Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out

2010-2011 Fellows Handbook

VIEWS: 24 PAGES: 12

									                           Fellows Handbook




Last updated: April 2010
                                       Doris Duke Charitable Foundation
                                              Medical Research Program
                                             650 Fifth Avenue, 19th Floor
                                                     New York, NY 10019
                                                 Table of Contents
Introduction to Doris Duke Charitable Foundation........................................................... iv-v

I. General CRF Program Description ......................................................................................1
    A. History .............................................................................................................................1
    B. Program Goal ...................................................................................................................1
    C. Type of Research ..............................................................................................................1
        1. Foundation’s Definition of Clinical Research...............................................................1
        2. Use of Human Subjects................................................................................................2

II. CRF Program Management ................................................................................................2
    A. Foundation Management ..................................................................................................2
    B. Program Management at Each School...............................................................................2

III. Program Details...............................................................................................................2-6
    A. Requirements of Fellowship ............................................................................................2
        1. Length of Fellowship...................................................................................................2
        2. Research Requirement .................................................................................................2
        3. Didadic Requirement................................................................................................2-3
        4. End-of-the-Year Meeting.............................................................................................3
        5. CRF Program Surveys .................................................................................................3
        6. Research Credit ...........................................................................................................3
        7. Post-fellowship Contact...............................................................................................3
    B. Resources Offered to Fellows ...........................................................................................3
        1. Stipends.......................................................................................................................3
        2. Health Insurance..........................................................................................................3
        3. Supplemental Funding ..............................................................................................3-4
        4. Mentors .......................................................................................................................4
        5. Didactic Training.........................................................................................................4
    C. Meetings...........................................................................................................................4
        1. CRF Year End Meeting ...............................................................................................4
        2. Clinical Investigator Student Trainee Forum.............................................................4-5
    D. Changing Mentors ............................................................................................................5
    E. Loan Deferment ................................................................................................................5
    F. Relocating Fellows............................................................................................................5
        1. Malpractice Insurance..................................................................................................5
        2. Matriculation Status.....................................................................................................5
        3. Financial Aid...............................................................................................................5
        4. Fees at Home School ...................................................................................................5

IV. Communications and Foundation Contact Information................................................6-7
    A. CRF Web Site ..................................................................................................................6
    B. E-mail Contact Information ..............................................................................................6
    C. Foundation Staff and Contractor .......................................................................................6
    D. Documenting Your Fellowship Year..............................................................................6-7


For use by the CRF 2010-2011 Class                                   ii
V. Assessing the CRF Program and Maintaining Contact......................................................7
   A. Long-Term Metrics ..........................................................................................................7
   B. Maintaining Contact .........................................................................................................7




For use by the CRF 2010-2011 Class                              iii
             INTRODUCTION TO THE FOUNDATION




  The Doris Duke Charitable Foundation

  The mission of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation is to improve the quality of people’s
  lives through grants supporting the performing arts, environmental conservation, medical
  research and the prevention of child abuse, and through preservation of the cultural and
  environmental legacy of Doris Duke’s properties. The foundation supports four national grant
  programs as well as three properties that were owned by Doris Duke in Hillsborough, New
  Jersey, Honolulu, Hawaii, and Newport, Rhode Island.

  Created in 1996 and headquartered in New York City, the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation is
  governed by a board of eleven Trustees. As of December 31, 2009, the foundation’s
  endowment totaled approximately $1.5 billion, and the foundation’s grant programs have
  approved 1,061 grants totaling approximately $724 million. More information about the
  foundation’s three properties and its Arts, Environment, Child Abuse Prevention and Medical
  Research Programs can be found at www.ddcf.org.




                                                             Snapshots from 2008 CRF Fellows Meeting




For use by the CRF 2010-2011 Class            iv
  About Doris Duke

  Born on November 22, 1912 in New York City, Doris Duke was the only child of James
  Buchanan Duke, who founded the American Tobacco Company, the Duke Energy Company
  and was a principal benefactor of Duke University. When J.B. Duke died in 1925, he divided
  his fortune between the Duke Endowment – a foundation he established to serve the people of
  the Carolinas – and his 12-year-old daughter.

  Throughout her life, Doris Duke enthusiastically pursued her varied interests. Fascinated by
  different cultures, she gathered countless treasures on her worldwide excursions and acquired
  remarkable collections of Islamic and Southeast Asian art. She was a lifelong environmentalist
  with a keen interest in conservation and horticulture. Her interest in the performing arts was
  demonstrated not only by her patronage, but also by her participation as a jazz pianist and
  composer, a student of modern dance, and a singer with a gospel choir in New Jersey.

  Although Doris Duke lived a private life, she contributed to a number of public causes. She
  was an active supporter of medical research and child welfare throughout her life. When she
  was just 21, she established a foundation called Independent Aid, which later became the Doris
  Duke Foundation. It is estimated that she gave away more than $400 million in current dollars
  during her lifetime, often as anonymous contributions. Doris Duke died in October 1993 at the
  age of 80. In her will, she left the majority of her estate to the Doris Duke Charitable
  Foundation.




                                                               Snapshots from 2009 CRF Fellows Meeting




For use by the CRF 2010-2011 Class             v
I. General CRF Program Description
A. History
The Doris Duke Charitable Foundation’s Clinical Research Fellowship (CRF) Program is
designed to encourage medical students to pursue careers in clinical research by giving
exceptional students the opportunity to take a year to experience clinical research first hand. The
CRF Program began in 2000 at seven1 medical schools across the United States with 42 students
in its charter class. One year later, three2 more schools joined the program and in 2008, two3
more schools joined the program. Participating schools are selected based on a peer-review
process. Six4 schools among the current 12 are now offering international fellowship
opportunities, and 733 medical students have participated to date.

B. Program Goals
The CRF Program goal is to encourage medical students to pursue clinical research careers and
to increase the number of physicians capable of translating basic research findings into new
treatments, preventions, and cures for human diseases. It accomplishes this goal by providing
medical students with mentored didactic and research training at 12 outstanding U.S. medical
centers.

C. Type of Research
Each Doris Duke Clinical Research Fellow must conduct research that meets the Foundation’s
definition of clinical research. (On occasion, if a fellow’s clinical research project is delayed, he
or she may work for very short periods on small projects that do not strictly meet the definition.)

1. Foundation’s Definition of Clinical Research: For the purposes of the CRF Program, clinical
research is defined as research with human subjects with direct application to the prevention,
diagnosis, or treatment of any disease, including:
    • Studies on the etiology and pathogenesis of human disease
    • Therapeutic interventions
    • Clinical trials
    • Epidemiological studies
    • Disease control research
    • Health outcomes research
The Medical Research Program of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation does not fund research
that uses animals.


1
  Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Harvard Medical School, University of California San
Francisco School of Medicine, University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School at Dallas, and
Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis
2
  Mount Sinai School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and Yale University School of
Medicine
3
  Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
4
  Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Harvard Medical School, University of California San
Francisco School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, University of
Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and Yale University School of Medicine


For use by the CRF 2010-2011 Class                     1
2. Use of Human Subjects: All research projects involving human subjects conducted in
connection with the CRF Program must have written evidence of documentation of education in
the protection of human subjects for the trainees, compliance with required federal guidelines,
and approval from an institutional review board (IRB). IRB approvals must be maintained and be
in effect throughout the project’s connection with the CRF Program.

II. CRF Program Management
A. Foundation Management
The CRF Program is centrally managed by Dr. Betsy Myers, Medical Research Senior Program
Officer of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. Dr. Myers and the Program Associate, Jennifer
O’Rourke, carry out coordination of the program across the 12 schools. Ms. O’Rourke serves as
the first point of contact for the Foundation for applicants, fellows, and Program Leaders and
Administrators. In addition, she facilitates communication between the different year-out
programs and the community by maintaining the online resources, providing program updates as
needed, collating and maintaining program data on past and present fellows, and plans and
implements the CRF meeting.

B. Program Management at Each School
Each CRF school has at least one Program Leader and one Program Administrator. The Program
Leader(s) run the CRF Program at each participating school. As such, they establish the
admission standards, oversee the selection of fellows at their own institutions, help match
fellows with the best mentors, plan local program activities, disperse supplementary funds to
fellows (as needed), monitor progress of the fellows throughout the year, and market and
publicize the program to potential applicants. The Program Administrator handles the daily
management of their institution’s CRF program and generally serves as the first point-of-contact
for prospective applicants and current fellows.

III. Program Details
A. Requirements of Fellowship
The following are the core CRF Program Requirements that all fellows must fulfill during their
fellowship year. In addition to these core requirements, each CRF school may have additional
requirements that include didactic training, meetings, presentations, or other research-related
activities.

1. Length of Fellowship: Fellows must complete the entire length of the fellowship, which is 12
months with 2 weeks of vacation (up to 3 weeks with Program Leader permission). The Program
Leader must approve other types of leave or variations on the timing of the fellowship. Leaves
are not typically granted to study for the United States Medical Licensing Exam. Fellows are
expected to find time to study for the USMLE during their regular school terms and/or use
vacation or personal time.

2. Research Requirement: Each fellow must have primary responsibility, under the guidance of
the mentor, for conducting a research project that falls within the foundation’s definition of


For use by the CRF 2010-2011 Class             2
clinical research. Despite additional time spent in didactic training and other program activities,
the fellow is expected to spend at least 10 consecutive months engaged in their research
project(s).

3. Didactic Requirements: Fellows must fulfill their CRF school’s didactic requirements.

4. Year End Meeting and Abstract: Fellows must submit to the foundation at least one abstract
summarizing a research project conducted during their fellowship year. This abstract will be
published in the CRF abstract book to be distributed at the annual CRF meeting. This book also
serves as part of the historical record of the work of each class of fellows. Fellows must attend
and present their fellowship research at the annual end-of-the-year meeting through either a
poster or oral presentation. The Program Leader for each school will assign the method of
presentation for their fellows.

5. CRF Program Surveys: Each fellow must complete an entrance survey at the start of the year,
an exit survey at the end, and evaluation surveys after the fellowship is over. The Foundation’s
entrance and exit surveys of each class of fellows are used to assess fellow satisfaction and to
evaluate the programs at the twelve participating schools. This information is used to continually
refine the program and ensure that it responds to the fellows needs.

6. Research Credit: Each fellow must credit the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation in any
publication or poster resulting from the fellowship year. The recommended wording of such an
acknowledgement is: “This work was supported by a grant from the Doris Duke Charitable
Foundation to <institution> to fund Clinical Research Fellow <fellow’s name>.”

7. Contact Information Post-fellowship: Upon completion of the fellowship year, fellows will be
required to provide their Program Administrator with new contact information for tracking
purposes. If possible, fellows should provide permanent email and mailing addresses (rather
than school- or employment-based addresses). Periodic surveys will be sent to all fellows to
track their career progress.

B. Resources Offered to Fellows
1. Stipends: The total fellowship stipend for the 2010-2011 year is $27,000. Under the Internal
Revenue Code, income received as a fellowship stipend is generally included in gross income for
federal income tax purposes. Please note that fellows are responsible for establishing the amount
of their taxable income and for making any required payments of estimated tax. Internal Revenue
Service information regarding fellowships can be obtained from the following Web site:
http://www.irs.gov/individuals/students/index.html

2. Health Insurance: All fellows are to be provided with individual health insurance. Often, this
takes the form of reimbursing fellows for retaining health insurance with their home medical
school. Program Administrators at each CRF school will work with their school’s fellows to
determine the best way to obtain the needed health insurance coverage.

3. Supplemental Funding: Most mentors will have the necessary equipment and supplies in place
before a fellow begins his/her project. Nevertheless, each fellow has access to up to $5,000 in


For use by the CRF 2010-2011 Class               3
supplementary funds to support training-related costs such as travel to scientific meetings,
laboratory supplies, equipment, publication costs, books, fees for specific courses related to the
fellowship, and continued work in the year following the fellowship, if needed. With their
Program Leader’s direct approval, supplementary funds can be used during the fellowship year
or the year following the fellowship. The uses to which these funds can be applied may vary
from institution to institution. At the beginning of the fellowship year, fellows should check with
their school’s CRF Program Leader to determine how requests for supplementary funds are
processed.

4. Mentors: Each fellow will work directly with at least one clinical research mentor whose
research activities match the interests of the student. International fellows should have at least
two committed mentors: one at the U.S. school and one at the international institution. With
guidance from their mentors, fellows must develop a research protocol that falls within the
Foundation’s definition of clinical research. Mentors are expected to meet with their fellows on a
weekly basis and to ensure that fellows have the resources needed to accomplish their research
project. If a fellow’s research interest crosses several disciplines, multiple investigators may
mentor him or her, one from each discipline. Depending on the school, mentors may be assigned
prior to or after the student’s arrival.

5. Didactic Training: Lectures and classes are to be provided by each CRF school. These vary
among CRF institutions but often include general lectures on methods in clinical research and
research ethics as well as statistics and epidemiology courses. Some schools offer courses that
can be taken for credit and may be accepted as transfer credit. These courses may be applied to
an advanced degree. Fellows should check with their CRF school’s Program Administrator to
determine whether they are eligible to take these courses for credit.

C. Meetings
1. CRF Year End Meeting: Exiting fellows are required to attend the CRF meeting. The
Foundation covers the costs of housing and board while the CRF institutions provide air and
ground travel. Attendance at these meetings is limited to CRF Fellows, Program Leaders,
Program Administrators, and invited guests. All fellows must submit to the Foundation at least
one abstract on the research they conducted during their fellowship year. This abstract will be
published in the CRF abstract book to be distributed at the meeting. This book also serves as part
of the historical record of the work of each class of fellows.

2. Clinical Investigator Student Trainee Forum (CIST): The National Institutes of Health (NIH)
will host CIST in Bethesda, Maryland on November 18-19, 2010, to bring together medical
students participating in clinical and translational research fellowships around the country. Doris
Duke CRF fellows are invited to participate. Invited participants are provided with travel and
lodging through NIH, not the Foundation. A contractor that works with the NIH coordinates all
travel and lodging arrangements. The two-day program of lectures and panels allows participants
to learn more about academic careers in clinical research and to interact with peers in similar
programs. The organizers of the CIST Forum have made clear their preference that all attendees
should stay for the full duration of the meeting. If one cannot attend the full meeting, they should
possibly opt not to attend. If they choose to attend only a portion of the meeting, that guest is




For use by the CRF 2010-2011 Class               4
asked to make their own travel and lodging arrangements. International CRF fellows will be
invited to attend the following year after completing their fellowship.

D. Changing Mentors
While it is very unusual, it is possible for a fellow to change his/her mentor during the fellowship
year. Fellows who do not believe their mentors are giving them adequate guidance and support
or who desire to change research fields should first speak with their CRF school Program
Leader(s).

E. Loan Deferment
CRF fellows with student loans should be eligible for loan deferment and should take action to
defer their loans as soon as possible. Most lenders require a letter from the Dean of the school of
matriculation that supports the fellow’s participation in the CRF program. If needed, fellows can
request from the foundation a certification letter that can be sent to their lending institution as
proof of participation in the CRF program. Questions about loan deferments should be directed
first to the Program Administrators at the CRF schools and second to the CRF Program
Associate.

F. Relocating Fellows
The following issues are relevant to fellows who are taking their fellowship at a medical school
at which they are not matriculated (relocating fellows):

1. Malpractice Insurance: In order to see patients, CRF program fellows must be covered by an
institutional malpractice insurance policy. This may be problematic for fellows working at
schools at which they are not matriculated. Program Administrators will work with fellows to try
to resolve this issue.

2. Matriculation Status: It is very important that fellows know their matriculation status at their
home medical school. Changes in matriculation status may affect a fellow’s eligibility for health
and malpractice insurance, loan repayment, and other programs. In addition to working with each
fellow’s own school administration, CRF program staff may be able to provide advice on some
of these issues.

3. Financial Aid: Fellows should check with their medical school to ensure they will retain a
student’s standing for future financial aid if a research year is taken. Also, fellows should ask if it
would affect their student loan repayment schedule.

4. Fees at Home School: Fellows should check with their medical school as some past fellows
have been required by their home schools to pay certain student fees and/or a continuation fee to
keep their place within their medical school class.




For use by the CRF 2010-2011 Class                5
IV. Communications and Foundation Contact Information
A. CRF Web Site
A web site for CRF (http://www.ddcf.org/mrp-crf) provides CRF fellows, alumni, and applicants
with important program information. At this site, there are links to the CRF Fellows Handbook
and information about CRF meetings, clinical research, IRB and research ethics, journals, and
loan repayment and other financial resources.

B. E-mail Contact Information
The Foundation’s primary form of communication with fellows throughout the year is e-mail.
Please update the Foundation throughout the year to any changes in your e-mail or contact
information.

C. Foundation Staff and Contractor
Betsy Myers, Ph.D.
Senior Program Officer for Medical Research
Doris Duke Charitable Foundation
650 Fifth Avenue
19th Floor
New York, NY 10019
E-mail: bmyers@ddcf.org
Tel: (212) 974-7095

Jennifer O’Rourke
CRF Program Associate
American Institute of Biological Sciences
1900 Campus Commons Drive, Suite 200
Reston, VA 20191
E-mail: ddcfcrf@aibs.org
Tel: (703) 674-2500 ext. 129

D. Documenting Your Fellowship Year
Capture your research activities throughout the year. The Foundation likes to see examples of
your work in action and occasionally these photos are incorporated into a slide show for the end
of year meeting and/or the CRF promotional brochure.

As to the types of pictures sought: the Foundation would like you to focus your photos on your
research activities such as the environment where you worked, clinical activities/process, and the
mentors or staff you worked with.

The Foundation will provide a document-sharing site to upload your photos. With your photos,
please provide a word document with a brief sentence per photo identifying the people and
places shown. If you submit photographs of patients, we ask that you be sensitive to patient




For use by the CRF 2010-2011 Class              6
confidentiality and that you follow your home institution's policies on patient photographs and
release forms. If permission is not obtained, you should blackout or blur patients' faces.

V. Assessing the CRF Program and Maintaining Contact

A. Long Term Metrics
The Foundation is interested in determining if CRF alumni pursue careers in clinical research or
in other aspects of biomedical research. To accomplish this, the Foundation will send all alumni
periodic surveys. These surveys will request updated contact information and career path details.
Alumni should respond to surveys generated by the Foundation or their CRF school.

B. Maintaining Contact
It is recommended that upon completion of the fellowship year, fellows provide their Program
Administrator with updated contact information. If possible, fellows should provide permanent
e-mail and mailing addresses (rather than school- or employment-based addresses).




For use by the CRF 2010-2011 Class              7

								
To top