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					                                                                                              Academic and Student Services Division
                                                                                                                                                                                              Sr Vice President
                                                                                                                                                                                            Chief Academic Officer
                                                                                                                                                                                                   D Parker


                                                                                                                                                                           Executive Asst
                                                                                                                                                                             C Bowers




                                                          Associate VP                                                                                                            Assoc VP for Student Serv                     Director Prop Schools              Director Vocational Educ        GED/AHS Dir                                 Assoc VP Basic Skil s
                                                    Instructional Dev & Tech                                                                                                             V Wilson                                    S Wil iams                             E Brown                 L Parker                                       R Whitfield
                                                             J Mann


                                     Admin Asst                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Office Asst                                    ABE/ESL Dir
                                       A Holt                                                                                                    Director Stud Dev Svcs                                  Director High School        Education Prog Auditor                      Admin Sec            GED & AHS Tech     C Casey                                        K Brown
                                                                                                                                                         W White                                          Partnership Progs               D Jackson                               B Helle r              K O'Neal
                                                                                                                                                                                                               A Jordan
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Training Dir                                Comp Educ Dir
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Office Asst                        Coord Voc Educ          GED & AHS Tech     K Waters                                     S Smith
                 Director Program Svcs            Prog Coord Allied Health            Director Program Svcs                    Assoc Dir Stud Dev Svcs            Assoc Dir Stud Supp Svcs                                                  D Nixon                             N Massey                 M Lenz
                       J Frazelle                        R Batts                          T McPherson                                 K Yerby                             C Sims

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Coord Voc Educ                                 Infor Proc Tech
                                                                                                                               Assoc Dir Financial Aid                Office Assistant                                                                                           D Long                                          J Howell
 Coord Business Tech                      Office Asst              Coord Developmental Ed           Prog Coord Engin/Industr        M Hickman                             W Heilig
      H Lahoud                            S Johnson                      E Spragins                     Trans Syst Tech
                                                                                                           F Scuiletti                                                                                                                                                       Bus & Tech App An                                  Office Asst
                                                                                                                                                         Admin Asst                                                                                                            J McDougald                                   I Schlot erbeck
 Coord Early Childhood                   Inf Proc Tech                  Office Assistant                 Technical Asst                                    P Kury
   Public Svc Tech                          R Sayers                     G Robertson                        S Smith
       E Smith                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Assoc Dir Tech Prep                       NCCCLRC Dir
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 B Witchger                              B Allen



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Office Asst
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              D McDougald                                                      Office Asst
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               J Johnson




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Bus & Tech App An
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    G Johnson




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          ________________________________
01/2009 – Page 1 of 2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Vice President                                                                                    Date
                                           Basic Skills



        The Basic Skills Section provides leadership, oversight, and policy development services
to the institutions in the community college system for programs that provide educational
opportunities for adults who do not have a high school diploma or who lack sufficient mastery
of basic education skills to enable them to function effectively in society. These programs
include Adult Basic Education, English as a Second Language (ESL), Adult High School, General
Educational Development (GED) preparation and testing, and Compensatory Education.
General functions include administration of federal ABE programs, the North Carolina
Community College Literacy Resource Center, GED testing and reporting, curriculum
development, faculty in-service education, program evaluation, development and
administration of standards, and policy development.

The primary objectives of this unit are:

        To provide policy leadership and new program initiatives for serving traditionally
         underserved, underemployed and unemployed adults with productive basic skills
         training.


        To provide statewide accountability for the funding allocated by the section to the
         colleges in the system to assure compliance with federal and state laws, regulations
         and policies while establishing effective mechanisms to promote accountability and
         increased flexibility in funding.

        To provide state leadership, advocacy, and liaison to the U.S. Departments of
         Education and Labor, the N.C. State Board of Community Colleges , the Governor’s
         Commission on Workforce Preparedness and other agencies concerned with
         workforce development.

        To provide statewide planning and accountability for Basic Skills programs.

        To provide state leadership in the development and implementation of effective
         models of curriculum, standards, assessment procedures, staff development,
         support services, reporting, and program administration to ensure that all students
         in Basic Skills programs have access to quality teaching and academic support
         services.

        The Basic Skills Section, through its oversight, leadership and administrative
         functions, will provide opportunities for all adult North Carolinians to master the
         basic critical thinking skills demanded in a complex economy.
                            NORTH CAROLINA COMMUNITY COLLEGES

                                   BASIC SKILLS PROGRAMS

                                          2008 -- 2009


General Description . . .


        The mission of the Basic Skills program is to provide educational opportunities for adults
16 years or older who are out of school. The program addresses the needs of adults who do
not have a high school diploma or who lack sufficient mastery of basic education skills to enable
them to function effectively in society. The system provides educational opportunities for
adults to improve their reading, writing, mathematics, and communication skills through five
major programs: Adult Basic Education, General Educational Development (GED), Adult High
School (AHS), English as a Second Language (ESL), and Compensatory Education (CED).


        All 58 community colleges have Basic Skills programs. Classes are free of charge and are
offered in a variety of settings and at convenient times. Classes are offered annually on
community college campuses, work sites, churches, public schools, community centers,
libraries, homeless shelters, correctional institutions, and other locations. The community
college system also provides funding for twenty-nine community-based organizations that
provide basic literacy education to adults in one-on-one tutoring and small group sessions.


Programs . . .

Adult Basic Education (ABE): A program of instruction designed for adults who lack
competence in reading, writing, speaking, problem solving, or computation at a level necessary
to function in society, on a job, or in a family.

General Educational Development (GED): A program of instruction designed to prepare adult
students to pass the GED tests that lead to a high school diploma equivalency.

Adult High School (AHS): A program of instruction offered cooperatively with local public
school system to help students earn an Adult High School Diploma.

English as a Second Language (ESL): A program of instruction to help adults with limited or no
English language proficiency.

Compensatory Education (CED): A program to compensate adults with mental retardation who
have not had an education or who have received an inadequate one.
Need . . .

 According to the 2000 Census, 20% of North Carolina’s adults over the age of 25 have not
  completed high school. These figures reflect a decrease from the 32% in 1990 and 35% in
  1980.
 According to the National Adult Literacy Survey (NALS), 50% of the North Carolina adult
  population performs at a “below adequate level” in information processing skills. North
  Carolina ranks below the national average in skills level of the population, with skills levels
  equal to or less than adults in only 10 other states.


Key Facts for 2007-2008 . . .

 110,126 students were served in Basic Skills in 2007-2008 (attendance based on 12 hours or
  more).
 60,450 students were served in ABE.
 Out of the ABE figure, over 6,000 students were enrolled in Compensatory Education, a
  program for mentally handicapped adults.
 The total enrollment for adult secondary education programs (GED and AHS) was 18,785
  Graduates were: GED 13,028       AHS 2,279
 30,891 students were served in ESL programs.
 2,209 students were served in the workplace.
 Family literacy programs enrolled 2,222 students.
 Enrollment of homeless adults was 733.
 The number of students served in correctional facilities was 11,240.
                        RECORDS RETENTION REQUIREMENTS
Basic Skills

   Virtual Imaging/Scanning records after the audit – year 2
    (Scan image to DVD or CD ROM)

   Retention of class files (contracts, registration, attendance sheets, etc.) - usually 5 years
    after the 2 year audit and audit report to the president (archived – one on campus and one
    off campus) - Records and Retention Manual, Item 45539. Extension Data Database
    (Electronic) File
   Student Portfolios – purge after 2 years
   Storage of files off campus – one on campus and one off campus – Location ---local college
    decision – Ex. Bank vaults, satellite campuses (secured location) – Records and Retention
    Manual, Item 45539
   Release forms –after audit – not needed
   Purge paper copies of requisitions – after the financial audit is closed and after funding
    stream is closed – 3 years
   Destroy part-time instructor file – inactive for 3 years – Records and Retention Manual, Item
    45547. Available Instructors File
   Check Business Continuity Plan


GED

       Demographic forms – Verify information is in the computer system – Keep 30 days and
        shred– GEDTS
       Eligibility Confirmation forms –File in electronic permanent student file
       GED Score report – File in permanent student file or save on CD (can provide a paper
        copy if needed) *archive according to Business Continuity Plan
       Incomplete Scores – File in permanent student file or save on CD (can provide a paper
        copy if needed) *archive according to Business Continuity Plan
       Answer sheets – Verify in the computer system – Keep Answer sheets and essays for 6
        months - GEDTS
       Test Surveillance Log – Keep 1 year and shred (Contract Year) - GEDTS
       Seating Chart – Keep 1 year and shred ( Contract Year) - GEDTS
       GED Contract – Shred old and replace with new contract – GEDTS
       GED Accommodations Tracking Form – After the examinee takes the last GED tests and
        the tracking form is scanned, shred. The NCCCS GED office will keep the
        accommodation files for 3 years after successful completion.


Records and Retention Manual – Item 45537

GEDTS
AHS

      Adult High School Diplomas – give out or mail (if not delivered – archive in electronic
       permanent student file
      AHS Transcript – archive in electronic permanent student file (on and off campus)


Records and Retention Manual – Item 45536

www.nccommunitycolleges.edu/publications/index.html



Updated 12/08 LAP
                          BASIC SKILLS STATE LEADERSHIP ADVISORY BOARD

                                             2008 -2009


Name/E-Mail Address                           Address                  Area   Telephone
                                                                       Code

       C          Jeri Griffin                Martin CC                252    792-1521

       E          Director of Basic Skills    1161 Kehukee Park Road

       N          jgriffin@martincc.edu       Williamston, NC 27892

       T          Pam Earp                    Johnston CC              919    934-3051

       R          Director of Basic Skills    PO Box 2350

       A          earpp@johnstoncc.edu        Smithfield, NC 27577

       L

       C          Tony Taylor                 Beaufort County CC       252    946-6194

       O          Director of Basic Skills    PO Box 1069                     Ext. 6298

       A          tonyt@beaufortccc.edu       Washington, NC 27889

       S              Paula McElheney         Coastal Carolina CC      252    938-6320

       T          Director of Basic Skills    444 Western Boulevard

       A          mcelheneyp@coastalcar       Jacksonville, NC 28546
                  olina.edu
       L

       P          Candy Putnam                Mitchell CC              704    878-3236

       I          Basic Skills Director       701 W. Front Street

       E          ckegarise@mitchellcc.ed     Statesville, NC 28677
                  u
       D
                  Laura Coffee                Alamance CC              336    506-4375
       M
                  Basic Skills Director       PO Box 8000
       O
                  coffeel@alamancecc.edu      Graham, NC 27253-8000
       N

       T
S   Martha Bergman             Sandhills CC

O   Senior Director            3395 Airport Road        910   695-3784

U   bergmanm@sandhills.ed      Pinehurst, NC 28374
    u
T
    Sherry Byrd                Richmond CC              910   582-7061
H
    Basic Skills Director      PO Box 1189
E
    sherryb@richmondcc.ed      Hamlet, NC 28345
R   u
N

W   Debbie Woodard             Wilkes CC                336   667-5368

E   Basic Skills Director      P.O. Box 120

S   debbie.woodard@wilkes      Wilkesboro, NC 28697
    cc.edu
T
    Beverly Jaynes             Caldwell CC & TI
E
    Basic Skills Director      2855 Hickory Boulevard   828   726-2237 Ext.
R                              Hudson, NC 28638               2266
    BJaynes@Caldwell.ccti
N

A   Kathy Gardner              Stanly CC                704   991-0278

T   Associate Dean, Adult      141 College Drive
    Literacy
                               Albemarle, NC 28001
    gardnekk@stanly.cc.nc.u
L   s
A   Leo Kelly, Jr.             Vance Granville CC       252   492-2061, ext.
R                                                             314
    Dean of Continuing         P. O. Box 917
G   Education
                               Henderson, NC 27536
E   kelly@vgcc.edu

    Calvin Dull                Wilkes CC                336   838-6208

    Dean of Continuing         P.O. Box 120
    Education
                               Wilkesboro, NC 28697
    calvin.dull@wilkescc.edu
NORTH CAROLINA COMMUNITY COLLEGE SYSTEM




     Dropout Prevention/Driver’s License

                 Guidelines
Topics/Subject:                                                         Location:

 What are the major aspects of the Law?                                 Page 3

 What state agencies are involved in the Law?

 When is the Law effective?

 Who is affected by this Legislation?

 What are the new changes?

 What is a Driving Eligibility Certificate?

 Sample Parent Letter                                                   Page 4

 What is adequate progress?                                             Page 5

 What about dropouts?

 Are there hardship rules?

 Examples of hardship considerations                                    Page 6

 What is the process for hardships?

 Sample Driving Eligibility Hardship Request Form                       Page 7 and 8

 How will LEIS be used?                                                 Page 9

 How will Colleges notify DMV?

 Dropouts: Steps for reporting to DMV

 Inadequate Progress: Steps for Reporting to DMV                        Page 10

 What happens when DMV is notified?

 Community Colleges are responsible for correct information!

 Is there an appeals process?

 Issuing Driving Eligibility Certificates                               Page 11

 Certificates are valid for 30-days

 Requirements for a Driving Eligibility Certificate

 Implications for the Fall, 1998 Semester

 What else is required to receive a Driver’s Eligibility Certificate?

 How often is the Driving Eligibility Certificate issued?

 What about students who transfer from Public Schools to                Page 12
Community Colleges or Non-Public School?

How do Community Colleges get Driving Eligibility Certificates?

Training on the DMV Reporting Procedures

Any Questions?



Copy of House Bill 769: Dropout Prevention                                Appendix



What Are The Major          The Dropout Prevention/Driver’s License legislation reflects a
Aspects of the Law?         coordinated statewide effort to motivate and encourage
                            students to complete high school. The revocation of a student’s
                            driving permit or license will result if a student is unable to
                            maintain adequate academic progress or drops out of school.

What State Agencies Are     The law specifically identifies several state agencies to work
Involved in the Law?        collaboratively in the implementation of the law. The
                            Department of Public Instruction, Division of Motor Vehicles, the
                            Division of Non-Public Schools, and Community College System
                            are partners in this effort.

When is the Law             The law becomes effective August 1, 1998.
Effective?

Who is Affected By This     The new legislation is directed to all North Carolina students
Legislation?                under the age of 18 who are eligible for a driving permit or
                            license. This includes public school, federal school, home school,
                            private school, and community college students.

Who Is Not Affected By      Students who have attained a high school diploma, a G.E.D., or
This Legislation?           an adult high school diploma as issued by a community college
                            are not affected by this legislation. In addition, students who
                            received a driving permit or license prior to the implementation
                            of the Graduated Driver’s License program (before December 1,
                            1997) are not affected.

What Are the New            There are several changes in the procedures regarding how a
Changes?                    student obtains and retains his or her driver’s permit and
                            license. Beginning August 1, 1998, a student will need to have a
                            Driving Eligibility Certificate in order to receive a North Carolina
                            driver’s permit or license. The Division of Motor Vehicles will
                            not issue a driver’s permit or license without a Driving Eligibility
                            Certificate.

                            Note: A parent letter is found on page 4. This is only a sample
                              and is included to give Community Colleges an example of a
                              possible parent letter.

 What is a Driving            A Driving Eligibility Certificate is a printed document that is
 Eligibility Certificate?     issued by the Community College president and/or president’s
                              designee. The Driving Eligibility Certificate certifies that the
                              student has demonstrated adequate progress in school.



Dear Parents:

As you may know, North Carolina has new legislation that reflects a coordinated statewide
effort to motivate and encourage students to complete high school. The revocation of a
student’s driving permit or license will result if a student is unable to maintain adequate
academic progress or drops out of school. The law is in effect August 1, 1998.

 What State Agencies        The law specifically identifies several state agencies to work
 Are Involved in the        collaboratively in the implementation of the law. The Department
 Law?                       of Public Instruction, Division of Motor Vehicles, the Division of
                            Non-Public Schools, and Community College System are partners in
                            this effort.

 Who Is Affected            The new legislation is directed to all North Carolina students under
                            the age of 18 who are eligible for a driving permit or license. This
 By This Legislation?       includes public school, federal school, home school, private school
                            and community college students.

 Who Is Not Affected By     Students who have attained a high school diploma, a G.E.D., or an
 This Legislation?          adult high school diploma as issued by a community college are not
                            affected by this legislation. In addition, students who received a
                            driving permit or license prior to the implementation of the
                            Graduated Driver’s License program (before December 1, 1997) are
                            not affected.

 Driving Eligibility        There are several changes in the procedures regarding how a
 Certificate                student obtains and retains his or her driver’s permit and license.
                            A student will need to have a Driving Eligibility Certificate in order
                            to receive a North Carolina driver’s permit or license. The Division
                            of Motor Vehicles will not issue a driver’s permit or license without
                            a Driving Eligibility Certificate.

 What is Adequate           Adequate academic progress will be evaluated at the end of six
 Progress?                  months. A student enrolled in Basic Skills must attend class for a
                            minimum of sixty hours per month for a period of six consecutive
                            months. A student enrolled in GED must pass two GED tests. A
                            student enrolled in Adult High School (AHS) must pass two AHS
                            units. A student enrolled in Adult Basic Education or English as a
                            Second Language must demonstrate progress at the end of each six
                       month period by increasing scores on each subsequent
                       standardized test or making progress as documented by teacher
                       assessment.
For More Information   For more information, please contact:

What About Dropouts?   A student who drops out of school will lose his or her driver’s
                       permit or license.

Are There Hardship     Yes, presidents and/or a president’s designee will be able to issue
Rules?                 Driving Eligibility Certificates to students based on hardship. Cases
                       of hardship must reflect specific circumstances that are beyond the
                       control of the student, his or her parents, or the college. The
                       specific hardship circumstances are divided into four categories:

                       #1:     Medical Considerations

                       #2:     Work-Related Considerations

                       #3:     Exceptional Students Considerations

                       #4:     Other Considerations

                       In all cases of hardship, documented proof must be submitted. It is
                       also the responsibility of each college to maintain a record of
                       students given Driving Eligibility Certificates.

Examples of “Medical
                             Medical considerations can involve the student or the parents
Considerations”              or the student’s dependents.
                             Example #1: A Driving Eligibility Certificate can be given to a
                             student who was making adequate progress in a community
                             college, but was unable to attend college due to medical
                             reasons. In this case, documented proof must be submitted to
                             the community college from a doctor citing reasons why the
                             student missed college, dates of illness, etc. In addition,
                             documentation must be submitted to demonstrate the student
                             was making adequate progress prior to the illness.

                             Example #2: A Driving Eligibility Certificate can be given to the
                             student based on the special medical circumstances of the
                             parent. This would apply to parents who may be legally blind
                             or have other medical impairments that require the students to
                             have a license in order to maintain the general welfare of the
                             family. In this case, documented proof of the parent’s illness or
                             medical impairment must be submitted, along with evidence
                             demonstrating the absolute necessity of the student to have a
                             driver’s license.

Example of “Work-Related     A Driving Eligibility Certificate can be given to the student if he
 Considerations”               or she requires transportation to and from a job that is
                               necessary to the family’s financial welfare and is unable by any
                               other means to do so. There should be documented proof that
                               the student is working and that the student’s earnings go
                               directly to support the basic needs of the family. In addition,
                               there must be proof that the student is unable by any other
                               means to get to and from work.

 Example of “Exceptional       A Driving Eligibility Certificate can be given to the student when
 Students Considerations”      it has been determined that the student is unable to make
                               progress toward obtaining a high school diploma or GED. This
                               ruling is not intended to apply to exceptional students who
                               have the ability to obtain a high school diploma or GED.

 “Other Considerations”        This is for unusual circumstances not covered by the first three
                               categories.

 What is the Process for       Parents or legal guardians of a student wanting to pursue a
 Hardships?                    Driving Eligibility Certificate based on hardship must notify the
                               community college president and/or the president’s designee.


 Sample Hardship Request       In order to facilitate this procedure, a sample Driving Eligibility
 Form                          Hardship Request Form can be found on the next page.

                               This is only a sample and is included to give an example of a
                               possible

                               form that could be customized to suit the needs of the
                               community college.

                            Driving Eligibility Hardship Request Form

                                (To be filled out by the parent)


Name of Parent of Legal Guardian:_________________________________________________

Name of Student: _______________________________________________________________

Name of School: ________________________________________________________________

Parent’s Address: _______________________________________________________________

City: _________________________State:_________________________Zip:________________

Parent’s Work Phone: (     )____________________ Home Phone: (          )____________________
I am requesting a Driving Eligibility Certificate for my son or daughter: Cases of hardship must
reflect specific circumstances that are beyond the control of the student, his or her parents, or
the college. The specific hardship circumstances are divided into four categories. For specific
examples, please read the back of this form.

(Please circle as appropriate)#1:   Medical Considerations

                                     #2:   Work-Related Considerations

                                     #3:   Exceptional Students Considerations

                                     #4:   Other Considerations - Please specify


Directions: To be considered for hardship, all information on this form must be complete.
Support documents (a letter from a doctor, etc.) will be necessary to determine your request.
Briefly explain the circumstances of your hardship request. Include any
documents/attachments as needed.




Signature of Parent or Guardian:_______________________________Date:_____________


                                       OFFICE USE ONLY

 Date In:_______________Decision Date:_________________Other:____________________




               (See the back of this form for examples of hardship categories.)
                                 Examples of Hardship

                           Medical considerations can involve the student or the parents or
Examples of “Medical       the student’s dependents.
Considerations”            Example #1: A Driving Eligibility Certificate can be given to a
                           student who was making adequate progress in a community
                           college, but was unable to attend school due to medical reasons.
                           In this case, documented proof must be submitted to the
                           community college from a doctor citing reasons why the student
                           missed school, dates of illness, etc. In addition, documentation
                           must be submitted to demonstrate the student was making
                           adequate progress prior to the illness.

                           Example #2: A Driving Eligibility Certificate can be given to the
                           student based on the special medical circumstances of the parent.
                           This would apply to parents who may be legally blind or have
                           other medical impairments that require the student to have a
                           license in order to maintain the general welfare of the family. In
                           this case, documented proof of the parent’s illness or medical
                           impairment must be submitted, along with evidence
                           demonstrating the absolute necessity of the student to have a
                           driver’s license.

Example of “Work-Related   A Driving Eligibility Certificate can be given to the student if he or
Considerations”            she requires transportation to and from a job that is necessary to
                           the family’s financial welfare and is unable by any other means to
                           do so. There should be documented proof that the student is
                           working and that the student’s earning go directly to support the
                           basic needs of the family. In addition, there must be proof that
                           the student is unable by any other means to get to and from work.

Example of “Exceptional    A Driving Eligibility Certificate can be given to the student when it
Students Considerations”   has been determined that the student is unable to make progress
                           toward obtaining a high school diploma. This ruling is not
                           intended to apply to exceptional students who have the ability to
                           obtain a high school diploma or GED.
“Other Considerations”     This is for unusual circumstances not covered by the first three
                           categories.
Support Documents          Please note that support documents will be required to prove
                           hardship cases. Hardship Request Forms that do not have
                           adequate support documentation will be denied.
How Will LEIS Be Used?     In order to effectively manage this process and to take advantage
                           of the existing electronic infrastructure, the Department of
                           Community Colleges will develop the capacity within LEIS to
                           collect data for this bill.
How Will Colleges Notify   Colleges will notify the Division of Motor Vehicles via software
DMV?                       developed by DMV. Any school or central office with internet or
                           AS 400 access will be able to use this method. Security system ID’s
                           (RACF) will be required for each user.

Dropouts: Steps for          The first step is to determine and verify that the student has
Reporting to DMV           dropped out of school.

                             The next step is to notify the parents by letter using the
                           student’s current address. The letter should outline the
                           consequences of dropping out of school as based on the new
                           Dropout Prevention law and explain the procedures for using the
                           Driving Eligibility Hardship Request Form (or other locally-
                           approved form). This should be done within five working days

                             Once parents have been notified, colleges should give parents a
                           reasonable time (no less than five, or more than ten working days)
                           to return the appropriate form requesting consideration under the
                           hardship rules.

                             A review panel is convened by the president and/or the
                           president’s designee to review the hardship request. This should
                           be done in a timely manner as parents should be notified within
                           ten working days of the results.

                             If it is determined that a Driving Eligibility Certificate should be
                           granted under the conditions of hardship, written documentation
                           is given to the parents and a copy is filed at the college.

                              When it is time for the student to apply for a driving permit or
                           license, he or she will request a Driving Eligibility Certificate from
                           the president and/or the president’s designee. Note:

                           The Driving Eligibility Certificate is only valid for a 30-day period
                           when it is issued.

                             Students who are not granted a Driving Eligibility Certificate are
                           reported to DMV using the AS 400 or internet.


Inadequate Progress:       At the end of the semester, Basic Skills will identify those students
                           not making adequate progress. The president and/or the
Steps for Reporting to        president’s designee should notify the parents of the student not
DMV                           making adequate progress. If the student received his or her
                              driving permit or license before the implementation of the
                              Graduated Driving License program (prior to December 1, 1997),
                              the student is not affected by this new law. The following
                              guidelines should be followed:

                                Once parents have been notified, schools will give parents a
                              reasonable time (no less than five, or more than ten working days)
                              to return the appropriate form requesting consideration under the
                              hardship rules.

                                A review panel is convened by the president and/or the
                              president’s designee to review the hardship requests. This should
                              be done in a timely manner as parents should be notified within
                              ten working days of the results.

                                If it is determined that a Driving Eligibility Certificate should be
                              granted under the conditions of hardship, written documentation
                              is given to the parents and a copy is filed at the college.

                                 When it is time for the student to apply for a driving permit or
                              license, he or she will request a Driving Eligibility Certificate from
                              the president and/or the president’s designee.

                                Students who are not granted a Driving Eligibility Certificate are
                              reported to DMV using the AS 400 or internet
What Happens When DMV         Once DMV is notified by a college, a letter is automatically
is Notified?                  generated and sent to the student. Typically this will be done
                              within 24-hour period. For example, if a college inputs the
                              information during the day, the DMV computers will process the
                              revocation letter that night.
Colleges are Responsible      It is the responsibility of each college to ensure that the correct
for Correct Information!      student has been identified and verified. Correct identification is
                              an essential part for the successful implementation of this dropout
                              prevention program. Note: When a student’s permit or license is
                              revoked, the student will have to pay fees of $35 ($25 restoration
                              fee and a $10 license fee) to get a new permit or license.
Is There An Appeals           Each college will determine the policies and procedures for an
Process?                      appeals process for parents who have a grievance connected with
                              this law. At the present time, the majority of colleges have a
                              written grievance procedure in place.
Issuing Driving Eligibility   The president and/or the president’s designee is responsible for
                              signing and issuing a Driving Eligibility Certificate. This will occur
Certificates                 when a student plans to apply for a driving permit or license.

Valid for 30 Days            The Driving Eligibility Certificate is only valid for 30-days once it
                             has been issued by the college. For this reason, the student
                             should request a Driving Eligibility Certificate in a timely fashion.
Requirements for a Driving   The Driving Eligibility Certificate will be issued only if the student
Eligibility Certificate      has demonstrated adequate progress in the prior six months and
                             has not dropped out of community college. Students who do not
                             meet this requirement will not be given a Driving Eligibility
                             Certificate.

Implications for the Fall,   A student who is enrolled in college and requesting a Driving
1998 Semester                Eligibility Certificate in order to process his or her driving permit or
                             license during the fall term of the 1998-99 program year can
                             receive one without demonstrating adequate progress in the prior
                             six months.

What Else is Required to     A student is required to show an original or certified copy of his or
Receive a Driver’s           her birth certificate and the Driver Education Completion
Eligibility Certificate?     Certificate. The birth certificate is needed to ensure that the
                             student’s legal name and correct date of birth appear on the
                             Driving Eligibility Certificate. The Driver Education Completion
                             Certificate will verify that the student has passed the required
                             driver education class.

How Often is the Driving     Under most circumstances a student will only need to be given a
Eligibility Certificate      Driving Eligibility Certificate once. Once a student’s driving permit
Issued?                      is issued, the DMV office will indicate on its computers that the
                             student has received a Driving Eligibility Certificate. The student
                             will retain this status as long as DMV is not notified by a college
                             that the student’s status has changed. When a student drops out
                             of college or does not maintain adequate progress, the
                             community college will notify DMV. Once the student regains his
                             or her Driving Eligibility Status, a new Driving Eligibility Certificate
                             will need to be issued.

What About Students Who      A student who is making adequate progress in school can transfer
Transfer From Public         to a community college or a non-public school without any
Schools to Community         consequences. A student who is not making adequate progress
                             (or drops out of school) and enrolls in a community college or a
Colleges or Non-Public
                             non-public school cannot be granted a Driving Eligibility Certificate
School?                      for a period of six-months.

How do Community             Driving Eligibility Certificates and associated guidelines will be sent
Colleges Get Driving         to LEAs by July 1, 1998. Contact your LEA to obtain your
Eligibility Certificates?   certificates.

Training on the DMV         We will conduct a special training during the summer. More
Reporting Procedures        information regarding the training will be forthcoming.
                             ATTACHMENT Pol.




       North Carolina
Community College System




“Lose Control, Lose Your License
          Guidelines”


          May, 2000

                                               SBCC

                                           5/19/00
When is the Law               The law is effective July 1, 2000.

Effective?

What Does the Law Do?         The law will suspend a student’s permit or license for one year.
                              The legislation directs public schools, community colleges, and
                              nonpublic schools to notify the North Carolina Division of Motor
                              Vehicles whenever a student is given an expulsion/suspension for
                              more than 10 consecutive days or an assignment to an alternative
                              educational setting for more than 10 consecutive days for one of the
                              following reasons:

                              1. The possession or sale of an alcoholic beverage or an illegal
                                 controlled substance on school property.

                              2. The possession or use on school property of a weapon or firearm
                                 that resulted in disciplinary action under G.S. 115C-391(d1) or
                                 that could have resulted in that disciplinary action if the conduct
                                 had occurred in a public school.

                              3. The physical assault on a teacher or other school personnel on
                                 school property.

What is School Property?      The physical premises of the school, school buses or other vehicles under
                              the school’s control or contract and that are used to transport students,
                              and school-sponsored or school-related activities that occur on or off the
                              physical premises of the school.

How Will DMV Be Notified? The State Automated Driver License System (SADLS)
                          will be used to notify DMV.

Who Is Affected               1. Students who are at least 14 years old or who are rising 8th graders on
By This Legislation?          or after July 1, 2000 are subject to this law.

                       Note: Students who were issued a N.C. driver’s permit or license
                       before 12/1/1997 or students who are 18 years old cannot be charged
                       under this law. However, the year’s suspension can go beyond a
                       student’s 18th birthday.

___________________________________________________________________________

What About Students Who Turn 18          Unlike the “Dropout Prevention/Driver’s License” law that stops
when a student turns 18 years old, the “Lose Control” law does not stop at age 18. It is possible for a
student to have his or her license suspended as a 17-1/2 year old. If a student is unable to demonstrate
exemplary behavior, then he or she will be 18-1/2 before being eligible to drive.
What About the Family Education Right to Privacy Act (FERPA)?

Beginning with the 1999-2000 academic year, colleges will require parents, guardians, or emancipated
juveniles to provide their written irrevocable consent for a school to disclose to the Division of Motor
Vehicles that the student no longer meets the conditions for a Driving Eligibility Certificate under G.S. 20 -
11.

A sample copy of this written consent appears below.

Wording for Written Consent

The following is a sample of a separate written consent form now required for a Driving Eligibility
Certificate. This consent form should be signed by a parent, acting parent, guardian, or emancipated
minor when requesting a Driving Eligibility Certificate.

I do hereby consent to this school or any other educational agency in North Carolina which this student
may be enrolled to notify the Division of Motor Vehicles if the student exhibits conduct that subjects
him/her to disciplinary action as defined by G.S. 20-11(n1).

1. The possession or sale of alcoholic beverage or an illegal substance on school property.

2. The possession or use on school property of a weapon or firearm that resulted in di sciplinary action or
that could have resulted in disciplinary action if the conduct had occurred in the public school.

3.The physical assault on a teacher or other school personnel.

This is subject to all terms and conditions contained in the Driving Eligibility Certificate.
                    ____________________________

                   Typed or Printed Name of Student
                   __________________________________________________

                   Typed or Printed Name of Parent, Acting Parent, or Guardian
                   __________________________________________________

                   Signature of Parent, Acting Parent, Guardian, or Emancipated Minor
                   ___________________ _______________________
                        Date                    Home Phone
What Happens if the Parent Does Not Give Consent?

A Driving Eligibility Certificate will not be issued if the parent, acting parent, guardian, or emancipated
minor does not give consent.

How Can a Student’s Driving Privileges Be Restored?

The community college president or the president's designee shall issue a Driving Eligibility Certificate to
the student under one of the following three conditions:

                   1. The enumerated student c onduct occurred before the student reached the age of
                      15, and the student is now at least 16 years old.

                   2. The enumerated student conduct occurred after the student reached the age of
                      15, and it is at least one year after the date of the ineligibility.

                   3. The student needs the certificate to drive to and from school, a drug or alcohol
                      treatment counseling program, as appropriate, or a mental health treatment
                      program, and no other transportation is available.

Note: This should only apply to students with a Level 2 or 3 N.C. driver’s license. Students with a permit
(Level 1) cannot drive by themselves.


Clarify “No Other Transportation is Available.”

The legislation is very clear on this. A Driving Eligibility Certificate shall be issued by the community
college president or the president's designee, if it can be demonstrated that the student has no other
possible means of transportation to and from school, a drug or alcohol treatment counseling program, as
appropriate, or a mental health treatment program. Students with access to a school bus, carpooling,
having a parent or other relative drive, or using other modes of transportation (bicycle, city bus, etc.)
shall be denied.

Restored for Exemplary Behavior or Completion of a Drug Treatment Counseling Program

A student is eligible for a certificate after a six month period for displaying exemplary student behavior.
The community college president or the president's designee shall issue a Driving Eligibility Certificate to
the student under the following:

1. The student has returned to school or has been placed in an alternative educational setting, and has
displayed exemplary student behavior.

2. The student has successfully completed a drug or alcohol treatment counseling program for a drug -
related suspension and has demonstrated exemplary behavior.
Note: A student given a drug-related suspension must successfully complete a treatment counseling
program. This is not an option if the student wishes to get a Driving Eligibility Certificate after the six
month waiting period.



What is “Exemplary Behavior”?

Exemplary student behavior is defined as the student having no further incidents of misconduct where
expulsion, suspension, or an assignment to an alternative educational setting is required. Students
found in violation of local college policies addressing related behaviors (i.e. attendance, dress code, or
other behaviors that result in an official disciplinary action by the president, etc. ) would not qualify for
having exemplary behavior.


What is “Successful Completion” of a Treatment Counseling Program?

Successful completion of a treatment counseling program would consist of a minimum of 12 hours of
drug or alcohol treatment counseling, a mental health treatment program, or other appropriate
intervention programs recognized by the community college. While a minimum of 12 hours is
recommended, each community college can decide this based on available resources. In addition, the
treatment counseling program should have a strong parental involvement focus.

Sample Form #1

In addition, colleges should convey to parents the extent of this driving privilege. A sample agreement
form is found on page 7. It is further recommended that colleges keep accurate records. This will be
needed to avoid the potential abuse of this provision. For example, if a student is given a Driving
Eligibility Certificate to attend a 12-week drug treatment counseling program, then the student’s driving
privilege should be suspended after the 12 weeks are completed.


Sample Form #2

A status form should also be a part of a student’s records. This is to ensure a way to track the student
when he or she enrolls in another educational setting, such as another community college. This form is
needed to ensure that student’s status in relationship to this law is understood by the enrolling
institution.

A sample status form is found on page 8.

WARNING: Driving Eligibility Certificates

Because of the potential overlap of this new law and the current “Dropout Prevention/Driver’s License”
law, all school personnel should abide by the following:•. Check to see if the student has a suspension
based on the Dropout Prevention/Driver’s License” law. A student cannot be issued a Driving Eligibility
Certificate unless he or she is “clear” on both the “Lose Control” and “Dropout Prevention/Driver’s
License” laws.

Do We Issue DECs to In-State Private School Students?

No. In-state home school and private school students can get a Driving Eligibility Certificate from the
chief administrator of his or her non-public school. All non-public school (private and home homes)
administrators must obtain their supply of DECs from the Division of        Non-Public Education. Call
Rod Helder at (919) 733-4276.


Senate Bill 57

The “Lose Control, Lose Your License” Guidelines address all of the key requirements of this legislation.
Colleges are also encouraged to use the original legislation when making determinations in the best
interest of the student. Please refer to the attached copy of Senate Bill 57 (1999 Session).

CONTACT LIST

The following individuals are responsible for providing information on this and related legislation.

In-State Private Schools and Home Schools

For questions concerning in-state private school or home school students, please call Rod Helder at (919)
733-4276.

Community Colleges

For questions regarding community college students, please call Dr. Randy Whitfield at (919) 733-7051.

Division of Motor Vehicles

For questions regarding policies of the Division of Motor Vehicles, please contact Larry Daniel at (919)
861-3808.

Public Schools and Out-of-State Students

For questions regarding the rules related to out-of-state and public school students, please contact Artie
Kamiya at (919) 715-1824.

SADLS Program to Notify DMV

For help with using the State Automated Driver License System (SADLS), please contact Kathy Blake,
Terry Shellwood, or Joy Matthews at (919) 733-7051.

DMV Help Desk

For additional help with SADLS, please contact the DMV Help Desk at        1 (800) 368-2004 or (919) 861-
3317.
Suspended Licenses

Suspended permits/licenses should be sent to DMV - Attn: Eula Williams

                                           1100 New Bern Avenue

                                           Raleigh, NC 27697
                               This form should be placed on your college’s letterhead.

                                       Agreement Form

__________________

Today’s Date


Pursuant to G.S. 20-11(n1), a Driving Eligibility Certificate is being issued to the following

individual. Once the need for transportation is no longer required (example:: when the drug or

alcohol treatment counseling program is completed), the college will use the State Automated

Driver’s License System (SADLS) to notify the N.C. Division of Motor Vehicles to suspend the

student’s driving privilege.

__________________________________________________

         Typed or Printed Name of Student

__________________________________________________

Typed or Printed Name of Parent, Acting Parent, or Guardian

__________________________________________________

Signature of Parent, Acting Parent, Guardian, or Emancipated

Minor

___________________             ___________________

Begin Date                         Tentative End Date

__________________________________________________

Typed or Printed Name of the College President or President's Designee

__________________________________________________

Signature of College President or President's Designee




     This form will be placed in the student’s permanent records to be reviewed as needed.
                         This form should be placed on your colleges letterhead.

                                          Status Form

__________________

Today’s Date

The following student has been reported to the Division of Motor Vehicles under G.S. 20-
11(n1) for the following reasons:

____ The possession or sale of alcoholic beverage or an illegal substance on school property.

____The possession or use on school property of a weapon or firearm that resulted in
disciplinary action or that could have resulted in disciplinary action if the conduct had occurred
in the public school.

____The physical assault on a teacher or other school personnel.

____________________________

Typed or Printed Name of Student

__________________________________________________

Student’s Address

__________________________________________________

Student’s Social Security Number, if known

__________________________________________________

Name of Person Completing this Form

Name of College: ___________________________________

College Phone Number: (        ) _____________________

Beginning Date of the Suspension: _______________________

Ending Date of the Suspension: __________________________



 This form will be placed in the student’s permanent records to be reviewed as needed.
                           Frequently Asked Questions and Answers
                                     Drivers License Laws

If someone under the age of 18 does not have a high school diploma from a regionally
accredited high school, what must he/she do in order to qualify for a driving eligibility
certificate?

   Enroll in a North Carolina public, private, approved home school, or community college
    (basic skills program leading toward a GED) and demonstrate adequate academic progress
    toward obtaining a high school diploma or its equivalent.


What if a student has passed the necessary placement tests at a community college and
enrolled in a curriculum program, how does he/she get a driving eligibility certificate?

   Pursue a GED or high school diploma.
   Enroll in a public, private, or approved home school and demonstrate adequate academic
    progress toward obtaining a high school diploma or its equivalent.

What happens to students who leave school to attend a Community College?

  When a student leaves a public school to attend a community college and is NOT making
   adequate progress at the point of withdrawal the public school should revoke that student’s
   driving privileges.
 When a student leaves a public school to attend a community college and IS making
   adequate progress the public school should not revoke that student’s driving privileges.
Who is responsible for issuing a DEC to a student who lives in North Carolina but attends a
boarding school out of state?
  A student who has permanent residency in North Carolina but attends a boarding school
   out of state shall receive a DEC from the school they would normally attend. That school
   may ask for the following documentation:
               1. Proof of residency within their district.
               2. Transcript/report card showing the latest semester from the school.
               3. A letter on school letterhead stating the student is currently in attendance at
                  that school.
               4. A report card/transcript at the end of each semester until the child graduates
                  – making sure the student understands that they will lose driving privileges if
                  this is not presented at the end of each semester.
Can public schools share their DEC’s with other schools?

   Public schools are not allowed to share Driver Eligibility Certificates with community
    colleges, private schools, home schools, or other public schools.
Are public schools or community colleges allowed to revoke a private school student’s
license?

   No, the private school should contact the Division of Non Public Schools to revoke driving
    privileges of a student attending the private school.


Who can community colleges issue DEC’s to?

   Community colleges may not issue a DEC to a student who attends any of the following;
    public school, home school, private school (within NC), or an out of state correspondence
    school.


How does Dropout Prevention/Lose Control- Lose Your License affect minors who are
emancipated?

   Emancipated minors are still affected by both the Dropout Prevention and the Lose Control
    Lose Your License Laws.


Is a hardship permanent?

   Hardships should only be granted under extreme circumstances. Once a student is granted
    a hardship their license should not be revoked again.


Can DMV, DPI, or the North Carolina Community College System Office issue DEC’s or grant
hardships?
   State level positions at DPI, DMV, and the North Carolina Community College System Office
    cannot grant hardships or distribute DEC’s to students.


Who is responsible for charges incurred when a license is revoked in error?

   If a program revokes a student’s license in error and the student has to have a duplicate
    license issued, the program should be responsible for the $10.00 duplication fee.


When should programs send the names of licenses to be revoked to the DMV?

   Programs should wait the determined time period to receive any hardship requests after
    notifying parents of the student’s license revocation before sending the names to the DMV.
When errors occur…
 If a program places a suspension in error it is important that NCCCS is contacted and the
  suspension is deleted. If suspensions placed in error are not deleted, the student may incur
  increases in their insurance premiums.


   Programs should use extreme caution when entering suspensions so they do no label a
    student as a Lose Control suspension when it should have been under Dropout Prevention.
    Each suspension has different guidelines for reinstatement and special attention should be
    paid when entering this information.


What is the purpose of the DEC?

   A DEC is used to determine if a student is maintaining adequate progress toward graduation
    and has not been suspended for having an illegal substance on campus or assaulting a staff
    member.


For More Information, Contact Randy Whitfield at NCCCS Office:
   919/807-7132
   whitfieldr@nccommunitycolleges.edu
                      Basic Skills

             Policy & Procedures Manual
                          For

                 Community Colleges




                Randy Whitfield, Ed.D.

Associate Vice President of Academic & Student Services

                Basic Skills Department

      North Carolina Community College System

                     March 2004

                Revised October 2008
                                    MISSION OF BASIC SKILLS


The mission of the Basic Skills program is to assist adults to become literate and obtain the
knowledge and skills necessary for employment and self-sufficiency, assist adults who are
parents to obtain the educational skills necessary to become full partners in the educational
development of their children, and assist adults in the completion of a secondary school
education. The North Carolina Community College System provides educational opportunities
for adults to improve their reading, writing, mathematics, and communication skills through
five major program components.
                                                   TABLE OF CONTENTS



MISSION OF BASIC SKILLS ................................................................................................ 34
ADULT BASIC EDUCATION (ABE)........................................................................................ 1
   ADULT BASIC EDUCATION ...................................................................................................... 1
   ADULT BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM ................................................................................... 1
   ASSESSMENT OF ADULT BASIC EDUCATION STUDENTS ................................................................. 1
ADULT HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA PROGRAM...................................................................... 2
   ADULT HIGH SCHOOL............................................................................................................ 2
   ADULT HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA .............................................................................................. 2
   AGREEMENT OF AFFILIATION .................................................................................................. 2
   BOOKS FOR ADULT HIGH SCHOOL AND GED ............................................................................. 2
   MOVEMENT FROM LOW ADULT SECONDARY TO HIGH ADULT SECONDARY...................................... 2
   TUITION FOR ADULT HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA COURSES ............................................................... 3
   UNITS REQUIRED FOR PROGRAM............................................................................................. 3
   WORK EXPERIENCE FOR ADULT HIGH SCHOOL ........................................................................... 3
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ...................................................................... 4
   ADA LEGISLATION................................................................................................................ 4
   FUNDING FOR ADA STUDENTS ............................................................................................... 4
   GED TESTING ACCOMMODATIONS.......................................................................................... 4
   SERVING ADA STUDENTS ...................................................................................................... 4
ASSESSMENT FOR BASIC SKILLS ......................................................................................... 5
   ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES..................................................................................................... 5
   LOWEST SCORE DETERMINES PLACEMENT ................................................................................. 5
   PRE/POST-TESTING .............................................................................................................. 5
   PRE-TESTING FOR “STOP-OUTS”............................................................................................. 6
   QUALITY CONTROL PROCEDURES............................................................................................. 6
   STANDARDIZED ASSESSMENTS FOR BASIC SKILLS......................................................................... 7
   TRAINING FOR ADMINISTERING ASSESSMENTS ........................................................................... 7
   USE OF ALTERNATE TEST FORMS ............................................................................................. 7
   USE OF INFORMAL ASSESSMENTS ............................................................................................ 7
ASSESSMENT HOURS FOR BASIC SKILLS ............................................................................ 8
   REPORTING GED ASSESSMENT HOURS..................................................................................... 8
   STUDENTS ASSESSED WHO DO NOT RECEIVE INSTRUCTION.......................................................... 8
   STUDENTS ASSESSED WHO RECEIVE INSTRUCTION...................................................................... 8
AUDITING ............................................................................................................................ 9
   AUDIT SERVICES PURPOSE...................................................................................................... 9
   COURSE CONTENT AUDITING.................................................................................................. 9
   DOCUMENTATION CORRECTIONS............................................................................................. 9
   DOCUMENTATION REQUIRED FOR AUDITING ............................................................................. 9
   INFORMATION CONCERNING AUDITING .................................................................................. 10
AWARDS ........................................................................................................................... 11
   ANGELA MOORE TROGDON AWARDS..................................................................................... 11
   INSTRUCTOR AND VOLUNTEER/TUTOR OF THE YEAR.................................................................. 11
   STUDENTS OF THE YEAR ....................................................................................................... 11
BASIC SKILLS FUNDING..................................................................................................... 12
   AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS....................................................................................................... 12
   BASIC SKILLS FUNDING FORMULA .......................................................................................... 12
   COST-SHARING OF CLASSES.................................................................................................. 12
   FUNDING FOR BASIC SKILLS .................................................................................................. 12
   LIMITS ON USE OF BASIC SKILLS FUNDS .................................................................................. 13
   PROCESS FOR OBTAINING FUNDS/APPLICATION EVALUATION ..................................................... 14
   SPECIAL PROJECT FUNDING .................................................................................................. 17
   SPECIAL PROJECT TRANSFERS OF FUNDS ................................................................................. 17
   TRAINING ALLOCATION - FEDERAL ......................................................................................... 17
BASIC SKILLS STATE LEADERSHIP ADVISORY BOARD...................................................... 18
   HISTORY AND PURPOSE OF BOARD ........................................................................................ 18
   MEETINGS ........................................................................................................................ 18
   SELECTION OF BOARD MEMBERS........................................................................................... 18
BASIC SKILLS STATE STAFF................................................................................................ 19
   STAFF ORGANIZATION......................................................................................................... 19
   STAFF RESPONSIBILITIES....................................................................................................... 19
CAPTIVE CO-OPTED PROGRAMS...................................................................................... 23
   CAPTIVE CO-OPTED PROGRAMS DEFINITION............................................................................ 23
   PRIOR APPROVAL FOR C APTIVE CO-OPTED PROGRAMS.............................................................. 23
COMPENSATORY EDUCATION PROGRAM (CED)............................................................. 24
   COMPENSATORY EDUCATION................................................................................................ 24
   COMPENSATORY EDUCATION ADVISORY COUNCIL - LOCAL ......................................................... 24
   COMPENSATORY EDUCATION ADVISORY COUNCIL - STATE ......................................................... 24
   COMPENSATORY EDUCATION CAPTIVE CO-OPTED APPROVAL...................................................... 25
   COMPENSATORY EDUCATION COMMUNITY C LASSROOM APPROACH ............................................ 25
   COMPENSATORY EDUCATION COURSE OF STUDY ...................................................................... 25
   COMPENSATORY EDUCATION PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY ................................................................. 25
   COMPENSATORY EDUCATION PROGRAM FUNDING ................................................................... 26
   ICF-MR ........................................................................................................................... 26
   PROOF OF ELIGIBILITY.......................................................................................................... 26
   SIGN-IN SHEETS FOR COMPENSATORY EDUCATION STUDENTS ..................................................... 26
CONTACT HOUR REPORTING ........................................................................................... 27
   BREAKS ............................................................................................................................ 27
   CANCELLATION OF BASIC SKILLS CLASSES ................................................................................ 27
   CONTACT HOUR REPORTING FOR BASIC SKILLS CLASSES............................................................. 27
   NON-REGULARLY SCHEDULED CLASSES ................................................................................... 28
CORRECTIONS EDUCATION .............................................................................................. 29
   CORRECTIONS EDUCATION ................................................................................................... 29
DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES STUDENTS ............................................................................ 31
   REFERRAL TO BASIC SKILLS ................................................................................................... 31
   TEACHING BASIC SKILLS AND DEVELOPMENTAL COURSES SIMULTANEOUSLY .................................. 32
DISCIPLINE OF STUDENTS................................................................................................. 33
   LAWS CONCERNING STUDENT DISCIPLINE................................................................................ 33
   REGULATION OF STUDENT DISCIPLINE .................................................................................... 34
DISTANCE EDUCATION ..................................................................................................... 35
   APPLICATION FOR DISTANCE EDUCATION CLASSES .................................................................... 35
   COMPUTER-ASSISTED INSTRUCTION....................................................................................... 35
   HANDBOOKS FOR DISTANCE EDUCATION................................................................................. 35
   ORIENTATION AND TESTING ................................................................................................. 35
DRIVERS LICENSE LAWS.................................................................................................... 36
   DRIVERS LICENSE LAW #1: DRIVERS LICENSE / DROPOUT PREVENTION LAW................................. 36
   DRIVERS LICENSE LAW #2: LOSE CONTROL; LOSE YOUR LICENSE LAW ......................................... 36
   DRIVERS’ LICENSE LAWS AND DROPOUTS................................................................................ 36
   DRIVERS’ LICENSE ELIGIBILITY CERTIFICATES............................................................................. 37
   EMANCIPATED MINORS....................................................................................................... 37
   ISSUING CERTIFICATES TO MINORS NOT ENROLLED IN BASIC SKILLS ............................................. 37
   NOTIFYING MINORS REGARDING LAW.................................................................................... 38
   SADLS SYSTEM ................................................................................................................. 38
EMANCIPATED MINORS ................................................................................................... 39
   DEFINITION ....................................................................................................................... 39
   DRIVERS LICENSE LAWS AND EMANCIPATED MINORS ................................................................ 39
   PROOF OF EMANCIPATION ................................................................................................... 39
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL) / ENGLISH LITERACY ...................................... 40
   ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE ......................................................................................... 40
   ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE ASSESSMENT....................................................................... 40
   ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE CURRICULUM ...................................................................... 40
   ENGLISH LITERACY/CIVICS EDUCATION GRANTS ....................................................................... 40
   TEACHING IN SPANISH......................................................................................................... 40
ENROLLMENT INFORMATION (GENERAL) ....................................................................... 41
   ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR LEGAL ALIENS & FORMER RESIDENTS OF OTHER STATES ................ 41
   BASIC SKILLS CLASSES LASTING LONGER THAN 17 WEEKS .......................................................... 41
   DUAL/C ONCURRENT ENROLLMENT ........................................................................................ 41
   ENROLLMENT BASED ON LOWEST TEST SCORE ......................................................................... 41
   ENROLLMENT OF HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES ........................................................................... 41
   ENROLLMENT REQUIREMENTS .............................................................................................. 42
   HUSKINS........................................................................................................................... 42
   MULTI -ENTRY/MULTI -EXIT C LASSES IN PRISONS...................................................................... 42
   STUDENTS FROM OTHER STATES ........................................................................................... 42
FAMILY LITERACY.............................................................................................................. 43
   COMPREHENSIVE FAMILY LITERACY........................................................................................ 43
   COMPREHENSIVE FAMILY LITERACY GRANTS ............................................................................ 43
   COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT FOR FAMILY LITERACY .................................................................... 45
   FTE FOR FAMILY LITERACY COMPONENTS ............................................................................... 46
   MADISON HEIGHTS/LIFELINES .............................................................................................. 46
   MOTHEREAD ................................................................................................................. 46
   NORTH C AROLINA FAMILY LITERACY CONSORTIUM ................................................................... 46
   NORTH C AROLINA CENTER FOR FAMILY LITERACY ..................................................................... 46
   PARTICIPATION IN NCCCS FUNDED COMPREHENSIVE FAMILY LITERACY PROGRAMS ....................... 46
FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT (FERPA)........................................... 47
   FERPA AND BASIC SKILLS .................................................................................................... 47
   GUIDELINES FOR FOLLOWING FERPA REGULATIONS ................................................................. 47
FTE’S (FULL TIME EQUIVALENT STUDENTS) FOR BASIC SKILLS ....................................... 48
   CONTACT HOUR REPORTING ................................................................................................ 48
   FTE FOR FAMILY LITERACY COMPONENTS ............................................................................... 48
GENERAL EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (GED) ............................................................. 49
   GENERAL EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (GED) ....................................................................... 49
   GED ACCOMMODATIONS FOR ADULTS WITH DISABILITIES ......................................................... 49
   GED ADMINISTRATION POLICIES........................................................................................... 49
   GED CLASSES IN SPANISH.................................................................................................... 49
   GED - COMBINING SCORES.................................................................................................. 49
   GED ELIGIBILITY LIMITATIONS .............................................................................................. 49
   GED ENGLISH PROFICIENCY TEST .......................................................................................... 50
   GED GUIDELINES FOR TEST ADMINISTRATION ......................................................................... 50
   GED PASSING SCORE.......................................................................................................... 51
   GED PROOF OF IDENTIFICATION ........................................................................................... 51
   GED RE-TESTING POLICY..................................................................................................... 51
   GED TEST ADMINISTRATION FUNDING................................................................................... 51
   TAKING THE GED IN ONE LANGUAGE..................................................................................... 52
   TEST SECURITY (ADDITIONAL MEASURES) .............................................................................. 52
GROUPWISE LISTS FOR BASIC SKILLS............................................................................... 54
   EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE TO COLLEGES.................................................................................. 54
   MAINTENANCE OF LIST........................................................................................................ 54
INSTRUCTORS/PART-TIME STAFF .................................................................................... 55
   PAYMENT FOR ATTENDING C ONFERENCES/MEETINGS/FIELD TRIPS.............................................. 55
   PAYMENT FOR NON-TEACHING HOURS .................................................................................. 55
   PRORATION OF SALARIES ..................................................................................................... 55
   QUALIFICATIONS FOR INSTRUCTORS ....................................................................................... 55
LITERACY EDUCATION INFORMATION SYSTEM (LEIS) .................................................... 56
   LEIS SYSTEM ..................................................................................................................... 56
   MOVEMENT FROM ONE LEVEL OF BASIC SKILLS TO THE NEXT IN LEIS........................................... 56
MINORS............................................................................................................................. 57
   RELEASE DOCUMENTS FOR MINORS....................................................................................... 58
   SERVING MINORS IN DIVISION OF YOUTH/DOC FACILITIES ........................................................ 58
   TESTING OF MINORS FOR GED ............................................................................................. 58
NATIONAL AGENCIES........................................................................................................ 59
   COMMISSION ON ADULT BASIC EDUCATION (COABE).............................................................. 59
   LITERACY INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION SYSTEM (LINCS) .............................................. 59
   NATIONAL ADULT EDUCATIONAL PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CONSORTIUM (NAEPDC) ............. 59
   NATIONAL ADULT LITERACY AND LEARNING DISABILITIES CENTER (NALLD) .................................. 59
   NATIONAL ADULT LITERACY DATABASE, INC. (NALD) ............................................................... 59
   NATIONAL CENTER ON ADULT LITERACY (NCAL)...................................................................... 60
   NATIONAL CENTER FOR EDUCATION STATISTICS (NCES)............................................................ 60
   NATIONAL CENTER FOR FAMILY LITERACY (NCFL) .................................................................... 60
   NATIONAL CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF ADULT LEARNING AND LITERACY (NCSALL) ........................ 60
   NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE FOR ESL LITERACY EDUCATION (NCLE)............................................ 61
   NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY (NIFL) ............................................................................. 61
   PROLITERACY AMERICA ....................................................................................................... 62
   PROLITERACY WORLDWIDE .................................................................................................. 62
   UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, OFFICE OF ADULT AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
   (OVAE) ........................................................................................................................... 62
NATIONAL REPORTING SYSTEM (NRS) ............................................................................ 63
   ASSESSMENT OF STUDENTS .................................................................................................. 63
   CORE NRS MEASURES ........................................................................................................ 63
   CORE NRS SECONDARY MEASURES ....................................................................................... 65
   CORE NRS SECONDARY MEASURES DATA MATCH.................................................................... 66
   GOALS AND C ORE INDICATORS OF TITLE II, ADULT EDUCATION & FAMILY LITERACY ACT.................. 67
   HISTORY OF THE NATIONAL REPORTING SYSTEM (NRS)............................................................. 67
   NATIONAL REPORTING C ENTER WEBSITES............................................................................... 67
   STUDENT GOALS ................................................................................................................ 68
   TWELVE HOUR RULE........................................................................................................... 68
   WORK-BASED PROJECT LEARNERS ......................................................................................... 69
   WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA—P.L. 105-220) .............................................. 69
NORTH CAROLINA AGENCIES........................................................................................... 70
   MOTHEREAD, INC........................................................................................................... 70
   NORTH C AROLINA CENTER FOR FAMILY LITERACY ..................................................................... 70
   NORTH C AROLINA NETWORK FOR EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING (NC-NET)........................................ 70
   NORTH C AROLINA LITERACY ASSOCIATION .............................................................................. 70
   SCALE (STUDENT COALITION FOR ACTION IN LITERACY EDUCATION) ........................................... 70
   VOICES........................................................................................................................... 70
NORTH CAROLINA COMMUNITY COLLEGE LITERACY RESOURCE CENTER..................... 71
   DESCRIPTION OF C ENTER ..................................................................................................... 71
NUMBERED MEMOS......................................................................................................... 72
   PURPOSE OF NUMBERED MEMOS ......................................................................................... 72
   SELECT NUMBERED MEMOS................................................................................................. 72
PATHWAYS TO EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS .................................................................... 73
   DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM.................................................................................................. 73
   GRANT APPLICATION........................................................................................................... 73
   USE OF FUNDS FOR PATHWAYS GRANTS ................................................................................. 76
PROGRAM MONITORING................................................................................................. 77
   MONITORING VISITS ........................................................................................................... 77
   NUMBER OF PROGRAMS VISITED........................................................................................... 77
   PROGRAM MONITORING FORMS........................................................................................... 77
OUTCOME MEASURES...................................................................................................... 78
   FEDERAL ........................................................................................................................... 78
   STATE : 75% RETENTION RATE ............................................................................................. 78
TRAINING .......................................................................................................................... 79
   APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROJECT ................................................ 79
   BASIC ENGLISH SKILLS TEST (BEST-PLUS) AND COMPREHENSIVE ADULT STUDENT ASSESSMENT SYSTEM
   (CASAS) TRAINING............................................................................................................ 79
   BASIC SKILLS DIRECTORS INSTITUTE (REQUIRED TRAINING)......................................................... 79
   BASIC SKILLSFAMILY LITERACY C ONFERENCE......................................................................... 79
   BASIC SKILLS NEW DIRECTORS ORIENTATION........................................................................... 79
   COMPENSATORY EDUCATION COORDINATORS CONFERENCE....................................................... 79
   MOTHEREAD / NATIONAL CENTER FOR FAMILY LITERACY ....................................................... 80
   STAFF TRAINING REQUIREMENTS........................................................................................... 80
   TRAINING COSTS FOR BASIC SKILLS DIRECTORS......................................................................... 80
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION IN BASIC SKILLS ..................................................................... 81
   BASIC SKILLS FUNDS FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION................................................................... 81
   COMPENSATORY EDUCATION PROGRAM................................................................................. 81
   PATHWAYS TO EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM................................................................................. 81
   WORKPLACE LITERACY PROGRAM.......................................................................................... 81
WORKPLACE BASIC SKILLS................................................................................................ 82
   BASIC SKILLS PROGRAMS IN THE WORKPLACE .......................................................................... 82
   BASIC SKILLS WORKPLACE PUBLICATION ................................................................................. 82
   PRE-EMPLOYMENT ASSESSMENTS ......................................................................................... 82
   WORK-BASED PROJECT LEARNERS ......................................................................................... 82
                                                            Adult Basic Education (ABE)




                            ADULT BASIC EDUCATION (ABE)


Adult Basic Education
Adult Basic Education (ABE) is a program of instruction designed for adults who need to
improve their reading, writing, speaking, problem solving, or computation skills to
function more effectively in society, on a job, or in the family. ABE students function
below a high school level. The four levels of ABE are as follows:
     Beginning Literacy ABE
     Beginning Basic Education
     Low Intermediate ABE
     High Intermediate ABE


Adult Basic Education Curriculum
There is no set ABE curriculum. Colleges may choose curricula that best fit the needs of
their students. Adult Literacy Media Alliance (ALMA) video-tapes which have been
distributed to all community colleges are excellent for ABE students. Also, Appalachian
State University through its Adult Basic Skills Professional Development Project has
distributed to all colleges manuals and video-tapes which outline appropriate teaching
techniques for ABE students. (Note: Caldwell Community College and Technical
Institute developed excellent reading and math curricula, Project Independence, for
intermediate ABE students. All college programs were given copies of the curricula.)

Assessment of Adult Basic Education Students
All Adult Basic Education students should be pre-tested with a standardized assessment
(WorkKeys – High Intermediate ABE only, CASAS, TABE) upon entering the program and
placed into one of the four ABE levels based on the lowest assessment score.




Page 1
                                                                     Adult High School Diploma



                          ADULT HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA PROGRAM


Adult High School
Adult High School (AHS) is a program of instruction offered cooperatively with local public
school systems to help adults earn an Adult High School Diploma.


Adult High School Diploma
Adult High School diplomas must be issued in conjunction with a local public school.
Community colleges do not have the statutory authority to issue high school diplomas.

Four signatures should be on the diploma: the president of the college, the chairperson of the
college’s Board of Trustees, the superintendent of the public school system, and the
chairperson of the public school system.

Agreement of Affiliation
To offer an Adult High School Diploma program, colleges must sign an “Agreement of
Affiliation” with their local public schools for students who are 16 and 17 years old. (23.NCAD
2E.0101(2)(d)(iii) and CC-97-222) An “Agreement of Affiliation” is also needed for adults 18
years old and older for the public schools to issue diplomas. Community colleges do not have
the statuary authority to issue their own adult high school diplomas. Blank copies of the
“Agreement of Affiliation” may be obtained from the System Office. Once an agreement is
signed by both community college and local school officials, a copy must be sent to the NCCCS
AHS/GED Office.



Books for Adult High School and GED
Colleges may suggest that Adult High School or GED students purchase textbooks, but should
make available free access to books in classrooms. Programs do not have to provide free of
charge books for students to write in, only to read. It is highly recommended that all books
used in both programs are made available in a laboratory or library setting for students to use
outside of class.


Movement from Low Adult Secondary to High Adult Secondary
All Adult High School students should be pre-tested with a standardized assessment (CASAS,
TABE, WorkKeys) upon entering the program and placed into adult basic education, low adult
secondary, or high adult secondary based on the lowest assessment score. Students who score
below 9.0 or its equivalent must be placed in the appropriate ABE level until a post-test score
shows movement into adult secondary.

Page 2
                                                                      Adult High School Diploma


Movement from low adult secondary to high adult secondary may be determined by two
methods for the Adult High School Diploma program: (1) post-test scores or (2) completion of
50% of the requirements for the Adult High School program. (For example, a college that
requires students to complete 20 units may move students from adult secondary low to adult
secondary high upon the completion of 10 units.) Students who score 10.9 or below (or the
equivalent) and have completed 50% or more of the requirements for the Adult High School
program should be placed in adult secondary low until successful completion of at least one
Adult High School credit. (CC01-005)

Tuition for Adult High School Diploma Courses
All Basic Skills programs are free of charge; therefore, colleges may not require students to pay
tuition for other college programs and transfer credits into the Adult High School Diploma
program.

Units Required for Program
Programs may choose to set a different number of units required for minors than they do for
other adults. The minimum number of units for all students is 20, but programs may work with
local public schools and decide to require units above the 20 minimum and up to the number of
units required by the local educational agency. (CC-97-222)

Work Experience for Adult High School
The purpose of the AHS intern student work practicum is to promote workforce development
by giving academic credit for work competencies mastered by a student who is pursuing a high
school education through the AHS diploma program. The concept of the AHS intern student
work practicum is for a student to practice workforce development basic skills learned in the
classroom by applying these skills at the workplace. The practicum is an extension of the
classroom to the workplace where the student practices those types of attributes, represented
as work competencies, deemed to be essential by employers for a productive workforce. The
supervising employer and the student’s instructor certify the accomplishment of each work
competency and give credit only when the work is performed, at least, at a minimal standard
for the work. The work experience shall not exceed 160 hours per student as cited under Title
23NCAC2D.0324 (e). For FTE reporting purposes, a college may not report more hours per
student than the number of hours specified in the instructor’s contract. If multiple instructors
are used for supervision of the AHS work experience component, the total hours paid to all
instructors for the work experience may be totaled and equal up to 80 hours or 160 hours,
depending upon the number of work experience units for which the student is registered. One
instructor should be designated as the lead instructor for the work experience component with
the contract listing the other instructor contract numbers.

The work experience component for each 80 hours of work experience for one unit of elective
credit should be completed within the semester or no longer than a twenty-one week period.
The instructor, at a minimum, must monitor the work site at least once during the 80 hours of
work experience. (CCS99-027)

Page 3
                                                            Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA)


                           AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA)


ADA Legislation
The Americans with Disabilities Act was enacted to make all aspects of American society more
accessible to people with disabilities, whether physical or psychological.


Funding for ADA Students
The ADA is an unfunded mandate – programs must provide funding for ADA needs, but they do
not receive any funding for that purpose. Some colleges have es tablished a separate fund for
ADA, but others take the funding from each program as needed. Check with your local college
ADA administrator.

GED Testing Accommodations
GED Testing Service provides accommodations for students with documented disabilities. See
GED Examiner’s 2005 Manual, Section II, for information regarding test accommodations.
The following are disabilities which have accommodations addressed in the GED Examiners’
2005 Manual:
    Learning and Other Cognitive Disabilities
        Dyslexia
           Dysgraphia
           Dyscalculia
    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
       AD/HD

    Emotional/Mental Health
    Physical/Chronic Health Disability

Serving ADA Students
One of the most important areas of ADA is physical access. Programs must provide physical
access to and within the building where students come for services. Also, under the ADA Act,
all programs are required to provide “reasonable accommodations” to students with
disabilities. Those disabilities include both physical disabilities and learning disabilities. Check
with your local college ADA administrator to determine “reasonable accommodations.”
Colleges are not required to use IDEA standards (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) for
individuals with disabilities because that is the law that governs K-12 education.




Page 4
                                                                       Assessment for Basic Skills


                                 ASSESSMENT FOR BASIC SKILLS


Assessment Procedures
All students in programs funded by the North Carolina Community College System must be
tested twice annually with an approved Basic Skills standardized assessment. All students
reported in the National Reporting System data submission must be tested (LEIS for community
colleges; LACES for community-based organizations). Exceptions may be made for students
who are unable to understand or respond to the test due to low literacy or Engl ish proficiency
or due to disability. However, the programs must provide some alternative assessment for
such students.
The only exception to students being tested twice annually is when students enter a program or
takes a post-test during the last 90 days of a program year. In that case, that assessment may
count as a pre-test for the following program year. The basic rule is that students should be
tested at least twice per year. Students must be post-tested according to directions for each
standardized test. Most tests recommend post-testing after 50 to 100 hours of instruction.
Most students should not be post-tested with less than fifty hours of instruction.

Although overall test results should be shared with students, no students should be give n the
correct answers to the test questions that they missed. Instructors should not discuss specific
questions from standardized tests with students.

Lowest Score Determines Placement
Students should be placed into adult education levels based on their lowest test score. If a
student takes both TABE math and reading tests, scoring 8.9 on math and 10.0 on reading, that
student should be placed in ABE Intermediate High. If a student takes both the reading and
math tests, but only wants to work on one area such as math, then only that test should be
entered into the system.

Pre/Post-Testing
The North Carolina Community College System encourages local Basic Skills/literacy programs
to select the test series that they use based on a learner’s goals and the instructional focus of
the program. Pre-tests should be administered prior to enrollment or within the first two
weeks of enrollment. Post-tests should be administered according to test manufacturers’
recommendations for the amount of instructional hours between pre- and post-tests or there
should be written justification why post-tests are being administered in fewer than the
recommended hours. Students who indicate they are leaving the program before the
completion of the scheduled time between pre- and post-test may be post-tested before they
leave if there is evidence that progress has been made. Alternate test forms must be used for
pre- and post-tests.

Page 5
                                                                       Assessment for Basic Skills


Pre-Testing for “Stop-Outs”
If a student has “stopped-out” of the program for more than 90 days, then the program must
give a new pre-test prior to or within two weeks of re-admittance to the program. This is a
requirement of the federal government.

Quality Control Procedures
Testing data should be entered into LEIS on an on-going basis. Data should be entered no less
than quarterly.
Quality control must be maintained for assessment procedures. Local program
directors/coordinators may use the following assessment checklist to ensure correct
assessment procedures have been followed.


                           Standardized Assessment Checklist
Assessment Procedures for Test Administrators                                   yes/no
1. The test administrator has been trained in giving the assessment(s).

2. The test administrator has read the test manual(s).
3. The test administrator follows all directions in giving the
assessment(s).
4. The testing facility is quiet, has adequate lighting, and adequate space
for test-takers.
5. The test administrator follows all directions, including strict adherence
to time limits, etc.
6. The tests are accurately scored and raw scores are converted to scale
scores.
7. Tests results are kept confidential.
8. Test results are shared with test takers and appropriate instructors in
a timely manner.
9. Test answers are not shared with test takers, but the type of questions
missed may help test takers to understand what they need to learn.
10. Tests results are available for instructors and program staff.

11. Test results are reported in LEIS or LACES in a timely manner (no less
than quarterly).



Page 6
                                                                      Assessment for Basic Skills


(North Carolina Assessment Policies for Basic Skills)

Standardized Assessments for Basic Skills
All Basic Skills students should be pre- and post-tested with a standardized Basic Skills
assessment. The following assessments are the only ones approved for North Carolina Basic
Skills programs:

     TEST                ABE          Compensatory           ESL           GED/Adult
                                        Education                          High School

    CASAS                 √                  √                √                  √

     TABE                 √                                                      √

  *WorkKeys               √                                                      √

                         High
                    Intermediate
                      ABE only

BEST/BEST Plus                                                √

 (For Compensatory Education, see CC01-035; for English as a Second Language, see CC-99-174
and CC06-265)

*Students may not be charged a WorkKeys assessment fee.

Training for Administering Assessments
Training is essential for a quality assessment system. All staff who administers any standardized
assessment must be trained before administering the tests. Once initial training is complete,
staff should attend refresher sessions every two years.
Use of Alternate Test Forms
Directions for all standardized tests require that test forms be alternated. Example: Give TABE
9 as a pre-test and TABE 10 as a post-test. The next test in the sequence would be TABE 9,
followed by TABE 10.
Use of Informal Assessments
         The North Carolina Community College System Office encourages local Basic
Skills/literacy programs to use a variety of informal assessments to assist instructors/tutors in
designing appropriate educational programs for adults. The use of instructor/tutor-made tests,
unit tests, portfolios, applied performance assessments, and learner observations are
encouraged to design and monitor learning opportunities. However, informal assessments may
not be used to determine federal educational functioning levels.



Page 7
                                                               Assessment Hours for Basic Skills


                            ASSESSMENT HOURS FOR BASIC SKILLS


Reporting GED Assessment Hours
The hours a student takes to complete the General Educational Development (GED) exam are
reportable for budget/FTE. GED testing hours may only be counted for budget FTE if students
are enrolled in the semester during which the assessment occurred. (CC95-185)

Students Assessed Who Do Not Receive Instruction
If a student is given an assessment and receives no Basic Skills instruction (instruction in
reading, writing, mathematics, or communication skills), the student assessment hours may not
be reported for budget FTE. (CC-95-185)

Students Assessed Who Receive Instruction
Any Basic Skills student’s initial assessment, testing and retesting hours may be counted only
when the student receives Basic Skills instruction (instruction in reading, writing, mathematics,
or communication skills) in addition to the initial placement assessment. In this situation, both
the assessment hours and the instructional hours may be reported for budget FTE. This applies
for all Basic Skills classes. These students must be registered for the appropriate Basic Skills
class. (CC-95-185)




Page 8
                                                                                            Auditing


                                             AUDITING

Audit Services Purpose
Audit Services’ purpose is to ensure the equitable distribution of state funds to all colleges. This
is accomplished through reviewing college practices and implementation of appropriate
portions of S.115-D, 23NCAC, State Board of Community College policies and guidelines, and
System Office numbered memoranda. Audit Services’ role is to support programmatic
decisions made by each program area of the System Office.

Course Content Auditing
When auditors observe Basic Skills instructional content and materials, they are looking for
connections between course content and the purposes of Basic Skills which are as follows: to
provide instruction in reading, writing, mathematics, and communication skills; to provide
instruction leading towards the obtainment of a GED or Adult High School diploma; and to
provide instruction consistent with the Compensatory Education Course of Study. If students
are taking a field trip or watching a movie or doing any other activity that is not obviously in line
with the purposes of Basic Skills, auditors may question the activity. Program staff must be able
to relate all activities to the purposes of Basic Skills.

Documentation Corrections
If local staff discover auditing irregularities prior to an auditor’s visit, clearly mark what the
issue is, then document how the program has corrected the situation. Do not change records
once an audit has been conducted.

Documentation Required for Auditing
Auditors may ask for a variety of data while conducting program audits. Typically, the data
requested for Basic Skills includes:

 Registration information – student signature required
 Attendance sheet with daily attendance (first date must match registration and class roster
  date)
 Class Rosters – student signature required, social security number
 Assessment information – pre- and post-test scores/LEIS Testing and Progress sheet (CASAS,
  TABE, WorkKeys, BEST, BEST PLUS, Official GED practice test, actual GED test) Note: GED
  practice tests may not be used for student placement or progress.
 Student contact information (if used to document outcomes) Examples: post cards, email,
  telephone calls, job visits
 Student goals (1-5)
 Supporting documentation of goal completion:
   LEIS Student Outcome Form
   AHS units earned – Low AHS can move to High AHS after completion of half the units
      required for graduation

Page 9
                                                                                         Auditing


         GED Tests
         GED diploma
         AHS diploma
         Instructor and/or any instructional contracts
         Attendance records
         Signing in/out sheets – student signature and time


Auditors may ask colleges to produce other items during an audit session. Items may include,
but are not limited to, registration information, class rosters with signatures, student
maintenance forms, documentation of registration by semester (receipt forms), assessment
information, student contact information, student goals, etc. Auditors will ask to see your
college’s accountability plan to ensure that you are following your college’s internal
procedures.

Information Concerning Auditing
In order to contact your assigned auditor or to review questions asked of the auditors, refer to
www.nccommunitycolleges.edu and click on “search,” then enter Audit Services. You will find
contact information as well as detailed information needed for an audit. In addition, you will
find “frequently asked questions” of the auditors.




Page 10
                                                                                         Awards


                                            AWARDS

Angela Moore Trogdon Awards
Four awards are given at the annual Basic Skills and Even Start Family Literacy Conference. The
awards are for “Student of the Year – Community College/Family Literacy,” “Student of the Year
Community Based Organization,” and “Instructor of the Year,” and “Volunteer/Tutor of the
Year.” The awards include a trophy or plaque and cash bonus/prize and are given in honor of
Angela Moore Trogdon, who served as Basic Skills/HRD Director at Randolph Community
College, then Guilford Technical Community College. Angela lost her fight with breast cancer in
November 1999.


Instructor and Volunteer/Tutor of the Year
The winners for this category will be invited to speak at the annual conference. All
current/previous instructors/volunteers are eligible.



Students of the Year
The students of the year will be invited to speak at the annual conference. All current/previous
students are eligible.




Page 11
                                                                              Basic Skills Funding


                                     BASIC SKILLS FUNDING


Availability of Funds
The availability of funds for Basic Skills will be announced through a variety of methods to
assure ample opportunity for eligible providers to apply. Notice will be given directly to local
community colleges and other identified eligible providers by memorandum from the
community college System Office. The System Office will make every effort to seek out a wide
range of eligible providers and will invite any eligible providers to request applications. Notice
of availability of applications will be provided through various state and private organizations
across the state (e.g., North Carolina Literacy Association). Announcements will also be made
to the general public on the North Carolina Community College WWW site at
http://www.nccommunitycolleges.edu.

Basic Skills Funding Formula
Basic Skills funding is awarded based on the following formula:

 Base allocation -- $20,000
 25 cents per target population 16 to 54 years of age with less than a high school education
  based on the census.
 An amount per FTE (changes annually). FTE is based on the average of the last three years
  or the latest year, whichever is greater.
 $50 per General Educational Development (GED) certificates awarded.
 $150 per Adult High School diploma awarded.
 $10,000 per percent in excess of the statewide level of effort of the eligible population to be
  served.


Cost-Sharing of Classes
All student contact hours generated by the college for a given class shall be counted for budget
FTE purposes provided 100 percent of the instructional cost hours delivered are paid from
college funds; however, a company or entity may reimburse the college for a given class up to
fifty percent of the instructional cost, and the student contact hours generated in the class may
be reported for budget FTE. If the college is reimbursed for more than 50 percent of the
instructional cost for a given class, student contact hours reported for the class shall be
prorated in the same proportion as the college funding. (23 NCAC 2D.0326 (a)

Funding for Basic Skills
The state of North Carolina receives funding from the United States Department of Education
annually. The amount is based upon the number of high school dropouts in the state and is
currently around fifteen million dollars. This funding provides additional dollars f or community
college Basic Skills programs, direct and equitable access to funds for community-based

Page 12
                                                                             Basic Skills Funding


organizations, state level Basic Skills staff funding (5% of the total allocation), and state
leadership funding (12.5% of the total allocation). Federal funding from state leadership
provides training opportunities, including the Appalachian State University Adult Basic Skills
Project; the North Carolina Community College Literacy Resource Center; special projects;
evaluation studies; technology enhancements; and other state-wide initiatives.

The state of North Carolina provides funding for all community college Basic Skills programs.
The funding is distributed to local colleges based on a funding formula that includes a base
amount to each program plus an additional amount for exceeding target population and for the
number of GED and Adult High School diplomas awarded. Colleges also receive additional
funding for Compensatory Education. This funding is generally used to pay a part of a
coordinator's salary. Budgets are distributed to local programs annually after the North
Carolina General Assembly ends its session. Local college Finance Departments receive the
college’s full budget, including the Basic Skills budget and the Compensatory Education budg et,
after final approval from the General Assembly. Programs not receiving budget information are
encouraged to check with the Chief Financial Officer at their local college.

Limits on Use of Basic Skills Funds
Basic Skills funds may be used to fund anything that deals with direct instruction including, but
not limited to, salaries for program coordinators, instructors, assessment/retention specialists,
Basic Skills counselors; printed materials for classroom use; computer software related to Basic
Skills; training expenses including fees and travel reimbursement for presenters, travel
expenses and pay for attending training for instructional staff (including coordinators,
instructors, assessment/retention specialist, counselors whose salaries are paid for out of Basic
Skills funds); transportation for students; and child care and expenses for Early Childhood
components of comprehensive family literacy programs only if no other funding can be
located. The expenditures for child care and expenses for Early Childhood components of
comprehensive family literacy programs must be pre-approved by the Associate Vice President
of Basic Skills at the System Office.

Basic Skills funding may not be used for the following:

    Administrative salaries, including directors and clerical assistants
    Equipment (Exception: A special provision by the North Carolina General Assembly
     allows local colleges to use up to 5% of the Basic Skills budget to purchase computers.)
    Food
    Flowers, gifts
    Trophies, awards




Page 13
                                                                              Basic Skills Funding


Basic Skills federal funds may not be used to purchase any promotional items such as pencils,
luggage tags, hats, etc. However, Basic Skills state funds may be used if the items are
"program-specific." For example, you could use Basic Skills state funds to purchase a penci l
that has your college's name and logo on it as long as it also has "Basic Skills" or "Race for
Literacy" on it. Please check with your local Finance personnel for appropriate budget codes.

Process for Obtaining Funds/Application Evaluation
Applications will be reviewed by state staff to determine the eligibility of the proposed provider
and the completeness of the applications. Applications will be evaluated based on the criteria
detailed in Section 6.5 of the North Carolina Basic Skills State Plan. The Associate Vice President
of Basic Skills will invite representatives to help System Office staff in the determination of
funding for programs. Applications selected for funding will be submitted to the State Board of
Community Colleges for final approval.

All applications received by the North Carolina Community College System will be reviewed by
state staff to determine eligibility of providers and completeness of applications. Teams of
readers will evaluate applications using criteria outlined in the Workforce Investment Act with
points for each criterion as appears below.

According to the Workforce Investment Act, the following are eligible providers for subgrants of
federal adult education funds: a local educational agency; a community-based organization of
demonstrated effectiveness; a volunteer literacy organization of demonstrated effectiveness;
an institution of higher education; a public or private nonprofit agency; a library; a public
housing authority; a nonprofit institution that is not mentioned but has the ability to provide
literacy services to adults and families; and a consortium of the agencies, organizations,
institutions, libraries, or authorities described above.


                 Criteria for Evaluating Program Plans and Applications

                                                                          Total #    # of
                                                                            of      Points
                                                                          Points    Scored

I. Needs of the population to be served by this program                     20

A. Population to be served                                                  10

B. Needs in service area for each population served                          5

C. Steps to ensure equitable access and participation                        5


Page 14
                                                                            Basic Skills Funding


II. Past Effectiveness/Future Effectiveness                                90

A. All students have measurable goals.                                     5

B. The program can demonstrate its past effectiveness in improving         8
the literacy skills of adults and families.

C. The program is committed to serving individuals who are most in         10
need of literacy services, including individuals who are low-income
or have minimal literacy skills.

D. The program is of sufficient intensity and duration for                 5
participants to achieve substantial learning gains.

E. The program uses instructional practices that research has proven       5
to be effective in teaching adults.

F. The program uses educational activities that are built on a strong      5
foundation of research and effective educational practice.

G. Programs use computers and other advances in technology, as             7
appropriate.

H. The program gives students the opportunity to learn in “real life”      10
contexts to ensure that an individual has the skills needed to
compete in the workplace and exercise the rights and
responsibilities of citizenship.

I. The program is staffed by well-trained instructors, and                 5
administrators, and has access to services of counselors.

J. The program coordinates its activities with other available             10
resources in the community, including postsecondary schools,
elementary and secondary schools, One-Stop centers, job training
programs, and social service agencies.

K. The program offers or provides access to flexible schedules and         5
support services (such as child care and transportation) that are
necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities
or other special needs to attend and complete programs.

L. The program has a high-quality information management system            5


Page 15
                                                                          Basic Skills Funding


that has the capacity to report participant outcomes and to monitor
program performance.

M. The community has a demonstrated need for additional English          10
as a Second Language (ESL) programs.

III. Program Information                                                 35

A. Number of students served                                             10

B. Retention rate                                                        5

C. Assessment System                                                     5

D. Effectiveness in meeting core indicators (5 points each)              15

  1. Demonstrated improvements in literacy skills

  2. Post-secondary education, employment

  3. Receipt of secondary school diploma

IV. Estimated Future Program Information                                 20

A. Changes to be implemented                                             10

B. Number of students to be served                                       10

V. Evidence of Collaboration                                             10

A. Joint planning meeting and activities                                 5

B. Collaborative efforts with organizations                              5

VI. Budget and Cost Effectiveness                                        15



                                              Total Points:             190



The highest scoring applications will be recommended for funding. All acceptable applications
will be recommended to receive funding on a competitive basis subject to the availability of
funds.


Page 16
                                                                              Basic Skills Funding


Special Project Funding
Special project funds for Basic Skills sometimes have more leeway for funding than regular
program funding, especially in the area of equipment. Check with special project guidelines to
determine allowable expenses. Equipment for special projects will be approved only if the
equipment is necessary to complete the project’s goals and objectives and specified in the
grant application.

Special Project Transfers of Funds
Funding for special project grants is carefully scrutinized by teams of grant readers from the
field who are convened to determine which programs will be funded and for which amounts.
Although budget transfers cannot always be avoided, special projects should keep such
transfers to a minimum. Projects may move any amount of funding from any line item into
instructional salaries without prior approval. Basic Skills staff will automatically approve such
transfers upon receipt of a transfer budget request submitted by local Finance Departments.
Any budget transfer over $100 into any other line item needs prior approval from the state
Basic Skills staff member who works with the project (staff contacts are on each Request for
Proposal). Local programs need to justify why there is a change from the original grant
request. After the Basic Skills staff member approves the request, the local college’s Finance
Department should then submit a transfer request to the Finance Department at the System
Office. Budget transfer requests without prior justification approvals will be denied until written
justification is received.

Training Allocation - Federal

Basic Skills funding is awarded based on the following formula:

 Base allocation -- $20,000
 25 cents per target population 16 to 54 years of age with less than a high school education
    based on the census.
 An amount per FTE (changes annually). FTE is based on the average of the last three years
    or the latest year, whichever is greater.
 $50 per General Educational Development (GED) certificates awarded.
 $150 per Adult High School diploma awarded.
 $10,000 per percent in excess of the statewide level of effort of the eligible population to be
    served.
Each community college’s local budget includes a supplemental federal allotment. Of that
federal allotment, 10% is set aside for instructor training, an amount which is reflected in the
last column on the Basic Skills budget (entitled “Instructor Training). Federal legislation for
Basic Skills requires local programs to be staffed by “well-trained instructors, administrators,
and counselors;” therefore, it is important for every program to send Basic Skills personnel to
statewide conferences and training sessions to meet this requirement.


Page 17
                                            Basic Skills State Leadership Advisory Board


                    BASIC SKILLS STATE LEADERSHIP ADVISORY BOARD
History and Purpose of Board
The Associate Vice President of Basic Skills established a Basic Skills State Leadership
Advisory Board in 1996. The Advisory Board makes recommendations to state staff for
spending state leadership funding. The establishment of the Board has given regional
representatives the opportunity to learn more about the overall statewide program as
well as how it relates to other state agencies and programs. The Board focuses on state
leadership activities such as providing technical assistance and training to local Basic
Skills directors and staff, local program evaluation, and local awareness of national and
state trends and programs.

Meetings
Four meetings of the Basic Skills State Leadership Advisory Board are held annually. The
first meeting of the year is held in August or September and is a two-day retreat. Other
meetings are one-day in length. Additional meetings are held as needed. Local program
staff are encouraged to submit items for discussion to their Board representatives.

Selection of Board Members
The Basic Skills State Leadership Advisory Board consists of fifteen members. Board
members are selected by Basic Skills directors in each of the five Basic Skills regions.
Each of the five Basic Skills regions selects two members plus one alternate to serve on
the Advisory Board prior to July of each year. It is recommended that the chairperson of
each region be one of the representatives, but that is left up to the discretion of each
region. Four at-large members will include two continuing education deans, a
community college president, and a representative appointed by the Executive
Committee. One at-large member will be the current Basic Skills representative for the
North Carolina Community College Adult Education Association (NCCCAEA). Basic Skills
System Office staff serve as non-voting members on Basic Skills State Leadership
Advisory Board. (Basic Skills State Leadership Advisory Board By-Laws)




Page 18
                                                                     Basic Skills State Staff


                                BASIC SKILLS STATE STAFF
Staff Organization
The Basic Skills section at the North Carolina Community College System Office includes
the following: the Associate Vice President of Basic Skills and a clerical assistant; the
North Carolina Community College Literacy Resource Center which has a coordinator
and a clerical assistant; the GED/Adult High School Diploma office which includes a
Coordinator of GED/AHS and two GED/AHS technicians; a Coordinator of ABE and ESL; a
Coordinator of Compensatory Education and Special Populations; a Training Office
which includes a Training Specialist, a media specialist, and a training clerical assistant;
and a Basic Skills Business and Technology Applications Analyst. Names and telephone
numbers of Basic Skills state staff are listed on the System Office web site under Basic
Skills.


Staff Responsibilities
Associate Vice President of Academic and Student Services
 Administer the federal Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (Workforce
   Investment Act, Title II).
 Develop, administer, and interpret standards, policies, rules and regulations for
   Basic Skills/literacy programs (such as policies affecting the following: National
   Reporting System, “Drivers License/Dropout Prevention” law, and “Lose Control;
   Lose Your License” law.)
 Disseminate information to colleges regarding standards, policies, rules and
   regulations.
 Make recommendations for program budgets and oversee expenditures.
 Provide direction, management and supervision to Basic Skills and North Carolina
   Community College Literacy Resource Center program staff functions, organize staff
   responsibilities, and prioritize workloads.
 Prepare five-year State Plan for Basic Skills and submit it to the U.S. Department of
   Education.
 Represent North Carolina’s Basic Skills/literacy programs at national meetings and
   conferences such as the State Directors Conference and the National Adult
   Education Professional Development Consortium.
 Brief the General Assembly, State Board of Community Colleges, and other entities
   as requested on Basic Skills/literacy programs.

Coordinator of Adult Basic Education and English as a Second Language

 Assist in the development of policies, guidelines, and procedures for Adult Basic
  Education, English as a Second Language, family literacy, and community-based
  organization programs.
 Assist in the interpretation of standards, policies, rules and regulations affecting
  Adult Basic Education, English as a Second Language, family literacy, and
  community-based organization programs.

Page 19
                                                                   Basic Skills State Staff


 Generate Requests for Proposals for special funding as well as review and analyze
  applications for special funding.
 Coordinate and monitor new program initiatives.
 Oversee budgets and assist with program implementation of volunteer /
  community-based organizations.
 Assist in coordinating the Adult Basic Skills Professional Development Project at
  Appalachian State University.
 Coordinate family literacy programs.


Coordinator of Adult High School/GED Programs

 Coordinate the administration of the GED and AHS programs.
 Coordinate scoring services for GED English Tests, GED Spanish and French Tests, ESL
  Test, and scoring services for the North Carolina Competency Tests.
 Provide training for Competency Test Coordinators
 Supervise two support staff to process GED applications, requests for GED
  transcripts, transfer GED scores between colleges, maintain permanent GED records,
  and award and mail GED diplomas.
 Provide training for GED staff and certify newly appointed GED chief examiners.
 Monitor the security and integrity of the GED Testing and NC Competency Testing
  programs.
 Make annual GED reports for GED Testing Service.
 Provide GED and AHS special reports to colleges.
 Coordinate data collection for Basic Skills/literacy program with the Literacy
  Education Information System (LEIS) and the College Information System (CIS).

Coordinator of Compensatory Education and Special Populations

 Coordinate the statewide Compensatory Education program.
 Plan, develop and coordinate the annual Compensatory Education Coordinators
  Conference and regional training for Compensatory Education instructors in
  conjunction with the Basic Skills Training Specialist.
 Advise all levels of administration in the System Office and community colleges on
  matters relating to Compensatory Education and other special populations.
 Coordinate activities for special populations such as the homeless , Workfirst clients,
  learning disabled individuals, and institutionalized adults.
 Coordinate approval process for Basic Skills Captive Co-opted programs.


Coordinator, North Carolina Community College Literacy Resource Center

 Coordinate and oversee program, manage operations of NCCC Literacy Resource
  Center.


Page 20
                                                                   Basic Skills State Staff


 Maintain and encourage use of current materials in NCCC Literacy Resource Center’s
  library as well as the use of NCCC Literacy Resource Center’s WWW site and its
  connection to LINCS.
 Disseminate resources to programs and organizations.
 Respond to requests for literacy information from Basic Skills/literacy providers and
  others in NC and elsewhere.
 Encourage linkages between North Carolina community college Basic Skills programs
  and volunteer/community based literacy organizations.
 Encourage opportunities for North Carolina community college Basic Skills programs
  and volunteer/community based literacy organizations to participate in national
  initiatives (Equipped for the Future, Literacy Information aNd Communication
  System (LINCS), Bridges to Practice)
 Maintain public presence for NCCC LRC, Basic Skills/literacy in North Carolina and
  elsewhere.
 Serve as liaison between National Institute for Literacy and NC Basic Skills/literacy
  organizations.
 Represent North Carolina in national forums.
 Prepare and disseminate information on literacy issues to programs, organizations,
  media, general public.


Training Specialist for Basic Skills

 Provide needs-based in-service training at state, regional, and local levels.
 Plan, develop and coordinate the annual Basic Skills New Directors Orientation and
  the Basic Skills Directors Institute.
 Provide technical assistance to colleges and community-based organizations on
  planning and conducting locally-based in-service training.
 Monitor and evaluate the process of training development and delivery and the
  effectiveness of specific training programs.
 Coordinate the CASAS Trainers’ program.
 Coordinate the Adult Basic Skills Professional Development Project at Appalachian
  State University.
 Coordinate the annual Basic Skills/Family Literacy Conference.

Educational Media Specialist

 Assist in planning, designing, and creating staff development curriculum materials.
 Assist in maintaining the content of the Basic Skills section of the NCCCS web site.
 Work in partnership with the Basic Skills Training Specialist and staff in preparing for
  and conducting staff development projects in technology use (software reviews,
  demonstrations, workshops) that involve outreach to basic skills/literacy programs
  statewide. Investigate current local program technology capabilities and set realistic
  technology goals.

Page 21
                                                                 Basic Skills State Staff


 Cooperate with Basic Skills staff to prepare materials for staff development.
 Develop and maintain on-line professional development resource list for Basic Skills
  field.
 Assist in the development, production, and consistent dissemination of publications
  and resources highlighting best practices and key issues in adult literacy.
 Assist in the coordination of the drivers license laws by providing technical
  assistance, conducting training for the SADLS system, assisting local programs in
  using the SADLS system, and being a liaison to DPI and the Division of Motor
  Vehicles in working with the laws.


Basic Skills Applications Analyst Programmer

 Responsible for LEIS data in the data warehouse and other applications as assigned.
 Manage the LACES project.
 Respond to colleges, NCCCS Office and other requests for assistance, data,
  workshops, and staff development.
 Foster interdepartmental communication and collaboration with Student Records
  team to ensure accurate and timely reporting.
 Prepare annual federal data report.
 Act as a data liaison for the United States Department of Education.
 Analyze user problems to determine if it is procedural, hardware, system software,
  or IIPS and Colleague software related and communicate the solution to the user.
 Provide on-site support to the colleges/community-based organizations when a
  problem cannot be solved via phone.


All State Staff:

 Provide technical assistance to Basic Skills/literacy programs.
 Provide technical assistance to volunteer/community-based organizations (including
  program management, assessment, data management, tutor training).
 Monitor and evaluate Basic Skills/literacy programs.
 Represent the North Carolina Community College System Office and Basic
  Skills/literacy programs on boards, committees, task forces, and conferences.
 Collaborate with Training Specialist in developing and delivering professional
  development opportunities to Basic Skills/literacy personnel.
 Design and conduct projects to develop local program capacity, (technology
  applications, distance education).
 Maintain a public presence for Basic Skills/literacy programs in North Carolina and
  nationally.
 Represent Basic Skills/literacy in conference presentations, meetings, workshops,
  etc.



Page 22
                                                             Captive Co-opted Programs


                            CAPTIVE CO-OPTED PROGRAMS


Captive Co-opted Programs Definition
Captive co-opted programs are programs taught in the following locations: prisons,
jails, day reporting programs, community rehabilitation facilities (formerly called
sheltered workshops), nursing homes, etc. Captive co-opted programs are those
programs where students are “captive” audiences and cannot attend other programs.
Captive co-opted groups are as follows:
 Inmates in a correction facility
        Department of Correction facility
         Private facility
         Federal facility
         Local jail/Detention Centers
 Clients of mental retardation programs – such as ADAP (Adult Developmental
     Activities Program or Mental Retardation Centers)
 Clients of domiciliary care facilities
 Clients of substance abuse rehabilitation centers
 Clients of community rehabilitation facilities
 Clients of nursing facilities
 In-patients of psychiatric hospitals
(23 NCAC 02E .0403(a)

Compensatory Education classes held at ADAP’s and community rehabilitation facilities
are considered captive co-opted settings and require State Board approval; however,
Compensatory Education classes held on college campuses including off-campus sites
(such as churches, community centers, and public schools, etc.) are not considered
immured and do not require approval.

Effective April 1, 2003, an amendment to 23 NCAC 02E.0403 deleted the requirement to
obtain approval for courses at military bases except in brigs. This means that military
groups are no longer considered captive (except brigs).

Prior Approval for Captive Co-opted Programs
Starting July 1, 2003, the State Board of Community Colleges requires prior approval for
teaching all Basic Skills classes taught in a captive co-opted setting. Special approval
forms are available from the System Office. (NCAC 2E.0403, CC02-232 and CC02-243)
The captive co-opted form for State Board approval must be submitted to the Vice
President of Academic and Student Services by the third day of the month prior to the
month it is presented to the State Board of Community Colleges.




Page 23
                                               Compensatory Education Program (CED)


                    COMPENSATORY EDUCATION PROGRAM (CED)


Compensatory Education
Compensatory Education (CED) is a program to compensate adults with intellectual
disabilities who have not had an education or who have received an inadequate one.
The program requires specialized diagnosis and consists of specially designed
curriculum. Compensatory Education, a program designed for adults with intellectual
disabilities or traumatic brain injury, serves approximately 6,000 students annually.
There must be appropriate documentation providing evidence of formal diagnosis of the
intellectual disability. This condition must be determined and certified by a qualified
professional, such as a physician, psychiatrist, psychologist, etc.

The program goals of the Compensatory Education program are to help these
individuals acquire the basic skills and abilities needed to (1) become more independent
and self directed and (2) meet and manage community, social, work, and personal adult
responsibilities. Classes are normally held at one or more of the following sites:
community college campuses, adult day vocational programs or community
rehabilitation facilities (formerly called sheltered workshops), and community-based
facilities. Each college receives a special allocation from the state to hire a
Compensatory Education Coordinator to oversee the program. Other funding for the
program comes from state and federal Basic Skills funds.

Compensatory Education classes may be held up to six hours per day. The physical
appearance of these classes should be age-appropriate.

Compensatory Education Advisory Council - Local
Every college should have its own Compensatory Education Advisory Council which is
separate from the Basic Skills Advisory Board. The Compensatory Education Advisory
Council should be made up of representatives of from disability-related agencies. The
local Compensatory Education Advisory Council should meet at least twice per year.

Compensatory Education Advisory Council - State
The State Compensatory Education Advisory Board is made up of representatives from
disability-related agencies, students with disabilities, community college representatives
and interested citizens (at large citizens). The North Carolina Community College
System president appoints members to this council. The Compensatory Education
Program Advisory Council meets four times a year.




Page 24
                                                Compensatory Education Program (CED)


Compensatory Education Captive Co-opted Approval
Compensatory Education classes that are in captive co-opted settings require prior
approval from the State Board of Community Colleges. The following Compensatory
Education classes require prior approval: Compensatory Education classes offered at
any of the seven Mental Retardation Centers in North Carolina, Compensatory
Education classes offered at ADAP sites, and Compensatory Education classes offered at
any Community Rehabilitation Facility (formerly called sheltered workshop).

Compensatory Education Community Classroom Approach
The community classroom approach incorporates a laboratory component with
instruction. For example, if the Compensatory Education class in “Community Living” is
studying how to utilize local transportation, one of the students and the instructor may
go to the local transit office and purchase a bus pass. The instructor and student may
ride the bus to several points in the city for further experience, all of which supplements
classroom instruction and serves to facilitate application and transfer of skills. The
laboratory approach should be applied for those students who have completed at least
one quarter of CED instruction.

In applying the above example, the college reports actual student/instructor contact
hours. The college may report up to 10 laboratory hours per week per enrolled CED
student for the laboratory sessions. The combination of CED classroom and laboratory
instruction still could not exceed 30 hours per week. It should also be noted that the
laboratory sessions are practical applications of basic skills concepts comprising the CED
Program of Study. The laboratory sessions are not occupational practicums nor on-the-
job coaching.

Compensatory Education Course of Study
The Compensatory Education Course of Study should be used as a guide for instruction
in all Compensatory Education classes. Only those activities which can be incorporated
into the subject areas in the course of study may be included in classes funded by
community colleges. Community college funds should not be used to provide
supervision of meal periods, nor should community college funds be used to fund
classes which consist primarily of exercise or recreational activities. However, it would
not be inappropriate for an instructor to discuss the value of and demonstrate exercises
or discuss the value and types of recreational activities.

Compensatory Education Program Eligibility
Individuals with intellectual disabilities, aged 17 and older, who (a) have been diagnosed
as having an intellectual disability; or (b) are pronounced as functioning on a level
equivalent of intellectual disability resulting from head injury or brain damage.


Page 25
                                               Compensatory Education Program (CED)


Compensatory Education Program Funding
Compensatory Education is funded through two different sources: Basic Skills funding
and a special allotment for Compensatory Education. The state funds allotted for
Compensatory Education are for the salaries of Compensatory Education Coordinators.

ICF-MR
According to an agreement with the Division of Medical Assistance regarding
Compensatory Education instruction, local colleges must find out if ICF-MR students
have in their active treatment plan Compensatory Education. If the approved active
treatment program includes Compensatory Education and the facility receives
compensation from the Division of Medical Assistance for these services, the facility is
responsible for identifying the students for the college and paying the community
college for these instructional services at a mutually agreed upon rate.

The community college can draw down FTE’s if the facility paid for the instruction when
the college and the facility mutually agree upon the rate. In negotiating the rate, the
college must take into consideration how FTE’s are generated through the Basic Skills
program consistent with 23NCAC 2D.0326(a) (Administrative Code). This means that
in the “mutually agreed rate” the community college must pay at least 50% of the
instructional cost and the facility pays the balance; however 100% of the instructional
costs must be run through the college books. (CC-93-149.)

Proof of Eligibility
There must be appropriate documentation providing evidence of formal diagnosis of the
intellectual disability condition. This condition must be determined and certified by a
qualified professional, such as a physician, psychiatrist, psychologist, etc. While
certification does not have to be filed at the community college, the college must have a
record of where the documentation is filed and ascertain that is it available for
verification purposes. Similarly, there must be appropriate documentation certifying
the functioning level of individuals with brain damage/head injury.

Sign-in Sheets for Compensatory Education Students
Having Compensatory Education students sign class rosters may be very time-
consuming. An acceptable practice would be to have the students’ names written on a
sign-in sheet, and the students would just initial their names when they come into or
leave a classroom. It is never acceptable for instructors to sign for Compensatory
Education students when they enter/leave classes.




Page 26
                                                                   Contact Hour Reporting


                               CONTACT HOUR REPORTING
Breaks
“Breaks of 10 minutes could be utilized each hour or during the period of instruction,
but could not be accumulated. For example, a class scheduled from 6:00 p.m. until 9:00
p.m. could not “save” breaks to the end of the period, adjourn one-half hour early, and
report three hours per student in attendance.” (CC-93-259 and CC02-128) The intent of
this section is to emphasize that breaks cannot be accumulated and class adjourn earl y.
Breaks also should not be accumulated and class start time moved to a later time, but it
is allowable to accumulate breaks and take them during the middle of a class. The
following guidelines should help clarify the issue:

   Breaks cannot be accumulated to adjourn a class early.
   Breaks can be saved and taken in the middle of class (for any reason – lunch, dinner,
    etc.) if it is in the best interest of the students.
   Breaks cannot exceed the allowable 10 minutes per hour of scheduled instruction.
   Students may leave 10 minutes early if the break for the last hour of class has not
    been taken, however, the instructor is expected to stay until the scheduled ending
    time of the class. (CC02-128)

Cancellation of Basic Skills Classes
Canceling of Basic Skills classes should be done at the discretion of the local Basic Skills
administration. There are no guidelines for the cancellation of classes at the state level;
however, it is a good idea to put a sign on the classroom door and let the Basic Skills
Director/Coordinator know because state Basic Skills staff or auditors could show up to
monitor the class.

Contact Hour Reporting for Basic Skills Classes
Students in all Basic Skills classes will be reported by the number of hours of actual
attendance (contact hour reporting). “Each class hour of instruction shall be scheduled
for 60 minutes. The college shall provide for a minimum of 50 minutes of instruction for
each scheduled 60-minute hour. A student must attend a minimum of 50 minutes of a
scheduled 60 minutes of instruction in order to be counted in attendance for one hour.
Student time in class other than whole hours may be rounded to the nearest one-fourth
(1/4) hour. For example, if a student attended the 6:00 – 9:00 p.m. class from 6:00 to
7:40 p.m. the student could be reported for one hour and 45 minutes of attendance
(rounding to the nearest one-fourth of an hour). If the same student attended from 6:00
to 7:35 p.m., the student would be reported for one and one-half hours of instruction.”
(CC-93-259 and CC02-128)




Page 27
                                                                  Contact Hour Reporting


Non-Regularly Scheduled Classes
All non-regularly scheduled literacy classes will have student hours calculated, reported,
and documented consistent with NCAC 2D.0324(b). (CC-89-2)




Page 28
                                                                   Corrections Education


                               CORRECTIONS EDUCATION
Corrections Education
The North Carolina Community College System is the primary provider of educational
services to adult inmates housed in the North Carolina Department of Correction
correctional facilities. This includes providing Basic Skills programs.

Basic Skills programs are designed to meet the varied competency levels of adults. The
specific programs offered are Adult Basic Education (ABE), General Educational
Development (GED), Adult High School (AHS), Compensatory Education (CED) and
English as a Second Language (ESL). Programs offered are based upon the needs of the
inmate population at each of the prison units. Identified needs may range from learning
how to read to obtaining a high school credential.

The North Carolina Community College System has been providing educational services
to inmates for many years. Several legislative mandates since 1987 have expanded
community college programs in correctional institutions in cooperation with the North
Carolina Department of Correction.

In 1992 a Cooperative Agreement between the Community College System and the
Department of Correction was adopted by the State Board of Community Colleges,
providing an educational service plan for inmates. This agreement covers Basic Skills
programs which are offered by the local community colleges at correctional facilities
across the state. In this agreement criteria for Basic Skills programs were established as
follows:
 Each program offering must have a variety of instructional materials which are
    appropriate for adults.
 The program design must accommodate varied learning styles.
 The program will make available appropriate educational equipment.
 The program must use pre-assessment and performance methods/techniques
    designed to assist and encourage the student’s progress.
 The program must maintain appropriate records on each inmate. The files must
    contain appropriate individual data, testing data and educational counseling
    information.
 Facilities must be adequate and appropriate to house the intended program and
    accomplish the stated goals and course objectives.
 The design and use of facilities should enhance the opportunities of learners and
    instructional staff to communicate effectively.
 Adequate supplies and materials must be available for student use in accomplishing
    stated course objectives.
 Faculty for each course must meet the qualifications of the Southern Association of
    Colleges and Schools.



Page 29
                                                                   Corrections Education


   Responsibility for the administration of programs offered in the correctional setting
    must be clearly defined by the college and a contact person must be designated for
    the prison.
   Plans should be established to evaluate programs in a systematic manner.


In 1993 the North Carolina Legislature directed the State Board of Community Colleges
to develop a plan for the delivery of appropriate education in the state’s correctional
facilities. In 1994, A Plan for Appropriate Community College Education in North
Carolina’s Correctional Facilities was adopted by the State Board of Community
Colleges. The plan addressed the specific legislative concerns of high inmate-mobility
and low student-completion rates. The plan was a matrix classification system designed
based on an inmates length of stay for the type of program that the inmate would be
provided. A report that updated this plan was presented to and approved by the State
Board of Community Colleges in September 1998. However, the Basic Skills Programs
were and continue to be an open-entry and open-exit approach, regardless of the length
of inmate’s length of stay to accommodate inmates. All new programs offered at
correctional facilities must be approved by the State Board of Community Colleges.
G.S.115D-5(c1)




Page 30
                                                          Developmental Studies Students


                         DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES STUDENTS

Referral to Basic Skills
Most high school graduates who enter a community college intending to pursue a
curriculum degree, diploma or certificate should be enrolled in curriculum courses or
prerequisite developmental courses. Occasionally, there will be high school graduates
whose scores on the placement test are extremely low in one or more areas.
Curriculum counselors/ developmental education personnel should then administer a
second test to these students, using an instrument that reports scores by grade level or
has an equivalency scale score. (Basic skills personnel can provide guidance in choosing
an appropriate test for this purpose.) Only those students whose scores indicate a level
below 9th grade (or its equivalent scale score) may be referred to Basic Skills.

Enrollment in Basic Skills and Developmental/curriculum courses at the same time is
appropriate in a very limited number of cases. Students enrolled in Basic Skills
reading/language courses should not be enrolled in any developmental/curriculum
courses. However, students whose reading and language skills are consistent with
developmental/curriculum courses may be simultaneously enrolled in Basic Skills math
and developmental/curriculum courses that have no math content. (These are only
recommendations intended to ensure student success.)

High school graduates who are not enrolled in curriculum programs may enroll in
Basic Skills courses. High school graduates functioning below 9 th grade level (or its
equivalent scale score) on a standardized assessment may be enrolled in Adult Basic
Education (ABE), English as a Second Language (ESL), or Compensatory Education (CED).
High school graduates who are functioning on 9 th – 12.9 grade level (or the equivalent
scale scores) may enroll in Basic Skills as HSG (high school graduate). Since high school
graduates functioning on high school level are not the main target audience for Basic
Skills, enrolling them should be on a very limited basis. This category was developed to
serve adults, especially in workplace classes, who wanted to improve a specific skill, but
did not plan to enter a curriculum prog ram. Students who are functioning above the
high school level need to look for other options for remediation.

All students entering Basic Skills classes must be assessed by a standardized test.
Students can no longer “self-refer” into the program. Curriculum counselors/
developmental education personnel must administer a test which reports scores by
grade level or has an equivalency chart. (CC00-227)




Page 31
                                                            Developmental Studies Students


Teaching Basic Skills and Developmental Courses Simultaneously
Offering Basic Skills and Developmental Studies in the same location, but prorating
instructors’ salaries and differentiating the classes (registration, attendance, rosters,
etc.) is consistent educationally and fiscally with State Board policy.




Page 32
                                                                         Discipline of Students


                                   DISCIPLINE OF STUDENTS

Laws Concerning Student Discipline
 G.S. 14-269.2 makes it unlawful for any person including students to possess or carry or
 to cause any person to carry or encourage or aid a minor less than 18 to carry:

          (1) any firearm on education property or to a curricular or extracurricular
              activity sponsored by the college;
          (2) any bombs, grenades, mines, fireworks or powerful explosives on
              educational
              property, or to a curricular or extracurricular activity of the college;

          (3) to possess or carry, to cause, encourage or aid a minor to possess or carry a
              BB gun, stun gun, air rifle, air pistol, bowie knife, dirk-dagger, slingshot, lead
              cane, switchblade knife, blackjack, metallic knuckles, razors and razor blades,
              fireworks, or any other sharp-pointed or edge instrument except
              instructional supplies, unaltered nail files and clips and tools used for
              preparation of food, instruction, and maintenance.

          Exceptions are:

          (1) weapons used solely for educational or school sanctioned ceremonial
              purposes, or use in a school approved program conducted under the
              supervision of an adult approved by the college;

          (2) weapons used by emergency services personnel and private police employed
              by the college while on duty.

          G.S. 14-288.4 makes it unlawful to participate in disorderly conduct in campus
          buildings and facilities including the surrounding ground and premises.

          Examples of disorderly conduct include:

          (1) fighting or other violent conduct;
          (2) making or using utterances, gestures, displays, or abusive language intended
              and likely to provoke violent retaliation;

          (3) taking over buildings; and

          (4) refusing to vacate a building or facility when asked by someone in authority
              to do so.




Page 33
                                                                      Discipline of Students


Regulation of Student Discipline
The State Board of Community Colleges does not exercise any authority over student
discipline; therefore, regulation of student discipline is a local decision. However, minors
should be subject to the same disciplinary policies and procedures as adult students.




Page 34
                                                                      Distance Education


                                 DISTANCE EDUCATION


Application for Distance Education Classes
All programs offering distance education classes should follow guidelines for counting
distance education hours as described in the Basic Skills Distance Education Policy
Manual (once the guide is distributed in spring 2008). Programs that are using distance
education materials not described in the manual must submit an application form to the
System Office Associate Vice president for Basic Skills. An application form is located on
the NCCCS web site, under the Basic Skills section.

Computer-Assisted Instruction
Pilot projects were conducted using computer-assisted instruction for employees who
used a computer lab when the instructor was not present. Since nontraditional
instruction is allowable under 23 NCAC 2D.0324, colleges may offer nontraditional
instruction. The colleges in the pilot reported the hours students and instructors
worked directly together as well as the hours students worked on the computer without
the instructor being directly available. The hours the students worked through
individualized instructional materials on the computer were logged by the computer
records, and the instructional time as well as the educational materials the student
generated were reviewed daily by the instructor. The following are guidelines to be
followed for student contact hour reporting purposes through computer-assisted
instruction:

    “Retain applicable student registration records;
    Maintain an official count of actual student attendance hours;
    Keep on file a student portfolio which documents student work and
     instructor/student interaction;
    Materials generated through computer assisted instruction must be reviewed by
     the instructor of record in a timely manner.” (CC-97-301)

Handbooks for Distance Education
Two handbooks are available for distance education. Both may be located on the
community college system web site at www.nccommunitycolleges.edu/Basic_Skills. The
handbooks are: A Handbook for Distance Education, Project IDEAL, University of
Michigan and North Carolina Guidelines for Distance Education Learners, NCCCS.

Orientation and Testing
To get Basic Skills FTE credit for distance education courses, including GED in the
Newspaper, students must come for a face-to-face orientation and must be pre- and
post-tested. (FTE for distance education may be counted if students aren’t post-
tested, but programs need to try to post-test all students.)




Page 35
                                                                     Drivers License Laws


                                   DRIVERS LICENSE LAWS
Drivers License Law #1: Drivers License / Dropout Prevention Law
The “Drivers License/Dropout Prevention” law of 1998 requires that all 16 and 17-year
old students who drop out of public schools who are not making progress, even though
they subsequently enroll in a community college Basic Skills program, must lose their
drivers license or permit until one of the following conditions are met: completion of
GED or Adult High School diploma or attending a Basic Skills class (not HRD, Continuing
Education, or curriculum class) for six months for sixty hours per month and making
progress (progress based on individual program - check web site for details). Students
who lose their license under this law may apply for a hardship to the local community
colleges, but it is extremely rare that hardships are granted (and only under extenuating
circumstances which are documented in writing). (See “Drivers License/Dropout
Prevention Guidelines” on the community college system web site:
www.nccommunitycolleges.edu/Basic_Skills.

Drivers License Law #2: Lose Control; Lose Your License Law
The “Lose Control; Lose Your License” law of 2000 denies or takes away permits or
licenses for minors if they are suspended or expelled for three or more days due to one
of the following offenses: possession of drugs or weapons on a school campus or at a
school-related activity or assault on school personnel. Students who lose licenses or
permits under this law must lose their license for an entire year. This means that if a
minor is 17 ½ and loses his/her license/permit under this law, he/she cannot get the
license back until age 18 ½. If a student who has lost his/her license/permit due to a
drug offense enters a drug rehabilitation program approved by the local community
college, the community college may decide to restore driving privileges after a six-
month period. (See “Lose Control; Lose Your License Guidelines” on the community
college system web site: www.nccommunitycolleges.edu/Basic_Skills.)

Drivers’ License Laws and Dropouts
When minors drop out of public schools, public schools should “decertify” them if they
are not making progress which means they will lose their drivers’ permit/license. If they
are making progress, they will not lose their drivers’ permit/license. If the public school
does not decertify a student, the community college should not decertify the student
until he/she is not attending classes and/or making progress in the community college
program. All students who drop out of public schools are counted as “dropouts.” They
are no longer considered to be “transfers” when they enter our programs.




Page 36
                                                                     Drivers License Laws


Drivers’ License Eligibility Certificates
When students who lost their license/permit due to dropping out of school complete
the GED or Adult High School diploma or have attended a Basic Skills class for six months
for sixty hours per month and are making progress, local programs need to issue the
students a Drivers Eligibility Certificate (DEC). (If students lose their license/permit due
to “Lose Control; Lose Your License Law,” they are not eligible for a DEC upon
completion of the GED or Adult High School diploma or after attending a class for six
months, sixty hours per month, and making progress. Those students cannot get their
license/permit back for an entire year unless their decertification was due to a drug
offense and they complete a drug rehabilitation course. Students who complete the
drug rehabilitation course may be allowed to get their license/permit back within six
months.) The DEC will allow students to get into the DMV system where they left off –
with a permit, a license, or an application for a permit. Do not tell students that when
they get a DEC, they will get their “license.” That may not be true because they may
only be eligible for a permit. Also, they must meet DMV’s requirements for getting a
license/permit (such as taking Drivers’ Education). Once a student turns 18, this
“Drivers License/Dropout Prevention law” no longer applies, even if the student has not
earned a high school diploma or its equivalent. Since a suspension based on the “Lose
Control; Lose Your License” may extend past age 18, make certain that the student has
not had driving privileges suspended due to the “Lose Control; Lose Your License” law
before issuing a DEC. Most DMV offices require a Drivers Eligibility Certificate (DEC),
not a GED or Adult High School diploma, in order for students to get their
license/permit.

Emancipated Minors
Emancipated minors are not exempt from the driver’s license laws; however, they may
sign their own Drivers Eligibility Certificate. Attach a copy of the document which shows
the minor is emancipated (marriage certificate or court order). Also, refer to the
following section for information regarding emancipation.

Issuing Certificates to Minors Not Enrolled in Basic Skills
Community college staff may only issue drivers’ eligibility certificates to students who
are enrolled in Basic Skills programs – they may not issue these certificates for students
enrolled in curriculum programs or any Continuing Education programs except for Basic
Skills.

If someone under the age of 18 does not have a high school diploma from a regionally
accredited high school, he/she must enroll in a North Carolina public, private, approved
home school or community college (Basic Skills program leading toward a GED or Adult
High School diploma) and demonstrate adequate academic progress toward obtaining a
high school diploma or its equivalent. If a student has passed the necessary placement
tests at a community college and enrolled in a curriculum program, he/she can get a
driving eligibility certificate by enrolling in a North Carolina public, private, approved
home school or community college (Basic Skills program leading toward a GED or Adult


Page 37
                                                                   Drivers License Laws


High School diploma) and demonstrate adequate academic progress toward obtaining a
high school diploma or its equivalent.

Notifying Minors Regarding Law
It is extremely important to give all minor students information regarding this law upon
entry into the program. It is also important that students receive prior notification
before being decertified. (CC99-039)

SADLS System
All information regarding both driver’s license laws must be entered into the SADLS
system. Each college should have one person who can enter this system. Access to this
system may be obtained by contacting the North Carolina Community College System
Office.




Page 38
                                                                  Emancipated Minors


                               EMANCIPATED MINORS


Definition
An emancipated minor is a person below 18 years of age who has married or has a court
order stating that the person is emancipated.

Drivers License Laws and Emancipated Minors
Emancipated minors are not exempt from the driver’s license laws; however, they may
sign their own Driver’s Eligibility Certificate. Attach a copy of the document which
shows the minor is emancipated (marriage certificate or court order) with the DEC.

Proof of Emancipation
Programs must have proof of emancipation before granting minors the status of
emancipation. No agency or individual may grant a transfer in the “judicial decree of
emancipation;” therefore, each agency must see proof of emancipation in the form of a
court order or marriage license. (2C.0301 (a) and (c))




Page 39
                                   English as a Second Language (ESL)/ English Literacy


             ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL) / ENGLISH LITERACY


English as a Second Language
English as a Second Language (ESL) is a program of instruction designed to help adults
who are limited English proficient achieve some level of competence in speaking,
reading, listening, and writing the English language. The Workforce Investment Act of
1998 also refers to English as a Second Language programs as English Literacy programs.
The following are the six levels of English as a Second Language/English Literacy:

 Beginning ESL Literacy
 Low Beginning ESL
 High Beginning ESL
 Low Intermediate ESL
 High Intermediate ESL
 Advanced ESL
English as a Second Language Assessment
All English as a Second Language students should be pre-tested with one of the
standardized assessments, CASAS and/or BEST and BEST-Plus, upon entering the
program and placed into one of the six levels based on the lowest assessment score.

English as a Second Language Curriculum
There is no set English as a Second Language curriculum, but Crossroads Café and On
Common Ground are two video series that have been given to each community college
for ESL classes.

English Literacy/Civics Education Grants
The United States Department of Education gives states additional allotments for
English Literacy/Civics Education grants. Local programs are encouraged to apply for
these grants.

Teaching in Spanish
A major purpose of the Basic Skills program is to help students learn the English
language; therefore, a class that helps Hispanics who are illiterate in their own language
learn Spanish first is not allowable through Basic Skills.




Page 40
                                                       Enrollment Information (General)


                        ENROLLMENT INFORMATION (GENERAL)


Admission Requirements for Legal Aliens & Former Residents of Other States
Legal aliens who (1) are less than 18 years old, (2) have neither completed high school or
its equivalent nor attended elementary or secondary school in North Carolina, (3) do not
have a parent or legal guardian in this state, and (4) who have not been emancipated
pursuant to the law of this state do not have to have prior approval of the local
educational agency or parent or legal guardian as a precondition for admission to Basic
Skills.

Former residents of other states who (1) are less than 18 years old, (2) have neither
completed high school or its equivalent nor attended elementary or secondary school in
North Carolina, (3) do not have a parent or legal guardian in this state, and (4) who have
not been emancipated pursuant to the law of this state must obtain releases from the
local educational agency prior to admission. (CC-88-287) Copy the original release to
send to another college when transferring a student.

Basic Skills Classes Lasting Longer than 17 Weeks
Since no registration fees are collected for Basic Skills classes (ABE, GED, AHS, ESL and
CED), Basic Skills classes may be reported for more than 17 weeks, but only one class
registration would be necessary. (Letter from Barry Russell to presidents on August 27,
1997)

Dual/Concurrent Enrollment
Section 23 NCAC 2C.0305 provides for dual/concurrent enrollment of high school
students that are 16 years old or older in appropriate college courses. (CC-93-457)
Basic Skills courses are not appropriate courses for dual/concurrent enrollment and,
therefore, high school students should not be enrolled in such courses under the
dual/concurrent enrollment policy.

Enrollment Based on Lowest Test Score
If a student takes more than one standardized test for Basic Skills, he/she should be
placed based on the lowest test score. For example if a student scores 10.5 on a TABE
reading test, but 7.5 on math, the student should be placed in High Intermediate ABE.

Enrollment of High School Graduates
Students who have a high school diploma, GED, or Adult High School diploma may enroll
in Adult Basic Education classes if they score below 9.0 (or its equivalent) on a
standardized test, even if they are enrolled in curriculum programs and require
Developmental Studies courses.

Students with high school diplomas or their equivalent enrolled in curriculum programs,
especially if they are required to take Developmental Studies, who score 9.0 or higher
on a standardized test or up to 235 on CASAS, should be admitted to Basic Skills on an
extremely limited basis. These students should be served in Developmental Studies

Page 41
                                                        Enrollment Information (General)


courses. Enrollment of non-curriculum students with high school diplomas or their
equivalent who score 9.0 or above on a standardized test score or 225 to 245 on CASAS
is permissible in adult secondary classes, but should be on a very limited basis. (CC -90-
338 & CC-98-052, and CC00-227) It is not acceptable and will be considered to be an
audit exception to have the majority (over 50%) of students in an adult secondary
class with high school diplomas.

Enrollment Requirements
The Adult Education and Family Literacy Act of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998
defines the services and target population for Basic Skills/literacy programs as “services
or instruction below the postsecondary level for individuals

        (A) who have attained 16 years of age;
        (B) who are not enrolled or required to be enrolled in secondary school under
             State law; and
        (C) who –
                (i)     lack sufficient mastery of basic educational skills to enable the
                        individuals to function effectively in society;
                (ii)    do not have a secondary school diploma or its recognized
                        equivalent, and have not achieved an equivalent level of
                        education; or
                (iii)   are unable to speak, read, or write the English language.”
Programs should not refuse to serve students who are in the target population unless
the program has an “ability to benefit” policy which has been approved by the college
president and Board of Trustees. An “ability to benefit” policy could deny access to
potential students who cannot learn to improve their Basic Skills. Programs are asked to
try to get social security numbers from students, but cannot deny services if the
students do not give the program their social security numbers.

Huskins
High school students may apply for and receive permission to enroll in some community
college courses under the Huskins bill. Basic Skills courses are not acceptable for the
Huskins bill. Basic Skills programs may not serve currently enrolled high school students
in its programs.

Multi-Entry/Multi-Exit Classes in Prisons
No community college shall operate a multi-entry/multi-exit class or program in a prison
facility, except for a literacy class or program. (G.S.115D-5 and CC95-201)

Students From Other States
Students who move to North Carolina from other states do not have to wait for six
months before enrolling in the Basic Skills program.




Page 42
                                                                          Family Literacy


                                     FAMILY LITERACY


Comprehensive Family Literacy
Comprehensive family literacy programs are programs that include the following
components: adult education instruction, early childhood instruction, parent and child
interaction time, and parenting.

Comprehensive Family Literacy Grants
Programs that offer comprehensive family literacy programs may apply for additional
funding on a competitive basis. To be eligible to receive funding for family literacy, a
local program must complete the family literacy section of the Basic Skills Program Plan
and Application. The criteria for evaluating applications is listed below:



     Criteria for Evaluating Comprehensive Family Program Plans and Applications

                                                                         Total     # of
                                                                                  Points
                                                                         # of
                                                                                  Scored
                                                                         Points

I. Needs of the population to be served by this program                    20

A. Population to be served                                                 10

B. Needs in service area for each population served                         5

C. Steps to ensure equitable access and participation                       5

II. Past Effectiveness in Family Literacy                                  100

A. The program offers adult education instruction which is of              10
sufficient intensity in terms of hours, and of sufficient duration, to
make sustainable changes in a family.

B. Interactive literacy activities between parents and children are        20
offered.

C. Training is provided for parents regarding how to be the primary        25
teacher of their children and full partners in the education of their
children.

D. Programs offer parent literacy training those leads to economic         25
self-sufficiency.


Page 43
                                                                           Family Literacy


E. An age-appropriate education is available to prepare children for        20
success in school and life experiences.

III. Past Effectiveness/Future Effectiveness                                90

A. All students have measurable goals.                                      5

B. The program can demonstrate its past effectiveness in improving          8
the literacy skills of adults and families.

C. The program is committed to serving individuals who are most in          10
need of literacy services, including individuals who are low-income
or have minimal literacy skills.

D. The program is of sufficient intensity and duration for                  5
participants to achieve substantial learning gains.

E. The program uses instructional practices that research has proven        5
to be effective in teaching adults.

F. The program uses educational activities that are built on a strong       5
foundation of research and effective educational practice.

G. Programs use computers and other advances in technology, as              7
appropriate.

H. The program gives students the opportunity to learn in “real life”       10
contexts to ensure that an individual has the skills needed to
compete in the workplace and exercise the rights and
responsibilities of citizenship.

I. The program is staffed by well-trained instructors, and                  5
administrators, and has access to services of counselors.

J. The program coordinates its activities with other available              10
resources in the community, including postsecondary schools,
elementary and secondary schools, One-Stop centers, job training
programs, and social service agencies.

K. The program offers or provides access to flexible schedules and          5
support services (such as child care and transportation) that are
necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities
or other special needs to attend and complete programs.

L. The program has a high-quality information management system             5
that has the capacity to report participant outcomes and to monitor


Page 44
                                                                          Family Literacy


program performance.

M. The community has a demonstrated need for additional English             10
as a Second Language (ESL) programs.

IV. Program Effectiveness                                                   10

A. Number of students served                                                10



V. Proposed Comprehensive Family Literacy Program                           20

A. Description of progra m                                                  10

B. Number of students to be served                                          10

VI. Future effectiveness in meeting core indicators                         15

A. Demonstrated improvements in literacy skills                             5

B. Post-secondary education, employment                                     5

C. Receipt of secondary school diploma                                      5

VII. Budget and Cost Effectiveness                                          15



                                               Total Points:               270



To be recommended for family literacy funding, applications must describe a
comprehensive family literacy program by offering all of the four components and must
be one of the top scorers. All acceptable applications will be recommended to receive
funding on a competitive basis subject to the availability of funds. Representatives from
local programs will review applications and determine which programs will be funded
and the amount of funds which will be awarded per program.

Cooperative Agreement for Family Literacy
Community colleges and local public schools may want to enter into a cooperative
agreement to provide family literacy in their community. A sample of a cooperative
agreement for family literacy is available on the System Office Basic Skills web site.




Page 45
                                                                            Family Literacy


FTE for Family Literacy Components
There are four identifiable components of family literacy programs. These are early
childhood education, adult education, parent education, and parent and child
together/interaction time (PACT or PACI). Three of these components: adult education,
parent education, and PACT/PACI time are for the purpose of enhancing the basic skills
of the parents. Since these components are an integral part of the family literacy
program, it is allowable to count the hours that the parents spend in these components
for FTE purposes for the Basic Skills programs if the adult educator pa rticipates in the
components. (CC-93-116) Also, if the time spent during a home visit is documented to
be linked to the above components and the adult education instructor is present and
participating, that time may also be counted for FTE purposes for the Basic Skills
programs.

Madison Heights/Lifelines
Madison Heights/Lifelines is a video/workbook series designed for family literacy
programs.

MOTHEREAD
MOTHEREAD is a private, non-profit organization which helps parents learn to read by
reading books to their children. This unique program offers training through the System
Office to family literacy programs throughout the state.

North Carolina Family Literacy Consortium
The North Carolina Community College System received a two-year grant to establish a
North Carolina Family Literacy Consortium. Although there is no longer a grant for the
Consortium, committees still meet to work on family literacy issues.

North Carolina Center for Family Literacy
The National Center for Family Literacy has a branch in North Carolina – the North
Carolina Center for Family Literacy.

Participation in NCCCS Funded Comprehensive Family Literacy Programs
If an adult is eligible for activities under the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act and
is a parent or caregiver for a child or children living in the household, then that adult
and child or children may participate in a North Carolina Community College
comprehensive family literacy program. Such participation is conditional upon the
following: participation of the adult would enhance the learning of both the adult and
child and the adult must participate in adult education, Parent and Child Together Time,
parenting, and home visits.




Page 46
                                    Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)


               FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT (FERPA)


FERPA and Basic Skills
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) protects the rights of students
and grants students the rights of access to their student records when they turn 18 or
begin attending an institution of higher learning. Students who attend Basic Skills are
attending institutions of higher learning even though they are not enrolled in higher
learning programs; therefore, Basic Skills students are protected by FERPA.

Guidelines for following FERPA Regulations
The following are guidelines for FERPA regulations:
 A student’s right to educational records does not mean that parents have no rights
  to those records. If a parent claims a student as a dependent for tax purposes, then
  the program may share student records with the parent. (Programs have the right
  to ask parents to show a copy of their tax returns.)
 It is recommended that, if possible, programs still get the written consent of
  students before sharing information. Programs could have students sign a written
  release or bring their parents with them to a conference.
 Programs may obtain a blanket written authorization from a student which allows
  the program to disclose records/information to the parents. It is a good idea to have
  a statement saying students have to notify the college in writing if they decide to
  withdraw the authorization. (CC04-073)




Page 47
                                  FTE’s (Full Time Equivalent Students) for Basic Skills


             FTE’S (FULL TIME EQUIVALENT STUDENTS) FOR BASIC SKILLS


Contact Hour Reporting
Basic Skills local programs receive most of their funding based on the number of FTE’s
generated. Basic Skills FTE’s are generated by reporting student contact hours. See
NCAC2D.0324(b)(3), (4), and (5).

FTE for Family Literacy Components
There are four identifiable components of family literacy programs. These are early
childhood education, adult education, parent education, and parent and child
together/interaction time (PACT or PACI). Three of these components: adult education,
parent education, and PACT/PACI time are for the purpose of enhancing the basic skills
of the parents. Since these components are an integral part of the family literacy
program, it is allowable to count the hours that the parents spend in these components
for FTE purposes for the Basic Skills programs if the adult educator participates in the
components. (CC-93-116) Also, if the time spent during a home visit is documented to
be linked to the above components and the adult education instructor is present and
participating, that time may also be counted for FTE purposes for the Basic Skills
programs.




Page 48
                                                General Educational Development (GED)


                     GENERAL EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (GED)


General Educational Development (GED)
General Educational Development (GED) is a program of instruction designed to prepare
adult students to take the GED tests that lead to a high school diploma equivalency.

GED Accommodations for Adults with Disabilities
“In an effort to make GED Tests accessible to all applicants, accommodations are made
for candidates who have diagnosed physical, mental, sensory, or learning disabilities and
can provide appropriate documentation from a qualified professional of their
impairment and its effect on their ability to take the GED Tests under standard
conditions.” (GED Examiner’s Manual, 11.1)

GED Administration Policies
Local programs should test all students/potential students with a standardized test such
as TABE, CASAS, WorkKeys, BEST, or BEST Plus. If students score at the Low or High
Adult Secondary levels, students should then be given the Official GED Practice tests
prior to taking the GED. Colleges may administer the GED tests to a student without
that student taking a standardized test or the practice tests; however, such a policy is
not recommended except in a few cases because most people cannot pass the GED tests
without some preparation. If students who are not at the adult secondary level take the
GED tests and pass the tests, they cannot be placed at the adult secondary level without
taking a standardized test (TABE, CASAS, WorkKeys, BEST, or BEST Plus) and scoring
within the adult secondary level.

GED Classes in Spanish
A major purpose of the Basic Skills program is to help students learn the English
language; therefore, teaching GED classes in Spanish is not allowable for Basic Skills FTE.
Students who are studying for the GED in Spanish who do not have English literacy skills
must be taught those skills while studying for the GED in Spanish. (CC01-229)

GED - Combining Scores
GED Testing Service allows states to combine GED test scores from the Spanish and
English GED tests; however, states have to have a consistent policy throughout the state
- combining scores cannot be a local decision. (Most states do not allow the scores to
be combined.) The Basic Skills State Leadership Advisory Board decided that North
Carolina would not combine GED test scores from the Spanish and English versions.
(CC04-237)

GED Eligibility Limitations
Residence Limitation – “Jurisdictions shall administer the GED Tests to any qualified
adult who resides in that jurisdiction.” (GED Examiner’s Manual, Section 4.1)
Educational Limitation – Persons who hold a traditional high school diploma are not
allowed to take the GED Tests.

Page 49
                                                General Educational Development (GED)


Enrollment Limitation – “The GED Tests shall not be administered to candidates who are
enrolled in an accredited high school, including those accredited by regional accrediting
bodies and also those approved by the jurisdiction’s department of ministry of
education.”
Age Limitation – “The GED Tests shall not be administered to persons under 16 years of
age.” (GED Examiner’s 2005 Manual, Section 4)

GED English Proficiency Test
Examinees who take the Spanish or French version of the GED tests and would like to
provide information to an employer about their English proficiency, can now take the
sixth GED test to show English proficiency. Receiving a transcript with an ESL test score
will give an employer a better picture of the examinee’s English skills. If the individual
elects to take the English as a Second Language Test (the sixth GED test) and passes, the
transcript will read: The examinee passed the English Proficiency test. (CC05-186)

GED Guidelines for Test Administration
Students who score at the Low Adult Secondary Education or High placement levels on
all components of the placement test should be allowed to be administered the Official
GED Practice Tests.

Students who score at the Low or High Adult Secondary Education placement level on
some, but not all components of the placement test, should be allowed to be
administered the GED practice tests in the areas related to that component. For
example, if a student scores at the Low or High Adult Secondary placement level on the
reading component, he/she should be allowed to be administered the Science, Social
Studies, and Language Arts Reading components of the Official GED Practice tests.
Upon successful completion of the practice tests, students should be allowed to take the
GED Tests. Instruction related to the areas of deficiency is recommended for students
whose placement test scores indicate areas needing improvement. Students who do
not achieve satisfactory scores on the practice tests should be referred back to Basic
Skills classes to work on the areas needing improvement.

Students who score below the Low or High Adult Secondary Education placement level
on all components of the placement test should be referred to Adult Basic Education
(ABE) classes. After instruction, students should be post-tested to determine when they
have advanced to the Low or High Adult Secondary Education placement level. After
reaching the Low Adult Secondary Education placement, students should be allowed to
be administered the GED Practice Tests. Students who do not achieve satisfactory
scores on the practice tests should be referred back to classes. Students should not be
required to attend a set number of instructional hours of GED instruction. Instead,
students should be diagnosed and instruction prescribed according to their individual
needs. (CC03-030)




Page 50
                                                General Educational Development (GED)


GED Passing Score
To receive a GED diploma in North Carolina, students must score a minimum of 410 on
each of the five tests and a total score of 2250.

GED Proof of Identification
It is imperative that all GED examinees follow GED Testing Service’s policy for
verification of identity and eligibility. Chief GED Examiners and Alternate Examiners are
responsible for verifying that each GED candidate tested is eligible to take the GED Tests
to insure the security of the GED Testing Program in North Carolina. Students will need
the following to be eligible to test:

Driver’s Licenses, valid passports, military ID’s or other forms of government issued
(national or foreign) identification that show name, address, date of birth, signature,
and photograph are all acceptable forms of identification, unless there is any reason to
question their authenticity. Outdated identification or identification suspected of being
forged will not be accepted. Identification suspected of being forged will be reported to
the authorities. Current identification provided by a postsecondary educational
institution is also acceptable, provided it contains the candidate’s name, address, date of
birth, signature, and photograph. (GED Examiner’s Manual 2005, 4.2)

Post a sign at the examination area as to what identification documents will be required
before the tests can be given. (Although social security numbers are not required to
take the GED tests, it is recommended that local programs collect social security
numbers when possible for data matching purposes.)

GED Re-testing Policy
“Re-testing shall be permitted on the entire battery or on certain test(s) in the battery –
three times each contract year. In all cases of re-testing, the GED Chief Examiner or
Examiner shall administer a different form of the test(s).” (GED Examiner’s Manual,
Section 4.5)

 “GED graduates who have earned a high school equivalency diploma or earned scores
sufficient to qualify for a high school equivalency credential, but who need to earn
higher GED test scores to meet an admission requirement for postsecondary education
or training or to meet employment requirements are eligible to retake the GED Tests.

GED graduates who have earned a credential based on passing the French or Spanish-
language edition of the tests and need to pass the English-language version to qualify
for employment or postsecondary education or training are also eligible to retake the
GED Tests.” (GED Examiner’s Manual, Section 4.5)

GED Test Administration Funding
It is not admissible for state or local programs to use federal adult education funds for
the administration of the state’s GED testing program. Each program, therefore, needs
to ensure that it doesn’t spend more than their state budget on the GED Testing

Page 51
                                                 General Educational Development (GED)


Program. GED examiner positions and operating costs must be paid from the state
portion of the Basic Skills allotment. (CC05-168)

Taking the GED in One Language
The GED cannot be taken in two languages. If an examinee starts taking the GED tests in
Spanish, he/she must finish all five of the tests in Spanish. The transcript will print: Test
Version: Spanish. (CC05-186)

Test Security (Additional Measures)
Refer to the GED Examiner’s Manual, published by the GED Testing Service, Section 10
for loss or compromise of restricted testing materials, 10.1 for definition of test
compromise, and10.2 for procedures for investigating test loss or compromise.
The following is a checklist for the GED Chief Examiner or GED Examiner regarding loss
or compromise of secure GED testing materials:
     Immediately stop all GED testing at your Official GED Testing Center.
     Immediately report the loss or compromise to the Testing Center’s Chief
        Administrative Officer, the GED Administrator, and the GED Testing Service.
     Notify other Official GED Testing Centers, as directed by the GED Administrator,
        to discontinue use of the compromised forms until further notice.
     Cooperate with the GED Administrator to address the testing needs of your
        constituents while your Official GED Testing Center remains closed.
     Launch a thorough investigation within minutes to determine the location of any
        missing material(s) and the reasons the loss may have occurred.
     Notify the local police.
     Return the remaining stock of compromised testing materials to the GED Testing
        Service in Washington, D.C.
     Submit a written report, based on your investigation, to the Chief Administrative
        Officer, the GED Administrator, and the GED Testing Service.
     Meet in person, at your Official GED Testing Center, with the GED Administrator
        or a designated representative to review procedures.
     Receive notification that the GED Administrator has recommended in writing to
        the GED Testing Service that your Official GED Testing Center be permitted to
        resume testing.
Section 10.4 in the GED Examiner’s Manual states that “GED Testing Centers having
more than one incident of lost or compromise testing materials within a two-year
period, or more than two such incidents within a five-year period, will be permanently
closed by the GED Testing Service.

       If, after a three-year waiting period, an institution wishes to reopen an Official
GED Testing Center, the institution must submit a new application to the GED
Administrator, and all established criteria must be met before consideration will be
given to reopening.

          GED Examiners will require student examinees to be seated before test booklets

Page 52
                                                General Educational Development (GED)


are assigned for testing. No student examinee is to leave until the GED Exa miner goes
to the student examinee to have the student turn in the test booklet. The student
examinee must not leave the testing room until the GED Examiner gives the student
examinee permission to leave the testing room. Any time tests are taken from the
secure lockable storage container to a testing room or site, the tests are to be put in a
container with a covered top or lid. The container is to be always under the complete
control and always within direct view of the examiner. Only the exact number of GED
Test booklets or batteries plus one and the exact number of essay topic cards plus one
that are needed for that testing session should be transported to the testing room or
site. Those tests that are not used for testing are to be kept in the container. Only the
examiners are allowed to have access to the container.

        Examiners are to account for all the tests taken to the testing room or site by
inventory before leaving the testing room or site and an inventory is conducted upon
return.

      GED Examiners will require students taking the GED Tests to sit facing the
Examiner with sufficient spacing between students such as a seat between students.

GED Examiners will require students taking the GED Tests to bring a picture ID to the
testing room. No electronic devices will be allowed (i.e., cell phones, pagers, etc.).




Page 53
                                                           Groupwise Lists for Basic Skills


                          GROUPWISE LISTS FOR BASIC SKILLS


Email Correspondence to Colleges
The System Office Basic Skills Department no longer maintains its private GroupWise list
of Basic Skills directors. All correspondence to Basic Skills Directors is sent by using the
System’s GroupWise “CC Basic Skills Directors” list. There are two Basic Skills lists in
GroupWise – the first is labeled “Basic Skills.” If you send something to that list, it will
go to all Basic Skills staff at the System Office in Raleigh. The second list is “CC Basic
Skills Directors.” If you send something to that list, it will go to all community college
Basic Skills directors whose System Administrators have added their names to the list.

Maintenance of List
The “CC Basic Skills Directors” list is maintained at each local community college. Only
local community college System Administrators may add or delete names from that list.




Page 54
                                                                               Instructors


                            INSTRUCTORS/PART-TIME STAFF

Payment for Attending Conferences/Meetings/Field Trips
Although colleges should pay instructors and other part-time staff for their time while
attending conferences or meetings and going on field trips, including travel time,
whether or not colleges pay part-time staff for these activities is a local decision.
Colleges may not earn FTE for driving time to or from conferences, meetings, field trips,
etc.

Payment for Non-Teaching Hours
Basic Skills instructors may be paid for non-teaching duties such as attending weekly
meetings. Basic Skills instructors may be paid for non-teaching duties related to their
classes if those duties and designated times for performing them are identified in their
contracts. The duties listed should be specific, such as meeting with employers or
curriculum development, not preparation time; however it is important to remember
that programs do not earn budget FTE for these non-instructional hours and, if used
extensively, could negatively affect future budgets. (CC-96-210)

Proration of Salaries
Basic Skills directors who substitute-teach must prorate their salaries for the hours
taught from the Basic Skills budget so the hours will be counted toward budget FTE.

Qualifications for Instructors
“Colleges shall employ faculty members so as to meet Sout hern Association of Colleges
and Schools’ criteria.” (23 NCAC 02C.0202(1) SACS states that all instructors employed
by an institution must be “competent.” Check with your local SACS liaison to determine
what your college requires.




Page 55
                                          Literacy Education Information System (LEIS)


                 LITERACY EDUCATION INFORMATION SYSTEM (LEIS)


LEIS System
All local programs will submit data annually through an electronic information
management system. Community colleges presently submit their data through an in-
house system, the Literacy Education Information Management System (LEIS). This
system or its equivalent will be used to collect accurate data from community colleges.

Movement from One Level of Basic Skills to the Next in LEIS
All Basic Skills students should be pre-tested with a standardized assessment upon
entering the program and placed into the appropriate Basic Skills level based on the
lowest assessment score. Students who score below 9.0 or its equivalent must be
placed in the appropriate ABE level until a post-test score shows movement into adult
secondary.




Page 56
                                                                                    Minors


                                         MINORS


Adult High School Units
Adult High School students who are minors must complete the number of units agreed
upon by the college and the local public school; therefore, the number of units required
of them may be different from students who are 18 and older. Colleges are not
required to follow the same structure when teaching different sections of the same
courses. Classes may be structured differently as long as the content is covered.

Classes for minors

Minors cannot be required to attend classes set up only for them. However, a college
may locate classes wherever the college deems appropriate, as long as minors are not
restricted to any particular location.

Drivers’ License Laws and Dropouts

When minors drop out of public schools, public schools should “decertify” them if they
are not making progress which means they will lose their drivers’ permit/license. If they
are making progress, they will not lose their drivers’ permit/license. If the public school
does not decertify a student, the community college should not decertify the student
until he/she is not attending classes and/or making progress in the community college
program. All students who drop out of public schools are counted as “dropouts.” They
are no longer considered to be “transfers” when they enter our programs.

Enrollment of Minors

It is optional for community colleges to provide educational services to minors under
Rule 23 NCAC 2C.0305 (dual enrollment, cooperative programs or enrichment courses
during the summer term).

Although the State Board of Community Colleges has not specifically addressed this
issue by rule, once a person is beyond the compulsory age limit of the public school (16)
and has dropped out of school, it becomes difficult to defend community colleges not
serving this person if services are requested since G.S. 115D-1 says community colleges
are for persons beyond the compulsory age limit of the public schools who have also left
school. Therefore, community colleges should serve minors, aged 16 and 17, who have
dropped out of school.

Guidelines for Minors
Colleges should require minors to meet the same conduct standards as the adult
students. Colleges shall not adopt different disciplinary procedures or grievance
procedures for minor students.




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                                                                                      Minors


Some colleges have delegated to individual instructors the authority to set attendance
policies, including timeliness policies for students in their class. This practice may allow
individual instructors to address problems that occur in their classes. Any poli cies
adopted must be general and apply to all students in the class. Minors should be
subject to the same disciplinary policies and procedures as adult students.

Release Documents for Minors
It is necessary to obtain release documents from local public schools before enrolling
minors unless they have been out of school for six months. Release documents are not
needed for 18 year-olds. The NCAC 2C.0301 Admissions to Colleges states “ . . . each
institution shall maintain an open door admission policy to all applicants who are high
school graduates or who are at least 18 years of age.” The provisions set forth in NCAC
2C.0305 (b) must be followed when serving 16-17 year old students.

Serving Minors in Division of Youth/DOC Facilities
Minors below 16 may be served in community colleges if they are in programs operated
by the Office of Juvenile Justice, but not if they are in programs operated by the
Department of Correction; however, federal Basic Skills funding may not be used to
serve any minor below 16. (CC-98-161) (NCAC 2C.0305)

Serving Minors in English as a Second Language Programs

Colleges may serve persons who are 16 and 17 years old who have dropped out of
school in ESL classes. Current policy does not allow Basic Skills programs to serve
English as a Second Language students who are not high school dropouts.

Testing of Minors for GED
A minor 16 or 17 years of age may be admitted to testing without a notarized petition
from the parent/legal guardian and without an official withdrawal notice fro m a school
who meets one of the following conditions:
        A person incarcerated in a correctional institution, correctional youth center,
           committed to a training school for adjudicated youth, or similar institution.
        A patient or resident of a North Carolina state-operated hospital or alcoholic
           rehabilitation center.
        A person enrolled in a program of instruction required by a state agency, the
           Job Corps or other such agency, or a registered apprenticeship training
           program.
        A member of the United States Armed Forces.




Page 58
                                                                        National Agencies


                                  NATIONAL AGENCIES


Commission on Adult Basic Education (COABE)
The Commission on Adult Basic Education, COABE, was one of three commissions under
the Association for Adult and Continuing Education (AAACE). As of 1999, COABE
became a fully independent adult basic education organization, focusing on
practitioner-oriented issues. COABE hosts an annual national conference for
practitioners. COABE's web address is www.coabe.org.

Literacy Information aNd Communication System (LINCS)
LINCS is a cooperative electronic network of the National LINCS team at the National
Institute for Literacy, four regional LINCS partners, representative organizations from
the states and territories, and several major national organizations. The LINCS Network
provides a single focal point for adult literacy resources, knowledge, and expertise from
across the nation and the world. The coordinated efforts of the LINCS partners have
made LINCS a nationally recognized one-stop site for literacy information and
communication among literacy professionals. Connect to the LINCS network through
the community college web site, under Basic Skills and Literacy Resource Center.

LINCS’ web address is www.nifl.gov/lincs.

National Adult Educational Professional Development Consortium (NAEPDC)
NAEPDC was incorporated in 1990 to fulfill a desire of state adult education staff to
enhance their professional development. Organized by state directors of adult
education, NAEPDC has four main purposes: To coordinate, develop, and conduct
programs of professional development for state adult education staffs; to serve as a
catalyst for public policy review and development related to adult education; to
disseminate information on the field of adult education; and to maintain a visible
presence for the state adult education program in our nation’s capitol. NAEPDC's web
address: www.naepdc.org.

National Adult Literacy and Learning Disabilities Center (NALLD)
Funded by the National Institute for Literacy, NALLD provides information on learning
disabilities in adults and on the relationship between learning disabilities and low-level
literacy skills. The Center maintains a National Information Exchange Network, which
includes a moderated listserv, a toll-free telephone number, and a database and library
of resources on learning disabilities. Center products and publications include topical
newsletters and fact sheets as well as a national resource guide and individual state
resource sheets. The web address is www.novel.nifl.gov.

National Adult Literacy Database, Inc. (NALD)
The National Adult Literacy Database Inc. (NALD) is a federally incorporated, non-profit
service organization which fills the crucial need for a single-source, comprehensive, up-
to-date and easily accessible database of adult literacy programs, resources, services


Page 59
                                                                          National Agencies


and activities across Canada. It also links with other services and databases in North
America and overseas.

NALD gathers, sorts, stores and makes available information on literacy programming,
resources, services, contacts, events, awards, funding sources, and, most importantly,
resources that can be used in the learning situation. NALD also provides an analysis of
the literacy information, e.g. demographics, impact of programming, etc.

NALD provides adult literacy information to practitioners, teachers, volunteers, program
administrators, policy setters and learners across the country through its toll-free "800"
number, on the Internet through its web address: http://www.nald.ca.

National Center on Adult Literacy (NCAL)
The National Center on Adult Literacy (NCAL) was established in 1990 with a major grant
from the U.S. Department of Education. The Center is currently supported by federal,
state, and local agencies as well as by private foundations and corporations. NCAL is part
of the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education, which is registered as a
not-for-profit organization (501-C3) in the State of

Pennsylvania. NCAL's mission incorporates three primary goals: (1) to improve
understanding of youth and adult learning, (2) to foster innovation and increase
effectiveness in youth and adult basic education and literacy work, and (3) to expand
access to information and build capacity for literacy and basic skills service provision.
Web address: www.literacy.org

National Center for Education Statistics (NCES)
The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) is with the Institute of Educational
Science at the United States Department of Education. It is the primary federal agency
for collecting and analyzing data that are related to education in the United States and
other nations. Web address: www.nces.ed.gov.

National Center for Family Literacy (NCFL)
The National Center for Family Literacy (NCFL), a nonprofit educational organization
headquartered in Louisville, Kentucky, was founded in 1989 with a grant from the
William R. Kenan, Jr. Charitable Trust. NCFL is recognized internationally as the leader in
the field of family literacy, an innovative approach to meeting the educational needs of
both children and their parents. By providing training for educators, researching
effective practices, and raising public awareness, NCFL works to expand the learning
opportunities for all families nationwide. Web address: www.famlit.org.

National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL)
The National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL) both informs
and learns from practice. Its rigorous, high quality research increases knowledge and
gives those teaching, managing, and setting policy in adult literacy education a sound
basis for making decisions. NCSALL is also a leader in designing innovative professional


Page 60
                                                                         National Agencies


development programs and in building support for research use. NCSALL’s work focuses
on four purposes:

 Increasing knowledge through research examining critical issues that affect program
  success and adult learning.
 Improving practice through such efforts as ESOL and ABE/GED lab sites and the
  Practitioner Dissemination and Research Network.
 Providing leadership by bringing a research perspective to improving policy and
  practice, through such means as the Connecting Practice, Policy, and Research
  initiative, the National Adult Literacy Summit, scholarships, and participation in
  professional meetings and national advisory panels.
   Sharing expertise through informative publications, videos, and face-to-face
       communications.
  Web address: www.ncsall.net.

National Clearinghouse for ESL Literacy Education (NCLE)
The National Center for ESL Literacy Education (NCLE), works to provide services for
programs focusing on the language and literacy education of adults and out-of-school
youth learning English. NCLE provides information on adult ESL literacy education to
teachers and tutors, program directors, researchers, and policymakers interested in the
education of refugees, immigrants, and other U.S. residents whose native language is
other than English. This population includes adults who are low-literate and low-skilled,
as well as those who are more educated but need to improve their English language
skills.

NCLE was established by Congress in 1988 (Adult Education Act, P.L. 100-297, Sec. 372)
and is housed at the Center for Applied Linguistics (CAL), a non-profit organization
located in Washington, DC. NCLE's activities were originally funded under the English
Literacy Grants, but the current funding comes from the U.S. Department of Education--
through the Office of Vocational and Adult Education (OVAE).

NCLE provides a variety of services to staff working in the field of adult ESL literacy
education: information and referrals on individual questions regarding adult ESL literacy
education; teacher training workshops and other professional development
presentations; information and training on the Basic English Skills Test (BEST);
development of instructional materials for adult ESL populations; facilitation of
curriculum development for programs; program evaluations. Web address:
www.cal.org/ncle.

National Institute for Literacy (NIFL)
The National Institute for Literacy (NIFL) is a federal organization that shares
information about literacy and supports the development of high-quality literacy
services so all Americans can develop essential basic skills. It was created as a part of
the 1991 Literacy Act by a bipartisan congressional coalition to be the hub of national
literacy efforts.

Page 61
                                                                         National Agencies


NIFL established the Literacy Information and Communication System (LINCS) and
supports the National Adult Literacy and Learning Disabilities Center (NALLD). “Equipped
for the Future” is a project started by NIFL. NIFL's publications can be attained by
ordering online or calling Ed Pubs toll-free at (877) 433-7827.

NIFL also has a nationwide database of local programs entitled America’s Literacy
Directory. This directory and other information regarding NIFL may be found on NIFL’s
web site at www.nifl.gov.

Proliteracy America
ProLiteracy America, the largest adult literacy organization in the United States, was
established on October 1, 2002, with the merger of Laubach Literacy and Literacy
Volunteers of America, Inc. ProLiteracy America's 1,200 affiliates are represented inall
50 states and the District of Columbia. Visit the web site at www.proliteracy.org.

ProLiteracy Worldwide
ProLiteracy Worldwide is represented in 45 developing countries as well as in the U.S.
and serves more than 350,000 adult new learners around the world each year. It is the
parent company of ProLiteracy America. Its purpose is to sponsor educational programs
and services to empower adults and their families by assisting them to acquire the
literacy practices and skills they need to function more effectively in their daily lives and
participate in the transformation of their societies. Its publishing division, New Readers
Press, produces and distributes approximately 500 titles of adult educational books and
materials to literacy organizations, schools, libraries, and other institutions nationwide.
New Readers Press also publishes News for You, a weekly newspaper for adult new
readers, which is read by 90,000 adult learners. Its web site is also www.proliteracy.org.

United States Department of Education, Office of Adult and Vocational Education
(OVAE)
The Office of Adult and Vocational Education, United States Department of Education,
provides funding for Basic Skills/literacy programs by granting all states and some US
territories federal funding. North Carolina receives approximately 14 million per year
for its adult education programs. Visit the OVAE web site at www.ed.gov/OVAE.




Page 62
                                                        National Reporting System (NRS)


                         NATIONAL REPORTING SYSTEM (NRS)


Assessment of Students
The NRS requires assessment of all students in the program (except pre-designated
“work-based project learners”) on intake to determine their educational functioning
level. (See section on “Assessment of Basic Skills.”) Students are placed into one of the
following programs based on their lowest standardized assessment score:

     TEST               ABE          Compensatory            ESL            GED/Adult
                                       Education                            High School

    CASAS                 √                 √                  √                 √

     TABE                 √                                                      √

   Workkeys               √                                                      √

                        High
                   Intermediate
                     ABE only

BEST/BEST Plus                                                 √


After the appropriate number of hours of instruction (according to test manufacturers
for each test), students are post-tested with the same standardized instrument used for
the pre-test (but an alternate form) to determine whether the students have
progressed one or more levels or are progressing at the same level.

Core NRS Measures
Three types of core measures are required:
       1) Outcome measures which include educational gain, entered employment,
            retained employment, receipt of Adult High School diploma or GED, and
            placement in postsecondary education or training;
       2) Descriptive measures, including student demographics, reasons for
             attending
            and student status;
       3) Participation measures of contact hours received and enrollment in
            instructional programs for special populations or topics (such as family
         literacy or workplace literacy).

Performance standards required by WIA have been set for the core outcomes for each
state and incentive grants are awarded based on these standards.

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                                                     National Reporting System (NRS)



The following chart shows the required NRS measures and definitions.

                        NRS Core Measures and Definitions
     Topic         Core Outcome Measures             Categories or Definitions
Educational        Educational Gains           Educational functioning levels in
Gains                                              reading, writing, speaking and
                                                   listening and functional areas.
Follow-up          Entered Employment          Learners who obtain a job by the
Measures                                           end of the first quarter after exit
                                                   quarter
                   Retained Employment
                                                Learners who remain employed in
                                                   the third quarter after program
                   Receipt of secondary           exit
                    school diploma or GED
                                                Learners who obtain a GED,
                   Placement in                   secondary school diploma or
                    postsecondary education        recognized equivalent
                    or training
                                                Learners enrolling in a
                                                   postsecondary educational or
                                                   occupational skills program
                                                   building on prior services or
                                                   training received
                  NRS Core Descriptive and Participation Measures
Demographics       Ethnicity                   American Indian or Alaskan
                                                   Native, Asian, Native Hawaiian or
                                                   Pacific Islander, Black or African
                                                   American (non-Hispanic), Hispanic
                                                   or Latino, White (non-Hispanic)

                   Gender                       Male, female

                   Age                          Date of birth
Status and         Labor force status           Employed, not employed, not in
Goals                                             labor force

                   Public assistance status     Receiving or not receiving
                                                  assistance
                   Rural residency
                                                 Rural, not rural
                   Disability status

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                                                     National Reporting System (NRS)


                                                 Disabled, not disabled
                   Learner main and
                    secondary reasons or         Obtain a job, retain current job,
                    goals for attending           improve current job, earn a
                                                  secondary school diploma or GED,
                                                  enter post-secondary education or
                                                  training, improve basic literacy
                                                  skills, improve English language
                                                  skills, citizenship, work-based
                                                  project learner goal, other
                                                  personal goal
Student            Contact hours                Number of hours of instructional
Participation                                     activity
                   Program enrollment type
                                                 ABE, ESL, ASE, family literacy,
                                                  workplace programs, homeless
                                                  program, correctional facilities,
                                                  community corrections programs,
                                                  other institutional program

Core NRS Secondary Measures
NRS secondary measures include additional outcome measures related to employment,
family and community that adult education stakeholders believe are important. States
are not required to report on these measures to the United States Department of
Education.

The following chart shows the secondary NRS measures and definitions:

                       NRS Core Measures and Definitions
     Topic          Core Outcome Measures          Categories or Definitions
Employment           Reduction in receipt of  Students whose TANF or
                      public assistance         equivalent public assistance grant
                                                is reduced or eliminated due to
                                                employment
Work-based           Met work-based           Achieved skills for work-based
Project Learner       project learner goal      project learner activity (activity of
Achievement                                     at least 12 hours and no more
                                                than 30 hours of instruction to
                                                teach specific workplace skill)




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                                                         National Reporting System (NRS)


Community              Achieved citizen skills      Achieve the skills needed to pass
                                                      the citizenship exam

                       Voting behavior              Learner registers to vote or votes
                                                      for the first time

                       General involvement in       Learner increases involvement in
                        community activities          community activities
Family                 Involvement in               Learner increases help given for
                        children’s education          children’s school work, contact
                                                      with teachers to discuss
                                                      education, and involvement in
                                                      children’s school
                       Involvement in
                        children’s literacy-         Learner increases the amount
                        related activities            read to children, visits libraries,
                                                      or purchases books or magazines
                                                      for children
Student Status         Low income status            Low income, not low income

                       Displaced homemaker          Displaced homemaker, not
                                                      displaced homemaker

                       Single parent status         Single parent, not single parent

                       Dislocated worker            Dislocated worker, not dislocated
                                                      worker
                       Learning disabled adult
                                                     Learning disabled, not learning
                                                      disabled

Core NRS Secondary Measures Data Match
North Carolina uses a data matching system to obtain the following core outcome
measures: entered employment, retained employment, receipt of a secondary school
diploma or GED and placement in postsecondary education or training. Matching is
conducted by System Office staff using common follow-up systems. Social security or
tax identification numbers are required for a match; therefore, it is imperative that local
programs obtain as many social security or tax identification numbers as possible.
Matches are conducted only for students who have one or more of the goals listed
above. Only students who enter state-supported community colleges/universities are
matched for placement in postsecondary education or training.

The NRS allows states to obtain the core outcome measures listed above by data match
or follow-up survey. If a state uses follow-up survey, then local programs must send

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                                                         National Reporting System (NRS)


 surveys out to all students with the goals of entered employment, retained
 employment, receipt of a secondary school diploma or GED and placement in
 postsecondary education or training. The local programs must then compile the results
 and submit them to the state office. Local programs must receive a survey response
 rate of 50% or higher. Even though there are problems inherent with the data match
 system, North Carolina selected it as the way to collect these core outcome measures
 rather than having local programs conduct follow-up surveys.

 Goals and Core Indicators of Title II, Adult Education & Family Literacy Act
 The following chart shows the goals and core indicators of Title II:

                   Goals                                     Core Indicators

Assist adults to become literate and obtain Improvements in literacy skill levels in reading,
the knowledge and skills necessary for      writing, and speaking the English language,
employment and self-sufficiency.            numeracy, problem-solving, English language
                                            acquisition, other literacy skills.

                                             Placement in, retention in, or completion of,
Assist parents to obtain the skills
                                             postsecondary education, training,
necessary to be full partners in their
                                             unsubsidized employment or career
children’s educational development.
                                             advancement.

Assist adults in the completion of           Receipt of a secondary school diploma or its
secondary school education.                  recognized equivalent.


 History of the National Reporting System (NRS)
 In 1995 Congress considered eliminating adult education as a separate program and
 integrating its activities into existing workforce development programs. To keep the
 program separate, it was essential to develop a strong data collection system to show
 the impact of adult education. The National Reporting System (NRS) is the national
 accountability system for adult education. A National Reporting System project was
 developed to establish that system by identifying measures for national reporting and
 their definitions, establishing methodologies for data collection, developing software
 standards for reporting to the United States Department of education and developing
 training materials and activities on NRS requirements and procedures.

 National Reporting Center Websites
 The web addresses for the National Reporting System are www.nrsweb.org and
 www.nrsonline.org.

 “NRS Web is the primary Web site for the National Reporting System (NRS) for Adult
 Education. This site includes information about the NRS, recent workshop materials,

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                                                         National Reporting System (NRS)


additional resources, and publications in the field of adult education. In addition, the
NRS Web offers a question and answer section, and contact information for project
staff, technical working group members, and U.S. Department of Education staff.”
(www.nrsweb.org)

“NRS Online is the training site for the National Reporting System for adult education
(NRS). This site contains training courses designed for adult education program
administrators that explain NRS requirements and courses designed to improve the
quality of NRS data collection. You can also use this site as a reference source for the
NRS.” (www.nrsonline.org)

Student Goals
The NRS requires a collection of student goals for attending the program. These goals
must be ones that students can attain within one program year. All programs that
receive federal funding (community colleges and community-based organizations)
must collect the NRS goals.

The National Reporting System requires all students to have at least one goal. Setting
students' goals is an integral part of the education process. Goals help define areas in
which instruction and learning is to be focused, and they also provide a benchmark by
which programs and students can assess their progress (Guide for Improving NRS Data
Quality: Procedures for Data Collection and Training, USDOE, June 2002). Goals
collected for the NRS should be short-term goals that can be reached within the
program year. Instructors and/or intake counselors need to work closely with students
to help select the goal(s). Long-term goals are extremely important and need to be
collected, but not as a part of the NRS if the goal is not attainable within the program
year.

Students who have the outcome goals of obtaining employment, retaining employment,
achieving a GED or high school credential, or entering postsecondary education will be
matched by the state's data match system annually to determine if those goals are met.
Programs get credit for the students meeting the outcome goals only if students set
those goals during the program year. (For example, if a student did not have a goal of
getting a job, but did get a job, the student is not counted as meeting that goal.)

Twelve Hour Rule
Since it is difficult for many students to make progress with fewer than 12 hours of
study, the NRS project decided that states and outlying territories would only report to
the United States Department of Education those students who received 12 or more
hours of service. Note: North Carolina Community College programs receive state
funding as well as federal; therefore, local programs should report all students served
to the North Carolina Community College System Office. System Office staff report
only those students with 12 or more hours to the National Reporting System.


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                                                         National Reporting System (NRS)


Work-based Project Learners
North Carolina will also use project learner outcome measures according to the
following procedures outlined in the National Reporting System (NRS):

 The project learner measure will be completion of work-based project learner
   activity.
 The definition for progress of a project learner is "learner acquires the skills taught in
   a short-term learning course designed to teach specific work-based skills.” A short-
   term course is an instructional program of at least 12 hours but no more than 30
   hours duration.
 At intake, the individual learner is identified as a work-based project learner and as
   entering a project learning instructional activity. The instruction must be designed
   to teach work-based skills and must specify the educational outcomes and standards
   for achievement. The final assessment of skill achievement must be a standardized
   test or a performance-based assessment with standardized scoring rubrics.
 For federal reporting, the total number of learners who complete a work-based
   project learner activity is recorded. A rate of percentage can be computed by
   dividing this total by the total relevant population (number of w ork-based project
   learners). Project learners are not counted for the educational gain measure and
   are not assigned an educational functioning level. No core outcomes measures are
   reported for project learners.

Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA—P.L. 105-220)
Title II of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, Adult Education and Family Literacy
Act, is the federal law that provides funding for Basic Skills/literacy programs in North
Carolina.




Page 69
                                                        North Carolina Literacy Agencies


                              NORTH CAROLINA AGENCIES


MOTHEREAD, Inc.
MOTHEREAD is a not-for-profit agency which explores connections between literacy and
literature, develops curricula around family themes, and trains family literacy
practitioners in contextual practices.

North Carolina Center for Family Literacy
The Center is a state partner of the National Center for Family Literacy. It provides
training in comprehensive family literacy and acts as a resource to the state’s Even Start
programs.

North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching (NC-Net)
The North Carolina Network for excellence in Teaching (NC-NET) has a new resource on
its website which has been designed specifically for English as a Second Language
instructors; however, it may also be used with lower level Adult Basic Education and
Compensatory Education students.

The resource is the Virtual Library of Lesson Plans which are for instructors to use
and/or adapt in their classroom teaching. Most of the materials were developed and
tested in North Carolina community colleges under the sponsorship of EL/CIVICS grants.
The originating schools and organizations have provided them in electronic form for
inclusion in the library. To access the lessons, go to www.nc-net.info, click on The ESL
Virtual Library, then explore the many lesson plans, printable exercises, and activity
suggestions available to you.

North Carolina Literacy Association
The North Carolina Literacy Association (NCLA) is an association of volunteer literacy
programs which provides support services and a unified voice to advocate for volunteer
literacy.

SCALE (Student Coalition for Action in Literacy Education)
SCALE is a not-for-profit agency affiliated with the University of North Carolina at Chapel
Hill. SCALE acts as a clearinghouse, offers training opportunities, and provides program
development assistance to campus based literacy programs across the United States.

VOICES
VOICES is a not-for-profit agency which explores creative approaches to literacy and
offers training in writing-based literacy instruction.




Page 70
                           North Carolina Community College Literacy Resource Center


          NORTH CAROLINA COMMUNITY COLLEGE LITERACY RESOURCE CENTER


Description of Center
The North Carolina Community College Literacy Resource Center was incorporated with
the Community College System Office in January 1998. The Center’s staff includes a
coordinator and a support staff person. The Center’s staff will continue to operate as an
integral part of the System Office’s Basic Skills Section, supported by state leadership
funds. The Center’s staff will report directly to the Associate Vice President of Basi c
Skills. The Center’s main responsibilities continue to be in raising public awareness of
Basic Skills/literacy programs, helping the public locate Basic Skills/literacy resources,
and linking local programs and state agencies to innovative national initiatives.




Page 71
                                                                    Numbered Memos


                                 NUMBERED MEMOS


Purpose of Numbered Memos
North Carolina Community College System Office staff are required to send all
correspondence going to ten or more colleges in the form of a numbered memo. All
numbered memos are then posted on the community college system’s web site for easy
access for local program staff. Find numbered memos and select numbered memos on
the System Office website: www.nccommunitycolleges.edu/Numbered_Memos.

Select Numbered Memos
Select numbered memos are those that do not go to all fifty-eight community colleges,
but to some of them. An example would be a memo addressed to all programs that
have an ESL/Civics grant. More than 10 colleges have those grants, but not all 58
colleges have such programs. Correspondence to select colleges with such a program
would be listed as a select numbered memo.




Page 72
                                                                      Pathways to Employment


                         PATHWAYS TO EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS

Description of Program
Pathways to Employment programs are short-term training programs designed
specifically for welfare recipients, but open to all eligible students. The purpose of these
programs is to provide the skills, attitudes, and knowledge necessary for obtaining
employment. Pathways programs consist of the following three integrated
components: Basic Skills, Occupational Extension, and Human Resources Development
(job-seeking/job-keeping skills). The goal of the program is to provide short-term
training that leads to employment.

Grant Application
Programs may apply for Pathways to Employment grants on a competitive basis. To be
eligible to receive funding for Pathways to Employment, a local program must complete
the Pathways to Employment section of the Basic Skills Program Plan and Application.
Proposals will be evaluated using the criteria outlined below:

   Criteria for Evaluating Pathways to Employment Program Plans and Applications

                                                                             Total     # of
                                                                                      Points
                                                                             # of
                                                                                      Scored
                                                                             Points

I. Needs of the population to be served by this program                        20

A. Population to be served                                                     10

B. Needs in service area for each population served                             5

C. Steps to ensure equitable access and participation                           5

II. Program Description                                                        100

A. The program provides assessment and self-paced individualized               10
instruction in learning skills.

B. The program provides job skill development for specific jobs                20
identified by labor market analysis.

C. The program provides workforce basic skills (reading, writing,              30
mathematics, communication skills, critical thinking and problem
solving skills) leading to self-sufficiency. The skills relate directly to
an occupation.


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                                                                Pathways to Employment


D. The program provides human resources development (self-               20
management, job hunting, employment expectation).

E. Learning activities are coordinated among Basic Skills,               20
occupational skills, and human resources development.

III. Past Effectiveness/Future Effectiveness                             90

A. All students have measurable goals.                                   5

B. The program can demonstrate its past effectiveness in improving       8
the literacy skills of adults and families.

C. The program is committed to serving individuals who are most in       10
need of literacy services, including individuals who are low-income
or have minimal literacy skills.

D. The program is of sufficient intensity and duration for               5
participants to achieve substantial learning gains.

E. The program uses instructional practices that research has proven     5
to be effective in teaching adults.

F. The program uses educational activities that are built on a strong    5
foundation of research and effective educational practice.

G. Programs use computers and other advances in technology, as           7
appropriate.

H. The program gives students the opportunity to learn in “real life”    10
contexts to ensure that an individual has the skills needed to
compete in the workplace and exercise the rights and
responsibilities of citizenship.

I. The program is staffed by well-trained instructors, and               5
administrators, and has access to services of counselors.

J. The program coordinates its activities with other available           10
resources in the community, including postsecondary schools,
elementary and secondary schools, One-Stop centers, job training
programs, and social service agencies.



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                                                                  Pathways to Employment


K. The program offers or provides access to flexible schedules and          5
support services (such as child care and transportation) that are
necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities
or other special needs to attend and complete programs.

L. The program has a high-quality information management system             5
that has the capacity to report participant outcomes and to monitor
program performance.

M. The community has a demonstrated need for additional English             10
as a Second Language (ESL) programs.

IV. Program Information                                                     10

A. Number of students served                                                10

V. Proposed Pathways to Employment Program                                  10

A. Number of students to be served                                          10

VI. Future effectiveness in meeting core indicators                         15

A. Demonstrated improvements in literacy skills                             5

B. Post-secondary education, employment                                     5

C. Receipt of secondary school diploma                                      5

VII. Budget and Cost Effectiveness                                          15

                                                Total Points:              260



To be recommended for Pathways to Employment funding, applications must describe a
program that offers Basic Skills, job-seeking/job-keeping skills, and occupational training
as well as be among the top scorers of applicants. All acceptable applications will be
recommended to receive funding on a competitive basis subject to the availability of
funds. Representatives from local programs will review applications and determine
which programs will be funded and how much funds will be awarded per program.




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                                                             Pathways to Employment


Use of Funds for Pathways Grants
Although Pathways to Employment programs have Human Resources Development
(HRD) and Occupational Extension (OE) components, only the Basic Skills portion may be
funded from the Pathways to Employment grants. Any activity dealing with HRD and OE
must be funded from HRD and OE budgets, not the Pathways grant. (CC04-236)




Page 76
                                                                     Program Monitoring




                                PROGRAM MONITORING
Monitoring Visits
System Office staff will conduct on-site program monitoring of 20% of its programs
annually. Staff will use the Basic Skills Program Monitoring Checklist to evaluate the
effectiveness of programs, services, and activities. System Office staff will complete the
Basic Skills Monitoring Checklist for all programs monitored. A record of all programs
monitored will be kept at the System Office. Copies of the program monitoring report
will be sent to each local program, one to the program director and the other to the
community college president or the chairperson of the community based organization.

Each program monitored will be required to submit to the System Office an explanation
of how they have addressed any areas listed as “required actions” in the monitoring
report. Programs that have “required actions” may request additional technical
assistance from System Office staff and may receive a follow-up monitoring visit during
the next program year.

Number of Programs Visited
Twenty percent of all funded programs, including community college and community-
based organizations, must be monitored each year.

Program Monitoring Forms
A program monitoring form may be found on the community college system web site
under "Basic Skills." www.nccommunitycolleges.edu.




Page 77
                                                    State and Federal Outcome Measures


                                 OUTCOME MEASURES

Federal
1) Demonstrated improvements in literacy skills levels in reading, writing and speaking
    the English language, numeracy, problem-solving, English language acquisition, and
    other literacy skills.
2) Placement in, retention in, or completion of, post-secondary education, training,
    unsubsidized employment or career advancement.
3) Receipt of a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent.
To the extent possible, the Community College System will use North Carolina
Employment Security System’s wage income records to collect outcome data of former
participants at 6-month, 12-month, and 15-month intervals. North Carolina has
developed a system that allows individual agencies to share data without comprising
confidentiality. This data may be obtained at the state level for local community college
programs because all of them collect social security numbers. It will be more difficult to
get the data for community-based organizations because the majority of them currently
do not collect social security numbers.

The wage income records do not give a complete picture of employment, however,
because not all people who get jobs are tracked (such as those who work for some small
businesses). In order to get a broad picture of the outcomes, local programs may also
conduct follow-up surveys at the 6-month, 12-month, and 15-month intervals following
the procedures outlined by the United States Department of Education.

State: 75% Retention Rate
The State of North Carolina requires all colleges to meet a Basic Skills performance
outcome measure which is a 75% retention rate. The data needed to calculate the
percentages for the progress of Basic Skills students is found on Table 3 (Table 4 for CIS
colleges)of the Annual Literacy Data Report. First, subtract the number of students who
moved to a higher level from the number of students who completed a level. The
number of students listed as “Moved to a Higher Level” is a subset of “Completed a
Level.” Then, calculate the percentages of the total number of students served for the
following four fields:

 Number Level(s) Completed
 Number Progressing
 Number Separated
 Number Moved
The percentages of Number Level(s) Completed, Number Progressing, and Number
Moved should total 75% or more.




Page 78
                                                                                   Training


                                         TRAINING


Appalachian State University Staff Development Project
Since 1988 Appalachian State University has received a grant for a staff development
project. Currently the project offers two week-long institutes per year on Adult Basic
Education programs, an annual retreat for three year Institute graduates, and products
to support and enhance the programs.

Basic English Skills Test (BEST-Plus) and Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment
System (CASAS) Training
The North Carolina Community College System provides free-of-charge BEST-Plus and
CASAS training for all Basic Skills/literacy programs in the state. Although the System
Office will facilitate training for assessments sold and distributed by for-profit
companies, BEST-Plus (CAL) and CASAS are private, non-profit agencies; therefore,
training for these systems are offered by BEST-Plus and CASAS trainers who will provide
CASAS training free of charge to all Basic Skills/literacy programs in North Carolina.
Most training will be conducted in regional settings, but programs that need
individualized training sessions need to contact the Basic Skills Training Specialist to
schedule such sessions.

Basic Skills Directors Institute (Required Training)
Basic Skills directors receive annual training on top management issues at the Basic Skills
Directors Institute. Currently the Institute is held in conjunction with the North Carolina
Community College Adult Educators Association (NCCCAEA) conference. One person
from each college, preferably the Basic Skills Director or a coordinator, is required to
attend.

Basic SkillsFamily Literacy Conference
The annual Basic Skills/Family Literacy Conference provides an opportunity for program
administrators and instructional staff to learn what is new in the field of Basic Skills and
family literacy. The conference is attended by over 700 professionals each year. It is an
exciting conference and an excellent opportunity for learning new ideas and
networking.

Basic Skills New Directors Orientation
System Office staff provides annual training to new directors and/or coordinators at the
Basic Skills New Directors Orientation. Offered once a year at the System Office, this
training is a “must” for new directors and/or coordinators.

Compensatory Education Coordinators Conference
The Compensatory Education Coordinators Conference is held annually for all fifty-eight
Basic Skills/Compensatory Education programs.




Page 79
                                                                                    Training


MOTHEREAD / National Center for Family Literacy
Through special projects, the North Carolina Community College System offers training
for comprehensive family literacy programs through MOTHEREAD and the National
Center for Family Literacy. Training needs are assessed annually and a training program
is developed from those needs.

Staff Training Requirements
The Adult Education and Family Literacy Act of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998
requires all programs to have “well-trained” instructors, counselors, and/or
administrators. There are no set number of hours specified for training, but many
programs still require twelve hours of training annually which was the amount required
by the old Adult Education Act. The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS)
states that all instructors employed by an institution must be “competent.” Check with
your local SACS liaison to determine what your college requires.

Training Costs for Basic Skills Directors
If a Basic Skills Director is paid partially out of the Basic Skills budget for coordinating
and/or instructing duties, then the travel for that director may also be prorated from
the Basic Skills budget. If the Basic Skills Director’s full salary is paid for out of
administration, then no Basic Skills funds may be used for training costs of the director.




Page 80
                                                       Vocational Education in Basic Skills


                        VOCATIONAL EDUCATION IN BASIC SKILLS


Basic Skills Funds for Vocational Education
The United States Department of Education has become concerned about the number
of programs that are using Basic Skills/literacy funding to teach vocational education.
Basic Skills/literacy funding may only be used to provide instruction in the basic skills of
reading, writing, mathematics, and critical thinking/problem-solving. Basic Skills funds,
including funds for Pathways to Employment programs, may not be used for funding
vocational components. (CC04-236)

Compensatory Education Program
In Compensatory Education, students may be working on their reading skills by reading
information about different jobs, but colleges may not collect Basic Skills FTE's by
teaching students how to learn a trade such as basic cashiering.

Pathways to Employment Program
In Pathways to Employment programs, Basic Skills/literacy funding may pay salaries for
Basic Skills staff, including meeting times, but that funding may not be used to pay
salaries for Occupational Education and Human Resource Development instructors or
times that they meet to coordinate the program. Pathways funding may not be used to
purchase books or supplies for occupational or Human Resource Development classes.

Workplace Literacy Program
Workplace literacy students may learn the basics of reading, writing, and mathematics
by using workplace-specific materials, but they cannot learn job-specific skills in the
Basic Skills/literacy classroom. (CC04-236)




Page 81
                                                                                   Adult Basic Skills
                                    WORKPLACE BASIC SKILLS

Basic Skills Programs in the Workplace
Workplace Basic Skills is a program to improve the literacy skills needed to perform a job and at
least partly under the auspices of an employer. Although some programs are offered in
specialized workplace labs on college campuses, most of them are offered at the worksite. To
be identified as a workplace Basic Skills program, the program must either be operating at the
work site or providing reading, writing, math, and/or communication skills activities in the
context of the workplace. (For example, a class could be offered at a college site for employees
at a certain industry, using that industry’s written materials as a basis for teaching basic skills.)

Basic Skills Workplace Publication
The North Carolina Community College System produces an annual publication entitled “Basic
Skills in the Workplace.” This publication highlights workplace literacy programs in North
Carolina community colleges.

Pre-Employment Assessments
A federal judge ruled that using the TABE (Tests of Adult Basic Education) as a pre-employment
exam for apprentice dock workers discriminates against minorities because it tests skills that
have little to do with longshore work. A settlement to workers was for $2.75 million. If you are
using the TABE or CASAS or any other basic skills test of general knowledge to screen potential
employees for a company, you need to be able to match every competency covered by the test
to each specific job for which screening is being conducted. Since this is extremely difficult, it is
best not to use general tests for occupational screening. (CC00-148)

Work-based Project Learners
North Carolina will also use project learner outcome measures according to the following
procedures outlined in the National Reporting System (NRS):

  The project learner measure will be completion of work-based project learner activity.
 The definition for progress of a project learner is "learner acquires the skills taught in a short-
    term learning course designed to teach specific work-based skills.” A short-term course is
    an instructional program of at least 12 hours but no more than 30 hours duration.
 At intake, the individual learner is identified as a work-based project learner and as entering
    a project learning instructional activity. The instruction must be designed to teach work-
    based skills and must specify the educational outcomes and standards for achievement.
    The final assessment of skill achievement must be a standardized test or a performance-
    based assessment with standardized scoring rubrics.
 For federal reporting, the total number of learners who complete a work-based project
    learner activity is recorded. A rate of percentage can be computed by dividing this total by
    the total relevant population (number of work-based project learners). Project learners are
    not counted for the educational gain measure and are not assigned an educational
    functioning level. No core outcome measures are reported for project learners.
(Note: If you have workplace learners who are in a program designed for less than 30 hours,
you may code them as work-based project learners. The benefit to you is that you don’t have
to pre-/post-test them, but they will also not be in the total student count sent to the United
States Department of Education. You will earn FTE for project learners. For most students

                                              Page - 82
                                                        Vocational Education in Basic Skills


with 12 hours or more, it is recommended that programs assess them and place them in an
appropriate Basic Skills level rather than coding them as project learners.)




Page 83
                                               Vocational Education in Basic Skills




               Basic Skills Program Update


                     For Program Year


                          2009-2010




             DATED MATERIAL – OPEN IMMEDIATELY


          CLOSING DATE: 5:00 p.m. Friday, April 17, 2009




                      Dr. Randy L. Whitfield

              Associate Vice President of Basic Skills

            North Carolina Community College System




Page 84
                                                            Vocational Education in Basic Skills


DIRECTIONS FOR COMPLETING THE BASIC SKILLS
PROGRAM PLAN AND APPLICATION


1. Complete the attached program plan and application, indicating changes to your program
   since your last program update.


2. A budget sheet is not required unless programs request a different amount of funding from
   last year. (Community colleges are currently funded through a fixed formula; therefore,
   community colleges do not need to submit a budget sheet.)


3. Requests for budget increases need to be thoroughly documented.


4. All programs receiving federal funding from the Workforce Investment Act of 1998,
  Title II, Adult Education and Family Literacy Act, must ensure the following:
   A. The program has established measurable goals for participant outcomes.
   B. The program can demonstrate its past effectiveness in improving the literacy skills of
      adults and families.
   C. The program is committed to serving individuals most in need of literacy services,
      including individuals who are low-income or have minimal literacy skills.
   D. The program is of sufficient intensity and duration for participants to achieve substantial
      learning gains.
   E. The program uses instructional practices that research has proven to be effective in
      teaching adults.
   F. Educational activities are built on a strong foundation of research and effective
      educational practice.
   G. Programs use computers and other advances in technology, as appropriate.
   H. Students have an opportunity to learn in “real life” contexts to ensure that an individual
      has the skills needed to compete in the workplace and exercise the rights and
      responsibilities of citizenship.
   I. The program is staffed by well-trained instructors, administrators, and counselors.
   J. The program coordinates its activities with other available resources in the community,
      including postsecondary schools, elementary and secondary schools, One-stop centers,
      job training programs, and social service agencies.
   K. The program offers flexible schedules and support services (such as child care and
      transportation) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with
      disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs.
   L. The program has a high-quality information management system that has the capacity
      to report participant outcomes and to monitor program performance.
   M. The community has a demonstrated need for additional English as a Second Language
      (ESL) programs.
Page 85
                                                           Vocational Education in Basic Skills



                      North Carolina Community College System
                       Academic and Student Services Division
                                  Basic Skills Section

                BASIC SKILLS PROGRAM UPDATE FOR PROGRAM YEAR
                                   2009-2010




College/Agency/Organization                                  Date


Person(s) completing this application                          Telephone Numbe r


Address

________________________________________________________________________
Email Address




If you have questions concerning the Program Plan and Application Update, please call Dr.
Randy L. Whitfield at (919) 807-7132. Respond to each question and mail to the following
address. The original plan and four copies must be received by April 17, 2009. (NOT
POSTMARKED)


Mail to:       Dr. Randy L. Whitfield
               Associate Vice President of Basic Skills
               North Carolina Community College System Office


Regular or Courier Mail                            Overnight (Fed Ex, Priority, etc.)
5016 Mail Service Center                           200 West Jones Street
Raleigh, NC 27699-5016                             Raleigh, NC 27603


Page 86
                                                           Vocational Education in Basic Skills


BASIC SKILLS PROGRAM PLAN UPDATE


1. Please describe any changes to your program since you submitted your 2008-2009 Program
   Plan and Application.




II. Describe the effectiveness of your program in 2007-2008 by answering the following
questions:

Page 87
                                                          Vocational Education in Basic Skills


A. How many students (headcount may be duplicated) did you serve?
   (Use LEIS or LACES data.)
Program Area                                     2007-2008

Adult Basic Education (ABE)

GED/AHS

English as a Second Language (ESL)

Compensatory Education (CED)

Total

What was your unduplicated headcount for 2007-2008? ___________

B. What was your retention rate in 2007-2008?


Directions: Divide the number of students who completed a level plus the number who
remained in the program at the same or higher level of instruction by the total enrollment for
2007-2008 to get the % of retention rate.
                   2007-2008
       A. # Completed level
_____
       B. # Remained same level or
_____

                       Total of A + B
_____

Total of (A) and (B)   =           _____ %
Total Enrollment
Retention Rate



III.      Budget and Cost Effectiveness (For Community-Based Organizations Only)


Please submit the attached budget sheet only if you are requesting a different amount of
funding for 2009-2010 than you received in 2008-2009. If you request additional funding,
please write a detailed justification for the additional amount.


Page 88
                                                              Vocational Education in Basic Skills


         Budget and Cost Effectiveness (For Community-Based Organizations Only)
Budget Category                                         Federal Funds Requested
         Salaries, Instructional                        Total: $
    Full-time (Describe positions.)
                                          $

         Part-time (Describe positions.)


         Explanation:
                                               $

              Educational Materials and Supplies               $
         Explanation:


                            Equipment                          $


         May not purchase equipment unless it is an
          integral part of the grant and is pre-approved by
          the grantee.
         Explanation


                        Contractual Services                   $

         Explanation


                            Staff Travel                       $


         Explanation:


                          Student Travel                       $


         Explanation


                           Staff Training                      $
         Explanation


Page 89
                                                            Vocational Education in Basic Skills


             Other Cost                                      Total: $
 Note: Administrative Costs (Salaries
Supportive and Other Expenses) cannot
  exceed more than 5% of total grant.

Administrative Costs, Salaries Supportive
   Salaries, Supportive, Full-time
      (Describe positions.)
   Salaries, Supportive, Part-time
      (Describe positions.)
   Explanation


    Administrative Costs, Other Expenses
      Other Expenses (office supplies,
        postage, etc.)
                                            $
         Explanation




                                            $

                                            $

                           Note:
    How much funding do you expect to receive from
     other sources during the 2009-2010 program year?        $


    What was your total budget last year? Include state,
     federal and funds from other sources.
                                                             $




                Total Federal Funds Requested:               $




Page 90
                                                             Vocational Education in Basic Skills




The application narrative consists of the abstract, needs statement, program design, evaluation
plan, personnel information, budget, program timeline and assurances.


                               Comprehensive Family Literacy
                                      Update Plan
                                       2009-2010




                           DATED MATERIAL – OPEN IMMEDIATELY


                       CLOSING DATE: 5:00 p.m. Friday, April 17, 2009




                                    Dr. Randy L. Whitfield

                            Associate Vice President of Basic Skills

                          North Carolina Community College System




Page 91
                                                               Vocational Education in Basic Skills


          Section I: DEFINITION AND PURPOSE OF COMPREHESIVE FAMILY LITERACY

Since 1998, a consistent definition for these comprehensive family literacy services has been
included in federal legislation. The federal definition defines family literacy services
as:"...services that are of sufficient intensity in terms of hours, and of sufficient duration, to
make sustainable changes in a family and that integrate all of the following activities:

     Interactive literacy activities between parents and their children. [PACT] Training for
      parents regarding how to be the primary teacher for their children and full partners in
      the education of their children. [Parent Education]
     Parent literacy training that leads to economic self-sufficiency. [Adult Education]
     An age-appropriate education to prepare children for success in school and life
      experiences. [Early Childhood Education]."

NC Basic Skills Comprehensive Family Literacy funds provide the adult education and the
parenting components of these family literacy programs. Even Start, public schools, and Head
Start programs provide the early childhood components. Additional program support is
provided by Smart Start (state-funded early childhood program), Departments of Health and
Human Services, family resource centers, and Communities in Schools.

Eligible Applicants

2008-2009 community college and community-based organizations are eligible to apply during
the fiscal year 2009-2010 period. This is a continuous grant update application.

Project Period

July 1, 2009 – June 30, 2010

The following is a brief description of each required component for this update application:

Application Update Page

Complete and update the application page with any new contacts. New/Additional personnel
must comply with the major assurances of the original project proposal. Changes from the
original proposal must be described in the update plan so that it can be re-scored.

Budget
A budget sheet is not required unless programs request a different amount of funding. If
 additional funds are requested, a new budget and a detailed justification for the funding are
 required. As before, all state and federal budgetary guidelines must be followed.

General Application Directions
    Applications must be typed using the application template provided.
    The proposal must be double-spaced using only the front side of the paper.
    A 12-point font is required.

Page 92
                                                                Vocational Education in Basic Skills


         The original application plus four (4) additional copies must be submitted.
         Staple the application in the top left-hand corner; do not bind the grant application.




Page 93
                                                               Vocational Education in Basic Skills


   

                        North Carolina Community College System
                         Academic and Student Services Division
                                    Basic Skills Section

                     COMPREHENSIVE FAMILY LITERACY PROGRAM
                                 PLAN UPDATE



                                   FOR PROGRAM YEAR
                                        2009-2010




College/Agency/Organization                                   Date


Person(s) completing this application                          Telephone Number


Mailing Address


Email Address

Deadline for Applications

Applications must be received at the North Carolina Community College System, Basic Skills
Program, no later than 5:00 P.M., Friday, April 17, 2009. If you have any questions concerning
the Comprehensive Family Literacy update application, please call Karen Brown at (919) 807-
7140 or email at kbrown@nccommunitycolleges.edu

Mail to:        Dr. Randy L. Whitfield

                Associate Vice President of Basic Skills

                North Carolina Community College System

Regular or Courier Mail:                       Overnight (Fed Ex, Priority, etc.)

5016 Mail Service Center                       200 West Jones. Street

Raleigh, NC 27699-5016                         Raleigh, NC 27603
Page 94
                                                           Vocational Education in Basic Skills


I. Please complete the list of each family literacy program and site coordinator and describe
any changes to your overall program since you submitted your 2008-2009 Comprehensive
Family Literacy Program Plan Update.




Page 95
                                                           Vocational Education in Basic Skills


                       2009 – 2010 COMPREHENSIVE FAMILY LITERACY

                            SITES AND COORDINATOR / CONTACT

                         (please add additional programs as needed)

Program 1:    Name of site: __________________________________________________

              Coordinator: __________________________________________________

              Address:       __________________________________________________

                             __________________________________________________

              Email address: ________________________________________________

              Phone number: ________________________________________________



Program 2:    Name of site: __________________________________________________

              Coordinator: __________________________________________________

              Address:       __________________________________________________

                             __________________________________________________

              Email address: ________________________________________________

              Phone number: ________________________________________________



Program 3:    Name of site: __________________________________________________

              Coordinator: __________________________________________________

              Address:       __________________________________________________

                             __________________________________________________

              Email address: ________________________________________________

              Phone number: ________________________________________________

II. Describe the effectiveness of your 2007 – 2008 and 2008 – 2009 (estimate) family literacy
program by answering the following questions:
Page 96
                                                           Vocational Education in Basic Skills


   A. How many individuals (duplicated head count) did you serve in the following family
      literacy focused activities?


                      Type Individuals Served              2007 – 2008        008-2009

          ABE

          GED / AHS

          ESL

          Low income individuals

          Single parents and displaced homemakers

          Parents

          TOTAL



   B. What was unduplicated head count for family-related basic skills activities in 2007 –
      2008 and 2008 – 2009?
      _______________         __________________

III. Budget and Cost Effectiveness


Please submit the attached budget sheet only if you are requesting a different amount of
funding for 2009-2010 than you received in 2008 – 2009. If you request additional funding,
please write a detailed justification for the additional amount.




Page 97
                                                           Vocational Education in Basic Skills


2009 -2010 Budget Request                                   Federal Funds Requested
Salaries, Instructional                                     Total: $
     Full-time (Describe positions.)
                                            $

         Part-time (Describe positions.)


         Explanation:
                                            $

Educational Materials and Supplies                          $


         Explanation:


Equipment                                                   $
    May not purchase equipment unless it is an integral
      part of the grant and is pre-approved by the
      grantee.


         Explanation


Contractual Services                                        $
    Explanation


Staff Travel                                                $
    Explanation:


Staff Training                                              $


         Explanation




Page 98
                                                           Vocational Education in Basic Skills


Other Cost                                                  Total: $
Note: Administrative Costs (Salaries
Supportive and Other Expenses) cannot
exceed more than 5% of total grant.

Administrative Costs, Salaries Supportive


         Salaries, Supportive, Full-time
          (Describe positions.)


         Salaries, Supportive, Part-time
          (Describe positions.)


         Explanation
                                             $

Administrative Costs, Other Expenses


         Other Expenses (office supplies,
          postage, etc.)                     $


         Explanation                        $

                          Note:
   How much funding do you expect to receive from
    other sources during the 2009-2010 program year?        $


   What was your total budget last year? Include state,
    federal and funds from other sources.
                                                            $

                                                            $

                Total Federal Funds Requested:              $




Page 99
                                                Vocational Education in Basic Skills




             Pathways to Employment Program Update
                        For Program Year




                             2009-2010




              DATED MATERIAL – OPEN IMMEDIATELY


           CLOSING DATE: 5:00 p.m. Friday, April 17, 2009




                       Dr. Randy L. Whitfield

               Associate Vice President of Basic Skills

             North Carolina Community College System




Page 100
                                                            Vocational Education in Basic Skills


              DIRECTIONS FOR COMPLETING THE PATHWAYS TO EMPLOYMENT

                             PROGRAM PLAN AND APPLICATION
1. Complete the attached program plan and application, indicating changes to your program
   since your last program update.


2. A budget sheet is not required unless programs request a different amount of funding from
   last year.
3.
3. Requests for budget increases need to be thoroughly documented.


4. All programs receiving federal funding from the Workforce Investment Act of 1998,
  Title II, Adult Education and Family Literacy Act, must ensure the following:
           A. The program has established measurable goals for participant outcomes.
           B. The program can demonstrate its past effectiveness in improving the literacy skills
               of adults and families.
           C. The program is committed to serving individuals most in need of literacy services,
               including individuals who are low-income or have minimal literacy skills.
           D. The program is of sufficient intensity and duration for participants to achieve
               substantial learning gains.
           E. The program uses instructional practices that research has proven to be effective
               in teaching adults.
           F. Educational activities are built on a strong foundation of research and effective
               educational practice.
           G. Programs use computers and other advances in technology, as appropriate.
           H. Students have an opportunity to learn in “real life” contexts to ensure that an
               individual has the skills needed to compete in the workplace and exercise the
               rights and responsibilities of citizenship.
           I. The program is staffed by well-trained instructors, administrators, and
               counselors.
           J. The program coordinates its activities with other available resources in the
               community, including postsecondary schools, elementary and secondary schools,
               One-stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies.
           K. The program offers flexible schedules and support services (such as child care and
               transportation) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals
               with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs.
           L. The program has a high-quality information management system that has the
               capacity to report participant outcomes and to monitor program performance.
           M.The community has a demonstrated need for additional English as a Second
               Language (ESL) programs.


Page 101
                                                          Vocational Education in Basic Skills



                      North Carolina Community College System
                       Academic and Student Services Division
                                  Basic Skills Section

                        PATHWAYS TO EMPLOYMENT
             PROGRAM PLAN AND APPLICATION UPDATE FOR 2009-2010




College/Agency/Organization                                 Date


Person(s) completing this application                         Telephone Number


Address


Email Address

Instructions: If you have questions concerning the Pathways to Employment Program Plan and
Application Update, please call Dr. Randy L. Whitfield at (919)807-7132. Respond to each
question and mail to the address listed below. The original application and four copies must
be received by April 17, 2009. (NOT POSTMARKED)


Mail to:        Dr. Randy L. Whitfield
                Associate Vice President of Basic Skills
                North Carolina Community College System Office

Regular or Courier Mail                           Overnight (Fed Ex, Priority, etc.)
5016 Mail Service Center                          200 West Jones Street
Raleigh, NC 27699-5016                            Raleigh, NC 27603




Page 102
                                                          Vocational Education in Basic Skills


                   PATHWAYS TO EMPLOYMENT FOR WORK FIRST CLIENTS
                        ANNUAL PLAN AND APPLICATION UPDATE

1. Please describe any changes to your program since you submitted your 2008-2009 Pathways
to Employment Program Plan and Application.




2. Describe the effectiveness of your program in 2007 – 2008 and 2008-2009 by answering the
   following questions:

A. How many individuals (duplicated head count) did you serve in Pathways to Employment
   activities?


       Type Individuals Served                2007-2008       2008-2009

       ABE

       GED / AHS

       ESL

       Low income individuals

       Workers

       Total



B. What was the unduplicated head count for Pathways to Employment basic skills activities in
   2007-2008? _______ in 2008-2009? _______


Page 103
                                                           Vocational Education in Basic Skills


3. Budget

  Please submit the attached budget sheet only if you are requesting a different amount of
funding for 2009-2010 than you received in 2008-2009. If you request additional funding,
please write a justification for the additional amount.




Page 104
                                                             Vocational Education in Basic Skills




The application narrative consists of the abstract, needs statement, program design, evaluation
plan, personnel information, budget, program timeline and assurances.




               English Language/Civics Education
                          Update Plan
                           2009-2010




                          DATED MATERIAL – OPEN IMMEDIATELY


                       CLOSING DATE: 5:00 p.m. Friday, April 17, 2009




                                    Dr. Randy L. Whitfield

                            Associate Vice President of Basic Skills

                          North Carolina Community College System


Page 105
                                                             Vocational Education in Basic Skills




                      Section I: DEFINITION AND PURPOSE OF CIVICS EDUCATION
Civics education is defined by the Federal Register (1999) as “an educational program that
emphasizes contextualized instruction on the rights and responsibilities of citizenship, naturalization
procedures, civic participation, and U.S. history and government to help students acquire the skills
and knowledge to become active and informed parents, workers, and community members.”

The purpose of the U.S. Department of Education’s English Literacy and Civics (EL/Civics) Education
program is to:

 support projects that provide and increase access to English literacy programs in which civics
  education takes place.
 introduce students to civics-related content
 provide students with opportunities to apply that knowledge in their daily lives while building
  their English language and literacy skills.
 develop innovative ways to expand programs and integrate them with Civics Education

The content of ESL/civics classes includes the history and structure of the U.S. government (i.e.,
the executive, legislative, and judicial branches); the geographical history and current
geopolitical structure of the country; the roles and responsibilities of the president and the
White House; and the U.S. legal and education systems. These are the components of a
curriculum designed to guide learners in becoming knowledgeable citizens and active
community members.
Eligible Applicants

2008-2009 community college and community-based organizations are eligible to apply during
the fiscal year 2009-2010 period. This is a continuous grant update application.

Project Period

July 1, 2009 – June 30, 2010

Definition

Civics education means an educational program that emphasizes contextualized instruction on
the rights and responsibilities of citizenship, naturalization procedures, civic participation and
U.S. history and government to help students acquire the skills and knowledge to become
active and informed parents, workers and community members.

  http://www.ncccs.cc.nc.us/Basic_Skills/basicSkillsPlansAndApplications.htm



Page 106
                                                               Vocational Education in Basic Skills


The following is a brief description of each required component for this update proposal:

Application Update Page

Complete and update the application page with any new contacts. New/Additional personnel
must comply with the major assurances of the original project proposal. Changes from the
original proposal must be described in the update plan so that it can be re-scored.

Budget

A budget sheet is not required unless programs request a different amount of funding. If
 additional funds are requested, a new budget and a detailed justification for the funding are
 required. As before, all state and federal budgetary guidelines must be followed.

General Application Directions

        Applications must be typed using the application template provided.
        The proposal must be double-spaced using only the front side of the paper.
        A 12-point font is required.
        The original application plus four (4) additional copies must be submitted.
        Staple the application in the top left-hand corner; do not bind the grant application.




                                                 107
                                                                                  Adult Basic Skills



                        North Carolina Community College System
                         Academic and Student Services Division
                                    Basic Skills Section

                          ENGLISH LITERACY/CIVICS EDUCATION
                               PROGRAM PLAN UPDATE

                                   FOR PROGRAM YEAR
                                        2009-2010




College/Agency/Organization                                  Date


Person(s) completing this application                         Telephone Number


Mailing Address


Email Address


Deadline for Applications

Applications must be received at the North Carolina Community College System, Basic Skills
Program, no later than 5:00 P.M., Friday, April 17, 2009. If you have any questions concerning
the EL/Civics Update application, please call Karen Brown at (919) 807-7140 or email at
kbrown@nccommunitycolleges.edu

Mail to:        Dr. Randy L. Whitfield

                Associate Vice President of Basic Skills

                North Carolina Community College System

       Regular or Courier Mail:                       Overnight (Fed Ex, Priority, etc.)

      5016 Mail Service Center                        200 West Jones Street

      Raleigh, NC 27699-5016                          Raleigh, NC 27603


                                              Page - 108
1. Please describe any changes to your program since you submitted your 2008-2009 English
   Literacy/Civics Education Program Plan and Application.
   (Please refer to the original grant and cite the section (Ex. I.B. or III.A.) when describing the
   changes so that section can be re-scored.)




2.    Describe the effectiveness of your program in 2007-2008 and 2008 – 2009 (estimate) by
     answering the following question:


     A. How many individuals (duplicated head count) did you serve in the English Literacy/
        Civics Education activities?
                                          _________________________

                                                          2007-2008



                                                 ______________________________

                                                         2008 – 2009



3. Budget


Please submit the attached budget sheet only if you are requesting a different amount of
funding for 2009-2010 than you received in 2008-2009. If you request additional funding,
please write a detailed justification for the additional amount.




                                                 109
                               Budget and Cost Effectiveness
Budget Category                                            Federal Funds Requested
Salaries, Instructional                                    Total: $
     Full-time (Describe positions.)
                                         $

      Part-time (Describe positions.)


      Explanation:
                                           $




Educational Materials and Supplies                         $


      Explanation:




Equipment                                                  $


      May not purchase equipment unless it is an
       integral part of the grant and is pre-approved by
       the grantee.


      Explanation




Contractual Services                                       $

      Explanation




Staff Travel                                               $




                                               110
      Explanation:




Staff Training                                      $


      Explanation




Other Cost                                          Total: $
Note: Administrative Costs (Salaries
Supportive and Other Expenses) cannot
exceed more than 5% of total grant.

Administrative Costs, Salaries
Supportive


      Salaries, Supportive, Full-time
       (Describe positions.)
                                          $

      Salaries, Supportive, Part-time
       (Describe positions.)
                                          $

      Explanation



Administrative Costs, Other Expenses      $


      Other Expenses (office supplies,
       postage, etc.)


      Explanation




                                              111
Note:
 How much funding do you expect to receive from
   other sources during the 2009-2010 program year?        $


   What was your total budget last year? Include state,
    federal and funds from other sources.
                                                           $




             Total Federal Funds Requested:                $




                                              112
         Budget and Cost Effectiveness (For Community-Based Organizations Only)
Budget Category                                         Federal Funds Requested
         Salaries, Instructional                        Total: $
    Full-time (Describe positions.)
                                          $

      Part-time (Describe positions.)


      Explanation:
                                            $

           Educational Materials and Supplies              $
      Explanation:


                         Equipment                         $
      May not purchase equipment unless it is an
       integral part of the grant and is pre-approved by
       the grantee.
      Explanation


                     Contractual Services                  $
      Explanation


                         Staff Travel                      $
      Explanation:


                       Student Travel                      $
      Explanation


                        Staff Training                     $
      Explanation


               Other Cost                                  Total: $


 Note: Administrative Costs (Salaries
Supportive and Other Expenses) cannot
  exceed more than 5% of total grant.


                                                113
Administrative Costs, Salaries Supportive


        Salaries, Supportive, Full-time
         (Describe positions.)


        Salaries, Supportive, Part-time
         (Describe positions.)

                                            $
        Explanation


    Administrative Costs, Other Expenses

                                            $
        Other Expenses (office supplies,
         postage, etc.)




        Explanation




                                            $

                           Note:
    How much funding do you expect to receive from
     other sources during the 2009-2010 program year?       $


    What was your total budget last year? Include state,
                                                            $
     federal and funds from other sources.



               Total Federal Funds Requested:               $




                                                114
                         North Carolina Community College System
                          Academic and Student Services Division
                                     Basic Skills Section

                           BASIC SKILLS CASAS TRAINING GRANTS
                                  PLAN AND APPLICATION
                                         2009-2010




College/Agency/Organization                                  Date


Person(s) completing this application                          Telephone Number


Address

____________________________________
Email Address

Instructions: If you have questions concerning the CASAS Training Grant Plan and Application,
please contact the Basic Skills Training Specialist, Katie Waters at 807-7136 or email her at
watersk@nccommunitycolleges.edu. Respond to each question and mail to the address listed
below. The original application and four copies must be received by 5:00 p.m. on April 3,
2009. (Not postmarked) Please mail to:

                              Katie J. Waters
                              Basic Skills Training Specialist
                              North Carolina Community College System

Regular or Courier Mail ONLY )           (All Priority Mail except *US Postal)
(Priority mail will be delayed)              (FedEx etc. for overnight delivery)
5016 Mail Service Center                           200 West Jones Street
Raleigh, NC 27699-5016                             Raleigh, NC 27603
(delivery takes 1-2 weeks)                         (*US Postal Next Day mailed to this
                                                   address will automatically go to the mail
                                                   service center.)




                                             115
CERTIFICATION OF AGREEMENT
This funding is for CASAS Training grants to:
 Provide for current CASAS Level A to prepare to be Certified State Level Trainer – Level B.
 Provide local and state-wide CASAS assessment training.
 Provide support for the integration of assessment, curriculum, and instruction at the local
  agencies for program improvement.
 Provide support and oversight that adult education agencies use CASAS assessments with proven
  validity and reliability that correlate to the National Reporting System (NRS).


The plan, as submitted, constitutes the basis for the administration and operation of the Basic Skills
Program established pursuant to Adult Education and Family Literacy Act regulations, the State Plan
for Basic Skills, and the State Board of Community Colleges' policies, rules, and regulations.




            Potential Trainer’s Name:


            Level of potential trainer’s CASAS certification:
            Nationally certified: _______

            State certified: _______(Level B)

            Locally certified:   _______

            Local CASAS administrator: _______(Level A)


            Areas of CASAS assessment potential trainer certified to administer and
            dates of certification:

            Life and Work- Workforce Learning Systems (WLS) ___________
            Employment Competency System____________
            ESL____________________

            Compensatory Education _____________




                                                116
To all official endorsers of this/these applicant(s):
In the efforts of building a NC CASAS team of trainers, the college and its endorsers are signing a
letter of intent to provide the applicant(s) release time from their assigned duties to comply with the
standards outlined by CASAS. Specifically, colleges and their applicants must:


     Commit to two (2) trainings (6 days) with the CASAS Certified Trainer over the six (6) months.
      (Selected applicants can achieve Certified State Level Trainer – Level B status after trainings
      are verified by the CASAS Training Coordination Staff. See the attached “Facilitator and
      Trainer Classifications Record” for the description of each training.)


     Attend 2 meetings CASAS meetings with the NCCCS Training Specialist (or designee) and the
      CASAS team over the next six (6) months at designated NC locations.


     Commit to completion of Level B Certification (if applicable) to become a Certified State Level
      Trainer after which:
           In year 2009-20010 conduct 2 to 4 CASAS trainings per year regionally or at designated
             NC locations as indicated by the NCCCS Training Specialist


              Attend 2 – ½ day annual meetings of trainers as required by the NCCCS.


              Attend the CASAS Summer Institute in San Diego, CA in June 2010 after the
               completion of the requirements for CASAS Certified State Level Trainers – Level B
               status and every two years thereafter.


                                   ENDORSEMENT OF AGREEMENT
By signing the following “Endorsement of Agreement,” programs agree to the terms specified in
the “Certification of Agreement” listed on the previous two pages. Please note that NCCCS
reserves the right to terminate the grant money and the trainer from state CASAS training if any of
the following occur:
   Grantees that do not allow CASAS trainers to travel will be asked to return all unspent money to
    the System Office.
   Grant money is used to supply the local program with materials. (Grant money should only be
    used to supply materials for CASAS training.)
   The CASAS trainer consistently rejects opportunities to conduct training as determined by NCCCS.
   The CASAS trainer does not use up-to-date training materials for each training session.
   The CASAS trainer does not attend mandatory meetings or turn in evaluations, sign-in sheets, and
    certification sheets to CASAS and copies to NCCCS one week after the training has occurred.



                                                117


To Be Completed by Community College Programs
         (Community-Based Organizations do not have to complete this section.)




___________________________________________________                      ____________

Signature of Basic Skills Director                                     Date




__________________________________________________                     __________
Signature of Vice President/Dean of Continuing Education                Date




__________________________________________________                     __________
     Signature of President                                                 Date




                                          118
 To Be Completed by Community-Based Organizations
                (Community colleges do not have to complete this section.)




 __________________________________________________                              __________
 Signature of Executive Director                                                Date



  __________________________________________________                              __________
     Signature of President of the Board                                              Date




                                 COMPONENTS OF PROPOSAL
          (Identification of and instructions for completing the specific components of the
          proposal are given on the following pages. Be certain that all components listed are
          read and understood, then filled in on your proposal according to the information
          given under each component heading. The Body of the Proposal should not
          constitute more than 10, double-spaced, typewritten pages in a twelve-point font.

Abstract
       The abstract is a very brief summary of pertinent information found in the proposal.
       The importance of the abstract cannot be overstated in that it introduces each reviewer
       to the proposal.

       Note: Mention the CASAS trainer’s name, brief description on the training applicant’s
       knowledge and demonstrated skills, plans to complete training to Level B certification (if
       applicable), the amount of money requested, and other pertinent information. Limited
       to one, double-spaced page.


Body of the Proposal
        The Body of the Proposal consists of several sections which give the reader a clear view
of the project. The content of these sections, along with the other parts of the proposal, gives
evidence that the applicant agency has the capabilities for carrying out the proposed project
and contributing to the increased effectiveness of Basic Skills programs in North Carolina.
        A. Need for CASAS training
        This should be a general statement of the need for CASAS training and the impact it
        makes on a local and/or regional basis, followed by supporting statements concerning


                                               119
       its significance to Basic Skills programs in North Carolina, the need for the applicant to
       receive the training and desire to become a Certified State Level trainer, the rationale
       upon which the application is based and a summary of pertinent, related information.

       Note: This section should include a statement that CASAS training is necessary to
       support the implementation of the National Reporting System (NRS) and that CASAS is
       one of standardized assessments adopted by North Carolina for the NRS. It should also
       include a brief description of the training applicants’ knowledge and demonstrated
       skills.
       Objectives

       The objectives of the project must be listed and stated in very clear terms. They should
serve as a guide for the entire grant and should be listed in such a way as to determine whether
the methods and procedures proposed for accomplishing the objectives are appropriate.

       Note: The following should be included, but are not limited to:
        To provide CASAS Implementation Training and specialized areas training (DD, Power,
          Writing, Workplace, ESL, and ESL Listening) and use up-to-date materials.
        To prepare for or maintain State Level Certification as a CASAS trainer.
        To attend mandatory CASAS update training and the organizational and planning
          meetings on CASAS at the state level.
        To submit the required sign-in sheets, presentation report, training evaluation forms,
          the signed verification sheets to CASAS and to the NCCCS Basic Skills Training Office
          within one week after training is completed.
        To submit reimbursement forms to the NCCCS Finance Office in a timely manner.

       C. Procedures
       This section of the proposal indicates what is to be done and how the proposed grant is
       to be used for the applicant to become a CASAS Certified Level Trainer – Level B. This
       grant period should cover the preparation for that process and any possible training
       they might do as a Level B trainer.

       Note: Briefly state what the applicant intends to accomplish and how (trainings at
       local level, training for Level B status etc. and list the amount of time allotted by the
       budgeting supervisor for potential CASAS trainer to work for NCCCS (include 2 days for
       annual trainers meetings and 6 days for trainings during this grant period).

        (IMPORTANT: The standards are outlined in the attachment “CASAS Facilitator and Trainer
Classification Record.” To be eligible to apply, all applicants must have ‘Local CASAS Facilitator –
Level A’ status to be considered. Training will be available on March 18-20 for Level A status. Level A
status means that the applicant has attended prior Implementation Training and has documented
classroom experience in a specific program type. The applicant also must conduct CASAS
Implementation Training within the applicant’s own agency.)



                                               120
D.       Evaluation
The plan should be specific about how, when, and by whom the evaluation procedures will be
conducted.
        Note: The plan should specify that an evaluation will be conducted by the State Basic
Skills Training Specialist in conjunction with the local trainer and how evaluations are
collected for training the applicant participates in. The local trainer will evaluate his/her
overall training for the grant time period and will submit a progress report to the State Basic
Skills Training Specialist at the end of the grant period and with the application for the 2009 -
2010 CASAS grant.

E.     Time Schedule
This section describes the timetable by which major parts of the grant are to be completed.
The time schedule should clearly state major activities and/or deliverables with the expected
completion and/or delivery date. See Addendum 2.
       Note: This section will describe the amount of days this fiscal year (July 1, 2009,
       through June 30, 2010) that the budgeting supervisor will allow a potential CASAS
       statewide trainer to attend training and meetings for the NCCCS, Basic Skills Section in
       providing CASAS assessment training for the state.


       IMPORTANT: Only trainers that are Level B and higher will include attendance at one
       National Institute in June in San Diego, CA, where updates on training and resources are
       received. The time usually allotted to this certified trainer meeting/staff development is
       seven (7) days.
Resources
      The resources for the project are described under the following two headings:

Personnel
      The qualifications of personnel should be described in sufficient detail to
      indicate competence for the type of participation proposed for each.
      Note: IMPORTANT: All applicants must have ‘Local CASAS Facilitator – Level A’ status
      to be considered. (See “‘CASAS Facilitator and Trainer Classification” form.) A copy of
      the applicant’s resume should be attached that describes CASAS user and/or
      experience, including other related training experience.

       Materials and equipment:
         The adequacy of necessary equipment and other services available to conduct the
         training must be indicated. NOTE: CASAS training will be conducted at various locations
         throughout the state as arranged or agreed upon by the NCCCS Training Office. Thus,
         the mobility of transporting the necessary equipment and training materials for training
         must be indicated.

       Note: The CASAS Trainer is responsible for arranging with the host institution to use an
       LCD projector and laptop as needed.



                                               121
Budget
         The schedule for the proposed costs of the project must be given on the enclosed
         budget form. The budget is an estimate of costs; therefore, provision is made for
         necessary adjustments within the total allotment after a project is approved and
         started. The budget should serve as a guide for the entire project and should be
         consistent for each applicant/agency.



                                                                                Federal Funds
                          Indicate Budget for:
                                                                                  Requested
               Level A ______      or        Level B______
                              2008 - 2009

                                Salaries                                  $


    Explanation:




                    CASAS Materials and Supplies                          $


    Explanation:



                                                                          $

                              Staff Travel


    Explanation:




                                                  122
                             Staff Training                                             $


                                 Explanation




                          Administrative Costs                                          $


Note: Administrative Costs (Salaries Supportive and Other Expenses)
           cannot exceed more than 5% of total grant.


               Other Expenses (office supplies, postage, etc.)

                     Total Federal Funds Requested:                                     $




                                                                            ADDENDUM I

List items to include with grant proposal (Executive Summary, Proposal, Budget):

       Resume (VITA) with documentation of experience

       Letters of recommendation

       Video-taped training (May be mock training if local training is not held before deadline)


Selection Process:

The current CASAS Trainers for NC (Evelyn Woods and Shelley Bleyl) have many years of
experience training CASAS users across the state. They have received very good to outstanding
evaluations as CASAS Certified State Level Trainers and as National Certified Trainers in training
the Local CASAS Facilitator – Level A trainees. The NCCCS System Office Basic Skills ABE/ESL
Coordinator, Karen Brown, has conducted assessment training and has developed training
videos for language assessment training.




                                                 123
The evaluators will rate the trainee’s performance as documented in the video demonstrating
CASAS Implementation Training at the applicant’s own agency. Selection of applicants and
agencies will be determined by:

       1) a standard rubric with a point system to evaluate the applicant’s knowledge and
          expertise in CASAS training;

       2) the geographic need in the state for CASAS trainers;

       3) the applicant’s specialty area as ESL, CED, ABE, AHS, and/or GED.


        Once applicants are selected and approved by the State Board of the Community College
System, the applicants will be required to complete and have documented the remaining
requirements for a CASAS Certified State Trainer - Level B (See “CASAS Facilitator and Trainer
Classification Record.”) As a state level trainer, you will be authorized to train agencies across the
state of NC.
        (As a note, current CASAS Certified State Level Trainers – Level B who apply are not required
        to submit the CASAS certification documentation as this is already documented with CASAS.
        Additionally, current CASAS Certified State Level Trainers will need to attend the CASAS
        National Summer Institute in San Diego, CA to maintain certification and reimbursement for
        the late June travel has been worked out.)




                                               124
Criteria and Procedures Information

     PROCEDURES FOR APPLICANTS TO BECOME
     CASAS CERTIFIED STATE LEVEL TRAINERS – LEVEL A
     NCCCS Basic Skills Training Standards:

      Receive full support from the applicant’s Director/Dean/Vice-President
        (community colleges) or Board Chairperson/Director (community-based
        organization) to participate as a CASAS Trainer.
      Submit letter verifying this support from the College’s and CBO’s
        Directors/Dean/Vice-President to participate as a NC CASAS Trainer.
     CASAS Certification Standards - Part 1:

     To be considered, the applicant must meet the following standards and receive the
     required verification from the CASAS State Trainer(s) by the application due date:

      Fulfill the requirements to become a Local CASAS Facilitator – Level A.
      Videotape training your own staff using the entire IT packet in one or over a series
        of multiple workshops or training sessions. Send the videotape of the CASAS IT
        training to Katie Waters, NCCCS Basic Skills Training Specialist. (See address
        information on cover sheet.)
      Submit original evaluations on the feedback the applicant/trainer received on the
        CASAS IT training session(s) at their local agency.
      Submit three (3) or more letters of recommendation from supervisors that
        describe training abilities and CASAS implementation experience and success.
     CRITERIA FOR
     CASAS CERTIFIED STATE LEVEL TRAINERS – LEVEL B
     The CASAS applicant must agree to the following:

      To submit resume including a description of CASAS or other related test training
        experience
      To maintain CASAS Certified State Level Trainer – Level B status.
      To adhere to the assessment policy guidelines and the requirements and
        standards outlined by the CASAS Assessment Policy Guidelines and the NC
        Community College Assessment Policy Manual.
      To attend the CASAS Summer Institute every two years, minimally.
      To attend quarterly meetings for North Carolina CASAS trainers.
      To conduct training 2-4 times per year with community college and community-
        based (CBO) assessment personnel regionally and, as needed, in NC.
     The CASAS trainer’s Director/Dean/Vice-President (community colleges) or Board
     Chairperson/Director (community-based organizations) must agree to the following:

      To submit a letter of recommendation (or a designee) that describes the CASAS
       training abilities and CASAS implementation experience and success of the


                                             125
        applicant.
       To support and approve the applicant to maintain CASAS Certified State Level
        Trainer – Level B status.
       To support and approve the applicant to attend the CASAS Summer Institute in
        San Diego, CA, held in June.
       To support and approve the applicant to attend the quarterly meetings for the NC
        CASAS trainers in Raleigh and throughout the state as designated.
       To support and approve the applicant to train CASAS users at other colleges and
        community-based organizations throughout the region and throughout state as
        needed.

                                                                              ADDENDUM II

 Budget Information and Cost Effectiveness
The sample budget information should serve as a guide for preparing the budget in the grant.
           Sample Budget Information Category Level A                                Federal Funds

                            2008-2009                                                 Requested

alaries Level A:

   2 observations/training @16 hrs. = 32 hrs. (IT (8hrs.) and specialized area
   training ( 8hrs.) in January and April, 2008.) = 16 hours training
  4 CASAS meeting @ 8hrs. = 24 hours
Total of 72 hours x cost (ex. $45.00 per hour)
                                                                                    Level A Total: $
Should include cost of any staff to fill in for applicant’s absence.

CASAS Materials and Supplies Information for completing new trainer “start
up” package. Each trainer conducting 3 trainings for approximately 25 people
each time. (old form still needed)

       Appraisal Life Skills form 30(1)               LSA-030          $ 70

        Administration manual form 30                 LSM-30           $ 66

        4 Self score answer sheets                    ASS-030          $132

2 T Manual Life Skills                TAMS- LFS       $ 30

LS reading 27 (set of 25)                     BLRA-27         $ 38

Life Skills math 31-38(set of 10)           LSM-S10 $250

                                                      =$586

New Life and Work


                                                126
81-188 Set of 5 ea.                          LWR S05        $155

81R set of 25                             LWR -081      $ 70

1 Reading Large Print form 82                LWRL-082       $ 35

5 T Manuals                                  TAMS-LW        $ 75

Listening (not published yet) books/CD       set of 1 each $ 55

General purpose answer sheets (100)                  ASS-001        $ 50

                                                            =$440

Special populations Life and work – although they aren’t used until DD
training, it’s good for them to be available to be seen by those instructors at
the initial IT

        Locator form 350                              SPL -350      $30

        Level 2A form 310                             SP- 310       $30

        2A form 311                                   SP – 311      $30

        3A form322                                    SP-322        $30

        3A form 323                                   SP-323        $30
                                                                                  Level A Total: $
        4A form332                                    SP-332        $30

        4A form333                                    SP-333        $30

        5A form 342                                   SP-342        $30

        5A form 343                                   SP-343        $30

        Administration manual                         SP-TAM        $15

         Scan Disk 2g                                               $15

                                                                 =$300




                                               127
                                  Staff Travel
Level A:


  800 mi. RT @ $.25 = $ 200.00
(approximate the mileage for 2 trainings (6 days) and 2 (2 days) meetings at the
state allowable rate of reimbursement)

                                                                                   Level A Total: $

                             Administrative Costs


 Note: Administrative Costs (and Other Expenses) cannot exceed more than
                             5% of total grant.                                    Level A Total: $

                        Total Federal Funds Requested:                             Level A $




                                                 128
                                                                             Federal Funds
                          Sample Budget Category Level B
                                   2008-2009                                   Requested

                                 Salaries Level B:
                                     Example:
   2 IT and specialized area trainings @ 16 hrs. = 32 hrs.
   8-hrs. preparation time @ 2 trainings          = 16 hrs.
   2 quarterly CASAS meetings in
    east and west NC @ 8 hrs. each               = 16 hrs.

   2-3 observations of new trainees
    @ 16 hrs. per trainee                       = 48 hrs.

Total of 112 hours x cost (ex. $45.00 per hour)
                                                                           Level B total: $
Should include cost of any staff to fill in for applicant’s absence.

                   CASAS Materials and Supplies Level B:                   Level B Total: $
                 Number of complete trainings @ 25 people.
                             Staff Travel Level B:
                                   Example:
   2400 mi. RT @ $.25 = $ 600.00
   San Diego, CA Airfare = $ 500.00
                                                                           Level B Total: $
   San Diego, CA Hotel = $1100.00
   Subsistence           = $ 300.00

Staff Training Level B:
   CASAS Institute registration    = $ 450.00                             Level B Total: $

                           Administrative Costs
 Note: Administrative Costs (and Other Expenses) cannot exceed more than
                             5% of total grant.

                                                                           Level B Total: $



                          Total Federal Funds Requested:

                                                                            Level B Total: $




                                                129
                                         Facilitator and Trainer Classifications Record


For classification level B, all trainings must be verified by the CASAS training coordination staff.


Name
Agency
Mailing Address
City, State and Zip code                                                                          ___
Phone _________________________________Fax ____________________________________
E-mail
                                 Local CASAS Facilitator – Level A

You must meet the following requirements to become a local CASAS facilitator. As a local CASAS
Facilitator, you qualify to implement CASAS within your agency and provide training to your
agency staff. This does not authorize you to train others outside your own agency.

Attend a minimum of one complete, full-day CASAS          Date __________________
Implementation Training and have documented
classroom experience in a specific program type.          Verified by CASAS staff
Program type includes: adult education, alternative
high schools or learning centers, employment
preparation, occupational and/or vocational
training, ABE, ESL, GED-prep, Adult Secondary,
Corrections and Special Populations.
                              Certified State Level Trainer – Level B*

You must meet the following requirements to become a CASAS Certified State Level Trainer. As
a state level trainer you have authorization to train other agencies in your state that have
similar populations with specific program types. This certificati on does not authorize you to
train outside your state. These steps should be completed in the order listed below.

1. Fulfill requirements to become a Local CASAS Facilitator – Level A.

2. Attend entire CASAS National Summer
                                               CASAS requires trainers to attend the Certified
Institute and participate in the Certified     Trainer meetings and Summer Institute at least
Trainer meeting once every two years. In       every two years so trainers may remain informed


                                                 130
order to maintain state-level certified        and up-to-date on new assessments and
trainer status, attendance is required.        resources available for CASAS users.

3. Observe a minimum of two complete,          First observation ___/___/___
full-day Implementation Trainings              Certified Trainer: ______________
presented by a CASAS certified state or
                                               Second observation ___/___/___
national level trainer.
                                               Certified Trainer: ______________
Complete and submit one Trainer
Observation Form to CASAS.                     Trainer Observation submitted ___/___/___
                                               Reviewed by:

4. Complete the CD-ROM training                Date Completed ___/___/___
module.

5. Complete and submit secure version          Date Completed ___/___/___
(2.0) of IT Certification Activity to CASAS.
                                               Signed off by CASAS Staff ______________
6. Successfully implement a system using       How long has your agency been using CASAS?
a CASAS appraisal, pre- and post-tests,
and related support materials in your own      ______________________________________
agency. Test series options include: the
                                               Which CASAS assessments has your agency
Employability Competency System (ECS)          adopted? ______________________________
for reading, math, and listening; Life and            ______________________________
Work for reading; and Workforce
Learning Systems (WLS) for reading, math
and listening.

7. Train your own staff using the entire IT    Mark and date each box as completed.
packet in one or over a series of multiple     1. Intro ___/___/___
workshops or training sessions.
                                               2. CBE ___/___/___
                                               3. Tests ___/___/__
                                               4. Test Admin. ___/___/___
                                               5. Using Test Results ___/__/___
                                               6. Quick Search ___/___/___

8. Submit three or more letters of
                                               Recommended by:
recommendation from supervisors that
                                               1. ____________________________________
describe training abilities and CASAS



                                                131
implementation experience and success           2. ____________________________________

                                                3. ____________________________________


9. Co-train with a CASAS National               Mark and date each box as completed.
Certified Trainer in each of the six training   1. Intro ___/___/___
areas.
                                                Co-trainer __________________________
                                                2. CBE ___/___/___
                                                Co-trainer __________________________
                                                3. Tests ___/___/__
                                                Co-trainer __________________________
                                                4. Test Admin. ___/___/___
                                                Co-trainer __________________________
                                                5. Using Test Results ___/__/___
                                                Co-trainer __________________________
                                                6. Quick Search and IMG ___/___/___
                                                Co-trainer __________________________

10. Be observed doing an entire IT and be Observation date ___/___/___
evaluated and authorized by a CASAS
National Certified Trainer. This process  CASAS Certified Trainer ______________________
may take more than one observation.       Observation date ___/___/___

                                                CASAS Certified Trainer ______________________
11. Follow procedures to set up, conduct,       Complete and return to CASAS
and document all IT trainings.                      Sign-in Sheet and Presentation Form
                                                    Training Evaluation Forms
                                                    Training Verification Forms (signed)
                                                    Reimbursement Forms (if applicable)

12. Conduct, at a minimum, one                  Training 1
complete, full-day Implementation               Date ___/___/___ all paperwork was received by
Training per year. Submit documentation         CASAS
(sign-in sheets, presentation report,
                                                Training 2
training evaluation and verification forms)
                                                Date ___/___/___ all paperwork was received by
to CASAS in a timely manner.                    CASAS

Additional Comments (Use the back of this page if you need additional writing space.)


                                                 132
                                                                                      __
                                                                                      __
Contact the CASAS Professional Development Department at 1-800-255-1036 if you have
questions about the trainer certification process.




                                           133
                       BASIC SKILLS PROGRAM PLAN AND APPLICATION
                                        GLOSSARY

Individuals with multiple barriers to educational enhancement (ABE, ESL, AHS, GED)

Individuals enrolled in Adult Basic Education (ABE), English as a Second Language (ESL), Adult
High School (AHS) or General Educational Development (GED) classes with more than one of
the following barriers such as (but not limited to): students receiving financial assistance from
Federal, State or local government agencies, including Temporary Assistance for Needy Families
(TANF), food stamps, refugee cash assistance, old-age assistance, general assistance and aid to
the blind or totally disabled (Social Security benefits, unemployment insurance and
employment-funded disability are not included under this definition); low educational
achievement level; public school dropout; physical or mental impairment, including a learning
disability, that substantially limits or restricts one or more major life activities, including
walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, learning, and working.

          See “Intellectually handicapped adults” below for definition of mental impairment.
          Learning disabilities is a general term that refers to a heterogeneous group of
           disorders manifested by significant difficulties in the acquisition and use of listening,
           speaking, reading, writing, reasoning, or mathematical abilities. These disorders are
           intrinsic to the individual, presumed to be due to central nervous system
           dysfunction, and may occur across the life span. Problems in self-regulatory
           behaviors, social perception, and social interaction may exist with learning
           disabilities but do not by themselves constitute a learning disability. Although
           learning disabilities may occur concomitantly with other handicapping conditions
           (for example, sensory impairment, mental retardation, serious emotional
           disturbance) or with extrinsic influences (such a cultural differences, insufficient or
           inappropriate instruction), they are not the result of those conditions or influences.
           (National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities, 1994, p. 16)


Mentally handicapped adults

Adults with mental retardation or adults with traumatic brain injury; Compensatory Education
is the North Carolina Community College program for adults with mental retardation or
traumatic brain injury.
          Mental Retardation refers to substantial limitations in present functioning, usually
           resulting in a developmental disability. It is characterized by
           significantly subaverage intellectual functioning, existing concurrently with related
           limitations in two or more of the following applicable adaptive skills areas:
           communication, self-care, home living, social skills, community use, self-direction,
           health and safety, functional academics, leisure and work.
          Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is an injury to the brain caused by external physical force
           and which may produce a diminished or altered state of consciousness resulting in


                                                134
           an impairment of cognitive abilities or physical functioning. These impairments may
           be either temporary or permanent and cause partial or total functional disability or
           psychological maladjustment.


Correctional and other institutionalized adults

Adults in correctional facilities including: prison; jail; reformatory; work farm; detention center;
or halfway house, community-based rehabilitation center, or other similar institutions designed
for the confinement or rehabilitation of criminal offenders. Other institutionalized adults are
those individuals in mental health institutions, group homes, etc.
Low income students

Adults in this category include students receiving financial assistance from Federal, State or
local government agencies, including Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF),
food stamps, refugee cash assistance, old-age assistance, general assistance and aid to the
blind or totally disabled.

Single parents and displaced homemakers

  A single parent is someone who has sole custodial support of one or more dependent
   children from self-report or documentation.
 A displaced homemaker is a person who has been providing unpaid services to family
   members in the home and has been dependent on the income of another family
   member, but is no longer supported by that income.
Parents

The term “parents” refers to any individual who has custodial support of one or more
dependent children.


Workers

Individuals who are employed either part-time or full-time.

Goals for participant outcomes

Individual goals for achievement set by students.
          Higher level of independent living
          Increase daily living skills
          Learn basic functional skills
          Learn to read (nonreader)
          Improve reading skills/comprehension
          Improve communication skills (oral &/or written)


                                                135
          Improve math skills
          ABE Level I completion
          ABE Level II Completion
          Adult High School diploma
          General Educational Development (GED)
          Enter this community College System
          Enter other postsecondary education/training program
          Get off public assistance
          Get a job
          Get a better job or promotion
          U.S. citizenship
          Improve basic skills for personal satisfaction and increased self-confidence
          Student defined goal ______________


Measurable goals for participant outcomes

Goals that can be measured such as moving from one Basic Skills level to another, attainment
of GED/Adult High School diploma, learning to read, or increasing score on parenting test. The
following are examples of goals that are not measurable the way they are stated: increasing
self esteem, improving parenting skills, learning better job skills, etc.
Past effectiveness in improving literacy skills

Effectiveness may be measured in terms of student outcome gains, numbers served, quality of
program, etc.
Individuals who are most in need

Individuals who are most in need are defined by Title II of the Workforce Investment Act as
the following: low income students, individuals with disabilities, single parents and
displaced homemakers, individuals with barriers to educational enhancement, and criminal
offenders in correctional institutions and other institutionalized individuals.


Sufficient intensity and duration

Programs that are of sufficient intensity and duration meet a minimum of three hours per week
and last long enough for 60% of all students to make progress within a program year based on
one of the following:

     1. Progress based on test scores.

              a. Students show growth on at least one post-test.
              b. Students pass at least one GED test or AHS unit.
     2. Portfolios of students’ work which document improved student performance.


                                                  136
     3. Documentation of mastery of employability/life skills.

     4. Documented reports of student accomplishments.

Instructional practices that research has proven to be effective in teaching adults and
educational activities that are built on a strong foundation of research and effective
educational practice

Effective instructional practices include, but are not limited to, the following: teaching reading
through a combination of activities such as word recognition, ph onics, and context clues;
connecting reading, writing, and math skills to everyday life activities; using a variety of
methods and materials that are appropriate to adults. Educational activities which are not
effective include, but are not limited to, the following: having students complete every page of
every workbook, using only one set of workbooks, not connecting classroom activities to
everyday life, etc.
Effective educational activities include, but are not limited to, the following: assessing students
needs and abilities before placing them into programs of instruction, involving others in
decision-making, using group or individualized learning when appropriate, providing
educational counseling for students, providing classes/tutoring sessions that are of sufficient
intensity and duration for students to make progress, matching learning styles to instructional
activities, etc.
Programs use computers and other advances in technology
Programs using computers and other advances in technology include, but are not limited to:
access to computers for student use; use of distance learning programs such as public television
and Internet courses; etc.
“Real life” contexts

Teaching in “real life” contexts means connecting learning that is in the classroom to activities
in everyday life. Examples include: teaching percentages then helping students figure out
prices of merchandise on sale (10% off, 20% off, etc.); teaching students how to read using
menus from restaurants; teaching writing by having students write a letter to a friend or a
letter to a newspaper editor.
Well-trained instructors, administrators, and counselors

Instructors, administrators, and counselors who have documentation of or credentials of
specialized training in adult learning and a minimum of 12 hours of preservice/inservice training
per year. (This includes participation in workshops, conferences, courses, etc.)

Individuals with disabilities or other special needs

Individuals who have mental disabilities such as mental retardation or traumatic brain injury;
individuals who have physical disabilities such as hearing impaired, speech impaired, vision
impaired, or learning disabilities, etc.


                                                137
High quality information management system

A computerized student tracking system that not only stores student information at the local
level, but also connects to a centralized statewide data collection system. The two information
management systems currently used in North Carolina are LEIS (Literacy Education Information
System) and LiteracyPro.
Meeting the needs of English as a Second Language (ESL) students

Providing special learning programs/classes for students with English as a Second Language;
using interpreters, when appropriate, to respond to need in community; providing linkage
between ESL students and other services/programs in the community.
Duplicated Headcount

The number of students served in all programs during the program year. In this headcount,
some students may be counted more than one time because they may have begun classes on
one level and moved to another. For example, a student could have started the program year
in an advanced English as a Second Language class, progressed to Adult Basic Education, and
ended the year in an Adult High School diploma program. In the duplicated headcount, that
student would be counted three times.
Unduplicated Headcount

The total number of students served during the program year. In this headcount, even if a
student participated in several different programs such as English as a Second Language, Adult
Basic Education, and Adult High School, that student would only be counted one time.
Assessment System

An assessment system is more than just one test that is used. It is a process of determining
students needs based on formal and informal testing and then linking that student to programs
and courses of study based on the results. The assessment system should include for most, but
not all, students a standardized reading, math, or writing test designed for adults and informal
assessments such as instructor observation, portfolio assessment, informal inventories, etc.
The assessment system should include a discussion of how often students are assessed, how
the assessments link to curriculum, and how programs are evaluated based on student
assessments.
Demonstrated improvements in literacy skills levels in reading, writing, and speaking the
English language, numeracy, problem-solving, English language acquisition, and other literacy
skills

Demonstrated improvements are advancements from one literacy level to the next. The
following are the literacy levels according to the United States Department of Education:
          ABE Beginning Literacy
          ABE Beginning Basic Education



                                              138
       ABE Intermediate Low
       ABE Intermediate High
       Adult Secondary Low
       Adult Secondary High
       ESL Beginning Literacy
       ESL Beginning
       ESL Intermediate Low
       ESL Intermediate High
       ESL Low Advanced
       ESL High Advanced
Placement in, retention in, or completion of, postsecondary education, training, unsubsidized
employment or career advancement

          Placement in postsecondary education or training means enrolling in a
           postsecondary educational or occupational skills training program that does not
           duplicate other services or training received, regardless of whether the prior services
           or training were completed.
          Placement in unsubsidized employment means obtaining a job for pay (part-time or
           full-time) while enrolled.
          Retention in postsecondary education means completing at least one course or
           program.
          Retention in unsubsidized employment means remains employed in the third
           quarter after exiting the program.
          Completion of postsecondary education or training means finishing a course or
           program.
          Career advancement means receiving an increase in pay or responsibility.
       
Receipt of a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent

Learner obtains certification of attaining passing scores on the General Educational
Development (GED) tests, or who obtains a diploma, or state recognized equivalent,
documenting satisfactory completion of secondary studies (high school or adult high school
diploma.)




                                               139
                                         October 30, 2008



MEMORANDUM

TO:            Basic Skills Directors

               Community-Based Organization Directors

FROM:          Randy Whitfield, Ed.D.

               Associate Vice President, Academic & Student Services

               Basic Skills Department

SUBJECT:       Program Monitoring FY 2008-2009

North Carolina Community College Basic Skills staff are required to monitor twenty percent of
programs funded under the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act, Title II, of the Workforce
Investment Act. Attached is a list of programs to be monitored during the 2008-2009 program
year and the staff member(s) responsible for the monitoring. If your program is on the list,
then it has been selected to be monitored during this program year. We are sending this to all
programs – even those which will not be monitored this year – so every program will be able to
see the forms.
Also attached is a “Basic Skills Program Monitoring Checklist” for your use in preparing for the
monitoring visit. The checklist includes a worksheet of “Core Indicators of Performance.”
Please be prepared to show documentation for items on this checklist. We recommend that
you have materials ready for staff to view including, but not limited to: marketing materials,
class/tutoring schedules, information regarding tutors and staff (number of part-time/full-
time), number of students served, sample student folders, sample instructor/ administrative
folders, LEIS report (community colleges), LitPro reports (community-based organizations),
outcome measures, and other materials which demonstrate the effectiveness of your program.

We would like to start the visit by reviewing your documentation; visiting a variety of classes or
tutoring sites; talking to instructors, tutors, and students as appropriate; and



                                                                                         CC08-233

                                                                                     Email Copies




                                               140
MEMORANDUM

Page 2

October 27, 2008



meeting with program administrators such as directors, coordinators, deans, advisory

board chairs (community-based organizations).

At the end of the visit, we would like to have an exit interview with you, selected staff
members, your supervisor, and any other personnel you wish to include in the meeting. This
exit interview should take one to two hours, dependent upon the scope and size of your
program. You will be contacted by the person responsible for monitoring your site to set up the
dates/time of the monitoring session.

Thank you in advance for helping us fulfill our monitoring obligations and letting us get to know
you and you program better! Please contact me if you have any questions by calli ng 919-807-
7132 or emailing me at whitfieldr@nccommunitycolleges.edu.

Enclosures: 2

cc: Presidents

    Senior Continuing Education Administrators




                                               141
                      NORTH CAROLINA COMMUNITY COLLEGE SYSTEM

                          Division of Academic and Student Services
                          Basic Skills Program Monitoring Checklist
                                           2008-2009

College/Agency:                                   Contact Person:

Monitoring Team:                                  Date of Visit:

A. PROGRAM PRACTICES                                                    Yes   No      In
                                                                                   Progress

1. All students have measurable goals.

2. The program can demonstrate its past effectiveness in
    improving the literacy skills of adults and families.
3. The program is committed to serving individuals who are most
    in need of literacy services, including individuals who are low-
    income or have minimal literacy skills.
4. The program is of sufficient intensity and duration for
    participants to achieve substantial learning gains.
5. The program uses instructional practices that research has
    proven to be effective in teaching adults.
6. Educational activities are built on a strong foundation of
    research and effective educational practice.
7. Programs use computers and other advances in technology, as
    appropriate.
8. The program gives students the opportunity to learn in “real
    life” contexts to ensure that an individual has the skills needed
    to compete in the workplace and exercise the rights and
    responsibilities of citizenship.
9. The program is staffed by well-trained instructors,
    administrators, and counselors.
10. The program coordinates its activities with other available
    resources in the community, including postsecondary schools,
    elementary and secondary schools, One-stop centers, job
    training programs, and social service agencies.
11. The program offers flexible schedules and support services
    (such as child care and transportation) that are necessary to
    enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or
    other special needs to attend and complete programs.


                                               142
A. PROGRAM PRACTICES, CONT.                                           Yes   No      In
                                                                                 Progress

12. The program has a high-quality information management
    system that has the capacity to report participant outcomes
    and to monitor program performance.
13. The community has a demonstrated need for additional English
    as a Second Language (ESL) programs.
B. NATIONAL REPORTING SYSTEM                                          Yes   No      In
                                                                                 Progress

1. The program follows all guidelines of the National Reporting
    System.
C. SUPPORT SERVICES                                                   Yes   No      In
                                                                                 Progress

1. There is an orientation for all new students.

2. There are resources for counseling students.

3. There are resources for job placement referral.

4. Information on continuing educational opportunities is available
   for students.
D. RECRUITMENT/RETENTION                                              Yes   No      In
                                                                                 Progress

1. Recruitment and retention methods and procedures are
   implemented as planned.
E. ANNUAL PROGRAM EVALUATION                                          Yes   No      In
                                                                                 Progress

1. There is an annual evaluation of the program and that
   evaluation is used for program improvement.




                           CORE INDICA TORS OF PERFORMA NC E




                                              143
Core Indicator #1: Demonstrated Improvements in literacy skill levels in reading, writing, and
speaking the English language, numeracy problem-solving, English Language acquisition, and other
literacy skills.

             Level                 Target Percent for    Percent of Level      Met Goal       Did Not
                                   Level Completion        Completion                        Meet Goal
                                                            Attained
                                      2007-2008
                                                            2007-2008

     ABE Beginning Literacy                20%

 ABE Beginning Basic Education             36%

     ABE Intermediate Low                  38%

     ABE Intermediate High                 40%

   Adult Secondary Education
                                           46%
              Low

          ESL Literacy                     36%

       Low Beginning ESL                   32%

       High Beginning ESL                  32%

     ESL Intermediate Low                  34%

     ESL Intermediate High                 36%

       ESL Low Advanced                    24%

Core Indicator #2: Placement in, retention in, or completion of postsecondary education, training,
unsubsidized employment or career advancement.

Core Indicator #3: Receipt of a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent.

         Measure                 Target Percent     Percent Attained        Met Goal      Did Not Meet
                                                                                              Goal

       Placement in
                                     25%
unsubsidized employment




                                                  144
Retention in Unsubsidized
                                  26%
      Employment

 High School Completion           50%

Placement in Postsecondary
                                  25%
   Education or Training

                                                Overall Pluses &
                                                   Minuses:

                                                        Total Score:



Core Indicator #2: Placement in, retention in, or completion of postsecondary education,
training, unsubsidized employment or career advancement.

Core Indicator #3: Receipt of a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent.

        Measure              Target Percent    Percent Attained        Met Goal   Did Not Meet
                                                                                      Goal

      Placement in

      unsubsidized               25%
      employment

      Retention in
      Unsubsidized               26%
      Employment

 High School Completion          50%

      Placement in
     Postsecondary               25%
  Education or Training

                                               Overall Pluses &
                                                  Minuses:

                                                              Total Score:




                                              145
             NORTH CAROLINA COMMUNITY COLLEGE SYSTEM

                 Division of Academic and Student Services
                  Basic Skills Program Monitoring Report


                             COMMENDATIONS

                                 For Program

           (All commendations for programs will be listed below.)



                             REQUIRED ACTIONS

                                For Programs

   (All areas that are out of compliance with the law will be listed below.)



                            RECOMMENDATIONS

(All recommendations that will improve program quality will be listed below.)




                                     146
Adult High School Diploma Program


       Procedures Manual


            Open Door

               to a

      High School Education




        NORTH CAROLINA

  COMMUNITY COLLEGE SYSTEM



    Adult High School Programs

            Basic Skills

     Program Services Division

Department of Community Colleges

            April 1994




                147
   North Carolina Community College System




   ADULT HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA PROGRAM



            PROCEDURES MANUAL




       Adult High School Programs Office

                  Basic Skills

               Program Services

North Carolina Department of Community Colleges

            Raleigh, NC 27603-1337



                  April 1994




                      148
FOREWORD

The Adult High School Diploma Program Procedures Manual was developed as a result of
criteria adopted by the State Board of Education in December 1992 and by the State Board of
Community Colleges in January 1993 to govern the Adult High School Diploma Program.



The Department of Community Colleges in cooperation with the Department of Public
Instruction developed this manual to give policy guidance in offering the Adult High School
Diploma Program. This manual is to be used within the context of existing state laws and
established policies of the State Board of Education and the State Board of Community
Colleges.



Standards for the Adult High School Diploma Program are published in a separate document,
the North Carolina Community College System Competency-Based Adult High School
Curriculum Standard and Curriculum Guide. This document is based on the public school
system publication, the North Carolina Standard Course of Study.



Cooperation between the public school and community college systems is vital to the success of
this program. We have a commitment to the citizens of this state who wish to complete their
high school education to provide them an opportunity to do so. We can assist these citizens in
overcoming barriers to employment or furthering their education by offering them a program
to earn an Adult High School Diploma.



[signed]                                                                  [signed]

Robert W. Scott                                                           Bob Etheridge

President                                                             State Superintendent

Community College System                                               Public Instruction




                                              149
                                     ACKNOWLEDGEMENT




We wish to sincerely thank the following individuals for the time and effort they devoted to the
development of this manual:

       Joseph B. Webb                               Bobby Anderson

       Vann Langston                                Delane F. Boyer

       Department of Public Instruction             Department of Community Colleges



       Don Buie                                     Marie Barnes

       Central Carolina Community College           Wayne Community College



       Gary Craver                                  Diane K. Harber

       Davidson County Community College            Wilkes Community College



       Ellanor Graves                               Kathy Gardner

       Central Piedmont Community College           Stanly Community College



       Ruth Lewis                                   Shirley J. Sheares

       Durham Technical Community College           Johnston Community College



       John Clark                                   Hubert Bullard, Jr.

       George Norwood                               Robert Massey, Jr.

       Ellen Redshirt                               Fayetteville Technical Community College

       Guilford Technical Community College


                                              150
We are committed to continuing to provide citizens of this state without a high school
education an opportunity to earn an Adult High School Diploma through the cooperative efforts
of the Public School and Community College Systems.

[signed]                                                  [signed]

James G. Wingate                                   Henry L. Johnson

Vice President                                     Assistant State Superintendent

Program Services                                   Instructional Services

Department of Community Colleges                   Department of Public Instruction




                                             151
PREFACE



The purpose of this manual is to provide procedural guidance in accordance with the criteria
adopted by the State Board of Education and the State Board of Community Colleges to govern
the Adult High School Diploma Program. The Adult High School Diploma Program is to be
administered in accordance with applicable policies of the State Board of Community Colleges
and State Board of Education and within the procedures outlined in this manual.

The words “shall”, “may”, and “should” used throughout this manual mean the following: shall
is used to express what is mandatory; may is used to express what is permitted or allowed, but
not mandatory; and should is used to express a suggestion or a recommendation.

The intent of the procedures outlined in this manual is to have consistency in the
administration of the Adult High School Diploma Program within the community college
system; and, yet, permit local community colleges to have the flexibility in structuring the
program to recognize the uniqueness of adult students as non-traditional learners.

The desired outcome in the application of these procedures is to give those individuals who
have not completed their high school education an opportunity to earn an Adult High School
Diploma, and to develop, as a minimum, a range of skills which qualify them to succeed in the
labor market or to enter technical, vocational, or college transfer programs offered by local
community colleges. Adult educators can facilitate this outcome by exercising their
professional expertise to engage and challenge students to acquire the academic skills they
need with a quality, competency-based Adult High School Diploma Program.

Suggestions to improve this manual are always welcomed. This manual is subject for revision as
necessary for appropriate changes. Please direct your suggestions or inquiries to the AHS/GED
Coordinator, Basic Skills, Program Services, Department of Community Colleges, 200 West
Jones Street, Caswell Building, Raleigh, NC 27603-1337. Telephone (919) 733-7051, FAX
Number (919) 733-0680.

[signed]

Delane F. Boyer, Coordinator of ASH/GED Programs

Basic Skills

Program Services

Department of Community Colleges



                                               152
                 ADULT HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA PROGRAM PROCEDURES MANUAL



FOREWORD                                                                                                                      3



ACKNOWLEDGEMENT                                                                                                               4



PREFACE                                                                                                                       5



TABLE OF CONTENTS


I: ESTABLISHING THE ADULT HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA PROGRAM                                                      156
 A.   ADULT HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA PROGRAM ..................................................................... 156
 B.   AGREEMENT OF AFFILIATION ........................................................................................ 156
 C.   CRITERIA FOR THE AHS PROGRAM................................................................................. 157
 D.   UNITS OF CREDIT........................................................................................................ 157
 E.   DESIGN FOR THE AHS C URRICULUM .............................................................................. 157
 F.   ELECTIVE CREDIT ........................................................................................................ 157
 G.   EARNING CREDIT........................................................................................................ 158
 H.   METHODS OF INSTRUCTION.......................................................................................... 158
 I.   EXIT MEASURES ......................................................................................................... 158
 J.   FACULTY QUALIFICATION ............................................................................................. 158
 K.   AHS DIPLOMA .......................................................................................................... 158
 L.   STUDENT COSTS......................................................................................................... 159
 M.   PERMANENT RECORDS................................................................................................ 159


II: ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 159
 A.   ADMISSION POLICY..................................................................................................... 159
 B.   ADMISSION OF MINOR APPLICANTS. .............................................................................. 160
 C.   SCREENING OF MINOR APPLICANTS ............................................................................... 161
 D.   ADMISSION OF OUT-OF-STATE MINOR APPLICANTS.......................................................... 162
 E.   ADMISSION OF EMANCIPATED MINORS .......................................................................... 163
 F.   CURRENTLY ENROLLED HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS .............................................................. 163
 G.   ADMISSION OF STUDENTS FROM OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE AREAS ........................................ 163
 H.   CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION ....................................................................................... 163



                                                                  153
  I.   COURT-REFERRED APPLICANTS ..................................................................................... 164
  J.   EDUCATIONAL RECORDS .............................................................................................. 166
  K.   ORIENTATION ............................................................................................................ 166
  L.   PLACEMENT TESTING .................................................................................................. 166
  L.   GRADUATION ............................................................................................................ 166


III: ADULT HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA PROGRAM CURRICULUM                                                           167
  A.   AHS CURRICULUM STANDARD AND GUIDE...................................................................... 167
  B.   DEVELOPMENT OF OTHER COURSE ELECTIVES.................................................................. 167
  C.   AWARD OF OTHER ELECTIVE COURSE C REDIT................................................................... 167
  D.   CHALLENGE TESTING ................................................................................................... 169
  E.   RESTRICTION ON THE USE OF GED TESTS........................................................................ 170
  F.   BIOLOGY, CHEMISTRY AND OTHER LABORATORY COURSES ................................................. 170
  G.   TEXTBOOKS AND REFERENCE MATERIALS ........................................................................ 171


IV: TRANSCRIPT EVALUATION                                                                                   171
  A.   EVALUATION OF TRANSCRIPTS....................................................................................... 171
  B.   TRANSFER OF CREDIT .................................................................................................. 171
  C.   PARTIAL CREDIT ......................................................................................................... 172
  D.   OUT-OF-STATE SCHOOLS.... ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.
  E.   HOME SCHOOLS................ ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.
  F.   FOREIGN SCHOOLS ..................................................................................................... 172
  G.   CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS ........................................................................................ 172


V: LETTER GRADES                                                                                            172
  A. ASSIGNMENT OF LETTER GRADES .................................................................................. 172
  B. COMMON GRADING SYSTEM ........................................................................................ 172
  C. GUIDELINES FOR ASSIGNING LETTER GRADES ................................................................... 172


VI: COUNSELING SERVICES                                                                                     173
  A.   COUNSELING SERVICES ................................................................................................ 173
  B.   COMMUNITY COLLEGE AND HIGHER EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES........................................ 173
  C.   ACADEMIC AND PERSONAL CONCERNS ........................................................................... 173
  D.   REFERRAL TO SERVICES IN THE COMMUNITY .................................................................... 174




APPENDIX A                                                                                                  174


                                                                   154
APPENDIX B         180
APPENDIX C         184
APPENDIX D         185
APPENDIX E         187
APPENDIX F         189
APPENDIX G         190
APPENDIX H         194
APPENDIX I         196
APPENDIX J         197
APPENDIX K         198
APPENDIX L         200




             155
I: ESTABLISHING THE ADULT HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA PROGRAM


Adult High School Diploma Program


1.     The Adult High School Diploma Program (AHS) may be established cooperatively
       through an Agreement of Affiliation between a local public school board of education
       and the trustees of a community college under paragraph (2) (d) (I) of Rule 23 North
       Carolina Administrative Code (NCAC) 2E.0101 PROGRAM CLASSIFICATION.


2.     The AHS program is a Basic Skills Program and is classified as consisting of classroom
       instruction, learning laboratory courses, distance education, or a combination of both
       designed to qualify a student for an Adult High School Diploma under an Agreement of
       Affiliation with the local public school system under paragraph (2) (d) (I) of Rule 23
       NCAC 2E.0101 PROGRAM CLASSIFICATION. [
3.     Admission of students into the AHS program shall be in accordance with Rule 23 NCAC
       2C.0301 ADMISSION TO COLLEGES; and paragraphs (a) and (b) of Rule 23 NCAC 2C.0305
       EDUCATION SERVICES FOR MINORS.


4.     Funding, expenditures, FTE accountability, and reporting shall be in accordance with
       State Board of Community Colleges and the Department Community Colleges policies
       and procedures for the AHS program as part of the Basic Skills Program.


Agreement of Affiliation


1.     Refer to APPENDIX A for an Agreement of Affiliation.


2.     Two copies of the Agreement of Affiliation shall be filed with the Department of
       Community Colleges AHS/GED office for policy and procedural compliance review in
       cooperation with the Department of Public Instruction.


3.     The Agreement of Affiliation shall be reviewed every three years and/or when changes
       occur by the local community college in cooperation with the local public school system.
       The review process should be every 5 years. Addenda must be submitted prior to
       inclusion.




                                             156
4.     The local community college shall notify the AHS/GED office, in writing, of the results of
       the review and/or forward a new Agreement of Affiliation with applicable changes.


5.     The AHS/GED office shall notify the local community college of the results of the policy
       and procedural compliance review.


Criteria for the AHS Program


1.     Refer to APPENDIX B for criteria adopted by the State Board of Education and by the
       State Board of Community Colleges to govern the AHS program.


Units of Credit


1.     The AHS program shall have the minimum number of units of credit and specified
       courses adopted by the State Board of Education that is required for graduation from
       the public high school.
2.     Refer to APPENDIX C for North Carolina high school graduation requirements .


Design for the AHS Curriculum


1.     The design for the AHS curriculum shall be competency-based consisting of the core
       units required for high school graduation as determined by the North Carolina Standard
       Course of Study adopted by the State Board of Education. *DEFINE “COMPETENCY”+


2.     Electives shall be selected from a variety of program and structured so that students
       develop a range of skills which qualify them to succeed in the labor market or to enter
       technical, vocational, or college transfer programs in the local community colleges.

Elective Credit


1.     Students may be granted elective credit for selected post-secondary continuing
       education and/or curriculum courses, military training, registered apprenticeship
       programs, training sponsored by business and industry, and other educational
       accomplishments from which competencies can be documented and evaluated.




                                               157
2.     Students may not receive credit for courses they have paid for while enrolled in the AHS
       Program.



Earning Credit

1.         Students shall earn credit based on mastery of established competencies.


2.     Mastery shall be demonstrated using appropriate assessment techniques.


Methods of Instruction


1.     Methods of instruction should be flexible and shall be locally determined by the
       community college offering the AHS program.


Exit Measures


1.     Students enrolled in the AHS program shall be required to meet exit measures, such as
       the current North Carolina Competency Test, as established by the State Board of
       Education.
2.     All courses must have exit measures which demonstrate master of course
       competencies.


3.     Other measures as indicated by State Board of Education.

Faculty Qualification


1.     Faculty who teach AHS program courses, in accordance with the requirements of the
       Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, shall as a minimum have a bachelor’s
       degree and should have attributes or experiences which help them relate to the
       particular needs of the adults they teach.


AHS Diploma


1.     The title of the AHS program credential shall be: Adult High School Diploma.



                                              158
2.     The AHS diploma shall be awarded in cooperation between the local boards of
       education and trustees with appropriate signatures representing both educational
       systems.


3.     The credential shall be similar in appearance and quality to the regular high school
       diploma awarded locally.


Student Costs


1. Local community colleges may charge, as appropriate, costs for student textbooks, student
   activity fees or tuition and other fees including parking and graduation fees. Such charges
   shall not include registration fees.

Permanent Records


1.     Local community colleges shall maintain permanents records of transcripts of all
       completed high school courses and provide transcript service to students enrolled in the
       AHS program.


2.     Local Education Agencies (LEAs) shall provide a record of transcripts of all completed
       high school courses and provide transcript service to students enrolled in the AHS
       program.


3.     Students permanent records should include transcripts reflecting other credits earned
       prior to enrollment in AHS as well as courses earned in the AHS Program.


II: ADMISSION AND GRADUATION


Admission Policy


1.     The AHS program is designed for adults who desire to complete their high school
       education.




                                              159
2.   Admission of adult students shall be in accordance with Rule 23 NCAC 2C .0301
     ADMISSION TO COLLEGES.


3.   Admission of minor students shall be in accordance with paragraphs (a) and (b) of Rule
     23 NCAC 2C.0305 EDUCATION SERVICES FOR MINORS. For admission to the AHS
     program, minor age limits between the ages of 16 and 17.


4.   In reference to paragraph (b) of Rule 23 NCAC 2C.0305 EDUCATION SERVICES FOR
     MINORS, a minor with special needs is defined as a school dropout who is not yet 18
     years of age and whose educational needs cannot be met by the public or private school
     agency.


5.   Programs must be offered to all students regardless of age.




B.       Admission of Minor Applicants.


1.   The policy of the State Board of Community Colleges regarding minors is to encourage
     them to complete their high school education before seeking admission to loca l
     community colleges.


2.   A minor, 16 and 17 years or older, may be admitted to the AHS program if the local
     public school or private school agency, including a home school, determines that
     admission to the AHS program is the best educational option for the minor student. A
     minor who has been out of school for less than six calendar months may be admitted
     with the signature of the system designee…or superintendent and principal or designee
     of the last school system in which they were enrolled. A minor who has dropped out of
     school and who has been out of school for at least six calendar months may be admitted
     upon application and a notarized petition from the person or agency having legal
     custody or control that states the: student’s residence, date of birth, date leaving
     school, name of school last attended, and the petitioner’s legal relationship to the
     student [ADD: A MINOR WHO HAS BEEN OUT OF SCHOOL FOR LESS THAN 6 CALENDAR
     MONTHS MAY BE ADMITTED WITH THE SIGNATURE OF THE SYSTEM DESIGNEE
     ….(OR*LOU ANN TO REIVEW+)…SUPERINTENDENT AND PRINCIPAL OR DESIGNEE OF THE
     LAST SCHOOL SYSTEM IN WHICH THEY WERE ENROLLED.]




                                           160
3.    Approval for admission of minor students shall be determined by the local community
      college.


4.    Referral of minor students to the AHS program made by local public school, private
      school, or home school shall be made in writing.


5.    Refer to APPENDIX D for a model release (referral) form.


6.    Refer to APPENDIX E for a model notarized petition form. [FORM NEEDS TO BE
      UPDATED]


Screening of Minor Applicants [DEL: INTAKE ADVISING PROCEDURES]
*DELETE: EVERYWHERE “MINOR” APPEARS+ **REVIEW SECTION!**

1.    Local community colleges must implement a screening procedure to determine the
      appropriateness of placing applicants in the AHS program.

2.    An initial screening of each applicant should be conducted by designated staff to
      determine whether applicant is to be admitted or denied admission to the AHS
      program.


3.    Based on information obtained on an applicant, local community colleges may:
             a.     Admit applicant on a regular basis.
             b.     Admit applicant on a conditional status (contractual probation).
             c.     Deny admission of applicant.
             d.     Refer to APPENDIX F for a model student contract form.


4.    Items of information to be obtained in screening applicants should include the
      following:


             a.     School attendance history.
             b.     Behavioral history.
             c.     Age and maturity level.
             d.     Academic record.
             e.     Previous intervention strategies attempted to assist student.
             f.     Other relevant information on which to base a decision.




                                             161
5.    Criteria to deny admission of a applicant may include the following:

      a.     While under suspension.
      b.     Previous suspension
      c.     Evidence obtained during the screening and/or interview of the applicant that
             indicates it would be inappropriate to place the minor in the AHS program.


7.    An applicant admitted on a conditional status should be counseled on program
      expectations including personal conduct, as appropriate.


8.    Refer to APPENDIX G for a model code of conduct.


9.    Local community colleges shall inform the applicant denied admission to the AHS
      program of this decision. The public school or private school system from which the
      student was referred should also be informed of this decision.


10.   When informing an applicant of a decision to deny admission, the community college
      may only state that the AHS program was considered to be inappropriate for the
      applicant; and that the student be encouraged to return to the public or private school
      system to complete his or her high school education.


11.   If admission to the AHS program is denied, the local community college may reconsider
      admitting the student after six months.




Admission of Out-of-State Minor Applicants.


1.    An out-of-state minor applicant who took up residence in the state and who has never
      been enrolled in the North Carolina public school system or in a private school, may be
      enrolled in the AHS program under the same conditions as a resident minor.


2.    Local community colleges shall consult with the local public school superintendent to
      establish a procedure for enrolling out-of-state minor applicants who have never been
      enrolled in the local public school system.




                                              162
Admission of Emancipated Minors


1.     Admission requirements for an emancipated minor shall be the same as for an applicant
       18 years old or older. An emancipated minor, for admission to the AHS program, is an
       individual who is married or who has been granted a judicial decree of emancipation.


2.     A copy of the marriage certificate or judicial decree shall be required from the
       emancipated minor and shall be kept on file as part of the student’s record.


Currently Enrolled High School Students


1.     The AHS program is for high school dropouts or for those who have left school without
       earning a high school diploma. A currently enrolled high school student is not eligible to
       take AHS program courses.


G.     Admission of Students from Other Administrative Areas


1.     A student shall be permitted to enroll in the AHS program without regard to a particular
       public school administrative area in the state.


H.     Certificate of Completion


1.     An individual awarded a certificate of completion from the Nort h Carolina public school
       system is eligible to be enrolled in the AHS program.


2.     An individual may be required to take a remediation course or courses that lead to
       successful completion of the AHS program.


3.     All or some of the previous high school course work completed may be awarded to the
       individual.


4.     An individual successfully completing all AHS program graduation requirements shall
       graduate as an AHS program graduate.




                                               163
I.     Court-Referred Applicants


1.     Enrolling a court-referred applicant, an applicant on probation or on parole, into the
       AHS program is based on the premise that education is part of the process of
       rehabilitating the applicant.



2.     Providing an opportunity for a court-referred applicant to complete his or her high
       school education affords the applicant a chance to overcome barriers to employment or
       to further education and/or training programs so as to become positive and productive
       citizen in the community.



        3.     Admission of an adult court-referred individual, 18 years of age or older, shall be
in accordance with Rule 23 NCAC 2C.0301 ADMISSION TO COLLEGES, as it applies to any other
adult student.


      4.       A court-referred minor may be admitted or denied admission according to the
same criteria as for any other minor student under the conditions outlined in this manual.


       5.    A court-referred minor under 16 years of age is not eligible for enrollment in the
AHS program, unless the minor is emancipated.


        6.     Local community colleges should designate a staff person to establish a
particulation process with the appropriate probation/parole department to ease the transition
process for court-referred students.


       7.      The purpose of the transition process is to promote the reciprocal exchange of
information to:
       a.      Avoid foreseeable problems and limit any potential for negative impact on the
               faculty and on other students.


       b.      Provide information that will assist the local community college in developing an
               appropriate educational plan to foster student success.




                                               164
       c.      Inform the probation/parole department about program placement and student
               progress.


8.     The articulation process may include discussion of the following:



       a.      Any information that should be divulged that would indicate that the court-
               referred student could be a threat to the local community college staff.


       b.      What records should be confidential.


       c.      The extent to which information, if any, should be shared with the faculty as it
               affects the teaching/learning process or the safety of others.

       d.      Any special conditions of probation or parole.


       e.      The educational history of the student.


        9.      Local community colleges may establish other conditions or criteria in addition
to the regular admission or program requirements. These conditions or criteria may include,
but are not limited to the following:


       a.      Written expectations of the local community college with respect appropriate
               student conduct.


       b.      Attendance and/or course work conditions as they affect parole or probation
               conditions.


       c.      Specifically required course work, such as maturation training, career
               exploration, etc.


       d.      Regularly scheduled counseling sessions.
       e.      Ongoing communication with the probation or parole officer.


10.    Refer to APPENDIX H for a model probation/parole student information form.


                                               165
11.   Refer to APPENDIX I for a model probation/parole student evaluation form.

J.        Educational Records


1.    Local public and private schools, and community colleges shall provide complete
      educational records on each student referred or transferred between local schools and
      colleges.


K.        Orientation


1.    A student enrolling in the AHS program shall be given an orientation on the program
      and services available.


2.    Orientation should include program goals, admission and placement, graduation
      requirements, course contents, methods of instruction, evaluation, textbooks, length of
      program, class locations and times, attendance, conduct and behavior expected,
      grievance procedures, costs, student counseling services, and policies of the local
      community college.


L.        Placement Testing


1.    A student enrolling in the AHS program shall be assessed to determine his or her
      appropriate level of placement. The assessment shall be a process to diagnose the
      student’s functional academic level so as to place the student in the program where his
      or her needs are best met with appropriate instruction.


2.    Assessment and placement of students must be in accordance with Basic Skills
      procedures.

      Graduation


1.    An adult high school diploma will be awarded to any student who successfully
      completes all core courses, the appropriate number of electives, and the NC
      competency test or the equivalent. Students who would have graduated in 1980 or
      before will not be required to take the NC competency test.


                                            166
2.   Students enrolled in the AHS program must earn a minimum of 1 unit of credit before
     being awarded an AHS diploma.

3.   A minor student who has completed all course work and requirements shall not be
     awarded a diploma prior to the graduation date of his or her high school class, unless
     the minor has reached his or her eighteenth birthday. The public school superintendent
     may waive this requirement in writing.

4.   The class date of graduation shall be defined as when the minor student would have
     graduated if the student had normally passed each grade since beginning school.


III: ADULT HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA PROGRAM CURRICULUM


[REVIEW SECTION W/RANDY]
A.   AHS Curriculum Standard and Guide


1.   The North Carolina Community College System Competency-Based Curriculum Standard
     and Curriculum Guide shall be used by local community colleges for the AHS program.
     [ADD: SHOULD ALLOW FLEXIBILITY IN COUNTING HOURS OTHER THAN CONTACT.]
2.   Core courses outlined in the AHS curriculum standard and guide are required for
     meeting graduation requirements as determined by the North Carolina Standard Course
     of Study adopted by the State Board of Education.
3.   Elective courses shall be selected from a variety of program offerings as defined in local
     agreements and structured so that students develop a range of skills which qualify them
     to succeed in the labor market or to enter technical, vocational, or college transfer
     programs in the local community colleges.

B.       Development of Other Course Electives


1.   Local community colleges may develop course electives other than those outlined in the
     North Carolina Community College System Competency-Based Curriculum Standard and
     Curriculum Guide.
2.   Each new elective course shall have specific written competencies following the format
     as in the curriculum guide.
3.   The process to develop other course electives should include the following:
     a.      Input and feedback from instructors regarding propos ed course competencies.
     b.
C.        Award of Other Elective Course Credit



                                            167
1.   In addition to elective courses offered in the AHS program, a student may be granted
     elective credits for selected post-secondary continuing education and/or curriculum
     courses, military training, registered apprenticeship programs, training sponsored by
     business and industry, and other experiences from which competencies can be
     documented and evaluated.
2.   For such educational accomplishments, the student may be granted elective credits
     under the conditions in the following two areas only:
     a.      Credit for Post-Secondary Curriculum and/or Continuing Education Courses.
             (1).    A student may be granted one elective credit (one unit) for each credit or
                     three semester hours credit of any curriculum courses successfully
                     completed. A student may be granted credits for all elective courses
                     required for graduation under this condition.

            (2).    One elective may be awarded for CCE courses or combination of courses
                    that have established competencies that meet a minimum of 32 contact
                    hours.

            (3).    An official transcript or documentation shall be used as the basis to
                    award direct credit for an elective.

            (4).    When transferring credit, such credit shall transfer with a letter grade of
                    “C”, or the final letter grade given to the student for course work
                    completed at an accredited institution. [CHNG TO: CCE CREDIT]

     b.     Credit for Non-Traditional Learning.
            (1).    Only one elective credit may be granted to a student for non-traditional
                    learning for the skills, knowledge or competencies they have acquired
                    from their work or homemaking experience.

            (2).    Credit granted shall relate to the AHS course of study.

            (3).    The student shall be at least eighteen (18) years of age to be eligible for
                    award of credit for non-traditional learning.

            (4).    Awarding of credit shall be documented by means of a portfolio. The
                    student has the responsibility to present a portfolio with supporting
                    documentation, to appropriate AHS personnel for evaluation. The
                    decision of the personnel shall be final.

                    (a).   Guidelines for the development of a portfolio are as follows:




                                             168
                             (i).     The portfolio shall be structured to go beyond narrative
                                      experiences. The student should distinguish between
                                      learning and experience, articulate the knowledge
                                      acquired and its utilization, and establish interconnections
                                      between academic concepts and practice in work or
                                      homemaking experience.

                             (ii).    Credit shall be awarded only for learning, and not
                                      experience.

                             (iii).   Credit should be awarded only for high school level
                                      learning.

                             (iv).    Credit should be awarded only for learning that has a
                                      balance between academic concepts and practical
                                      application in work or homemaking.

                             (v).     Refer to APPENDIX J for a model portfolio form with
                                      criteria for awarding credit.

                        (b).   No more than one credit shall be awarded for non-traditional
learning only in the following areas:

                             (i).     Military – Active military duty for a minimum of two years
                                      documented by Honorable Discharge, DD Form 214, and
                                      other documentation to show that the student has
                                      acquired the competencies in a high school level academic
                                      or vocational area of study.

                             (ii).    Homemaker – Full-time homemaker for a minimum of two
                                      years with documentation to show that the student has
                                      the knowledge and has developed the skills in the
                                      application of relationships, consumerism, housing, food
                                      and nutrition, and clothing vital to the success of a
                                      homemaker.

D.     Challenge Testing


1.     Local community colleges may permit a student to earn core course credit through
       challenge testing. Challenge testing shall be used as an indication of previously
       mastered material and shall be given only when there has been prior learning


                                               169
     experience with the subject matter. It is not intended to require study and preparation,
     but rather to allow the student to demonstrate mastery of competencies previously
     learned.


2.   Guidelines for challenge testing are as follows:

     a.     Challenge testing shall be permitted only at the beginning of the term only when
            the course is first offered to the student.
     b.     Challenge tests shall apply to core courses only.
     c.     The content of the challenge test shall measure demonstrated mastery of course
            competencies.
     d.     The challenge test shall not be dependent on any particular textbook.
     e.     There shall be no program of study to prepare for the challenge test.
     f.     A minimum passing grade of 85 percent is required for demonstrating mastery.
     g.     A course can only be challenged one time.
     h.     A maximum of two credits may be earned through challenge testing.
     i.
E.        Restriction on the Use of GED Tests
1.   The General Educational Development (GED) Tests shall not be used as part of the AHS
     program on the basis of success on all or part of the GED Tests.
2.   The GED Tests are not designed, nor have they been validated, to measure discrete high
     school courses. Misuses of the test include: grade placement or promotion, measure of
     student progress, awarding academic credit (i.e., Carnegie units), or awarding
     alternative credentials to enrolled high school students.

A.   Biology, Chemistry and Other Laboratory Courses


1.   Local community colleges may use their laboratory facilities to satisfy laboratory
     learning outcomes.
2.   A student may earn credit to satisfy the AHS program laboratory course competencies
     through laboratory science simulations or participating in laboratory learning
     experiences that will result in outcomes which will qualify the student to enter a local
     community college curriculum program.
3.   Local community colleges and local educational agencies may enter into cooperative
     agreements to use public school laboratory science facilities to satisfy biology, chemistry
     and other laboratory learning outcomes.
4.   Procedures on desired learning outcomes, costs, safety and liability for experiments
     conducted by the student inside and outside the classroom should be established.




                                             170
G.     Textbooks and Reference Materials
1.     Selection of student textbooks and other reference materials shall be at the discretion
       of the local community college.
2.     Selection of textbooks and other reference materials should be based on content that
       addresses course competencies. Content should be suitable for adults as non-
       traditional students enrolled in the AHS program.


IV: TRANSCRIPT EVALUATION


A.     Evaluation of Transcripts


         1.     Acceptance of credit to meet AHS program requirements for graduation shall be
made from official transcripts or other official documents in determining the acceptance of
credit for courses required to meet North Carolina high school graduation requirements.
         2.     Acceptance of credit shall be limited to those secondary and post-secondary
institutions that are accredited by a regional accrediting agency, or approved by the North
Carolina State Board of Community Colleges.


B.     Transfer of Credit
1.     Local community colleges must accept direct transfer of credit for high school courses
       completed by students in North Carolina public high schools, from accredited North
       Carolina private high schools, and from other North Carolina community college AHS
       programs.
2.     The process to evaluate transcripts should include the use of the North Carolina
       Community College System Competency-Based Adult High School Curriculum Standard
       and Curriculum Guide, the North Carolina Standard Course of Study, and other relevant
       criteria or standards in meeting requirements for graduation.
3.     Accept direct transfer of credit from all accredited educational agencies in and out of
       state.
       a. Acceptable credits will be those which meet North Carolina community college
           standards.

C.     Home School Credits
1.     Home school credits will be accepted:
       a. If registered with non-public instruction
       b. Official transcript (see Appendix)
       c. Standardized test scores




                                              171
D.    Partial Credit
         1. Half units of credit may be combined to meet North Carolina state high school
              graduation requirements.




E.         Foreign Schools
1.    Official transcripts of high school level courses from foreign schools with official
      translation into English should be accepted for credit upon determination that the
      courses meet North Carolina graduation requirements.


Correspondence Schools


1.    Official transcripts of high school courses from correspondence schools accredited by a
      regional accrediting agency may be accepted for transfer of credit if the courses meet
      North Carolina state high school graduation requirements. [ADD: WEB-SITE]
2.
V: LETTER GRADES
A.     Assignment of Letter Grades


1.    Traditional letter grades shall be assigned by the local community college where the
      student has taken or is given credit for course work in the AHS program.
2.    The purpose for assigning a traditional letter grade to the AHS competency-based
      program is for the benefit of the student. A graduate of the AHS program enrolling in a
      post-secondary institution may be required to have certain traditional letter grades for
      matriculation purposes.


B.    Common Grading System


C.    Guidelines for Assigning Letter Grades


1.    The following guidelines must be used as a range by local community colleges in
      assigning letter grades:

                     A      93 – 100               Excellent

                     B      85 – 92                Good




                                             172
                     C      77 – 84                Average

                     D      70 – 76                Below Average

                     F       0 – 69                Failure

                     I      Incomplete

                     W      Withdrew



I: COUNSELING SERVICES


A.    Counseling Services


1.    Local community college counseling services shall be made available to students
      enrolled in the AHS program as they are available to students enrolled in other
      community college programs.


2.    Counseling services should be offered through the community colleges’ counseling
      centers and/or from appropriate support staff to assist students with academic and
      personal concerns.


B.    Community College and Higher Education Opportunities


1.    Students should be made aware of curriculum, vocational, technical, college transfer,
      and other programs offered by the local community college opportunities to further
      their education, to prepare for jobs, or to enhance career goals.


2.    Students should be counseled on the availability of financial aid, scholarships and
      prerequisites to enter North Carolina community college programs and admission
      requirements of other colleges and universities.


C.    Academic and Personal Concerns




                                             173
1.     Counseling services should include, as appropriate, such areas as academic difficulties,
       study skills, test-taking anxiety, program and course selections, time management,
       career planning, and post-high-school plans.


2.     Personal counseling services should include interpersonal relationships with other
       individuals, financial problems, childcare problems and other personal concerns.


D.     Referral to Services in the Community


1.      Counseling service should include referral to a network of related agencies such as
mental health, social services, vocational rehabilitation, employment security commission, job
training program agencies and other services available in the community that would be of
benefit to the student.



                                                                                     APPENDIX A
                                  AGREEMENT OF AFFILIATION

                                   PURPOSE OF AFFILIATION

The purpose of the cooperative Adult High School Diploma Program is to provide the testing,
guidance and instruction which will enable adult students and minor dropouts to complete the
requirements for and be awarded an Adult High School Diploma.

                                         AGREEMENT

It is mutually agreed between ______________________________ and

                               (Community College)

the ______________________________ Board of Education that the

       (Administrative Unit)

policies and regulations of the State Board of Community Colleges and the State Board of
Education which follow in this document shall govern the administration and supervision of the
cooperative adult high school diploma program and of the student and teaching personnel in
the program.




                                               174
If either party to the agreement wishes to withdraw or alter in any way the cooperative
agreement, it is understood that notice of at least four months shall be given to the cooperating
agency, and that students enrolled in the program at the time of notice shall be given the
opportunity to complete the courses for which they are currently registered.



______________________________              ______________________________

Signature of Superintendent                 Signature of Community College President

Date: _________________________             Date: _________________________



DISTRIBUTION

One copy to each of the following:

1.   Cooperating Board of Education
2.   Cooperating Board of Trustees
3.   Department of Community Colleges
4.   Department of Public Instruction


                 NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF COMMUNITY COLLEGES



                       NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION



                        Policies and Regulations Governing Cooperative



                              Adult High School Diploma Program




The State Board of Community Colleges and the State Board of Education encourage local
boards of trustees and education to enter into cooperative agreements to provide educational
programs for students leading to the Adult High School Diploma.


                                              175
The State Board of Community Colleges gives approval for an agreement of affiliation to
establish an Adult High School (AHS) Diploma Program cooperatively between a local board of
education and the trustees of the local community college.




FINANCES



       1.     Community Colleges may use sate and federal funds to support the AHS program
              where cooperative agreements are made between local boards of trustees and
              local boards of education.


       2.     Community colleges may charge, as appropriate, costs for student textbooks,
              student activity fees and other fees including parking and graduation fees.




JOINT RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE PARTIES TO THE AGREEMENT



       1.     Any additional agreement shall be cited as an addendum and signed by both
              parties.


       2.     The parties to the agreement shall cooperatively design a suitable diploma
              equivalent in stature to the local high school diploma.


       3.     The parties shall review the agreement for policy and procedural compliance
              every three years or when changes occur.




FURTHER RESPONSIBILITIES OF _____________________________________________

                                           (Community College)


                                             176
      1.    Develop the AHS program curriculum using the North Carolina Community
            College System Competency-Based Adult High School Curriculum Standard and
            Curriculum Guide.



      3.    Administer the AHS program in accordance with the Adult High School Diploma
            Program Procedures Manual.


      4.    Select the instructional and administrative staff and supervise the program.


      5.    Provide student textbooks for sale, rent or loan.


      6.    Provide instructional materials and equipment as available.


      7.    Evaluate transcripts to determine the acceptance of credit to meet course
            requirements for graduation.


      8.    Assess students to determine appropriate level of placement.


      9.    Certify to the superintendent those students who have satisfactorily completed
            the program and who qualify for the Adult High School Diploma.


      10.   Provide for an appropriate graduation ceremony.




FURTHER RESPONSIBILITIES OF ________________________________________________

                                          (Board of Education)



      1.    Provide a record of transcripts for course work completed and complete
            educational records on students referred to the AHS program.



                                            177
     2.   Determine the appropriateness to refer minor student dropouts, under 18 years
          of age, for admission to the AHS program.




PROGRAM PROCEDURES



     1.   The AHS program shall not supplant the presently approved High School Diploma
          Equivalency program.


     2.   The minimum number of students required in order to begin a class shall be
          determined by the local community college.


     3.   The program of instruction shall be at the secondary level.


     4.   The design for the AHS program shall be competency-based consisting of the
          core units required for high school graduation as determined by the North
          Carolina Standard Course of Study adopted by the State Board of Education.


     5.   Electives shall be selected from a variety of program offerings and structured so
          that students develop a range of skills which qualify them to succeed in the labor
          market or to enter technical, vocational, or college transfer programs offered by
          the local community colleges.


     6.   Students may be granted elective credit for selected post-secondary continuing
          education and/or curriculum courses, training sponsored by business and
          industry, registered apprenticeship programs, military training, and other
          learning experiences from which competencies can documented and evaluated.


     7.   Students shall earn credit based on mastery of established competencies rather
          than a certain number of hours of instruction. Mastery shall be demonstrated by
          using appropriate assessment techniques. Vocational Competency Achievement
          Tracking System (VoCATS) may be used where appropriate.




                                          178
      8.    The number of units of credit and specified courses shall be the same as those
            adopted by the State Board of Education as the requirement for graduation from
            the public high school.


      9.    While requirements for graduation shall be standardized, methods of instruction
            should be flexible and shall be determined by the local community colleges.


      10.   Minors enrolled in the AHS program who have completed their course work shall
            not be issued a diploma prior to the graduation date of their high school class
            unless they have reached their eighteenth birthday. The local superintendent
            may waive this requirement in writing.


      11.   Faculty who teach AHS program courses shall, as a minimum, hold a bachelor’s
            degree and should have attributes and/or experiences which help them relate to
            the particular needs of the adults they teach (as required by the Southern
            Association of Colleges Schools).


      12.   Local community colleges shall maintain permanent records. Local educational
            agencies shall provide comprehensive school records on students referred to the
            AHS program.


GENERAL STUDENT ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS



      1.    There shall be no residency requirement. All adults and minors who need or
            wish to participate in the AHS program shall be given the opportunity to do so
            regardless of their residency in a service area where the program is not offered.


      2.    Admission to the AHS program shall be in accordance with the admission policies
            of the State Board of Community Colleges.


      3.    Minors who are 16 or 17, coming from out of state and who took up residence in
            the state, may be admitted to the AHS program under the State Board of
            Community College admission policy for minors.




                                            179
ADMISSION AND GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS



     1.    Each student applying for admission shall be assessed by the community college
           to determine the appropriate level of placement in one or more of the following
           ways:


           a.     Appropriate placement tests with standards of reliability and validity;


           b.     Official transcript from a state or regionally accredited secondary school
                  or post-secondary institution showing course work completed; and


           c.     Records of performance on academic course work, training received, or
                  other tests.


     2.    Satisfactory completion of each course in the program shall be determined by
           the student’s mastery of the course competencies or for any credit awarded that
           equates to at least D or S grade as appropriate.


     3.    Students enrolled in the AHS program shall be required to meet exit measures,
           such as the current North Carolina Competency Test, as established by the North
           Carolina State Board of Education.




                                                                                 APPENDIX B




                                          180
                               RECOMMENDED CRITERIA



                                        FOR THE



                    NORTH CAROLINA COMMUNITY COLLEGE SYSTEM’S



                       ADULT HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA PROGRAM

Recommendation 1:         The Adult High School Diploma should represent the same quality
                          as the regular high school diploma.

Recommendation 2:         The number of units of credit shall be the same as the number
                          adopted by the State Board of Education that is required for
                          graduation from the public high school.

Recommendation 3:         The design for the curriculum shall be competency-based
                          consisting of the core units required for high school graduation as
                          determined by the North Carolina Standard Course of Study
                          adopted by the State Board of Education. Electives shall be
                          selected from a variety of program offerings as defined in local
                          agreements and structured so that students develop a range of
                          skills which qualify them to succeed in the labor market or to
                          enter technical, vocational or college transfer programs in the
                          community colleges.

Recommendation 4:         Students may be granted elective credit for selected post-
                          secondary extension and/or curriculum courses, military training,
                          apprenticeship programs, training sponsored by business and
                          industry, and other experiences from which competencies can be
                          documented and evaluated. Guidelines shall be established to
                          award such credit using the American Council on Education and
                          other sources as guides to granting credit for educational
                          accomplishments.

Recommendation 5:         Students shall earn credit based on mastery of established
                          competencies rather than a certain number of hours of
                          instruction. Mastery shall be demonstrated using appropriate
                          assessment techniques including, where possible, end-of-course
                          tests and the Vocational Competency Achievement Tracking
                          System (VoCATS).


                                           181
Recommendation 6:    While requirements for graduation shall be standardized,
                     methods of instruction should be flexible and locally determined
                     by the community colleges and public schools.

Recommendation 7:    Students enrolled in the AHS program who have completed their
                     coursework may not graduate prior to the graduation date of
                     their high school class unless they have reached their eighteenth
                     birthday.

Recommendation 8:    Students enrolled in the AHS program shall be required to meet
                     exit measures, such as the current North Carolina Competency
                     Test, as established by the North Carolina State Board of
                     Education.

Recommendation 9:    Faculty who teach AHS program courses shall, as a minimum, hold
                     a Bachelor’s Degree and have attributes and/or experiences which
                     help them relate to the particular needs of the adults they teach.

Recommendation 10:   Community colleges may charge, as appropriate, costs for student
                     textbooks, student activity fees and other fees including parking
                     and graduation fees. Such charges shall not include registration
                     fees.

Recommendation 11:   Community colleges shall maintain permanent records and
                     provide transcript service to students enrolled in the Adult High
                     School Diploma Program. Local Education Agencies (LEAs) shall
                     provide a record of transcripts on those students referred to the
                     AHS program.

Recommendation 12:   The Department of Community Colleges, in cooperation with the
                     Department of Public Instruction, shall develop and publish a
                     procedures manual to address:

                     a.     an updated agreement of affiliation,
                     b.     a process for reviewing agreements of affiliation at the
                            state level,
                     c.     A common grading system using letter grades, A, B, C, D
                            and F which will be consistent with the policy established
                            between the State Board of Education and the University
                            of North Carolina system,
                     d.     guidelines for developing competencies for elective
                            courses, and other experiences,
                     e.     guidelines to provide counseling and other support
                            services,




                                      182
                     f.     guidelines for the format of the AHS diploma, and
                     g.     guidelines for record keeping, transmitting transcripts to
                            community colleges from public schools for complete high
                            school course work.


Recommendation 13:   The Department of Community Colleges, in cooperation with the
                     Department of Public Instruction, shall establish a process to:
                     review agreements of affiliation between community colleges and
                     public schools every three years, or when changes occur, for
                     policy and procedural compliance.

                     a.     file agreements with the Department of Community
                            Colleges.
Recommendation 14:   These criteria shall become effective with students entering the
                     AHS program in the Fall of 1994.

Recommendation 15:   The State Board of Community Colleges and the State Board of
                     Education adopt these criteria to govern the Adult High School
                     Diploma in North Carolina.




                                     183
                                                                     APPENDIX C




             REQUIREMENTS FOR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION


                            APPROVED BY



                     STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION



                           AUGUST 7, 1991




ENGLISH                                 4 UNITS



MATHEMATICS                             3 UNITS (TO INCLUDE ALGEBRA I)



  SCIENCE   3 UNITS (TO INCLUDE BIOLOGY AND A PHYSICAL SCIENCE)

  SOCIAL STUDIES   3 UNITS (GOVERNMENT/ECONOMICS, U.S. HISTORY AND WORLD
  STUDIES)

  HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION         1 UNIT

  ** ELECTIVES                          6 UNITS


                               TOTAL:20 UNITS




                                  184
                                                                               APPENDIX D
                                  MINOR APPLICANT


                    RELEASE FROM ________________________________



                 TO ENTER THE ADULT HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA PROGRAM AT



                 ______________________________ COMMUNITY COLLEGE

(To be completed by Principal)

Name of Student: ______________________________         Date of Birth: ______________

                                                                      Month/Day/Year



Address: _____________________________________________________________________



____________________________________________ Telephone No.: ___________________

     City                        State           ZIP



Last school attended: ___________________________________________________________



Address: _____________________________________________________________________

              Street                     City                 State          ZIP



Date last attended: ___________________________________

                       Month     Day             Year




                                           185
Official withdrawal date: __________________________________

                                Month         Day    Year

Suspension                Yes: _____    No: _____

Expulsion                 Yes: _____    No: _____

Projected date of high school graduation:



________________________________                     _______________________________

  Month        Day               Year                       Student School I.D. Number



Recommended approval to complete Adult High School Education Program prior to projected
date of high school graduation. Yes: _____ No: _____

Transcript is attached.

Complete educational records are attached.




____________________________________                 ___________________________

  Signature of Principal                                     Date




                                               186
                                                                                       APPENDIX E


                                        MINOR APPLICANT


                              (To be completed by the parent guardian)



                                       NOTARIZED PETITION



STATE OF ______________________________, COUNTY OF __________________________



___________________________________________ personally appeared before me on this

 (Printed Name of Parent or Guardian)



__________ day of _____________________, 20_____ and acknowledges that he/she is the



parent, legal guardian or other person or agency having legal custody and control of



_____________________________________, attests that the current place of residence of the

 (Name of Applicant)



applicant is _________________________________________________________ and

                       City                           State

       The date of the applicant’s withdrawal or last attendance in school was
       ____________________

       Month           Day      Year



                                                187
At __________________________________________________________________________.

      Name and address of school




                                           ______________________________________

                                                   Parent or Guardian Signature



                                           Witness my hand and official this



                                           ______ of ______________________, 20____.

                                            Day           Month




      _______________________________________________

      Signature of Notary Public/Official Seal




                                             188
                                                                                   APPENDIX F

STUDENT CONTRACT


This contract entered into this _______ day of ____________________, 20_____,



Sets forth the conditions agreed upon by undersigned student and



_________________________________________________ representative.

 Name of College



_________________________________________________ agrees to:

 Name of College



       (1)    provide quality individualized educational programming;


       (2)    provide support services as needed that are available; and


       (3)    provide trained personnel for offering guidance and direction as indicated.




________________________________________________ agrees to:

 Name of Student



       (1)    attend classes regularly and adhere to any attendance policies;


       (2)    be in assigned class except during designated break times;



                                             189
       (3)      abide by all rules and regulations and the Student Code of Conduct for
                community colleges; and


       (4)      maintain satisfactory academic progress.


       Other:




Provided that all conditions of this contract are met on a daily basis, further stipulations of will
not be made. If for any reason(s) any one of these conditions is not met, further stipulations
will be made for compliance. Additional stipulations may be added to this contract without
additional negotiation.

This contract will be binding for a period of: _________________________.

I have read and agree to the contract. ______________________________________________

                                                         Signature of Student

_____________________________________________________________________________

Dean of Continuing Education                                          Director of Basic Skills




                                                                                        APPENDIX G



                                                 190
                     ____________________________________________

                                  Name of Community College



                                       CODE OF CONDUCT


Students of the Basic Skills Program are also students of the community college and are
expected to abide by all rules and standards of conduct that apply to the student body at large.
This is an adult oriented program, and students are expected to exhibit adult behavior and
responsibility.

1.     Any student whose conduct, on or off campus premises, at or related to any college
       activities, becomes unsatisfactory in the judgment of college officials in the light of the
       foregoing statements or policies will be subject to appropriate disciplinary action.
       Disciplinary action can be initiated by campus police, students, staff, faculty, or
       administrative personnel of the college. No student will be permitted to graduate or
       officially withdraw from the community college while disciplinary action is pending
       against him/her. Unwarranted charges shall not be subject to disciplinary action.


2.     A student shall refrain from:
       a.     Knowingly publishing or circulating false information which is damaging to any
              member of the college community (slander, lying or libel).


       b.     Using abusive, obscene, vulgar, loud, disruptive language, or conduct directed
              toward and offensive to a member of or a visitor to the community college.


       c.     Using any college or privately rented telephone in:


              1.      Avoiding the payment of tolls or long-distance calls.


              2.      Using the telephone to make harassing, intimidating, nuisance or
                      obscene phone calls.


       d.     Harassing, abusing, or threatening another by means other than the use or
              threatened use of physical force.
       e.     Endangering, injuring, or threatening to injure the person or property of another.


                                               191
f.   Entering halls, buildings, classrooms, or other college properties, or student
     properties (i.e., automobiles, lockers, or offices) without authorization.


g.   Vandalizing, destroying maliciously, damaging, or misusing public or private
     properties.


h.   Stealing or attempting to steal, aiding or abetting, receiving stolen property,
     selling stolen property, or embezzling the property of another person, the
     college, or associated units.


i.   Illegally manufacturing, selling, using, or possessing narcotics, barbiturates,
     amphetamines, marijuana, sedatives, tranquilizers, hallucinogens, and/or other
     known drugs and/or chemicals. A student shall also refrain from buying, selling,
     possessing, or using any kind of drug paraphernalia or counterfeit drugs.


j.   Being intoxicated in public, displaying, or driving under the influence, or illegally
     possessing, or using, alcoholic beverages or liquors.


k.   Refusing to comply with any lawful order of a clearly identifiable college official
     acting in the performance of his or her duties in the enforcement of college
     policy.


l.   Failing to present his/her I.D. card when requested to do so by a college official.


m.   Participating in hazing or harassment of community college students.


n.   Gambling.


o.   Forging, altering, defrauding, or misusing documents, charge cards, money,
     checks, records, I.D. cards/activity cards of an individual, or the college.


p.   Furnishing false information to the college with intent to deceive.


q.   Violating any of the following:




                                       192
       1.     Cheating – The actual giving or receiving of any unauthorized aid or
              assistance or the giving or receiving of any unfair advantage on any form
              of an academic work.
       2.     Plagiarism – Copying the language, structure, ideas, and/or thoughts of
              another and passing same as one’s original work.
       3.     Falsification – Statement of any untruth, either verbally or in writing,
              regarding any circumstances relative to academic work.
       4.     Attempts – Action towards the commission of any act which would
              constitute an academic violation as herein (that is, cheating, plagiarism,
              and/or falsification) may be punishable to the same extent as if the
              attempted act had been completed or consummated.


r.     Possessing or using firearms, fireworks, explosive, or illegal weapon on college
       controlled or owned property.


s.     Withholding, with knowledge, information from the college.


t.     Failure to heed parking/traffic regulations and pay parking/traffic fines.


u.     Any other act, acts, or threat of acts either stated or implied which disrupts the
       educational process or peace and tranquility of the college or staff, faculty,
       students, or visitors.


I have read the Code of Conduct stated herein and hereby agree to follow all rules and
regulations.



__________________________________                   _________________________

       Signature of Student                                 Date




                                       193
                                                                            APPENDIX H


                        PROBATION/PAROLE STUDENT INFORMATION


                                                  Date: ___________________________



Name: __________________________________ SSN: ___________________________



Address: ______________________________________________________________________



Probation/Parole Officer: _________________________________________________________



Address: _____________________________________________________________________



Phone: __________________________________



Supervisor:____________________________________________________________________



Crime: _______________________________________________________________________



Suspended sentence:____________________________________________________________



Length of probation:_____________________________________________________________



Is copy of release form attached?   _____ YES     _____ NO



                                            194
Is copy of judgment attached?        _____ YES     _____ NO



Type of educational program requested:
_____________________________________________



Completion due date: ____________________________________________________________



Additional comments:
_____________________________________________________________________________



_____________________________________________________________________________



_____________________________________________________________________________



_____________________________________________________________________________



_____________________________________________________________________________




                                             ________________________________


                                       195
                                              Signature of Probation/Parole Officer

APPENDIX I

PROBATION/PAROLE STUDENT EVALUATION
                                              Date: ___________________________



Client’s Name: _____________________________ SSN: ___________________________

Type of Program: _______________________________________________________________

Attendance: ___________________________________________________________________

Participation in class: ___________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

Attitude toward class and
instructor:_________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

Progress toward completion: ______________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

Grades(s): ____________________________________________________________________

Comments:

                                                __________________________________

                                              Signature – Director of Basic Skills




                                        196
                                                                                      APPENDIX J
                               (NAME OF COMMUNITY COLLEGE)

                          ADULT HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA PROGRAM

                                             PORTFOLIO

                                        ELECTIVE CREDIT
PART A.                                   COVER SHEET


NAME OF STUDENT: ___________________________                ______    ____________________

                              (First Name)                   (MI)           (Last Name)

DATE OF BIRTH: _______________________________SSN: ____________________
ADDRESS: ___________________________________________________________________

TELEPHONE NUMBER: ________________________________________________________

Check the non-traditional learning area for which the portfolio is being submitted:

       _____ Military                 _____ Business and Industry           _____ Homemaker

List and attach supporting documents:

I certify that the above information is correct to the best of my knowledge.

       _________________________________                      _________________________

               Signature of Student                                  Date



APPROVED: _____       DISAPPROVED: _____               ELECTIVE CREDIT AWARDED: ______

COMMITTEE:

               _________________________________                     ___________________

                      Dean of Continuing Education                          Date

               _________________________________                     ___________________

                      Director of Basic Skills                              Date

               _________________________________                     ___________________

                      AHS Program Instructor                                       Date


                                                 197
PART B.                               NARRATIVE DESCRIPTION

Describe training, activities or responsibilities:



Describe learning and skills that resulted from training, activities or responsibilities:
                                                                                            APPENDIX K
                               (NAME OF COMMUNITY COLLEGE)
                          PORTFOLIO FOR NON-TRADITIONAL LEARNING
                     CRITERIA FOR AWARDING CREDIT IN THE AHS PROGRAM

Awarding of credit shall be documented by means of a portfolio. The student has the
responsibility to present the portfolio, with appropriate supporting documentation, to the AHS
program faculty for evaluation.

To be eligible for award of credit for non-traditional learning, the student must be at least 21
years old.

Guidelines to develop a portfolio are as follows:

        1.      The portfolio should be structured to go beyond narrative experiences. The
                student should distinguish between learning and experience, articulate the
                knowledge acquired and its utilization, and establish interconnections between
                academic concepts and practice in work or homemaking experience.

        2.      Credit will be awarded only for learning at the high school level and not just for
                experience.

        3.      Credit will be awarded only for learning that has a balance between academic
                concepts and practical application in work or homemaking.

        4.      Determination of competence level and award of credit will be made by
                appropriate faculty and their decision will be final.

        5.      No more than one credit will be awarded for non-traditional learning

                a.      Military – Active military duty for a minimum of two years documented
                        by Honorable Discharge, DD Form 214, and other documentation to show
                        that the student has acquired the competencies in a high school level
                        academic or vocational area of study.




                                                     198
b.   Business and Industry – Full-time continuous employment with the same
     employer for a minimum of two years with written verification by the
     employer and other documentation to show that the student has the
     knowledge and has developed skills for the student as the knowledge and
     skills for entry-level employment, participation in advanced or highly
     skilled post-secondary vocational, technical, or college transfer programs;
     or has acquired the competencies in a high school level academic or
     vocational program area of study.

c.   Homemaker – Full-time homemaker for a minimum of two years with
     documentation to show that the student has the knowledge and has
     developed the skills in the application of relationships, consumerism,
     housing, food and nutrition, and clothing vital to the success of a
     homemaker.




                             199
                                                                                 APPENDIX L
Excerpt from a brochure on information about home schools in North Carolina published by the
Division of Non-Public Education, Office of the Governor:

E.     Under North Carolina law, a home school is defined as a non-public school in which a
       child receives his academic instruction from:

       a.     His Parent;
       b.     His legal guardian; or,
       c.     A member of the household in which the child resides.
              Two-household schools are permitted.

II.    Parents/legal guardians residing in North Carolina and desiring, in lieu of conventional
       school attendance, to home school their children who are at least age 7 but not yet age
       16 must:

       a.     File with the Division of Non-Public Education (DNPE) a Notice of Intent to
              Operate a School. It shall include the name and address of the school, along
              with the name of the school owner and its chief administrator;

       b.     Present documentation to DNPE that those providing instruction hold at least a
              high school diploma or its equivalent;

       c.     Elect to operate under either Part 1 of Article 39 of N.C. non-public school law as
              a religious school, or under Part 2 as a non-religious school. Requirements are
              identical:

              1.      Operate the school “…on a regular schedule, excluding reasonable
                      holidays and vacation, during at least nine calendar months of the year.

              2.      Maintain at the school disease immunization and annual attendance
                      records for each student;

              3.      Have a nationally standardized achievement test administered annually
                      to each student. The test must involve the subject areas of English
                      Grammar, Reading, Spelling, and Mathematics. Records of the test
                      results must be retained at the school for at least one year and made
                      available to DNPE when requested;

              4.      Notify DNPE when the school is no longer in operation.

III.   The following agency of state government is authorized by state law to receive school
       notices of intent to begin initial operation and to terminate operation; and to annually



                                              200
       inspect the school’s student attendance, disease immunization and nationally
       standardized achievement test result records:


                      Office of the Governor
                      Division of Non-Public Education
                      116 West Jones Street
                      Raleigh, North Carolina 27603-8001


                                OTHER GENERAL INFORMATION


I.     A DNPE representative periodically inspects the records of each home school to verify
       each school'’ continuing compliance to state law.

II.    If a home school does not meet all legal requirements for such a school, DNPE notifies
       the local public school superintendent that the North Carolina compulsory school
       attendance law is not being satisfied. The local public school superintendent then takes
       appropriate action.

III.   A home school which has met the legal requirements for such a school qualifies as a
       private school. Consequently, a photocopy of the student'’ cumulative record from his
       previous school may be obtained and kept at the site of the home school if the parent
       so desires. The last public or private educational institution which the student attended
       should retain the original record.

IV.    DNPE suggests that before finalizing plans for establishing a home school, you first
       consult with the chief administrator of the local conventional school (public or private)
       which your child would otherwise be attending. Ask him how he would handle the
       grade placement of your child should you decide later to terminate your home school
       and enroll your child in that school. The initial point of student entry into the N.C. Public
       School System is the kindergarten level.

V.     When submitting your Notice of Intent to DNPE, please attach to it diploma
       documentation for all persons named on lines 6 and 7 of the form. Be sure to include
       on line 7 the name of the parent/legal guardian who is usually with the student during
       the day while other area children are normally attending local schools.

VI.    In a school involving two families/households, please submit diploma evidence for at
       least one person from each family/household.

VII.   Do not withdraw your child from his present school or begin your school until you have
       met items A and B under item II of the Legal Requirements section of this publication


                                               201
        and have received written acknowledgement from DNPE that your completed “Notice of
        Intent to Operate a School” form has been received.

VIII.   Keep in mind that in ordering textbooks and curriculum materials from a publishing
        company, you should allow from six to ten weeks for delivery.




                                              202
                           COMPENSATORY EDUCATION PROGRAM
Definition


Compensatory Education is a community college program designed specifically for adults with
intellectual disabilities (formally called mental retardation). The purpose of the program is to
compensate adults with developmental disabilities for the lack of, or inadequate, education
received earlier. The focus of the Compensatory Education Program is on helping the individual
become as independent as possible through acquiring basic and life skills needed to function
successfully in daily living.
Background


Until the introduction of the Compensatory Education Program, there was no statewide
educational program designed for adults with intellectual disabilities (formally called mental
retardation). Although several state and local agencies serve this special population, none has
education as, a specifically defined responsibility. Through court action, the state agreed in
1978 to compensate adults with intellectual disabilities through provision of a specifically
designed program. The North Carolina Community College System has been providing
Compensatory Education for the states adult citizens with mental retardation since 1983, and
at which time the Compensatory Education was formally approved as a program by the State
Board of Community Colleges. Currently the program is offered in all 58 colleges within the
system. Typically, classes are held in sheltered workshops, Adult Vocational Activity Programs
(AVAPs), group homes, on community college campuses, and in various sites within the
community, for example, school buildings, churches, etc.
Administration

Compensatory Education is one of several programs offered and administered under the
Community College's Basic Skills Programs Section. Monies for operating the Compensatory
Education Program at the local community colleges are provided through the annual allocation
of Basic Skills program funds from the NC Community College System Office. Also, an additional
annual allocation, over and above the regular Basic Skills funding, has been available to each
college and designed for Compensatory Education Program coordination.

Compensatory Education Program Coordinator
State legislative funds are allocated for Compensatory Education Program Coordination. These
funds are used by some of the colleges to hire a Compensatory Education Program Coordinator.
Other colleges’ Basic Skills Directors act as the Compensatory Education Program Coordinator.
Basic Skills Directors, who act as Compensatory Education Program Coordinator, utilize a lead
instructor to assist with the daily supervision of the Compensatory Education Program (CED)
class or classes.




                                              203
                           COMPENSATORY EDUCATION PROGRAM
Curriculum


The Compensatory Education curriculum consists of seven domains, or major subject areas,
which are: Language, Math, Social Science, Community Living, Consumer Education, Health,
and Vocational Education. Instructional guidance under each of these specific domains
provided by the Compensatory Education Program of Study (curriculum guide). This document
was developed and field-tested within the NC Community College System over a three-year
period. Within each domain, specific courses are broken down into various units, or subsets, of
the course. Each unit comprises task-analyzed lessons for which behavioral objectives, success
criteria, teaching strategies and resources are suggested. The focus of the Compensatory
Education Program is on skills needed by adults with intellectual disabilities to function as
independently as possible in their present and likely future living environments.


Eligibility Criteria


An individual, age 17 and older that has been diagnosed as:

a) having intellectual disabilities (formally called mental retardation); or
b) is pronounced as functioning on a level equivalent to intellectual disabilities resulting from
   head injury or brain damage. To enroll in the compensatory Education Program the
   student with the intellectual disabilities must provide evidence of formal diagnosis of
   intellectual disabilities. The diagnosis must be made by a qualified professional, such as a
   physician, psychiatrist, and psychologist, etc. While certification does not have to be filed
   at the Community College, the college must have a record of where the documentation is
   filed and ascertain that it is available for verification purposes. Similarly, there must be
   appropriate documentation certifying the functioning level of individuals with head injury.




                                               204
                          GUIDELINES FOR ENROLLING STUDENTS IN

                THE COMPENSATORY EDUCATION PROGRAM TRANSITION CLASS

Introduction:

The Compensatory Education Program Advisory Council requested the establishment of a
subcommittee made up of Council members and local community college Compensatory
Education Program representatives. The subcommittee was charged with addressing the needs
of students who meet the eligibility criteria for the Compensatory Education Program, but
whose academic needs and functioning levels exceed what is currently offered in the
Compensatory Education (CED) class. These students include some students who are already
enrolled in the program and some students who are exiting the public school. The public school
students include those who have completed the occupational course of study and have
diploma.

The current Compensatory Education Program of Study cannot meet the educational and
vocational demands of these students. Even with the recent development of guidelines for the
establishment of a transition class, without additional funding, this class cannot adequately
meet the academic and career needs of the higher functioning CEO student or the student who
has completed the occupational course. of study and has a diploma.

Purpose of the Transition Class:

To provide appropriate support to students who meet the eligibility criteria for the
Compensatory Education Program, but their academic needs or functioning levels exceed what
is currently offered in the Compensatory Education class. The transition class will serve as a
bridge to assist students in participating in other appropriate community college programs and
the workforce

Guidelines:

   1. Students in the transition class must meet the eligibility criteria for the Compensatory
      Education Program.


   2. Students should score over 200 on the CASAS Test. However, on a case by case basis,
      some students with CASAS test scores between 190 and 200 can be enrolled in the
      transition class. After a sufficient number of hours of instruction, the Compensatory
      Education staff will determine whether or not a student scoring between 190 and 200
      should be placed in the transition class.




                                              205
    3. Classroom instruction will focus on goals that facilitate students' accessing other
       appropriate community college programs and work literacy training for entering the job
       market. Classroom instruction should include, but not be limited to:


   Functional reading and writing literacy skills- for personal, social and economic purposes.
    Financial literacy- mathematic skills for budgeting, home management and employment).
   Computer literacy- utilizing computer technology to improve academic skills, and work
    literacy skills).
   Improving skills in self-determination, self-advocacy, problem-solving, citizenship, and
    planning for the future.


    4. Instructional period for students in the transition class is up to one year for full -time
       students (students who attend class 30 hours per week) and up to two years for part-
       time students (students who attend class less than 30 hour per week)


    5. Students in the transition class who are unable to successfully complete their goals
       within the time allowed will be invited to return to the Compensatory Education class.
       They will also be informed of other available -services such as the community
       rehabilitation facilities, vocational rehabilitation, human resource development and,
       where available, community supported employment programs.


    6. Once a student exits the transition class, re-entry into the Compensatory Education
       Program is dependent upon the outcome of an individual assessment meeting. The
       meeting will include the student, Compensatory Education Program coordinator, and
       other appropriate Basic Skill staff. The meeting will be used to assess the student's skills,
       explore the available career options and assist the student in making an informed choice
       about available opportunities. Other factors to consider regarding re-entry into the
       Compensatory Education Program are: Did the student exit before or after the specified
       period of time (one year for full-time, and two years for part-time)? Should students
       who left before their specified time period be allowed to complete the time remaining?


Recommendations:

1. Additional funding for the Compensatory Education Program is needed to adequately meet
   the academic and vocational needs of higher functioning students.


2. The transition class should be held on the community college campus when possible. Due to
   the nature of instruction and the need for transition class students to have access to attend



                                                206
   other community college programs, it is strongly recommended that the transition class be
   located where other community college classes are held.


3. Students completing the transition class should receive a certificate of completion stating
   that the student has successfully completed his/her specified goal.




                                              207
          COMPENSATORY EDUCATION PROGRAM

                                    GOAL PLAN SHEET

STUDENT NAME:

COLLEGE:

DATE GOAL PLAN ACTIVITIES BEGIN:

GOAL:



(The goals are made from the Seven Domains in the Compensatory Education Program of Study. In
addition to the goals made from the Domains, the student can choose up to three Personal Goals to
work on that are not a result of the CASAS Testing)


   DOMAIN OR PERSONAL GOAL                   STRATEGIES/METHODOLOGIES                 INSTRUCTOR




Criteria for Success/Completion: _____________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

Date Goal Completed: __________________ Signature of Instructor________________________




                                               208
                COMPENSATORY EDUCATION COORDINATORS

              NORTH CAROLINA COMMUNITY COLLEGE SYSTEM
                                                                 Area

Director / Coordinator    Institution and Address      Courier    Code         Telephone

      Floyd Hinshaw                 Alamance CC           17-49-01       336        506-4304

       Laura Coffee                P.O. Box 8000

                              Graham, NC 27253-8000

         Tom Rash             Asheville-Buncombe TCC      12-64-01       828        254-1921

    trash@abtech.edu             340 Victoria Road                                   Ext. 371

        Kay Manley              Asheville, NC 28801

  kmanley@abtech.edu

         Ron Clark              Beaufort County CC        16-03-01       252        940-6264

        Tony Taylor                P.O. Box 1069

                               Washington, NC 27889

       Renee Steele                  Bladen CC            U.S. Mail      910        862-2164

                                    P.O. Box 266                                     Ext. 272

                                 Dublin, NC 28332

       Rick Marshall               Blue Ridge CC          06-76-01       828        694-1746

   rickm@blueridge.edu             College Drive

                                Flat Rock, NC 28731

        Greg Bland                 Brunswick CC           04-24-01       910        755-7374

 blandg@brunswickcc.edu             P.O. Box 30

                                 Supply, NC 28462




                                             209
    Christie Arney            Caldwell CC/TI       15-26-22   828   726-2275

  carney@cccti.edu       2855 Hickory Boulevard

   Beverly Jaynes           Hudson, NC 28638

  bjaynes@cccti.edu



    Vickie Valand             Cape Fear CC         04-12-06   910   362-7457

                            411 N. Front Street

                          Wilmington, NC 28401

   Pam Brecheisen              Carteret CC         11-12-08   252   222-6212

 pmb@carteret.edu          3505 Arendell Street

                         Morehead City, NC 28557

   Darlene Hudson           Catawba Valley CC      09-72-01   828   327-7000

 dhudson@cvcc.edu            2550 Hwy 70 SE                         Ext. 4268

    Sandie Loyer            Hickory, NC 28602                       Ext. 4352

   sloyer@cvcc.edu



Stelfanie Williams-Lee     Central Carolina CC     14-43-14   919   775-5401

Melody McGee/Harnett         1105 Kelly Drive

Evangeline Smith/Lee        Sanford, NC 27330

      April Root           Central Piedmont CC     05-18-40   704   330-6219

 april.root@cpcc.edu         P.O. Box 35009

                           Charlotte, NC 28235




                                        210
      Chris Nanney                Cleveland CC         06-52-04   704   484-4000

                              137 South Post Road                       Ext. 4062

                                Shelby, NC 28152

        Judy Byrd              Coastal Carolina CC     11-07-26   910   938-6320

byrdj@coastalcarolina.edu    444 Western Boulevard

    Paula McElheney          Jacksonville, NC 28546

     Wanda Halstead         College of The Albemarle   10-39-32   252   335-0821

whalstead@albemarle.edu          P.O. Box 2327                          Ext.2314

                            Elizabeth City, NC 27906

      Jackie Kiernan               Craven CC           16-62-01   252   638-4755

  kiernanj@cravencc.edu        800 College Court

     Zeledith Blakely         New Bern, NC 28562



      Cynthia Krider          Davidson County CC       13-53-20   336   224-4574

cdkrider@davidsonccc.edu         P.O. Box 1287

                            Lexington, NC 27293-1287

       Betty Lyons                Durham TCC           17-21-01   919   536-7219

 lyonsb@durhamtech.edu         1637 Lawson Street                       Ext. 3103

   Kathye Washington           Durham, NC 27703                         686-3409

  washingtonk@durham
        tech.edu




                                           211
        Mary Lieb                 Edgecombe CC            07-51-11   252     446-0436

liebm@edgecombe.cc.nc.us     2009 West Wilson Street                         ext. 337

                                Tarboro, NC 27886

       Jessie Tolar              Fayetteville TCC         14-51-41   910     678-8297

  tolarj@faytechcc.edu            P.O. Box 35236

                            Fayetteville, NC 28303-0236

       Pam Glenn                   Forsyth TCC            13-05-01   336     734-7763

 pglenn@forsythtech.edu      2100 Silas Creek Parkway                        734-7764

     Michael Harris          Winston-Salem, NC 27103                       (336-593-2482)

mharris@forsythtech.edu

      Paul Kindley

pkindley@forsythtech. edu

      Lisa Woodall                Gaston College          06-33-01   704     922-6320

 woodall.lisa@gaston.edu      201 Highway 321 South

                              Dallas, NC 28034-1499

 Anne Nulsen/High Point        Guilford Technical CC      13-29-01   336     454-1126

Stephany Cousins/High Pt        High Point Campus                            Ext. 4142

                                901 S. Main Street

                               High Point, NC 27260

    Brenda Robinson            Guilford Technical CC      13-29-01   336     334-4822

  bcrobinson@gtcc.edu          Greensboro Campus                              Ext.4209

  Pat Freeman/ G’Boro       3505 E. Wendover Avenue

                              Greensboro, NC 27405




                                            212
      Joy Cooley                 Halifax CC           07-47-01   252   536-2551

      Ada Harris              P.O. Drawer 809

                             Weldon, NC 27890

  Elizabeth Hembree             Haywood CC            08-10-01   828   565-4183

ehembree@haywood.edu       185 Freedlander Drive                       627-4618

     Debra Gaddy              Clyde, NC 28721



      Ruth D. Hils             Isothermal CC          06-63-04   828   286-3636

 rdhils@isothermal.edu          P.O. Box 804                           Ext. 283

    Mary Ann Head            Spindale, NC 28160                        Ext. 218



      Eddie Ford              James Sprunt CC         11-20-10   910   285-6531

 edordegmg@aol.com              P.O. Box 398

  Renita Allen-Dawson    Kenansville, NC 28349-0398



       Pam Earp                 Johnston CC           01-65-35   919   209-2065

                               P.O. Box 2350

                            Smithfield, NC 27577

    Janice Leonard               Lenoir CC            01-23-27   252   527-6223

     Randi Taylor               P.O. Box 188                           Ext. 417

                          Kinston, NC 28502-0188

    Margaret Askew               Martin CC            10-81-09   252   792-4861

maskew@martincc.edu       1161 Kehukee Park Road

      Jeri Griffin         Williamston, NC 27892




                                         213
   Deborah Houston               Mayland CC            12-70-01    828   765-7351

dhouston@mayland.edu             P.O. Box 547

    Louise Hembree          Spruce Pine, NC 28777



     Shelba Murray              McDowell TCC           12-91-03    828   652-6021

shelbam@mail.mcdowell         Route 1, Box 170
       tech.edu
                              Marion, NC 28752


     Sherry Clarke               Mitchell CC           09-32-08    704   878-3233

 sclarke@mitchellcc.edu      701 W. Front Street

                             Statesville, NC 28677

      Lois Callicutt           Montgomery CC           03-97-20    910   576-6222

                                P.O. Box 1100

                               Troy, NC 27371

    Cynthia Hinnant                Nash CC             07-70-01    252   451-8315

 chinnant@nashcc.edu          Old Carriage Road

                                P.O. Box 7488

                          Rocky Mount, NC 27804-7488

     Clark Dimond                Pamlico CC            U.S. Mail   252   249-9082

cdimond@pamlicocc.edu          Hwy. 306 South                            Ext. 3013

                            Grantsboro, NC 28529

     Debra Harlow                Piedmont CC           02-32-10    336   694-5707

harlowd@piedmontcc.edu          P.O. Box 1197

                             Roxboro, NC 27573




                                          214
       Tammy Buck                      Pitt CC            01-45-28   252   493-7377

  tammybu@gmail.com               P.O. Drawer 7007                         493-7340

    Marilyn Beaumont          Greenville, NC 27835-7007

mbeaumont@email.pittcc.e
         du



     Donnie McNeill                  Randolph CC          13-65-20   336   633-0254

 mcneilld@randolph.edu              P.O. Box 1009

                              Asheboro, NC 27204-1009

     Terry Thompson                 Richmond CC           03-80-03   910   410-1787

 terryt@richmondcc.edu              P.O. Box 1189

                                  Hamlet, NC 28345

    Michele Meischeid            Roanoke-Chowan CC        10-11-10   252   862-1252

meischei@roanokechowan. 109 Community College Road
          edu
                             Ahoskie, NC 27910

      Rocky Peterkin                 Robeson CC           14-93-02   910   272-3605

        Vickie Tate                 P.O. Box 1420                          738-7101

                                Lumberton, NC 28359

Jonny Colley (336.342.4761,        Rockingham CC          02-23-05   336   342-4261
          ext. 36)
                                     P.O. Box 38                           ext. 2152
      Margo Lindsey
                              Wentworth, NC 27375-0038

     Barbara Gainey              Rowan-Cabarrus CC        05-32-03   704   216-3508

 gaineyb@rowancabarrus.             P.O. Box 1595                          216-3503
          edu
                               Salisbury, NC 28145-1595
     Cheryl A. Marsh




                                                 215
    Peggy Brewer             Sampson CC          11-34-32   910   592-8081

pbrewer@sampson.edu        P.O. Drawer 318

                        Clinton, NC 28329-0318

     David Hale              Sandhills CC        03-43-01   910   695-3933

 haled@sandhills.edu      2200 Airport Road

                         Pinehurst, NC 28374

    Robin Pittman         South Piedmont CC      03-83-01   704   290-5813

 rpittman@spcc.edu      4209 Old Charlotte HWY
    Ian Brailsford        Monroe, NC 28110
 ibrailsford@spcc.edu



   Jackie Williams         Southeastern CC       04-22-24   910   642-7141

 jwilliams@sccnc.edu         P.O. Box 151                         Ext.326

                         Whiteville, NC 28472

    Joan Moulton           Southwestern CC       08-23-14   828   586-4091

                             P.O. Box 67

                           447 College Drive

                           Sylva, NC 28779

     Scott Crisco             Stanly CC          03-20-03   704   991-0253

 criscosl@stanly.edu       141 College Drive

                         Albemarle, NC 28001

    Sharron Atkins             Surry CC          09-91-01   336   386-3415

  atkinsl@surry.edu       630 S. Main Street

  Virginia Stammetti      Dobson, NC 27017




                                      216
     Susann West               Tri-County CC        08-53-06   828   837-6810

swest@tricountycc.edu      4600 Highway 64, East

                            Murphy, NC 28906

     Sue Grissom            Vance-Granville CC      07-20-01   252   738-3315

                               P.O. Box 917

                           Henderson, NC 27536

   Nancy Morabito           Wake Technical CC       14-79-01   919   334-1560

nfmorabito@waketech.      9101 Fayetteville Road
         edu
                             Raleigh, NC 27603

     Naomi Collie                Wayne CC           01-13-20   919   735-5151

  tree@waynecc.edu            Caller Box 8002                        Ext. 260

                         Goldsboro, NC 27533-8002

     Lisa Mauney           Western Piedmont CC      15-06-01   828   448-6705

 lmauney@wpcc.edu          200 East College Drive

                           Morganton, NC 28655

   Melissa McLeese               Wilkes CC          15-11-04   336   667-6493

melissa.mcleese@wilkes         P.O. Box 120
         cc.edu
                           Wilkesboro, NC 28697
   Debbie Woodard

debbie.woodard@wilkes
        cc.edu

      Lisa Shreve                Wilson CC          01-51-04   252   246-1233

 lshreve@wilsoncc.edu          P.O. Box 4305

   Barbara Boyette           Woodard Station

                             Wilson, NC 27893




                                         217
    Sillar Smith             NCCCS              56-50-00   919   807-7134

smiths@nccommunity   5016 Mail Service Center
     colleges.edu
                     Raleigh, NC 27699-5016




                                    218
                     Literacy Resource Projects

Angela Moore Trogdon Awards

The Angela Moore Trogdon Awards are very special awards to honor deserving people for
outstanding accomplishments and providing instruction in Basic Skills programs across North
Carolina. Awards are given at the annual Basic Skills and Even Start Family Literacy Conference.


The awards are for “Student of the Year-Community College”, “Student of the Year-Community-
based organization”, "Instructor of the Year," and “Volunteer/Tutor of the Year.”


The awards include a trophy and cash bonus and are given in honor of Angela Moore Trogdon, who
served as Basic Skills/HRD Director at Randolph Community College, then Guilford Technical
Community College. Angela lost her fight with breast cancer in November 1999.


Click here for more information on this year's Basic Skills and Even Start Family Literacy
Conference.



Basic Skills Newsletters


February 2008


July 2008


Great Basic Skills Staff Event


The Great Basic Skills Staff Retreat, an internationally acclaimed workshop experience, is held at
Camp Kanuga in Hendersonville, NC. This special professional development experience for Basic
Skills directors and staff has been in operation since 2007. David B. Gottshall, founder of this
workshop, celebrates “greatness” in leadership and teaching through his unique style of facilitating.


Numbered Memo CC07-008 Great Director's/Teacher's Retreat for Basic Skills




                                           219
Basic Skills Newsletters

2007 Participants


Numbered Memo CC08-028 Great Basic Skills Staff Retreat


2008 Participants


Literacy Ambassadors Program

This dynamic workshop prepares students to become effective advocates and spokespeople for
their organizations and adult literacy in general. The training is scheduled on a Friday and Saturday
at Camp Caraway in Asheboro, NC.



Numbered Memo CC06-223 Literacy Ambassador Program



December 2006 Participants


Numbered Memo CC07-189Literacy Ambassadors Program


December 2007 Participants


Numbered Memo CC08-088Literacy Ambassador Program


June 2008 Participants



NC Holocaust Initiative


NC Community College Holocaust Educators



                                           220
NC Holocaust Initiative

Numbered Memo CC06-104 Holocaust Educators Training-Group 2


Numbered Memo CC06-276 Holocaust Educators Training-Group 3


Numbered Memo CC07-188 Holocaust Educators Training-Group 4


Select Numbered Memo S07-143 Holocaust Educators Training-Group 5


Numbered Memo CC08-021 Holocaust Educators Training-Group 6


Numbered Memo CC08-156 Holocaust Educators Training-Group 7



Student Success Activity Grants

Numbered Memo CC07-235 Student Success Activity Grants 2007-2008


Numbered Memo CC08-185 Student Success Activity Grant Final Report


Numbered Memo CC08-186 Student Success Activity Grants 2008-2009




                                      221
                                               Training Calendar

                                                2008-2009
                                        Basic Skills
                                     Training & Events
               * Listing includes events organized by agencies other than the North Carolina Community College
             System Office. Where available a link will provide you with more inf ormation about the event. Meetings
                 are by invitation only. Sessions that are listed as closed cannot accept additional participants.
                                    Please contact respective agencies for more information.

                        Basic Skills Program Training Calendar & Professional Development Opportunities



             TRAINING/MEETING                                       LOCATION/
 2008        agenda if available                                                                                CITY
                                                                    DIRECTIONS

July 23-25   Motheread Institute (contact Motheread)                Western Piedmont CC                         Morganton, NC

                                                                                                                Winston Salem,
August 6-8 Basic Skills & Family Literacy Conference                Embassy Suites/Marriott Hotel
                                                                                                                NC

September NC Competency Test/AHS Coordinators                       Forsyth TCC - West Campus                   Winston-
16        Training                                                  Auditorium                                  Salem, NC

                                                                    Western Piedmont CC -Jim A.
September NC Competency Test/AHS Coordinators
                                                                    Richardson Building (East Campus)           Morganton, NC
17        Training
                                                                    Room 115-B

September NC Competency Test/AHS Coordinators                       Fayetteville TCC - Continuing
                                                                                                                Fayetteville, NC
18        Training                                                  Education Center, Room 118

                                                                    Coastal Carolina CC - Hurst
September NC Competency Test/AHS Coordinators                                                                   Jacksonville,
                                                                    Continuing Education Bldg., Room
19        Training                                                                                              NC
                                                                    203




                                                              222
September
          B.A.B.Y - (contact Motheread)                     First Baptist Church                   Raleigh, NC
18-19

September NC Competency Test/AHS Coordinators
                                                            Wayne CC - Walnut Bldg., Room 101 Goldsboro, NC
23        Training

September                                                                                          Greensboro,
          NCCCAEA                                           Koury Convention Center
24-26                                                                                              NC

October 1-
           Proliteracy Worldwide Annual Conference          The Peabody Little Rock                Little Rock, AR
4

                                                            Fayetteville TCC - 2201 Hull Street,
October 6   CASAS (Life and Work) (cancelled)                                                      Fayetteville, NC
                                                            Bldg. Room 2

                                                            Fayetteville TCC - 2201 Hull Street,
October 7   CASAS (Developmental Disabilities - DD)                                                Fayetteville, NC
                                                            Bldg. Room 2

            CASAS (English as a Second Language -           Fayetteville TCC - 2201 Hull Street,
October 7                                                                                          Fayetteville, NC
            ESL)                                            Bldg. Room 2

            CASAS (Beyond Imple mentation Training -        Fayetteville TCC - 2201 Hull Street,
October 8                                                                                          Fayetteville, NC
            BIT)                                            Bldg. Room 2

                                                            Western Piedmont CC - Continuing
October 8   CASAS (Life and Work)                                                                  Morganton, NC
                                                            Education Center - Room CE210

                                                            Western Piedmont CC - Continuing
October 9   CASAS (Developmental Disabilities - DD)                                                Morganton, NC
                                                            Education Center - Room CE210

            CASAS (English as a Second Language -           Western Piedmont CC - Continuing
October 9                                                                                          Morganton, NC
            ESL)                                            Education Center - Room CE210

October     CASAS (Beyond Imple mentation Training -        Western Piedmont CC - Continuing
                                                                                                   Morganton, NC
10          BIT)                                            Education Center - Room CE210

October     North Carolina Community College System
                                                    Raleigh Convention Center                      Raleigh, NC
12-14       Conference

October
            F.a.t.h.e.r (contact: Motheread)                                                       Lumberton, NC
13-14




                                                      223
October                                                   NCCCS Office - Poole Conference
           STAR Training                                                                     Raleigh, NC
15-16                                                     Room

           NC ABE Mathematics and Technology
October                                                   Durham TCC Teaching Learning
           (Computer Literacy) Content Standards                                             Durham, NC
17                                                        Center, Phillips Bldg, 1st Floor
           Project - Developing the Standards (9a-4p)

October                                                   Wake County Public Library
           LEA (Module #1: Using Self-Assessment                                             Raleigh, NC
21                                                        Cameron Village

October                                                   NCCCS Office - Poole Conference
           Credentialing                                                                     Raleigh, NC
22                                                        Room

           NC ABE Mathematics and Technology
October                                                                                      Williamston,
           (Computer Literacy) Content Standards          Martin CC - Bldg. 1, Room 14
24                                                                                           NC
           Project - Developing the Standards (9a-4p)

           NC ABE Mathematics and Technology              Western Piedmont CC - Jim
October
           (Computer Literacy) Content Standards          Richardson Campus - Continuing     Morganton, NC
27
           Project - Developing the Standards (9a-4p)     Education Bldg., Room 200

November                                                  Village Inn Golf & Conference
           Compensatory Education Conference                                                 Clemmons, NC
5-7                                                       Center

           NC ABE Mathematics and Technology
November                                                  Sandhills CC - Van Dusen Hall,
           (Computer Literacy) Content Standards                                             Pinehurst, NC
12                                                        Room 108
           Project - Developing the Standards (9a-4p)

November
           GED New Chief Examiner Training (10a-3p) NCCCS Office - Room 401                  Raleigh, NC
12

           NC ABE Mathematics and Technology
November
           (Computer Literacy) Content Standards          Cape Fear CC - TBD                 Wilmington, NC
14
           Project - Developing the Standards (9a-4p)

November
           Story Exploring (contact Motheread)                                               Durham, NC
14

November
           NC Homeless Conference (cancelled)             McKimmon Center                    Raleigh, NC
17-18

November   CASAS Power Training                           Asheville-Buncombe TCC 218B
                                                                                             Asheville, NC
18         (for CED instructors/users only)               Pines Building




                                                    224
November   CASAS Implementation Training                   Asheville-Buncombe TCC 218B
                                                                                             Asheville, NC
19         (for new CASAS users)                           Pines Building

November
           Motheread Institute (contact Motheread)         Wayne CC                          Goldsboro, NC
19-21

November                                                   Asheville-Buncombe TCC 218B
           9-12a - CASAS ESL                                                                 Asheville, NC
20                                                         Pines Building

November                                                   Asheville-Buncombe TCC 218B
           1-4p - CASAS DD                                                                   Asheville, NC
20                                                         Pines Building

November
           F.a.t.h.e.r (contact Motheread)                                                   Snow Hill, NC
20-21

November   CASAS BIT (refesher course for current          Asheville-Buncombe TCC 218B
                                                                                             Asheville, NC
21         users)                                          Pines Building

December
           Motheread Institute (contact Motheread)                                           Durham, nc
3-5

December
           Carolina TESOL Conference                       Francis Marion Hotel              Charleston, SC
5-7

December
           GED New Chief Examiner Training (10a-3p) NCCCS Office - Room 401                  Raleigh, NC
10

December
           LEA - Webcast #1                                TBA                               TBA
15


           TRAINING/MEETING                                LOCATION/
2009       agenda if available                             DIRECTIONS
                                                                                             CITY

           LEA Training - Module #2 - Integrating
January                                                    Wake County Public Library
           Research Cancelled (Make-up date                                                  Raleigh, NC
21                                                         Cameron Village
           February 6)

January                                                    NCCCS Office - Poole Conference
           STAR Training                                                                     Raleigh, NC
21-23                                                      Room

January    American Library Association (Midwinter
                                                           Colorado Convention Center        Denver, CO
23-28      Meeting)




                                                     225
February 2 SCALE's Virtual Read.Write.Act
                                                                                                  Cyberspace
(week of)  Conference

February
             LINCS Regional Meeting                                                               Phoenix, AZ
4-5

             LEA Training - Module #2 - Integrating         Central Piedmont CC - Harris
February 6                                                                                        Charlotte, NC
             Research                                       Campus - Harris Bldg. II, Room 2101

February     COABE/ProLiteracy Southwest Regional
                                                            Hilton Garden Inn Phoenix/Midtown     Phoenix, AZ
6-7          Institute

February                                                    Sandhills CC - Van Dusen Hall,
             CASAS                                                                                Pinehurst, NC
10-12                                                       Rooms 102 and 103

February
             GED New Chief Examiner Training (10a-3p) NCCCS Office - Room 401                     Raleigh, NC
18

February     Compensatory Education Regional
                                                            TBA                                   TBA
18-19        Instructors Training

February                                                                                          Williamston,
             My United States (contact Motheread)           Martin CC
19-20                                                                                             NC

February                                                                                          Marriottsville,
             NAASLN Mid-Atlantic Conference                 Bon Secours Conference Center
22-23                                                                                             MD 21104

             NC ABE Mathematics and Technology
February                                                    Randolph CC - Foundation
             (Computer Literacy) Content Standards                                                Asheboro, NC
23                                                          Conference Center
             Project - Focus Groups

             NC ABE Mathematics and Technology
February                                                    Fayetteville TCC - Continuing
             (Computer Literacy) Content Standards                                                Fayetteville, NC
24                                                          Education Center, Room 220
             Project - Focus Groups

             NC ABE Mathematics and Technology
February                                                    Johnston CC - Elsee Building,
             (Computer Literacy) Content Standards                                                Smithfield, NC
25                                                          Rooms 160-162
             Project - Focus Groups

February     Learning Disabilities Association of                                                 Salt Lake City,
                                                            The Grand America Hotel
25-28        America International Conference                                                     UT


February     NC ABE Mathematics and Technology              Craven CC (location TBA)              New Bern, NC



                                                      226
27          (Computer Literacy) Content Standards
            Project - Focus Groups

            18th Annual National Conference on
March 1-3                                                   Disney's Coronado Springs Resort    Orlando, FL
            Family Literacy

            NC ABE Mathematics and Technology
March 3     (Computer Literacy) Content Standards           McDowell TCC (location TBA)         Marion, NC
            Project - Focus Groups

            Keeping it Real: Contextualized Instruction
March 7                                                     Broyhill Civic Center               Lenoir, NC
            (contact Motheread)
March 18-
            STAR Training                                   http://westerncampus.waketech.edu/ Cary, NC
19

March 18-                                                   Pitt CC - Leslie Hall Auditorium,
            CASAS                                                                               Greenville, NC
20                                                          Room 143

March 23-
            Basic Skills Directors' Institute               TBA                                 TBA
24

March 25-                                                                                       Atlantic Beach,
            NCCCAEA (CANCELLED)                             Sheraton Atlantic Beach
27                                                                                              NC

March 25-   Compensatory Education Regional
                                                            TBA                                 TBA
26          Instructors Training

March 26-
            Motheread Institute (contact Motheread)         Robeson CC                          Lumberton, NC
28

March 26-
            TESOL Convention                                Colorado Convention Center          Denver, CO
28

March 28    Story Exploring (contact Motheread)             Robeson CC                          Lumberton, NC

                                                            Catawba Valley CC
April 1-3   CASAS                                                                               Hickory, NC
                                                            East Campus Room 975

                                                                                                Hendersonville,
April 5-8   GREAT Teachers' Retreat                         Camp Kanuga
                                                                                                NC




                                                      227
April 9        LEA (webcast #2)                                   TBA                               TBA

                                                                  NCCCS Office - Poole Conference
April 15       LEA                                                                                  Raleigh, NC
                                                                  Room

April 16       GED New Chief Examiner Training (10a-3p) NCCCS Office - Room 401                     Raleigh, NC

April 18-22 COABE Annual Conference                               Gault House Hotel & Suites        Louisville, KY

               Compensatory Education Regional
April 29-30                                                       TBA                               TBA
               Instructors Training

               Institute 2009 Integrating Multimedia and
May 24-29      Technology into Teaching and Training
               (contact: Jackie McInturff                Appalachian State University               Boone, NC
Week 1         mailto:McInturff@mcintrffjm@appstate.edu


May 31-        Institute 2009 Integrating Multimedia and
June 5         Technology into Teaching and Training
               (contact: Jackie McInturff                Appalachian State University               Boone, NC
               mailto:McInturff@mcintrffjm@appstate.edu
Week 2




              For additional information contact Judy Howell.




                                                            228

				
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