's Group



                                                            22
                                         2009-20 I 0 Highland/N 2 Partnership Program Goals Summary
                      The Highland Partnership Group is part of the North Neighborhoods Communio/ Progress Team, N2
               ·.··             ..                                                  .      < .... ./.. •·' ,.·. •                                                        .      ·.            .·.·     ......   .:.

         VISION
         A communiry of neighborhoods where everyone is committed to the well-being of children: families are nurtured and
         supported: neighborhoods are safe and secure: people know each other and help each other; education is valued and
         diversiry esteemed: the wisdom and participation of our seniors is high!Y sought: and all people experience a high QUaliry
         of life.
         MISSION
...
         Raise the voices, identify priorities, develop plans, and engage resources to make a difference and advocate in Salem's
         north-central neighborhoods!                                                                                                                                                                                        '




                      '''·"',''<'"


       .. .· .·· •.;····             :•\~::;~i~€··ra~ge. ~f•.resources •t~I:;uppori'h;althy fami\ies• by• way.~f\th~ det~brRt~g~fhathappens·b~tw~~~th~··· ~? :..
      ave~& .                    •.. . ;~~ighb,ots t{nd ccirn,munio/ p~rtners ~ho cqme togethyre~.c~il]lOQtli.
                                                                                           Th~ lt~rgeit [:ami.Jxskill~buildlng e~o.it .·~··.
· ... th<!t.w~~·~(?o~~~~~tedJhroughN :oyer thepasti}'~ar ~~ He~lth ar~<:l S(lfe~~F~ir for High{~nd.~dx;:irant.~~milie~,.at S,al~lll' ·
                                                                  2


, ,J\IIl.ah~~~h~r~hoilrvtarc&t.,20 I Q, .Appr!)ximate!Y 4oO:·peop,le . partl~lpat~~ ~nd $28;18~ ·\"Ja~;lev~rag~alnyolwite.er.;; . •.•
  • hml[$       qtner ~bl1(ributjons. .                     ~>    > . i .;; t :zz            < >~. r • · <· • >~·:," \ ' : <. : .~>
                                                                                              '' ··.-··.'·. '·~<~ >~ ·,.·-, · / ~: k~i: x~:.·::~·< ··, ·
······He~~~lB~rN<>sot~os 'FarnifYLlteracy·.~tdtr~mw~sciffered. b_yAG:;Oiibert's~ .~1~c?~er)'Villag~~~d~t~~ qr~g9~ Writtli¥ ,. .
. ·; R&oj~ctat flighfalld Elementary. School (jv~r Jhe Win~eri .Tnlrry-five. in<fividl);;ll~ were serxec! .{J 0 a.9ult$ & 15 dilldr~n) i apd . . ;
      Jee9h~ckshowe<l thatfa!Tiille~ ~njoyc;:darlq betiefit~c:l(rom th~ prog(am.·                                                                      /·. · .·. '·· ··· ,.•· :•.• :;.~;(j;; . •·. .


.•. C.~rciy··otth~total evenr~xpens¢s o , )226; $4,059>was paid fpr \Yith ~casH 9on~ti~nsinclu~iJig ·$4:.0()0 from {'J7.;.'                                                                                           .· .
•·.,~5', I.~'~ was contrib~;~tec:l in~kihdiin d~naUons;and feet(!ductions fron1'.:;r1ariett ()f CbJl1mlfni!}' pa~ne{.$\/ :c·· ..

  ·rhefol\oWing . resources . .were .di,scus~ecE'fheAugustJ~ . Boys an~CJir:ls Clubft~alth.F~iry~n~·f>atk~~Fk giv¢aw~}/66me/~;;,··•
•.· owne!s,h.ip r(:sOljrces througp Tu Casa •.Real• Estate ~}ld oth~rs; Strengthening Familles~'effo~.si~r0arioll ~qunw:~ 1)·,00() · ·• ;. ·
   ·b{>o~?in: 12days c~mpalgri;{\(: (Jilp~rr ~()use's llferacy~lasses andsc~ol~r~hips; . ~hll? 16Use [lrev~.ntl€>11:'(\w~renes~ ' ·
    e~~r1tstin'Apri.l; Sal~m-K,eiz~r· comn\oni~YI)evefoph1ent.Gorpoftltio.n ~tee T~x,i\ssl$tant~ii·.~r~nt Scn[)ol:~<lra~eand~'.' : ··~:.·.••·.·
                                                                                                                                           •.
 · f~Mr~l$,t!rfotPa!1ners jn Educ<ltiof1 <::J.ub ~N~~ he;lJthcate .gra~ts~.free. bo.okSfrom.~~a · ·for Alf.lnltl ... · · .· fa .del Nlfi6 •· •
    ev~nts;in;\prll.: the Grant .~chool. Eart!t[)ay (:~lebrati6n ~u1d Clean lJp ~ndJurie 9 Gra~t
                                                      ''   '\           '   •   '       ''' C   -'                        C   ---    •v'   '       '




      ~g~?ij~W~~t~ffi:~~~~ij~r~r~~f~,~~~~~~~~t~~~:~tri~~t;~l~i·•0]I
      ·. origin~t~~.ltid:lig~l~nq..~r{<:th~s.:e~~ll.q.~d ~.(J ins I~~·~· .~()rWgat~ andN E~G~·asJWeU.~~~n esth~ate<:1.7:~~. ~~~g~~?t~·.~nt.trt.• .• · · ·
         neighborhood visitors attended the 10 concerts thisJ:ear. ·The series continues·to demonstrate that caring neighbots and
         partners can make local parks safe, fami[Y:-friend!J places'~                          ·     ·c         ·•


       neig~bpr!;<)n~t •.· . · th~ Grant~9.~~91 gym,• ~nd the,Q walke(f.arqund;:thelschopl, ~illginq· ttaditipnal Cljri~tl)1~5 ~9~gs: .,Mexican··,; .
      .traditional cfioc6lrtte, tamales, sofue tradiHonaJ[cookieS, fruit and candies for kids were setved"·•i· ·. .; . . . < :c • . . . •
 :'\>,:,';:     -~~'•••,<::,,·,,,,           v'•''•    ''       '>''••';,',,               •',,      0   •.'•.'o.'   •'       ;,-_•,',•,,•',•''~',•''''••o•'••::-,-·•·-,-            '•,-'   ,u,




                                                                                                                                    23
  A.Highland.     rieighbqforganiz~~;n¢ighbor~~to· ~eet
                                                  .•   a.half .ho.tir                  bd(or~~Hiihl~~~··~e~ti~gs;to focus:spe~iflcal~ on.~r1Jl1e:···
                                                                                                                                  ..
• Pr~vention inylp~iD:g 9eliverlng.·1l few oftre ne~~~W:elcome to J-tighl~f1.d NRch~r~ that she \:VOI'ke<;l·on, ~ith C:i'ITe ..••
                                                                                               11


.•. . Preventi~nst~l·.~hebrochureo/elcpme5·ne~.reside~ts/la~4for:<:!stdl-llgrlal1~•gives informatfon.ab,q~tl\feigh!J#rh()oo .•
   l/Vatch'ancl wh)')t'$11)1por;tatJt t9'W!.people. W:hd alreadyliy~·hl\H tgnl~l'lt:f ;•an~Jists resoutc~s.~l1d:c1)nt"d:inf9rlll~uool. :

  ~,h·o~~~~o~r. thij~~a~fUrba~'ij~~estin~~aslnt;g~b~ed;~.~~t~f~·ril~~g~t;:rrom Mati~R;~~)k':r~~cis~~~e·;; ·~n?:rBeavar.•·)~
...:th~ . ~u$h.park'<freaneigb.bor~.c·ppfclinatipgtijls e~ort l~•to.·f~glster frWtJre~~;~~tcthat. covl9 Q~·ha&¢St$c;l·.byyp.!JJMeet§all• ·••·.•
  yover Salem;.· an9th.~p~o~uc~ qistr~bUtt)d'.tr• t~ose ~fio . n~ed)t~· ;Th~ B19,tk..lfYll~i~~. teamggll\oted, this tnreu~houtth~Y~flfi •.
 'c•. inclusiiossollGitirt?· ~~·artid~fqr,th.eN: ~ummer n~wsfett~r£ . They:feltthatjrt ag~iti?n.1o tielpirig,}Vi[h h~nge,t.o·Jt:.c.auld be~ly :~
;~;•way to;qutf4'r\eMorf<s .• or~omltlun1catlqf!•Perhaps·alongthy.lin~~ ofNf,tghhor~o,qd.\fYatc~:,~tt.r9ut waitJng.(or\~C;~islsto ~·~"·····
~· motl\l~t~:   peoPJe.   > · ··· ·· · .· ···· '                      ·      · ·· ···           ·. · · · · ·· · · ·                   · ·.· ··· ·. ·· ·                           ··

    GOAL: Increase communication and connections throughout the neighborhoods.
                                            '   ~   .-   ~'   .=-.-



;~!~rr§xt~g;colllmu~ic?ti()h~'<ln<t&etting}he Word ()ut is.el~men~apr[o~\Jn~ing ~tron~d~ ~()11~e~f!~ns.ln;~;:~eigti~prh~:()(L.fu 2 : :
>.grqduced,fall ahdstin1metbi.dipg~al'n~ig6(5orh8od newsl.~tt#rs.W:ith· inf9rmatlo~~~b{Jyt:n~igjjbqr~9Qd:a~ti~1ti~~;\in~~ ·.>·· ·:.·.
;•. n!!~slener .is.nq Jon&~r•·rn.all~~. t().eV<Jry bp~J11ess·.a'1d resid~rice)n:Highl~nd, but'sgare(f byN~·patliflp~nts.}Vi(h . ~ \1ar.le;yo~··· •.
 .·r~sid~?ts ·and businesses tn Hard copy ana by e:.m~il in paftbeca~se there. arepJfonger~funds for{dl~trt!J~fion; ~tJt'~rso tc? ~· ,
    ~~~re~se ;dlstri~utjprl beyond Highland, T.he I(}llJhg .Our~t()l)\.actlon t~~!n .~()J\tinue$ to expan~Hhe ·~r()~por~t list;[or > . ·
 -di~~r1~~·uon ~n?·;,~.~~P~torm Wa~.:1?,·~lripf~Ve-t,h~~W~.~c-sl!~~·                                                   i{,     ,~::,.:;··~\~.~·:·~. · ~·.~~ · ·

. N2;Qo~tin~eq~~t~iJ~!ndlvidu~J~"~nd ~rg~~~~~{i~M~n9·t~~c~~~~~~~~ai9i[ere;c~ In.~h§~ort6:.riel~~~~thJodi(~r~~thi~>~af {
 ..wt!h :a.e~rm.Yr ~:li!Jt(! ~11Ri~. $1 q,gift,Ce!1ificate from~rpa,d\llray .<±a,fe )IVitH .theh2Res o~;fec~(liting.a,qdfr~ta,!ilirg .r;J2                            .·, .· ••. ·~ ·•· ?.   ! .• •.·
 ~ pa~ticipant~,     ·        · ·                                         , · )· . •                                         . . ~; : :                   f       '




                                                                                  24
                                                  GLOSSARY

Civic Engagement
The interaction of citizens with their sociery and their government.

Crime
Violations of state laws and ciry ordinances.

Crime Rate
The ratio of crimes in an area to the population (households and businesses) of the area.

Foster Care
Alternative living arrangement for children whose parents are unable to care for them at home for a period of
time.

National Night Out Block Parry
Each year on the evening of the first Tuesday in August. neighbors are encouraged to turn on outside lights and
spend the evening outdoors with fellow neighbors and police. Police agencies support the event by attending
neighborhood block parties and bringing along crime prevention information and mascots. Sponsored by the
National Association ofTown Watch since 19 83, it is an event celebrated in all 50 states, US territories, military
bases worldwide and many Canadian cities.

Student Stabiliry Rate
The percentage of students that maintained their enrollment the entire school year.




                                                         25
                      ATTACHMENTS



A   Highland Neighborhood Association Boundary Map

B   Census Block Groups and Tracts Map

C   Central Area 20 Residential Housing Market Map

D   Highland Elementary School Attendance Area Map




                                 27
land Neighborhood
ommunlty Development Department                                                   rn




                            lNfi pr-W~tl~ pt'-QYldM u 1~, WitbolA WHTV!t'f·   tn no w-ent'' th•
                            eov Oll>l<m ll>bl•tord>l••O<Ohlrt!ll•u.. l>l ttl< ~IO<IU¢t. tnt;
                            ptQdU(( II JUbjtd: to lletntt Md -c.opyrf~ llmlt~Uont and f1li1Mr"
                            <~•-tnt:u.Ai-on   «r.-aJ•fJ ptthlbit+d,




    Attachment A
Highland Neighborhood
    Census Block Groups and Ttact.s
   Community Development Department




                                      ThiJprtdu.:liJpl~AJif,WJthOltWJfr.\nty,        Jnno•YMtltV'I_.
                                      CIC)I ol8>1.., IIUIH6t<ltm>t'" tr.... IMUIHitN4p,..dll;t Ynl<
                                      prock.lc:t lltUbjtd to lktnlt xtd '4:opyrfghtUmlbdOIU andtwthtr
                                      chtribl.tion orr'l'ildltb )'t'Ohlbttod,




        Attachment B
                                                                                            u
                                                                                            .....
                                                                                             c:
                                                                                             (I)
                                                                                             E
                                                                                            ...c:
                                                                                              u
                                                                                            .....
                                                                                             ~


                                                                                            ~




   Thls:prodw:tls pr~dect~ Is; wtthoutwamt!l'¥. · 1n no. ev.m.Js.1fle
   CJtV·atS31~ Pabl.-tordatr:t~• trom.the.us• Of1hft,proctu<i. Th1l
   produ.ctl~su~tO Jfcense and c:opyrfs#Rmltatfons and tU:rtt~er
   diStrfl.Litlotr'orrenle-ls prC>hlblted.


N:\CQ\Proj\CS\Hlghfimd_Landus&\Hi~hland_NREj\NSJ-A;_L~ndScapeJTlXd -1/61201 0 @ 6:25:W M1
;e
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        --
         ·--~
        ......... £a~An:a


        ~~-
                            _......
                            -.........
                             ..
                             ......
                            •w..•-~

                            ""'"
                            ~
                                            -'-
                                           <e>·
                                            -\~-
        lii:li:lH!l"-
        g;;J .....-
        il!ll!JIW-
        /V"-flnot
                            +            /'\____/\
                              Comments or Questions about this document?
                              Please contact Jessica Loewen Preis, Ci9' of Salem
                               Neighborhood Partnership Program Coordinator
                              503-588-6207 • jlpreis@ci9'ofsalem.net




                                           This document is available at:
www.ci\)'ofsalem.net/Departments/Communi\)'Development/NeighborhoodEnhancementDivision/neighbor/npe/Documents/hproflle.pdf

								
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