Prayer Organizer Template by eyg87181

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									*Priority Instructions*                        Instructions for Unit Template
 1                                                      Revised 7/04
     Saving - Save each unit separately under a different name to preserve your lesson plan template for future use.
 2 Print Area - The number of lines on the lesson plan page has been increased to 100, but the print area is set
   only for 64 so that it will fit on two pages. If you have more than 64 lines you will need to highlight all the used
   cells, go under file and press "Print Area" -> "Set Print Area."
 3 Adding Lines to LP Page - Highlight bottom row (3 cells). Copy Cells. Highlight the number of rows you need in
   this format below. Edit -> Paste.
 4 Adding Lesson Plan Sheets - Before you use the last "clean" LP sheet select EDIT and "move or Copy Sheet."
   In the Window, check "create a copy," and use the scroll bar to move to the bottom of the pane and check "(move
   to end)."
   You will have to enter LP Objectives manually for new sheets.
   You can rename sheets by simply double clicking on their respective tabs and typing in a new name.
 5 Changing Info on LP Page - You cannot change the automatic copied information (# of days, LP objective,
   Mastery Codes) on the Lesson Plan Sheet. It must be changed on the Unit page so that both have the same
   information.
To Begin…
Each time you start a new unit, keep the format of the unit template (the cells colored green), and add information in
the appropriate blank, white cells.
Begin by changing the Header/Footer Information
1. Go to View Header and Footer
2. Custom Header
3. Center Section and type the grade and subject area after the existing information. i.e. Unit Plan (Teacher,
School, Grade and Subject)
Course Page
Fill in the Course Title, Course Objectives, and elements of each unit.
As you type, cells will automatically expand; if they do not, highlight the row, go to Format, and under Row choose
Autofit (unless they are merged cells).
Unit Page
 1 Begin by changing the Header/Footer Information
   1. Go to View Header and Footer
   2. Custom Header
   3. Center Section and type the grade and subject area after the existing information. i.e. Unit Plan (Teacher,
   School, Grade and Subject)
 2 Replace the text in the top middle cell with your unit title/topic.
 3 Complete the remainder of the top section: Duration, Rationale, Unit Goal, Prior Knowledge, Unit Assessment.
   Note: The rationale will most often be tied to your course outcomes and where this unit fits in the big picture.


4 Begin filling in the elements of the lesson plans. The lesson plan objective and mastery codes will automatically
  copy to its cell on the appropriate lesson plan sheet.
- If your diocese mandates the use of Mastery Codes complete Column G (this is colored turquoise to make
  referencing easier during lesson planning).
Lesson Plan Page
- Complete the top portion of the template. The left side contains permanent information while the right side
  contains information that may change from year to year.
- Assessment - the formal/informal, formative/summative tools you plan to use to assess your students' mastery of
  the given objective (these could include tests, projects, observation, participation).
- Enrichment and Accommodations - Activities that provide challenge and that recognize the particular needs of
  excpetional students.
- Equipment/Materials - list the materials you will need throughout the lesson (this will aid considerably in
  organizing yourself).
- Method - the strategies you will use to present/teach your learning tasks (individual work, whole-class discussion,
  cooperative groups).
  Procedure - activities such as prayer, collecting HW, closure
                                 Instructions
Inserting Pictures, Equations, Diagrams for Unit Template
  It is easiest to prepare pictures, equations, and Revised 7/04 separate Word Document.
                                                    diagrams in a
  Save the file and then go to the appropriate lesson plan. Click on the cell where you want the
  information to be placed. Press Insert ->Object - > Create from File - > Then press Browse to find your
  file and click OK.
  The object can easily be resized by pulling a corner.
                                                              (Matt Kloser)

Course
 Title



                                                  Course Outcomes
  1


  2


  3


  4


  5


  6


  7


  8


  9


  10



            Dates
                       Unit Concept or Title or                                                                             (Course
Unit #   (Number of                               Unit Goal                   Prior Knowledge         Unit Assessment
                              Question                                                                                     Outcomes)
         Class Days)




                                                                                      Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                                                             Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
                                                                       Matthew Hughes | Immaculate Conception School | Grade 4 Reading


         Unit #                                                                                                                                                                                  Estimated
                                                                          Oh, the Stories You'll Read!                                                                                            Duration
                                                                                        Story Grammar & Dr. Seuss                                                                                    17
                           Developing a deep sense of story grammar and how it affects a story is a constant goal in the elementary grades. This unit serves as a refresher for students'
                           basic understanding of the elements of story grammar. It then goes deeper, asking students to apply story grammar to analysis of stories and to explain this
                           analysis to other students in the class. Students are also asked to relate elements of story grammar to each other, seeing them as a connected web of story
   Unit Rationale
                           elements. The goal of this unit is to help students develop a deep understanding of story grammar through analysis of entertaining, accessible stories. The
                           unit should be taught near the beginning of the year so that students have the opportunity to apply it many times over during the rest of the year. If students
                           need further instruction, the performance assessment (writing an alternate ending to one of the stories read during the unit) could be turned into a mini-unit
        Unit Goal          SWBAT use elements of story grammar.
  Prior Knowledge          Students should have been exposed to story grammar previously, but this unit will ask students to apply their knowledge of story grammar in reading and
  Unit Assessment          SWBAT rewrite the ending to a story read during the unit.



             estimated #                                                                         Lesson Objective                                                                             Standards: L.A.
Lesson #
                of days                                                                         Lesson Assessment                                                                             Texas 110.6.b.


                                                                                           Acquiring & Integrating
                             Objective:     SWBAT, in writing, predict and respond to elements of story grammar in a book (The Sneetches).                                                   10.a, 10.d, 10.f,
  LP1               1                       SWBAT write a five-sentence prediction (one sentence for each element of story grammar) for how the story will end.                              10.I, 10.L
                            Assessment:

                             Objective:     SWBAT explain how setting influences other elements of story grammar.                                                                            10.a,10.d, 12.I
  LP2               2                       SWBAT write a five-sentence explanation of how life would be different in a different setting.
                            Assessment:

                             Objective:     SWBAT interpret the development of a character in a story.                                                                                       L.A. 10.a, 10.L,
  LP3               2                       SWBAT write a three-entry journal as a character in the story (each entry four sentences) that addresses that character's development.           12.a, 12.h
                            Assessment:

                             Objective:     SWBAT summarize events and characters of a story.                                                                                                10.a, 10.f, 10.L
  LP4               2                       SWBAT write a one-sentence summary of the story that involves story events and characters.
                            Assessment:

                             Objective:     SWBAT examine a story's problem in terms of characters and events.                                                                               10.a, 12.I
  LP5               3                       SWBAT write a paragraph relating the story's characters and events to its problem.
                            Assessment:

                             Objective:     SWBAT exhibit their understanding of elements of story grammar and their connections on a pencil and paper test.                                 10.a, 10.d, 10.f,
  LP6               2                       SWBAT complete a pencil and paper test.                                                                                                          10.L, 12.a, 12.h,
                            Assessment:
                                                                                                                                                                                             12.I
                                                                                        Extending & Refining
                                            SWBAT identify the author's message of a story.                                                                                                  10.a, 10.f
                             Objective:
  LP7               3
                                            SWBAT write a paragraph that identifies the author's message of a story with textual support.
                            Assessment:

                                                                                      Using Knowledge Meaningfully
                             Objective:     SWBAT use elements of story grammar.                                                                                                             12.h, 12.I
  LP8               2                       SWBAT rewrite the ending to a story read during the unit.
                            Assessment:

                             Objective:
  LP9
                            Assessment:

                                                                                                                                                                          Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                                                                                                                                                 Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
                                                       Matthew Hughes | Immaculate Conception School | Grade 4 Reading



                             Meet The Sneetches: An Introduction to Story Grammar
    LP 1
                    1                                                                                                     Advanced students might write about how elements of story
                                                                                                                          grammar affect one another--how the characters created the
   # of Days                                                                                        Enrichment            problem, for instance, or how the events might be different if the
                                                                                                                          characters or setting were different. This will give them a taste of
                                                                                                                          future lessons.
                    Students should already have a sense of the important parts of a story                                Students finding difficulty might work with a partner, especially in
                    and should have previously made and responded to predictions about                                    forming predictions for each of the elements of story grammar.
                    literature.                                                                                           Students may have a partner for a scribe. The lesson makes use of
                                                                                                                          different intelligences that should accommodate most students in
Prior Knowledge                                                                                 Accommodations
                                                                                                                          understanding the elements of story grammar, and hearing the
                                                                                                                          story will help students to respond to their predictions. The read-
                                                                                                                          aloud will make the story accessible for even the most challenged
                                                                                                                          reader. Students may create movements associated with each
                    SWBAT, in writing, predict and respond to elements of story grammar                                   Students might lose focus during the read-aloud; interspersing
                    in a book (The Sneetches).                                                     (Anticipated           comprehension questions will keep their attention. The use of
Lesson Objective                                                                                                          voices and dramatic movements is also helpful while reading Dr.
                                                                                                    Problems)
                                                                                                                          Seuss.
    Lesson     SWBAT write a five-sentence prediction (one sentence for each                    (Changes for next
               element of story grammar) for how the story will end.
  Assessment                                                                                         time)
(Benchmarks or 10.a, 10.d, 10.f, 10.I, 10.L
                                                                                               (What worked well)
  Standards)
                    Writing journals; story grammar map; The Sneetches by Dr. Seuss
Materials Needed                                                                                        Dates

      Time                            Student Learning Task or Activity                                                            Teacher Method or Activity
                    Students should think-pair-share five essential ingredients of a story.   During the share phase, responses are collected on the board and discussed. Teacher tells
                                                                                              students that the class is going to create a recipe for "cooking" a story. Just like food, stories
                                                                                              can have many different ingredients, but there are certain ingredients a story cannot be without.
    10 minutes                                                                                 The five essential ingredients of setting, characters, events, plot/problem, and resolution are
                                                                                              then written on a large recipe card to be kept on display for the duration of the unit. Teacher
                                                                                              tells students that, together, the ingredients make up "story grammar." As a class, come up
                                                                                              with a working definition for each element of story grammar. These definitions will be
                                                                                              Teacher explains that the class will be using books written by Dr. Seuss to see how Dr. Seuss
    5 minutes                                                                                 uses each element of story grammar. Teacher introduces first book, The Sneetches, and allows
                                                                                              students to see the cover and the first page.
                    Students journal 1-sentence predictions for each element of story
    5 minutes                                                                                 Teacher walks around and checks progress.
                    grammar in The Sneetches, leaving room to respond to their




                                                                                                                                           Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                                                                                                                  Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
                                               Matthew Hughes | Immaculate Conception School | Grade 4 Reading


                                                                                     Teacher passes out and introduces story grammar map, showing students where each element
2 minutes                                                                            of story grammar can be found. Teacher tells students that they should fill out the story
                                                                                     grammar map while listening to the story.
20 minutes   Students fill in story grammar maps.                                    Teacher reads aloud The Sneetches with comprehension questions.
 8 minutes   Students finish filling in story grammar map.                           Class discussion: elements of story grammar in story.
             Informal assessment: Students write 1-sentence responses to each
5 minutes                                                                            Teacher walks around and checks progress.
             prediction they made about story grammar.
             Students share with the class one prediction they made and the actual
5 minutes                                                                            Closure
             result in the story.




                                                                                                                                 Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                                                                                                        Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
                                                      Matthew Hughes | Immaculate Conception School | Grade 4 Reading



                        Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are?: Applying Setting
    LP 2
                    2                                                                                                    Day 1: Advanced students might write a journal entry that
                                                                                                                         compares and contrasts the setting they drew and a setting familiar
                                                                                                                         to them. Day 2: These students might write a paragraph that
    # of Days                                                                                     Enrichment             describes how a character from the story would react to being in a
                                                                                                                         setting familiar to the students.

                    Students should know the elements of story grammar from Lesson 1.                                    Students finding difficulty might work with a partner, especially
                                                                                                                         during the drawing portion. Various intelligences are already
                                                                                                                         included in different portions of this lesson, and the read-aloud
Prior Knowledge                                                                                Accommodations            will make the story accessible to all learners. Students may opt to
                                                                                                                         hold drawings while other students read text/explain drawings.

                    SWBAT explain how setting influences other elements of story                                         Students might lose focus during the read-aloud; interspersing
                    grammar.                                                                                             comprehension questions will keep their attention. Students might
                                                                                                 (Anticipated            also become distracted during group work; the teacher should walk
Lesson Objective
                                                                                                  Problems)              around the room to ensure that students are on-track.


    Lesson     SWBAT write a five-sentence explanation of how life would be                   (Changes for next
               different in a different setting.
  Assessment                                                                                       time)
(Benchmarks or 10.a,10.d, 12.I
                                                                                             (What worked well)
  Standards)
                    Index cards; writing journals; story grammar map; Did I Ever Tell You
Materials Needed How Lucky You Are? by Dr. Seuss; copies of text from story; drawing                  Dates
                    supplies


       Time                            Student Learning Task or Activity                                                      Teacher Method or Activity
      DAY 1
                    Bellwork: On an index card, students draw a recipe card and note the
     5 minutes                                                                              Review story grammar elements as a class. Teacher reveals large recipe card.
                    five elements of story grammar.
                                                                                            Teacher reminds class of the working definition of setting they created during lesson 1 and tells
                                                                                            class that, by the end of the day, they will be setting experts. Teacher introduces Did I Ever
     5 minutes
                                                                                            Tell You How Lucky You Are? and passes out new story grammar map. Teacher reviews with
                                                                                            students how to use it during the story.
                    Students fill out story grammar maps and answer comprehension           Teacher explains that students will listen to the story without seeing any pictures. Students
                    questions.                                                              should focus on creating pictures in their minds, thinking about the time and place of the scene.
    15 minutes
                                                                                             After hearing the story, students will need to complete an activity that uses the pictures they
                                                                                            have created in their minds. Read aloud Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are? with



                                                                                                                                        Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                                                                                                               Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
                                                Matthew Hughes | Immaculate Conception School | Grade 4 Reading


             Students finish filling in story grammar map. Review story grammar          Teacher stresses the where and when sections and encourages students to think outside the box,
5 minutes
             maps as a class, checking for student understanding.                        including time of day, time of year, and location.
             Students form groups and are assigned a scene from the story that each
             student should represent visually and as accurately as possible based on
8 minutes                                                                                Teacher walks around and checks group progress.
             the words from the story. When finished their individual drawings,
             students should share with their groups.
             Groups share their visual representations while reading the text out        Teacher shows groups the illustrations included with the story, and group members comment
8 minutes    loud. Group members share why they included specific elements of            on similarities and differences in the two drawings and why the drawings are similar or
             their drawings based on lines in the text.                                  different.
             Students journal a paragraph (at least five sentences) on how the setting
10 minutes   they drew is different from a setting familiar to them (their house or      Teacher walks around and checks progress.
             school, for example). Students share their paragraphs with a partner.
             Informal assessment: Students write on an index card a new definition
                                                                                         Teacher leads class in crafting a modified class definition for setting that stresses time and
4 minutes    of setting based on what they have seen in this lesson's story; teacher
                                                                                         place. This new definition is placed on the large recipe card.
             shares volunteers' definitions.

 DAY 2
             Bellwork: Students write a five-sentence description of the setting of a
             location around the school with which all students would be familiar,
10 minutes                                                                            Teacher walks around and checks progress.
             without giving the name of the location. Students find a partner and try
             to guess the location their partner describes.
3 minutes                                                                               Teacher reviews elements of story grammar with class; review definition of setting.
             Students return to their groups from day one and prepare to act out what
             it would be like to live in that setting. Students should change their
7 minutes                                                                               Teacher walks around and checks group progress.
             actions based on the setting: e.g., a student in the desert at midday will
             act differently than a student in the tundra at night.
             Groups present their settings.                                             During presentations, teacher calls on students not presenting to change the setting. For
15 minutes                                                                              example, students may change the setting to underwater, then the moon, then a farm during
                                                                                        winter. Students should give both a place and time or time of year. Actors should change their
                                                                                        actions based on the new setting given by classmates.
                                                                                        Teacher leads class in discussion about how setting affects characters and their actions.
5 minutes
                                                                                        Students should cite specific examples from group presentations.
             Formal assessment: Students journal a paragraph (at least five
             sentences) on how their lives would be different if they lived in a        Teacher walks around and checks progress. Paragraphs are collected and graded (class
15 minutes   different setting. Students should note the different setting (both time   participation) based on how well they achieve the lesson objective.
             and place) and how their lives would change. Students share their
             paragraphs with a partner, and volunteers share their paragraphs with
             Students modify their definitions of setting from yesterday's lesson.      Teacher shares volunteers' definitions. Teacher leads class in crafting a modified class
5 minutes
             They should now include how setting can affect characters' actions.        definition for setting that stresses how it affects characters. This new definition is placed on the




                                                                                                                                      Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                                                                                                             Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
                                                     Matthew Hughes | Immaculate Conception School | Grade 4 Reading



                                         Introducing The Lorax: Applying Characters
    LP 3
                    2                                                                                                 Advanced students might act out with another student what they've
                                                                                                                      written in their three-entry journal. Students may develop a way to
    # of Days                                                                                   Enrichment            teach a classmate the difference between character motivation &
                                                                                                                      development. Groups may be challenged to make their scenes
                                                                                                                      rhyme in the style of Dr. Seuss.
                    Students should know the elements of story grammar from lesson 1                                  Working in groups should help students who have difficulty
                    and how setting affects characters from lesson 2.                                                 understanding character motivation. Students finding difficulty
                                                                                                                      with the three-entry journal may work with another student.
Prior Knowledge                                                                             Accommodations            Various intelligences are already included in different portions of
                                                                                                                      this lesson, and the read-aloud will make the story accessible to all
                                                                                                                      learners. Students may act as a supporting character with fewer
                    SWBAT interpret the development of a character in a story.                                        Students might lose focus during the read-aloud; interspersing
                                                                                               (Anticipated           comprehension questions will keep their attention. Students might
Lesson Objective
                                                                                                Problems)             also become distracted during group work; the teacher should walk
                                                                                                                      around the room to ensure that students are on track.
    Lesson     SWBAT write a three-entry journal as a character in the story (each          (Changes for next
               entry four sentences) that addresses that character's development.
  Assessment                                                                                     time)
(Benchmarks or L.A. 10.a, 10.L, 12.a, 12.h
                                                                                           (What worked well)
  Standards)
                    Index cards; writing journal; story grammar map; The Lorax by Dr.
Materials Needed Seuss; situations of character development                                         Dates


       Time                           Student Learning Task or Activity                                                     Teacher Method or Activity
      DAY 1
                    Bellwork: Students journal two sentences identifying their favorite
     5 minutes      setting and character from Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are?
                    and how the setting affected the character. They share these with a   Teacher walks around and checks progress.
                    partner.                                                              Teacher leads class in reviewing the five elements of story grammar on the recipe card along
     5 minutes
                                                                                          with the detailed definition created for setting and the basic definition of characters.
                                                                                          Teacher introduces The Lorax and passes out new story grammar map. Teacher reviews with
     5 minutes                                                                            students how to use it during the story and calls on students to give predictions for each
                                                                                          element of story grammar.
                                                                                          Teacher explains that students should pay careful attention to the characters in the story. They
                                                                                          should look for not just what the characters do but why they do what they do. After hearing
    20 minutes      Students fill out story grammar map. Review story grammar maps as     the story, students will need to complete an activity that requires them to know why characters
                    a class, checking for student understanding.                          in the story did what they did. Read aloud The Lorax with comprehension questions.




                                                                                                                                       Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                                                                                                              Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
                                                Matthew Hughes | Immaculate Conception School | Grade 4 Reading


                                                                                       Teacher explains that students will now become characters from the story to figure out why the
                                                                                       characters acted like they did. Teacher divides students into groups and gives each group a
                                                                                       scene from the story (recommended: use points of conflict or exchanges in the story where the
                                                                                       Lorax confronts the Onceler).Teacher explains that groups will present their scene to the class
10 minutes                                                                             by acting out what is said between characters and what is going on in the heads of the
                                                                                       characters. Teacher models example: teacher is the Lorax, and a student is the Onceler. Lorax
                                                                                       wants to approach Onceler about the problems Onceler has been causing. Before approaching
                                                                                       Onceler, Lorax turns to the side and thinks out loud to himself, "Hmm, I really don't like what
             When students understand the model, they decide how to act out their      this Onceler guy is doing. He is hurting my friends and making them lose their homes. I have
             scene in the story.                                                       already needed to send the Swamee Swans away because of the pollution his factory is
             Groups present their scenes from the story, thinking the characters'
             motivations out loud. **Groups with musical/rhythmic interest may
6 minutes
             make their lines rhyme.** After each group presents, group members
             call on classmates to give the motivation of each character.              Teacher introduces group presentations.
                                                                                       Class discussion: Teacher asks class to give examples of what characters in the story did and
                                                                                       why they did what they did. Teacher explains that the why is called the character's motivation.
4 minutes                                                                               Teacher acts out examples of motivation from real life (why you brush your teeth, why you do
                                                                                       your homework, etc.) using the same technique of thinking motivation out loud. Teacher asks
                                                                                       for other examples from students.
             Informal assessment: Students journal three things they have done
5 minutes    today and their motivation for doing them. Teacher encourages
             students to be as specific as possible. Students share their motivations Teacher walks around and checks progress.

 DAY 2
             Bellwork: Students write on an index card a new definition of             Teacher shares volunteers' definitions. Teacher leads class in crafting a modified class
5 minutes    characters based on what they have seen in this lesson's story.           definition for characters that stresses motivation. This new definition is placed on the large
             Definitions should now include character motivation.                      recipe card.
3 minutes                                                                              Teacher reviews elements of story grammar with class; review definitions of setting and
                                                                                       Teacher leads class in discussion about the storyline of The Lorax and the motivations of
                                                                                       characters that were presented yesterday. Teacher asks if any of the characters changed
                                                                                       through the story (the Onceler). Teacher asks for examples of how the Onceler changed (cared
10 minutes                                                                             about money -> cared about the environment; cared about himself -> cared about others; etc.).
                                                                                       Teacher asks if the Onceler's motivation changed through story (yes). Teacher explains that
                                                                                       the way a character changes in a story is called the character's development. Teacher gives
                                                                                       real-life examples from school or home of how people change and asks students to give their
             Formal assessment: Teacher models and students write a three-entry
             journal as the Onceler (at least four sentences for each entry): one
             entry at the beginning of the story when the Onceler first arrives (and
             wants to make money), one entry when the Onceler meets the Lorax
20 minutes   (and is annoyed), and one entry at the end of the story (when the
             Onceler wants to save the environment and feels remorse). The goal
             of the three-entry journal is for students to track the development of
             the Onceler and his motivation through the story. Students should         Journals will be collected and graded (class participation) for how well students track the
             make sure to include how the Onceler feels and why he feels like he       Onceler's development and motivation.



                                                                                                                                     Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                                                                                                            Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
                                                Matthew Hughes | Immaculate Conception School | Grade 4 Reading


             Volunteers share their three-entry journals, changing their voices to
10 minutes   match the character. The volunteer Oncelers call on classmates to ask
             them questions about how they feel at various points of the story.
             Students should draw comparisons between the developments of the          Teacher leads class in discussion about characters they know from other works of literature
7 minutes    character they choose and a character in The Lorax.                       that have developed (text to text). Teacher should emphasize that development takes place in
                                                                                       many characters--not just the Onceler.
             Students modify their definitions of characters from today's lesson.
             They should now include how characters can develop over time.
5 minutes    Teacher shares volunteers' definitions. Teacher leads class in crafting
             a modified class definition for characters that stresses development.
             This new definition is placed on the large recipe card.                   Teacher walks around and checks progress.




                                                                                                                                   Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                                                                                                          Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
                                                       Matthew Hughes | Immaculate Conception School | Grade 4 Reading



                      And to Think that I Saw It on Mulberry Street: Applying Events
    LP 4
                     2                                                                                                   Advanced students may attempt to expand a one-sentence
                                                                                                                         summary into a full story. A classmate should use the "Who
    # of Days                                                                                     Enrichment             wanted but so then" model to create a summary, which the
                                                                                                                         advanced student uses to write a detailed story.
                     Students should know the elements of story grammar from lesson 1                                    The progression from teacher-modeling to partner work to
                     and definitions of setting and character from lessons 2 and 3.                                      individual work should help most students to understand the
                                                                                                                         concepts in this lesson. Students who still experience difficulty
Prior Knowledge                                                                               Accommodations             may continue to work with a partner. Various intelligences are
                                                                                                                         already included in different portions of this lesson, and the read-
                                                                                                                         aloud will make the story accessible to all learners. Students may
                                                                                                                         verbally retell important story points in their own words.
                     SWBAT summarize events and characters of a story.                                                   Students might lose focus during the read-aloud; interspersing
                                                                                                                         comprehension questions will keep their attention. Students might
Lesson Objective                                                                           (Anticipated Problems)        also become distracted during group work; the teacher should walk
                                                                                                                         around the room to ensure that students are on-track.
    Lesson           SWBAT write a one-sentence summary of the story that involves            (Changes for next
                     story events and characters.
  Assessment                                                                                       time)
(Benchmarks or       10.a, 10.f, 10.L
                                                                                             (What worked well)
  Standards)
                     Index cards; writing journals; story flowchart; And to Think that I
Materials Needed Saw It on Mulberry Street by Dr. Seuss; overhead; short story for                    Dates
                     bellwork


       Time                             Student Learning Task or Activity                                                     Teacher Method or Activity
      DAY 1
                     Bellwork: Students read a short story (projected on overhead) and
     5 minutes                                                                             Teacher walks around and checks progress.
                     answer questions about the setting and character motivation and
                     development.                                                          Teacher leads students in reviewing the five elements of story grammar on the large recipe card
     5 minutes
                                                                                           as well as the detailed definitions of setting and characters.
                     Telephone game. Students line up, and a short phrase is whispered
                     to the first student, who whispers what s/he hears to the second, who
                     whispers what s/he hears to the third, and so on. What is heard by
                     the last person in line is then compared to what was originally said. Teacher leads game.
     10 minutes
                     After two or three rounds, teacher should ask students what is
                     happening and why it is happening. Teacher should explain that
                     things happen in the course of a story, much like in the class line,
                     that change the way things are going. Students should be aware of




                                                                                                                                         Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                                                                                                                Modified: Matt Kloser 8/04
                                               Matthew Hughes | Immaculate Conception School | Grade 4 Reading


                                                                                    Teacher reminds class of the working definition of events they created during lesson 1 and tells
                                                                                    class that, by the end of the day, they will be events experts. Teacher introduces And to Think
5 minutes                                                                           that I Saw It on Mulberry Street and passes out story flowchart. Teacher explains that students
                                                                                    are to keep track of the major events of the story. Teacher should model by using the events of
                                                                                    that day to fill out a projected flowchart.
             Students fill out story flowchart. Review flowcharts as a class,       Teacher explains that students should pay careful attention to the events in the story and why
20 minutes   checking for student understanding.                                    they happen. After hearing the story, students will need to complete an activity that requires
                                                                                    them to know the events and why they happened. Read aloud And to Think that I Saw It... with
             Informal assessment: On an index card, students write the major        Teacher acts out a made-up story (a standard fairy tale works well) for students.
10 minutes
             events of the teacher-created story in order.
             Students write on an index card a new definition of events based on    Teacher shares volunteers' definitions. Teacher leads class in crafting a modified class definition
5 minutes
             what they have seen in this lesson's story, especially their           for events that stresses connections. This new definition is placed on the large recipe card.

 DAY 2
             Bellwork: Students attempt to write one sentence that describes the
5 minutes    important parts of what they have done today. Volunteers share         Teacher walks around and checks progress.
             their sentences.
                                                                                    Teacher asks students if it was easy to write one sentence that told everything they've done today.
                                                                                     When students respond no, teacher asks why. Teacher then asks why it would be important for
5 minutes                                                                           students to tell in just one sentence everything that has gone on. After hearing student responses,
                                                                                    teacher explains that the same is true of stories: it is sometimes important to be able to retell a
                                                                                    story using only a few words without losing anything important in the story. Teacher explains
                                                                                    that this is called first sentence to a story, to which each student adds a sentence. Students
                                                                                    Teacher provides making a summary.
             Students then, as a group, decide the most important events of the    should make sure that setting and characters remain consistent through the story. Even though
10 minutes   story, leaving out any extra information. Teacher writes these points they have not been covered in depth, the story should also include a problem and resolution.
             on the overhead.                                                      Teacher writes story on overhead.
                                                                                   Teacher then introduces the "Who wanted but so then" model. Teacher models this form of
10 minutes                                                                         summary for the students with the story the students have created--e.g. Bobby (who) wanted to
                                                                                   go to the movies but he didn't have enough money so he cut grass to get money and then was able
             Students work with a partner and use the story grammar map from       to go to the movies.
10 minutes   The Lorax to make a one-sentence summary using the "Who wanted Teacher monitors progress.
             but so then" model. Volunteers share their summaries with the class.
             Formal formative assessment: Students use the story flowchart from
             And to Think… to make a one-sentence summary using the "Who            Teacher should emphasize that summaries do not always have to be the same: different people
10 minutes   wanted but so then" model. When finished, volunteers compare           can read the same story differently. Summaries will be collected and graded (class participation)
             their summaries to see how they are different and to see what might    for succinctness and completeness.
             have been left out or added. Volunteers share their summaries with
             Students revise their summaries to include the setting of the story.
5 minutes                                                                           Teacher reminds students of the importance of setting in stories.
             Volunteers share their revised summaries with the class.
             Closure: On the same index card as the bellwork students rewrite the
5 minutes
             summary of their day using the "Who wanted but so then" model.




                                                                                                                                   Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                                                                                                          Modified: Matt Kloser 8/04
                                                      Matthew Hughes | Immaculate Conception School | Grade 4 Reading



  How the Grinch Stole Christmas & The Butter Battle Book: Applying Problem &
                                   Resolution
   LP 5
                    3                                                                                                     Advanced students may journal about how a character had the
                                                                                                                          same motivation in solving multiple problems. Other students may
    # of Days                                                                                       Enrichment            wish to write an entire story using the problem/solution summary.
                                                                                                                          Students may continue their writing by creating the opening to a
                    Students should know the elements of story grammar from lesson 1                                      Students finding difficulty with the journal entry or story segment
                    and how setting, characters, and events affect a story from lessons 2,                                writing may work with another student. Various intelligences are
                    3, and 4.                                                                                             already included in different portions of this lesson, and the read-
Prior Knowledge                                                                                 Accommodations
                                                                                                                          aloud will make the story accessible to all learners. Students may
                                                                                                                          be given story-starter sentences that lead up to where a resolution
                                                                                                                          is needed. Students may use free time during the day or after
                    SWBAT examine a story's problem in terms of characters and events.                                    Students might lose focus during the read-aloud; interspersing
                                                                                                   (Anticipated           comprehension questions will keep their attention. Students might
Lesson Objective
                                                                                                    Problems)             also become distracted during group work; the teacher should walk
                                                                                                                          around the room to ensure that students are on-track.
    Lesson     SWBAT write a paragraph relating the story's characters and events              (Changes for next
               to its problem.
  Assessment                                                                                        time)
(Benchmarks or 10.a, 12.I
                                                                                              (What worked well)
  Standards)
                    Index cards; writing journals; story grammar maps; How the Grinch
Materials Needed Stole Christmas by Dr. Seuss                                                          Dates


       Time                           Student Learning Task or Activity                                                         Teacher Method or Activity
      DAY 1
                    Bellwork: Students read a short story (projected on overhead) and
    10 minutes      write a one-sentence summary using the "Who wanted but then so"          Teacher walks around and checks progress.
                    model. They share these with a partner and review as a class.
                                                                                             Teacher leads students in reviewing the five elements of story grammar on the large recipe card
     5 minutes
                                                                                             as well as the detailed definitions of setting, characters, and events.
                                                                                             Teacher reminds class of the working definition of problem they created during lesson 1 and
                                                                                             tells class that, by the end of the day, they will be problem experts. Teacher introduces How the
     5 minutes
                                                                                             Grinch Stole Christmas and passes out story grammar map. Teacher reviews with students how
                                                                                             to use it during the story.
                    Students fill out story grammar map. Review story grammar maps           Teacher explains that students should pay careful attention to the problems that arise in the
    20 minutes      as a class, checking for student understanding.                          story. They should also look to see if the problems are solved or if they remain unsolved. After
                                                                                             hearing the story, students will need to complete an activity that requires them to know several
                                                                                             problems and their solutions. Read aloud The Grinch with comprehension questions.



                                                                                                                                           Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                                                                                                                  Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
                                               Matthew Hughes | Immaculate Conception School | Grade 4 Reading


             Students write a journal entry (at least five sentences) as a character
             in the story who experienced a problem. They write not only about         Teacher walks around and checks progress.
10 minutes
             what the problem is and how s/he solved it but also about his/her
             motivation for solving the problem.
5 minutes    Volunteers share their journal entries with the class.                    Teacher points out that different characters might have different motivations for solving the
             Informal assessment: Students write on an index card a new
                                                                                       Teacher leads class in crafting a modified class definition for problem and resolution that
5 minutes    definition of problem and resolution based on what they have seen in
                                                                                       involves character motivation. This new definition is placed on the large recipe card.
             this lesson's story; teacher shares volunteers' definitions.

 DAY 2
             Bellwork: Students write a two-sentence description of a problem
5 minutes    they recently had, how they resolved the problem, and why they            Teacher walks around and checks progress.
             resolved the problem the way they did.
             Class reviews problem and resolution, using examples from                 Teacher asks students if the resolutions in the story are the only possible resolutions (no).
5 minutes    yesterday's story.                                                        Teacher tells students that they will now become choose-your-own-adventure authors, choosing
                                                                                       other possible resolutions for the problems in the story.
             Students, in groups, are assigned a problem from the story. Students
             must act out the problem and the resolution the way they occurred in
7 mintues                                                                              Teacher monitors group progress.
             the story. They must then act out two alternate endings and explain
             why they are possible resolutions.
             Students present their resolution, alternate resolutions, and
             explanations to the class. Classmates write three "who wanted but so
13 minutes                                                                             Teacher introduces the term "plot" and gives examples of student summaries that express plot.
             then" summaries for each group: one for the actual resolution and
             two for the alternate resolutions.
             Informal assessment: Students swap one "who wanted but so then"
15 minutes   summary for an alternate resolution, create a new "then" component        Teacher holds mini-conferences with students.
             (the resolution), and write a story segment (at least 10 sentences)
             Volunteers share their story segments with the class. Classmates          Teacher leads class in discussion about how an author approaches writing a story with a
10 minutes
             praise, question, and polish story segments.                              problem and resolution.
             Closure: Students write on an index card a new definition of
                                                                                       Teacher leads class in crafting a modified class definition for resolution that involves a character
5 minutes    resolution that stresses that the resolution is one of many possible
                                                                                       making a choice. This new definition is placed on the large recipe card.
             resolutions; teacher shares volunteers' definitions.




                                                                                                                                      Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                                                                                                             Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
                                                       Matthew Hughes | Immaculate Conception School | Grade 4 Reading



                                                   Putting It Together: The Teacher Test
    LP 6
                     2                                                                                                 Students finishing early may look at the performance assessment
    # of Days                                                                                   Enrichment             assignment and begin to brainstorm ideas for their story endings.
                     Students should now have a strong sense of each element of story                                  Teacher may read questions out loud for students finding
Prior Knowledge grammar and how they interact in a work of literature.                      Accommodations             difficulty. Students may answer limited questions selected by the
                                                                                                                       teacher. Students may use a story map completed during the unit
                     SWBAT exhibit their understanding of elements of story grammar and                                This test gives students the opportunity to exhibit their
                                                                                               (Anticipated
Lesson Objective their connections on a pencil and paper test.                                                         understanding at various levels (knowledge, comprehension, and
                                                                                                Problems)              application) and should be accessible to all students.
    Lesson     SWBAT complete a pencil and paper test.                                      (Changes for next
  Assessment                                                                                     time)
(Benchmarks or 10.a, 10.d, 10.f, 10.L, 12.a, 12.h, 12.I
                                                                                           (What worked well)
  Standards)
                     Tests; pencils
Materials Needed                                                                                   Dates


      Time                               Student Learning Task or Activity                                                   Teacher Method or Activity
 DAY 1—REVIEW
                     Review activities                                                    Teacher leads class in review activity of teacher's choice. Standard options like Jeopardy or
                                                                                          white board responses are a possibility, but group activities—possibly having students recall
    45 minutes
                                                                                          and use information from Dr. Seuss texts—are an effective support. Students could craft
                                                                                          questions about elements of story grammar in the various stories read through the unit and use

  DAY 2—TEST
   45 minutes        Teacher test                                                         Teacher monitors progress.




                                                                                                                                      Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                                                                                                             Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
                                                       Matthew Hughes | Immaculate Conception School | Grade 4 Reading



                                                       Why We Read: Author's Message
    LP 7
                    3                                                                                             Advanced students may be challenged to connect the author's
    # of Days                                                                                   Enrichment        message of their chosen story with another story with which they
                                                                                                                  are already familiar--either by Dr. Seuss or one of their choice.
                    Students should be able to relate elements of story grammar and recall                        Working in groups should accommodate most students. Teacher
Prior Knowledge appropriate story details to support ideas.                                   Accommodations      should assign each group a scribe. Students may use their story
                                                                                                                  maps to help them remember story details.
                    SWBAT identify the author's message of a story.                             (Anticipated      Since students select their own groups, students may have
Lesson Objective                                                                                                  difficulty staying on task.
                                                                                                 Problems)
    Lesson     SWBAT write a paragraph that identifies the author's message of a              (Changes for next
               story with textual support.
  Assessment                                                                                       time)
(Benchmarks or 10.a, 10.f
                                                                                             (What worked well)
  Standards)
                    Chart paper; markers; writing journals; performance assessment rubric
Materials Needed                                                                                   Dates


       Time                            Student Learning Task or Activity                                               Teacher Method or Activity

DAY 1—teacher-led




                                                                                                                                 Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                                                                                                        Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
                                                      Matthew Hughes | Immaculate Conception School | Grade 4 Reading



                                   Rewriting Dr. Seuss: The Performance Assessment
    LP 8
                    2                                                                                                    Advanced students may continue their story into a sequel that
    # of Days                                                                                      Enrichment            places the same characters in a different setting with a different
                                                                                                                         problem. Other students may wish to add illustrations to their
                    Students should understand how elements of story grammar interact in                                 story endings. difficulty may write a shorter story ending as long
                                                                                                                         Students finding
                    and are threaded through a work of literature. Students should also                                  as all elements of story grammar remain consistent. As more
                    know the steps of the writing process and be able to move through the                                advanced students finish, they will be able to assist classmates
Prior Knowledge                                                                                Accommodations
                    process at their own pace (in a writer's workshop model). Students                                   with their writing. Students who desire may use additional time to
                    should especially be familiar with peer revision and peer revision                                   revise or embellish their endings.
                    checklists. Students should also be familiar with using rubrics.
                    SWBAT use elements of story grammar.                                                                 Students may find difficulty creating a story ending other thant the
                                                                                                  (Anticipated
Lesson Objective                                                                                                         one they know. Other students may become distracted during the
                                                                                                   Problems)             extended writing portion of class.
                    SWBAT rewrite the ending to a story read during the unit.                  (Changes for next
Lesson Assessment
                                                                                                    time)
 (Benchmarks or     12.h, 12.I
                                                                                              (What worked well)
   Standards)
                    Writing supplies; writing journals; Praise-Question-Polish response
Materials Needed sheets                                                                                Dates

      Time                             Student Learning Task or Activity                                                       Teacher Method or Activity
     DAY 1
                    Bellwork: Students review the performance assessment and their
    5 minutes
                    progress from yesterday.                                                 Teacher is available to clarify assignment.
                    Students finish their brainstorming, select an ending, and write their
    25 minutes
                    first draft.                                                             Teacher is available during this time for conferences.
    5 minutes                                                                                Teacher reviews with class how to revise and edit writing using self-check questions.
                    Students revise/edit their story endings and write the final draft.
    15 minutes
                                                                                             Teacher monitors progress.
                                                                                             Teacher introduces students to second part of performance assessment. Students will present
    5 minutes
                                                                                             their story endings orally to the class and receive feedback.
    5 minutes       Students rehearse reading their story endings aloud.

     DAY 2




                                                                                                                                           Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                                                                                                                  Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
                                  Matthew Hughes | Immaculate Conception School | Grade 4 Reading




  LP 9
              0

 # of Days                                                      Enrichment




   Prior
                                                             Accommodations
 Knowledge


   Lesson     0                                                (Anticipated
  Objective                                                     Problems)
   Lesson     0                                              (Changes for next
 Assessment                                                       time)
(Benchmarks 0
                                                            (What worked well)
or Standards)
  Materials
                                                                   Dates
   Needed

    Time          Student Learning Task or Activity                               Teacher Method or Activity




                                                                                           Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                                                                  Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
Matthew Hughes | Immaculate Conception School | Grade 4 Reading




                                                       Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                              Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
                                  (Teacher Name, School, Grade and Subject)


                                        Lesson Title
 LP 10
  # of Days   0                                     Enrichment
    Prior
                                                  Accommodations
 Knowledge
   Lesson     0                                     (Anticipated
  Objective                                          Problems)
   Lesson     0                                  (Changes for next
 Assessment                                            time)
(Benchmarks   0
      or                                         (What worked well)
 Standards)
  Materials
                                                       Dates
   Needed

   Time           Learning Task                                          Method or Procedure




                                                                               Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                                                      Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
(Teacher Name, School, Grade and Subject)




                                            Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                   Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
                                  (Teacher Name, School, Grade and Subject)


                                       Lesson Title
 LP 11
  # of Days   0                                    Enrichment
    Prior
                                                 Accommodations
 Knowledge
   Lesson     0                                    (Anticipated
  Objective                                         Problems)
   Lesson     0                                   (Changes for
 Assessment                                         next time)
(Benchmarks   0
                                                  (What worked
      or
                                                      well)
 Standards)
  Materials
                                                      Dates
   Needed

   Time           Learning Task                                         Method or Procedure




                                                                               Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                                                      Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
(Teacher Name, School, Grade and Subject)




                                            Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                   Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
                                  (Teacher Name, School, Grade and Subject)


                                        Lesson Title
 LP 12
  # of Days   0                                     Enrichment
    Prior
                                                 Accommodations
 Knowledge
   Lesson     0                                     (Anticipated
  Objective                                          Problems)
   Lesson     0                                  (Changes for next
 Assessment                                            time)
(Benchmarks   0
                                                  (What worked
      or
                                                      well)
 Standards)
  Materials
                                                      Dates
   Needed

   Time           Learning Task                                         Method or Procedure




                                                                              Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                                                     Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
(Teacher Name, School, Grade and Subject)




                                            Template authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                   Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
                                  (Teacher Name, School, Grade and Subject)


                                        Lesson Title
 LP 13
  # of Days   0                                     Enrichment
    Prior
                                                  Accommodations
 Knowledge
   Lesson     0                                     (Anticipated
  Objective                                          Problems)
   Lesson     0                                  (Changes for next
 Assessment                                            time)
(Benchmarks   0
      or                                         (What worked well)
 Standards)
  Materials
                                                       Dates
   Needed

   Time           Learning Task                                          Method or Procedure




                                                                              TTemplate authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                                                      Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
(Teacher Name, School, Grade and Subject)




                                            TTemplate authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                    Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
                                  (Teacher Name, School, Grade and Subject)


                                       Lesson Title
 LP 14
  # of Days   0                                     Enrichment
    Prior
                                                 Accommodations
 Knowledge
   Lesson     0                                    (Anticipated
  Objective                                         Problems)
   Lesson     0                                 (Changes for next
 Assessment                                           time)
(Benchmarks   0
                                                  (What worked
      or
                                                      well)
 Standards)
  Materials
                                                      Dates
   Needed

   Time           Learning Task                                         Method or Procedure




                                                                              TTemplate authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                                                      Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06
(Teacher Name, School, Grade and Subject)




                                            TTemplate authors: Michael Saleeby Timothy Welsh
                                                                    Modified: Matt Kloser 7/06

								
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