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					Syllabus
Philosophy 8 – Methods of Argument
#5695 Spring 2009
Mr. Dan Barnett



Contents
Syllabus ......................................................................................................................................................... 1
Welcome! ...................................................................................................................................................... 2
   How To Reach Me .................................................................................................................................... 3
What’s It About? - Course Content............................................................................................................... 3
   Official Course Description ...................................................................................................................... 3
   Subjects Covered ...................................................................................................................................... 3
   Student Learning Outcomes ...................................................................................................................... 3
Required Materials – Book & Internet .......................................................................................................... 4
   Course Reader ........................................................................................................................................... 4
   Continuing Internet Access ....................................................................................................................... 4
   Blackboard ................................................................................................................................................ 4
The Computer Crashed – Unacceptable Excuses.......................................................................................... 4
   Working Online Can Be Tricky ................................................................................................................ 4
   The Bottom Line ....................................................................................................................................... 4
Assignments & Grades ................................................................................................................................. 5
   24 Online Quiz Experiences @ 10 points = 240 points ............................................................................ 5
   Important Technical Notes ........................................................................................................................ 5
   28 Twice-weekly Online Postings @ 10 points = 280 points ................................................................... 5
   10 short writing assignments on Blackboard @ 20 points = 200 points ................................................... 5
   One 5-page midterm & one 5-page final paper @ 140 points = 280 points ............................................. 6
   TOTAL POINTS = 1000 .......................................................................................................................... 6
Grade Definitions .......................................................................................................................................... 6
   Blackboard and Final Grades .................................................................................................................... 6
Policies & Attendance – Online is Different! ............................................................................................... 6
   Workload .................................................................................................................................................. 6
   If a family emergency happens ................................................................................................................. 6
   Cheating and plagiarism ........................................................................................................................... 7
   What is plagiarism?................................................................................................................................... 7
Attendance – Key Dates................................................................................................................................ 7
       Monday morning of the second week .................................................................................................. 7
       Monday morning of the third week ...................................................................................................... 7
       Remainder of the semester .................................................................................................................. 7
Participation .................................................................................................................................................. 8
   Active Participation .................................................................................................................................. 8
   The Most Difficult Point in the Semester ................................................................................................. 8
   Confusion and disorientation? In THIS class? .......................................................................................... 8
   ―I Follow You‖ Doesn’t Mean ―I Understand‖ ........................................................................................ 8
Help – Essential Resources ........................................................................................................................... 9
   Early Alert................................................................................................................................................. 9
   Blackboard Support Desk ......................................................................................................................... 9
   Disabled Student Programs and Services (DSPS) .................................................................................... 9
   Code of Conduct ....................................................................................................................................... 9
On Opinions – The most challenging aspect of this course! ......................................................................... 9
   Opinions .................................................................................................................................................... 9
District Mandated Information: Official Butte College Attendance Policy | Academic Honesty |
Accommodations ........................................................................................................................................ 10
       Butte College Attendance Policy | Academic Honesty | Accommodations ........................... 10
You’re responsible! ..................................................................................................................................... 13
Getting Started – First Steps to Online Success .......................................................................................... 13




Welcome!
Transcript of instructor YouTube video greeting (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nk2_EbJd3RA):

Welcome to Philosophy 8, Methods of Argument, online!

My name is Dan Barnett, and I've been teaching philosophy here at Butte College for about 20 years. This
interactive syllabus is designed to give you an idea of what the course is about and what the requirements are.

I've been interested in developing online courses for a long time to meet the needs of students who have work or
family responsibilities during the day, or who just can't fit the course into their on-campus schedule.

But the convenience of an online course doesn't mean it's easy. In fact, you may find that this course actually takes
more work than a face-to-face course; it certainly takes more discipline since the learning that actually takes place
depends entirely on your own initiative in frequently logging into the course, completing the assignments, and
participating in the discussion postings.
Though I'm always available to answer questions online, it's not the case that you can simply go to a lecture and
have me explain everything. There's no lecture in this course, just short five or ten minute presentations to help get
you oriented.

You may have decided to take this course online because of its flexibility, but remember that while you can work at
your own pace during the week, and log in at any hour, assignments are due each Monday morning at 8:00 a.m.
Pacific Time. You'll always have a weekend to complete an assignment, but remember that this online course tracks
week by week throughout the semester with the face-to-face version.

If this is your first online course, I'd like to extend a special welcome. It can be confusing at first but you'll find a
supportive group here ready and willing to help answer your technical questions, and in a week or two you'll get to
know your way around online pretty well.

As they say in fine restaurants, enjoy!


How To Reach Me
The best way to contact me is through Blackboard email from within the course.
I can also be reached at dbarnett@maxinet.com.

We can meet by appointment at my physical office, LRC 284 (at the end of the hallway).

The best way to contact me is through email, but if you need to call and leave a message my office phone
is 530.895.2973. My office hours are online; I’m usually available several hours each day. I’ll respond to
emails within 48 hours or we can chat live.


What’s It About? - Course Content
Official Course Description
This course is a study of, and instruction in, argumentative writing, including traditional topics in logic.
The course will emphasize the application of argumentative methods and models to the analysis of
contemporary moral, political, economic, and philosophical issues. Transfer 3 units to CSU, UC. This is
an IGETC course with a 6000-word writing requirement.


Subjects Covered
Deductive and inductive arguments; reading and writing arguments; using sources; refining
argumentative skills and analysis of short debates by thinking critically about contemporary and perennial
issues; analyzing longer and more abstract written works by thinking critically about contemporary and
perennial issues.


Student Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

1. Analyze an argument in terms of traditional logic (definitions, assumptions, premises and conclusion,
deduction and induction, and formal and informal fallacies).
2. Distinguish subjective from objective claims, and belief from knowledge.
3. Apply appropriate standards to the evaluation of judgments of value.
4. Evaluate assumptions, evidence, testimony, and statistics as they are used in argumentative writing.
5. Write an essay that demonstrates the use of generally accepted standards of good argumentation in the
identification and use of sources, evidence, and reasons.
6. Articulate viewpoints found in diverse cultural, political, gender, scientific, philosophical, and religious
contexts.


Required Materials – Book & Internet

Course Reader
The Philosophy 8 Course Reader is available from the Butte College Bookstore. I make no money on the
reader; in large part its cost is due to the copyright fees charged by the publishers of the essays it contains.

Continuing Internet Access
You will also need continuing access to the Internet, either on a home computer or through one of the
Butte College labs. If you are new to computers, or anticipate difficulty in getting connected, please
contact me right away. You will need to set aside up to 9 hours a week for completing required course
assignments.

Blackboard
You’ll access course materials, take quizzes, and contribute discussion postings using learning
management software called Blackboard, which you can log into using your browser (either Internet
Explorer or Firefox).

Blackboard is ―hosted‖ off-campus so if the campus network goes down you can still go the direct link
(which you should bookmark): http://blackboard.butte.edu.


The Computer Crashed – Unacceptable Excuses
Working Online Can Be Tricky
If you were able to complete an online quiz experience a half hour before its due date, the temptation is to
work on the next quiz experience at the last minute, too. But then you find you can’t connect to the
Internet because a friend changed the settings. Or you forgot your password. Or the computer refuses to
work. Or you have to be out of town on a family emergency. Or you have to attend an out-of-town
conference. Or you get food poisoning. All of these excuses and many more, are unacceptable.
You will be given from four to seven days to complete most online assignments. Blackboard is available
7 days a week, 24 hours a day, so my assumption is that (even if you are ill) you will have the opportunity
at some point to do the assigned work. The only excuse I will accept is that Blackboard itself has been
down for a significant period of time. (You’ll be informed of scheduled maintenance downtime so you
can plan accordingly.)

The Bottom Line
The bottom line is that if you delay in doing your online work, the Blackboard support desk may not be
available, or your computer may not work, but ―the plane will take off even if you’re not at the airport.‖
Please plan your time carefully! Due dates and times are firm and there is no extra credit.
Assignments & Grades
24 Online Quiz Experiences @ 10 points = 240 points
Based on the printed reader and online course materials (including my comments on discussion topic
postings). Open notes, two tries, timed (15 minutes each).

Your grade on a quiz experience will be the average of your two tries; for example, if you get 8 points on
your first attempt, and 9 points on the second, your quiz grade will be 8.5 points (the average of 8 and 9).

If you are satisfied with your grade on your first attempt, you do not have to take the quiz a second time;
for example, if you get 9 points on your first attempt, and don’t take the quiz a second time, your grade
will be 9 points.

However, if you decide to better your score by taking the quiz a second time, make sure you complete all
the questions, even the ones you got right the first time, since this second attempt counts in the average.
Matching questions shuffle the answers each time so you’ll need to look carefully for the correct answer
each time you take the quiz. The last quiz is cumulative.

As with all assignments in this class, your work must be your own. Sharing of quizzes or other
assignments is not permitted and is a violation of the Butte College student code of conduct.

Important Technical Notes
It is your responsibility to learn how to take an online quiz by completing the syllabus quiz (QE 0).
Though it doesn’t count toward your grade (the point total is not figured in to your final grade), you must
achieve a score on the syllabus quiz in accordance with the instructions in order to be able to take QE 1,
the first quiz that really counts toward your grade.

If for some reason your score on the second attempt of a quiz is lower than the first, I will be pleased to
delete the second attempt from the average if you write to me via Blackboard e-mail before the expiration
day and time for the quiz and explain the situation. However, you may not be able to take the quiz again;
in that case your score will be what you received on the first attempt.

28 Twice-weekly Online Postings @ 10 points = 280 points
Each discussion (―posting‖) assignment includes an original comment on the assigned topic (at least 50-
100 words) and at least one substantive response to another student’s comment (also at least 50-100
words). You must complete both parts of the assignment in order to be considered for a grade. A good
response to my original question without a reply to another student’s comment will result in a grade of
zero for the assignment. Once the discussion topic is locked no further comments may be added (though
they may be read). After the posting assignment is closed, I’ll read each of the contributions and assign
points based on a rubric and then summarize what I’ve read in an email to the entire class. These emails
are valuable keys to what I’m looking for in your work! Most postings assignments will receive scores of
8; especially good postings, in accordance with the rubric, will receive scores of 10.

10 short writing assignments on Blackboard @ 20 points = 200 points
You’ll respond to a question dealing with the current assigned reading in a short response of at least 50-
100 words. Be sure to use standard English in your answers, with appropriate punctuation, and be sure
quoted material is within quotation marks. The most common reason for low writing assignment grades is
failure to put a phrase or sentence used from the text or Learning Content Modules within quotation
marks.
One 5-page midterm & one 5-page final paper @ 140 points = 280 points
Each paper, to be submitted electronically, will evaluate and respond to some of the arguments presented
in the readings on the nature and purpose of education.

TOTAL POINTS = 1000


Grade Definitions
Sometimes students enter a class, especially a GE class, thinking an A or B is ―theirs to lose.‖ But in this
online course I will endeavor to adhere to the standards defined in the Butte College Catalog: C is for
satisfactory, competent work; B for good work that is above average; and A for superb work that
demonstrates an excellent understanding of the material and principles presented in the course. More
detailed rubrics for the writing assignments will be presented in the course materials. Considering the
difficult essays we will be studying, grades of C+ and above are admirable grades! My class GPA is
usually in the C- to C+ range, though it may be higher.

A       900 - 1000
A-      870 - <900
B+      830 - <870
B       800 - <830
B-      770 - <800
C+      730 - <770
C       700 - <730
C-      670 - <700
D       600 - <670
F       0 - <600

Blackboard and Final Grades
Grades in the Blackboard grade book shows pluses and minuses, but the final grades I turn in will delete
them since Butte College only reports letter grades.


Policies & Attendance – Online is Different!
Workload
You’ll be expected to spend at least 9 hours each week for this course, working online as well as thinking,
reading, and writing. I will make myself available as much as possible to answer questions, but I don’t
offer any extra credit.

Successful online students set aside fixed times throughout the week to work on the course rather than
waiting for ―free time‖ (which never seems to come). Just as in face-to-face classes, the workload for
different online courses varies, but please don’t assume that just because a course is online there is less
work to do!

If a family emergency happens
Please, if you are able, let me know via Blackboard email that you have to be away. You should refer to
the complete course calendar for ongoing assignments, and be sure to keep up with online quiz
experiences and other work. Since I will not attempt to talk with you in the midst of crisis (your attention
is needed elsewhere!), please contact me as soon as you return, and we can discuss what you may have
missed. In general, though, there is no acceptable excuse for missed work.
Cheating and plagiarism
Cheating and plagiarism are classified as academic dishonesty. According to the Butte College Student
Handbook, if you are caught cheating or plagiarizing you may receive an F for the assignment, an F for
the course, or be removed from the class, at my discretion.

What is plagiarism?
Indiana University has a good working definition at
http://education.indiana.edu/~frick/plagiarism/index2.html; if you think you know what plagiarism is, you
may be surprised. For a short interactive quiz, click
http://education.indiana.edu/~frick/plagiarism/item1.html.

The bottom line: Failure to put quotation marks around directly quoted material constitutes plagiarism! In
discussion postings assignments as well as short-answer questions, if you quote from readings or
Learning Content Modules, put the phrase or sentence in quotation marks and provide a brief reference,
including a page number if applicable.

Be carefully about paraphrasing, too! Simply replacing a word or two in a quotation from a source also
constitutes plagiarism.

For more practice on identifying both word-for-word and paraphrasing plagiarism, click
http://www.indiana.edu/%7Eistd/practice.html.


Attendance – Key Dates
My attendance policy for this online class may differ significantly from that of your other courses, so
please read it carefully!


Monday morning of the second week
1. You must log into the class by Monday morning of the second week of the semester or you will be
dropped as a ―no show.‖


Monday morning of the third week
2. If you have logged in to the course but are not actively participating I may drop you at the beginning of
third week of class. You can determine if you’ve been dropped by checking your WebAdvisor account.
Please contact me by email if you wish to be reinstated in the course, though you may have missed
significant work that cannot be made up.


Remainder of the semester
3. For the remaining part of the semester, if you do not log in for two consecutive weeks, or if you’re
logging in regularly but not fully participating, you may be locked out of the class (not dropped yet) until
we resolve the issue of your participation. If you are locked out I’ll send an email to your outside email
address if I have it. You’ll need to contact me by return email in order to regain course access if you’ve
decided to continue. That means you may miss course work that can’t be made up. If you have to be away
for a significant period of time please let me know in advance so you don’t get locked out; if an
emergency happens you may want to drop the course and take it again next time.

4. If you are locked out of the course and I have not heard from you, I may drop you; that may result in an
FW on your transcript.
5. If the course is not meeting your needs, and you want to avoid an FW on your transcript, it is up to you
to drop or withdraw from the course in a timely fashion.


Participation
Active Participation
Many if not most of the concepts we will read about and discuss in this online course will be new to you;
it is important that you participate actively online so that you can clarify ideas you do not understand. One
idea builds upon another, so if you ―drop out‖ for a week you’ll miss important connections.

The Most Difficult Point in the Semester
Perhaps the most difficult point in the course comes when you have to decide whether you’re going to
continue and finish out the semester. Sometimes you’ll find that the online method of presentation is not
for you: it just may be too easy to avoid logging in to Blackboard and you find yourself missing more and
more assignments.

The difficult part comes in finally deciding to withdraw from the class and letting me know!
It’s a matter of taking responsibility, and I know it can be difficult. Feel free to send me a Blackboard
email if you are dealing with these issues. Together we can figure out what’s best for you!

Confusion and disorientation? In THIS class?
Yup. Since some or many of the concepts we’ll discuss may be new to you, you can expect feelings of
confusion, disorientation, and even anger during the course. This is perfectly normal. As the semester
passes, if you are diligent in reading and in study, some of the confusion, I hope, will begin to diminish. If
at any time you feel things are not ―making sense‖ please email me right away.

“I Follow You” Doesn’t Mean “I Understand”
Philosophy looks for the general principles governing our thought processes, and throughout the semester
I’ll be illustrating those principles with numerous examples. Being able to follow the examples given in
my mini-presentations is necessary for understanding the underlying principles, but it is not sufficient.

In other words, following the discussion doesn’t mean you really understand the discussion. The
demonstration of your understanding comes when you are able to apply the principles you have learned in
new and perhaps unfamiliar situations in your written responses to various writing assignments.
There’s another issue, too, and it has to do with your emotional reactions to positions taken by the authors
we’ll be reading. You may not agree with what an author is arguing, but it’s unreasonable to dismiss the
argument until you have thoroughly examined it. Yet this is a difficult process, especially if you have
strong feelings for or against the position being argued for!

For example, it’s tempting to think that a good feeling about a given argument means that you have
understood (and agree) with that argument, or that a bad feeling about a given argument means that you
have understood (and disagree) with that argument. In fact, you may have misunderstood the argument.
That’s one of the biggest challenges of this course: understanding an author’s line of thought. But you
must do so before you can reasonably respond to the author’s argument.

How do you learn to do this? By doing it over and over again; in other words, by practicing the skills that
are presented in this class. The effort and diligence you put into the course will prepare you for further
academic challenges and to take your place as a responsible member of the human society.
Help – Essential Resources
Early Alert
Early Alert is a campus-wide referral system designed to connect students with the on-campus resources
they might need, FAST!

All students referred through the EARLY ALERT program have PRIORITY for appointments with all
campus services! The sooner problems are identified the easier it will be to find possible solutions.
Students who are facing financial, academic, personal, or health related difficulties are invited to ASK
any of their instructors or department staff members to refer them to the appropriate on-campus service.
That’s the ―ticket‖ to student success!

Blackboard Support Desk
The Blackboard Support Desk can be reached as follows:

Call 530.895.2925 or write
blackboardsupport@butte.edu

Disabled Student Programs and Services (DSPS)
If you have a learning or physical need that will require special accommodation, please let me know by
telephone or email so that you and I can work together to plan the appropriate assistance. Disabled
Student Programs & Services (DSPS) can sometimes offer invaluable ―work arounds.‖ To register, call
530.895.2455. Students with a print disability may request printed materials in alternate media.

Code of Conduct
It is expected that students will show respect for each other and obey the standards of student conduct as
outlined in the Butte College catalog and additional materials distributed by the College. Charges of
misconduct may be imposed upon students who violate provisions of Butte College regulations. The
student conduct code, disciplinary action procedures, student due process and grievance policy can be
found in the catalog, student handbook, and the office of Student Services.

This course will be conducted in accordance with acceptable behavior as described in Board policy 3.21,
and this policy is found in the Butte College catalog and Student Handbook. It can be obtained from
Campus Information or from Student Services.

Students who find themselves in difficult personal or academic situations may want to email, phone, or
set up a face-to-face appointment, and we can chat.


On Opinions – The most challenging aspect of this course!
Opinions
By definition, an opinion is just something someone believes. It is clear that some opinions can be true
(―the earth revolves around the sun‖) and some false (―the sun revolves around the earth‖).

Unfortunately, we tend to label true opinions with the word ―fact,‖ leaving the word ―opinion‖ to apply to
beliefs we disagree with (―that’s just your opinion!‖ we say dismissively) or to beliefs that don’t seem
provable in a laboratory (―God exists‖).
In effect we are saying that one’s opinions are simply how one feels about something, and that opinions
don’t have much to do with whether those feelings are justified.

But that puts the realm of opinion into the realm of the subjective—the realm of the personal and private:
―That’s just how YOU feel about it. I feel differently. End of story.‖ Yet this attitude is harmful to
productive conversation because it refuses to consider appropriate evidence (not just laboratory
evidence!) that might back up an opinion. It refuses to consider whether someone’s opinion is true. Such
an attitude is not one of tolerance but of patronization.

In this course our goal is to find what truth is to be found, to subject our opinions to careful scrutiny to see
if, and how, they are supported by good reasons or evidence.


District Mandated Information: Official Butte College Attendance Policy |
Academic Honesty | Accommodations
Butte College Attendance Policy | Academic Honesty | Accommodations
A. Butte College Attendance Policy

Regular attendance in all Butte College courses is crucial to doing well. It is important that the student
log in to the course the first day of class and begin participating. If a student has not logged in to the
course before the first week of class is over that student may be dropped as a “no show.”

Students who have logged in to the course but are not actively participating may be dropped by the
instructor at the beginning of the third week of class.

If a student is not able to log in to the course and participate during the first or second week of class, it is
the student’s responsibility to inform the instructor. It is the instructor’s discretion whether to drop the
student from the course.

Between the third and the eighth week of instruction, dropping the class is the student's responsibility.
After the eighth week, a student will receive a letter grade for the class unless he or she can demonstrate a
serious and compelling reason for withdrawing from class.

See your course syllabus for an individual instructor's specific policies and for the drop date in short-term
or irregular courses.



B. Dropping or Withdrawing From Courses

Students dropping courses during the first four weeks of instruction of a semester or the first 25% of an
irregular term course will result in the courses not appearing on their transcripts.

Students may withdraw from courses during the fifth through eighth weeks (or second 25% of an irregular
term course) and "W" grades will appear for the courses on their transcripts.
During the eighth week through the twelfth week, (or third 25% of an irregular term course), students will
need to identify "serious and compelling" reasons (see definition below) for withdrawing from classes.
They will need to obtain the signature of the course instructor.

After the instructor's signature has been obtained, the completed withdrawal card will need to be
submitted to the Admissions and Records Office for processing. Then the late withdrawal will be
granted. The date the student submits the card to the Admissions & Records Office will be the official
date of withdrawal.

1. Withdrawal from all classes

Students needing to withdraw from all their classes after the withdrawal deadline, may choose to have an
exit interview with a college counselor. Permission may be granted for students to withdraw late from all
their classes with the counselor's signature.

Prior to granting late withdrawals for students enrolled in specialized vocational programs (e.g.,
Construction Inspection, Nursing, Police Academy, etc.) counselors will contact the respective
departments regarding the students' status.

The following situations may reasonably be defined as "serious and compelling" for justifying late
withdrawal

       An extended absence due to a verifiable accident, illness, or personal problem; for example, a one
        or two week absence with a doctor's written excuse.

       An extended absence due to a death in the family. This applies to absences exceeding a week due
        to family affairs that must be attended to by the student.

       A necessary change in employment status which interferes with the student's ability to attend
        class. This change in status must be verified in writing by the student's employer.

       Other unusual or very special cases, to be considered on their own merit.

The following situations would NOT fall under the intent of "serious and compelling”

       Grade anticipated in class not sufficiently high or student is doing failing work.

       Failure to attend class, complete assignments or take a test.

       Dissatisfaction with course material, instructional method or instructor.

       Class is harder than expected.

       Pressure of other classes, participation in social activities or simple lack of motivation.

       Change of major.

2. Withdrawal from classes during the final four weeks
During the final four weeks of instruction a "W" can be assigned only in cases such as an accident or
serious illness when the need for withdrawal is due to circumstances beyond the student's control and an
assignment of an incomplete (I) is not practical. The student will need to obtain the instructor's
signature(s) and submit the drop card with a completed Academic Council Petition to the Counseling
Office. If the student is unable to complete the paperwork for her/himself, it can be done for them by the
Student Services Office with documentation of the respective accident or serious illness.

3. Short-term classes drop/withdrawal timelines

       "DR" Grade - first 25% of the course.

       "W" Grade – second 25% of the course.

       "Serious and Compelling" - third 25% of the course.

       Academic Council (end of term) – fourth and last 25% of the course.

C. Butte College Plagiarism/Cheating Policy: 3.21 Student Rights and Conduct

The board recognizes that as citizens of the Butte-Glenn Community College District, students are free,
individually and collectively, to express their interests. However, these privileges carry with them an
obligation to respect the rights and privileges of others, as well as any obligation to abide by the rules and
regulations set down by the College, its various agencies, and agents.

The Superintendent/President is authorized to suspend any student for good cause for an indefinite period
of time as prescribed by code. The Board of Trustees will be annually apprised of any student
suspensions.

In order to protect student rights and insure appropriate student conduct, the Superintendent is directed to
develop appropriate procedures to implement this policy.

Administrative Procedure: 3.21 Students Rights and Conduct

Disciplinary action involving students is primarily the responsibility of the Dean of Student Services.
Disciplining students is a means of protecting the rights and privileges of each member of the campus
community, as well as protecting College property.

The procedures described herein are designed to protect students from the imposition of unfair
disciplinary action. It is the right of every student to request due process. In order to file an appeal
against disciplinary action, the individual must be currently enrolled or must have been enrolled at the
time of the alleged violation.

D. Grounds for Disciplinary Action

As legally required, students are advised that the following behavior will constitute good and sufficient
cause for disciplinary action to be initiated.

Dishonesty: such as cheating, plagiarism, or knowingly furnishing false information to the College. (Butte
College Student Handbook)
Non-Discrimination Policy

Butte College complies with all Federal and State rules and regulations and does not discriminate on the
basis of race, color, national origin, gender, marital status, or disability. Harassment of any employee or
student is strictly prohibited. Inquiries regarding compliance and/or grievance procedures may be
directed to our Title IX Officer and Section 504/ADA Coordinator: Allen Renville, Vice President of
Student Services, Butte Community College, 3536 Butte Campus Drive, Oroville, CA 95965.

Academic Accommodations

If you believe that you may need an accommodation in this course because of a disability, please notify
your instructor immediately. Although not required, if you have a permanent or temporary disability you
are encouraged to contact the Office of Disabled Student Programs and Services (DSPS) on the main
campus. DSPS may be able to provide you with appropriate and reasonable accommodations,
adjustments, or services to mitigate the effects of your disability in this course. An appointment with
DSPS can be scheduled by calling 530.895.2455 [voice] or 895.2308 [TTY] or email at dsps@butte.edu.
The DSPS office is open M-F, 8am–4pm.

Alternate Media

This publication is available in alternate media. Students with a print disability — a visual limitation or
reading difficulty that limits access to traditional print material — caused by a learning disability,
blindness, disease, medication, or physical condition may request printed materials in an alternate media
format, with appropriate documentation of disability. Examples of alternate media formats include: e-text
(e.g., text on CD), audiotape, MP3 file, large print, tactile graphics, and Braille. Contact DSPS for
alternate media requests by calling 530.895.2455 [voice] or 895.2308 [TTY] or email at dsps@butte.edu.
The DSPS office is open M-F, 8am–4pm.


You’re responsible!
You’re responsible for all materials in this course, for keeping copies of your online submissions, and for
communicating with the instructor if there is a problem.


Getting Started – First Steps to Online Success
       Please read this syllabus thoroughly and thoughtfully.
       When you first log in to the course in Blackboard, click on the “Begin Here” icon and read
        each page.
       Then click on Learning Content Module (CM) 1, and enjoy!

				
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posted:7/11/2011
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