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					                        Exhibit A
               Comprehensive Plan Adoption &
                    Draft Plan Review

       1. Village Board Ordinance #2009-05 Adopting Amendments to
          the Comprehensive Plan

       2. Village Board Ordinance #2008-07 Adopting the
          Comprehensive Plan

       3. Plan Commission Resolution 2009-01 Recommending Village
          Board Adoption of Amendments to the Comprehensive Plan

       4. Plan Commission Resolution 2008-04 Recommending the
          Comprehensive Plan for Village Board Adoption

       5. Public Hearing Notices: Plan Amendments; Plan Adoption

       6. Comprehensive Plan Distribution & Notifications: Plan
          Amendments; Plan Adoption




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                               Page A-1
Exhibit A 03/24/2009
Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan   Page A-2
Exhibit A 03/24/2009
Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan   Page A-3
Exhibit A 03/24/2009
                                  VILLAGE OF CLINTON
                                   ORDINANCE #2008-07

   AN ORDINANCE TO ADOPT THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN OF THE VILLAGE OF
                         CLINTON, WISCONSIN

      THE VILLAGE BOARD OF THE VILLAGE OF CLINTON, WISCONSIN DOES
 ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS:

        SECTION 1. Pursuant to sections 62.23(2) and (3) of the Wisconsin Statutes, the
 Village of Clinton is authorized to prepare and adopt a comprehensive plan as defined in
 sections 66.1001(1)(a) and 66.1001(2) of the Wisconsin Statutes.

         SECTION 2. The Village Board of the Village of Clinton, Wisconsin has adopted
 written procedures designed to foster public participation in every stage of the preparation of
 a. comprehensive plan as required by section 66.1001(4)(a) of the Wisconsin statutes.

         SECTION 3. The Plan Commission of the Village of Clinton, by a majority vote of
 the entire commission recorded in its official minutes, has adopted a resolution recommending
 to the Clinton Village Board the adoption of the document entitled Village of Clinton,
 Wisconsin Comprehensive Plan, containing all of the elements and maps specified in section
 66.1001(2) of the Wisconsin Statutes.

         SECTION 4. The Village has held at least one public hearing on the Comprehensive
 Plan, in compliance with the requirements of section 66.1001(4)(d) of the Wisconsin Statutes.

        SECTION 5. The Village Board of the Village of Clinton, Wisconsin does, by the
 enactment of this ordinance, formally adopt the document entitled, “Village of Clinton,
 Wisconsin Comprehensive Plan,” pursuant to section 66.1001 (4)(c) of the Wisconsin
 Statutes.

      SECTION 6. This ordinance shall take effect upon passage by a majority vote of the
 members elect of the Village Board.


       IN WITNESS WHEREOF, we have hereunto set our hands and seals this 2nd day of
 September, 2008.




   I hereby certify that the above ordinance was adopted by the Village Board of the Village of
 Clinton on the 2nd day of September, 2008, and that on the 11th day of September, 2008, it was
 published as a Class I notice pursuant to Chapter 985, Wisconsin Statutes.




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                   Page A-4
Exhibit A 09/02/2008
Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan   Page A-5
Exhibit A 09/02/2008
Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan   Page A-6
Exhibit A 03/24/2009
                             RESOLUTION 2008-04
               RESOLUTION TO ADOPT THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
             OF THE VILLAGE OF CLINTON, ROCK COUNTY, WISCONSIN

     WHEREAS, Section 66.1001(1)(a) and 66.1001(2) of the Wisconsin
Statutes set out requirements for long-range Comprehensive Planning
for towns, villages, and cities across the State; and,

     WHEREAS, Section 62.23(2) and (3) of the Wisconsin Statutes
authorizes and requires the Clinton Plan Commission to prepare and
recommend a Comprehensive Plan for the Village Board; and,

     WHEREAS, The Village opted on October 5, 2004 to join with Rock
County and other Rock County communities in applying for a multi-
jurisdictional State of Wisconsin Comprehensive Planning grant which
was approved by the State of Wisconsin as set forth in the FY 2005
Comprehensive Planning Grant, Grant Agreement Between The State of
Wisconsin Department of Administration and Rock County, dated June 7,
2005; and,

     WHEREAS, The Clinton Village Plan Commission on September 6,
2005   adopted   written   procedures  designed   to   foster   public
participation throughout the multi-jurisdictional planning project as
required by Section 66.1001(4)(a) of the Wisconsin Statutes; and,

     WHEREAS, The    Clinton   Plan  Commission   has  conducted  its
individual planning process as part of this multi-jurisdictional
project, utilized information generated as a result of Citizen
Participation activities, and held officially noticed public meetings
for each step of drafting the Comprehensive Plan; and,

     WHEREAS, the Village Board is to hold a Public Hearing prior to
Village Board action.

     NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Clinton Plan Commission
of the Village of Clinton, Rock County, Wisconsin, by a majority
vote, hereby recommends adoption of the Village           of Clinton
Comprehensive Plan as amended, as documented in the minutes of the
August 26, 2008 Plan Commission meeting, containing all of the
required elements and maps specified in Section 66.1001(2) of the
Wisconsin Statutes and forwards the Comprehensive Plan to the Village
Board for adoption.



This resolution adopted by action of the Plan Commission of the
Village of Clinton and dated this 26th day of August, 2008.



  Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                          Page A-7
  Exhibit A 09/02/2008
Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan   Page A-8
Exhibit A 09/02/2008
                              PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE
                               VILLAGE OF CLINTON
                          COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT

    The Village of Clinton Plan Commission will conduct a public hearing Tuesday, March 24,
2009 at 7:00 PM at Clinton Village Hall, 301 Cross Street, Clinton, Wisconsin 53525, to
consider adoption of a proposed amendment to the Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan.
    Summary of the Proposed Comprehensive Plan Amendment.
    Transportation Element: Add goals and policies addressing transportation for persons with
disabilities.
    Land Use Element: 1) Add a description of existing/potential land use conflicts; 2) amend
existing maps and add maps depicting floodplains, wetlands, productive agricultural soils,
limitations for building site development, boundaries of service areas of public utilities and
boundaries of service areas of community facilities; 3) amend the current planned land use map
and future land use plan to change the land use designation of a 10-acre parcel located in Heldt-
Paulson Community Park from Park to Community Facilities.
    Housing Element: Update housing market information.
    Economic Development Element: Update employment by industry outlook.
    The Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan provides a set of goals, programs, objectives,
maps, and policies for the growth, future land uses, and development patterns of the Village for
the next 20 years. The Plan covers nine elements, as required by Wisconsin State Statutes
66.1001: Issues & Opportunities; Housing; Economic Development; Transportation; Utilities &
Community Facilities; Agricultural, Natural, and Cultural Resources; Intergovernmental
Cooperation; Land Use, and Implementation.
    Additional information regarding the proposed amendment to the Village of Clinton
Comprehensive Plan is available from Philip E. Rath, Village of Clinton Administrator, 301
Cross Street, Clinton, WI 53525; (608) 676-5304.
    The proposed Comprehensive Plan amendment may be inspected before the hearing at
Clinton Village Hall, 301 Cross Street, Clinton, WI 53525, and, at the Clinton Public Library,
214 Mills Street, Clinton, WI 53525. A copy of the proposed Comprehensive Plan amendment
may be obtained, upon request, at Village Hall.

                                             Philip E. Rath
                                             Village Administrator

(Published in The Clinton Topper February 19, 2009.)




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                    Page A-9
Exhibit A 03/24/2009
                             PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE
                     VILLAGE OF CLINTON COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

    The Village of Clinton Plan Commission will conduct a public hearing Tuesday, June 24,
2008 at 7:00 PM at Clinton Village Hall, 301 Cross Street, Clinton, Wisconsin 53525, to
consider adoption of the proposed Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan.
    Summary of the Proposed Comprehensive Plan. The Comprehensive Plan provides a set of
goals, programs, objectives, maps, and policies for the growth, future land uses, and
development patterns of the Village for the next 20 years. The Plan covers nine elements, as
required by Wisconsin State Statutes 66.1001: Issues & Opportunities; Housing; Economic
Development; Transportation; Utilities & Community Facilities; Agricultural, Natural, and
Cultural Resources; Intergovernmental Cooperation; Land Use, and Implementation. Major Plan
priorities include: attracting families to secure the local work force and participate in civic
activities and community life; bringing single family homes from 65% of the total housing stock
to 70% while encouraging a broad range of housing options; improving transportation access and
linkages, including street conditions, alternate through-streets, trails, and commuter rail;
maintaining Downtown as the civic and economic center of the Village, as well as the main
venue for community events; guiding future development at the I-43/Hwy 140 Interchange
toward a new Business Park and travel-oriented planned business; negotiating boundary and
revenue-sharing agreements to assist growth management; securing the long-term viability of
Village facilities; and, maintaining park, trail, open space, and urban forestry systems consistent
with village growth, with initial focus on improving existing parks. Future land use focuses
residential growth to the northwest and northeast. Future general industry would be west of the
existing industrial park. Agricultural and natural resource preservation would be mainly focused
in the southwest, and also in selected portions of the northeast.
    Additional information regarding the proposed Comprehensive Plan is available from Philip
E. Rath, Village of Clinton Administrator, 301 Cross Street, Clinton, WI 53525; (608) 676-5304.
    The proposed Comprehensive Plan may be inspected before the hearing at Clinton Village
Hall, 301 Cross Street, Clinton, WI 53525, and, at the Clinton Public Library, 214 Mills Street,
Clinton, WI 53525. At Village Hall and at the Clinton Public Library, a brochure on the Plan
may be obtained free of charge. A copy of the full Draft Comprehensive Plan may be obtained
at Village Hall for a charge of $36.00 and advance notice of at least two business days. A copy
of the Plan’s Executive Summary may be obtained at Village Hall for $2.00.

                                             Philip E. Rath
                                             Village Administrator

(Published in The Clinton Topper May 22, 2008.)




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                   Page A-10
Exhibit A 09/02/2008
                              Draft Comprehensive Plan Amendment Distribution
                                         Mailed February 19, 2009


Michelle Dennis, Director             Dr. Pamela Kiefert, Superintendent   Town of Bradford
Clinton Public Library                Kathy Zwirgzdas, Business Manager    Sandra Clarke, Clerk
214 Mill Street, PO Box 487           Clinton Community School District    11100 E. County Road MM
Clinton, WI 53525                     P.O. Box 566, 112 Milwaukee Rd       Avalon, WI 53505-9752
                                      Clinton, WI 53525
Town of Clinton
                                      Town of LaPrairie                    Town of Turtle
Beverly Torkilson, Clerk
                                      LaGena Crawford, Clerk               Deborah Bennett, Clerk/Treasurer
8719 E. State Road 67
                                      6215 E. Creek Road                   6916 S. County Road J
Clinton, WI 53525
                                      Janesville, WI 53546                 Beloit, WI 53511

Scott Heinig, Director                Peter Herreid                        William T. Henderson
Rock County Planning and Devel.       Comprehensive Planning Grant Adm     Collins & Henderson Law Offices
51 S Main St                          Div of Intergovernmental Relations   416 East Grand Ave, PO Box 777
Janesville, WI 53545                  101 E Wilson St, 10th Floor          Beloit, WI 53512-0777
                                      Madison, WI 53702-0001
Philip E. Rath
Village Administrator
Village of Clinton
301 Cross Street, PO Box 129
Clinton, WI 53525




       Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                           Page A-11
       Exhibit A 03/24/2009
February 19, 2009


To Neighboring Jurisdictions,

The Village of Clinton will hold a public hearing on proposed amendments to its Comprehensive Plan at
7:00 PM, Tuesday, March 24, 2009 at Clinton Village Hall, 301 Cross Street, Clinton, Wisconsin.

The attached pages address Plan amendments required by Department of Administration and proposed by
the Village.

Comprehensive Plan Element            Page(s)      Amendment

Housing                               II-30        Updated discussion of housing market conditions.

                                      III-20 and
Economic Development                               Updated industry sector outlook and local prospects.
                                      III-33, 34

                                      IV-38
                                                   Incorporated goals and policies regarding
Transportation                        through
                                                   transportation systems for persons with disabilities.
                                      IV-40

                                                   Updated acreage for Community Facilities and Park
                                                   designations, updated available development land
                                      VIII-23      map, added comments about land use conflicts, added
Land Use                              through      maps depicting environmental information,
                                      VIII-35      agricultural soils, and sewer service area, depicted
                                                   proposed land use plan amendment on future land use
                                                   map.

Please call, e-mail, or write with your comments: Pamela A. Lazaris, AICP, Planning Service & Solutions
LLC, P.O. Box 17, Lake Mills, WI 53551; (920) 648-6617; PAL@gdinet.com. Or, you may also send
comments to Philip E. Rath, Village Administrator, Village of Clinton, P.O. Box 129, Clinton, WI 53525;
(608) 676-5304; clintonadministrator@charterinternet.com.

Thank you for your time!

Sincerely,


Pamela A. Lazaris, AICP
Planning Service & Solutions LLC

Enclosure

cc: Philip E. Rath, Village Administrator


Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                          Page A-12
Exhibit A 03/24/2009
                                  Draft Comprehensive Plan Reviewers
                                        Mailed May 19-24, 2008

Michelle Dennis, Director            Dr. Pamela Kiefert, Superintendent   Fred Bobolz
Clinton Public Library               Kathy Zwirgzdas, Business Manager    Chairman, Town of Bradford
214 Mill Street, PO Box 487          Clinton Community School District    4001 S Emerald Grove Rd
Clinton, WI 53525                    P.O. Box 566, 112 Milwaukee Rd       Janesville, WI 53546
                                     Clinton, WI 53525

William Werhane                      Michael J. Saunders                  Dan DeLong
Chairman, Town of Clinton            Chairman, Town of LaPrairie          Chairman, Town of Turtle
12946 E Lake Shore Rd                P.O. Box 98                          6108 E County Road J
Clinton, WI 53525                    Avalon, WI 53505                     Clinton, WI 53525

                                     Mike Halsted                         Franklin Marcos
Scott Heinig, Director
                                     Environmental Analysis & Review      SW Regional Planner
Rock County Planning and Devel.
                                     WI Dept of Natural Resources         WisDOT Southwest Region
51 S Main St
                                     3911 Fish Hatchery Road              2101 Wright Street
Janesville, WI 53545
                                     Fitchburg, WI 53711                  Madison, WI 53704
William T. Henderson                 Philip E. Rath
Collins & Henderson Law Offices      Village Administrator
416 East Grand Ave, PO Box 777       Village of Clinton
Beloit, WI 53512-0777                301 Cross Street, PO Box 129
                                     Clinton, WI 53525




       Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                         Page A-13
       Exhibit A 09/02/2008
May 19, 2008



To Neighboring Jurisdictions,

Your reviews and comments are welcome as the Village of Clinton enters the final phase in its
comprehensive plan process.

The enclosed Draft Comprehensive Plan begins with an Executive Summary, followed by an introduction
and the nine planning elements required under Wisconsin Statutes 66.1001.
The Clinton School District is covered mainly in Chapter V, Utilities & Community Facilities, with
recreational facilities profiled on page 14 of Chapter VI, Agricultural, Natural and Cultural Resources,
Part A, Parks, Trails, Open Space and Urban Forestry.
Neighboring Towns may want to closely review the Intergovernmental Chapter (Chapter VII), which
contains an overview of Town planning priorities and goals on page 13. Chapter VI covers Agricultural,
Natural and Cultural Resources and Chapter VIII contains the Village’s Draft Future Land Use Plan.
Rock County services and intergovernmental activity is profiled in Chapter VII, Intergovernmental
Cooperation.

A copy of this proposed Plan will be available for review at Clinton Village Hall, 301 Cross Street,
Clinton, WI 53525 and Clinton Public Library, 214 Mill Street, Clinton, WI 53525.

A Draft Comprehensive Plan Open House will be held from 6:00-8:00 PM this coming Thursday, May 22
at the Clinton Fire Station, 145 Ogden Avenue. Please come if you are free.

Please call, e-mail, or write with your comments: Pamela A. Lazaris, AICP, Planning Service & Solutions
LLC, P.O. Box 17, Lake Mills, WI 53551; (920) 648-6617; PAL@gdinet.com. Or, you may also send
comments to Philip E. Rath, Village Administrator, Village of Clinton, P.O. Box 129, Clinton, WI 53525;
(608) 676-5304; clintonadministrator@charterinternet.com.

Thank you for your time!

Sincerely,


Pamela A. Lazaris, AICP
Planning Service & Solutions LLC

Enclosure

Cc: Philip E. Rath, Village Administrator
    William T. Henderson, Consulting Village Attorney




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                           Page A-14
Exhibit A 09/02/2008
May 24, 2008



Franklin Marcos, SW Regional Planner
WisDOT Southwest Region
2101 Wright Street
Madison, WI 53704

Dear Franco,

The Village of Clinton has completed a Draft of its Comprehensive Plan and is looking forward
to review and comment by interested parties.

Enclosed are the Transportation chapter of the DRAFT Plan, the Plan’s DRAFT Executive
Summary, the Existing Land Use Map, Proposed Future Land Use Map, and a CD containing the
full DRAFT Comprehensive Plan document. Please let me know if it would be helpful to you to
have the full plan or other portions of it as paper copy.

The Village of Clinton has scheduled its public hearing on the Comprehensive Plan for June 24,
2008, so it would help us to receive your comments by June 17.

We appreciate your review and look forward to your comments.

Thank you for your time!

Sincerely,


Pamela A. Lazaris, AICP
Planning Service & Solutions LLC

Enclosure

cc: Philip E. Rath, Village Administrator




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                               Page A-15
Exhibit A 09/02/2008
May 24, 2008



Mike Halsted
Environmental Analysis & Review
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources
3911 Fish Hatchery Road
Fitchburg, WI 53711

Dear Mike,

The Village of Clinton has completed a Draft of its Comprehensive Plan and is looking forward
to review and comment by interested parties.

Enclosed are the Agricultural, Natural and Cultural Resources chapter of the DRAFT Plan, the
Plan’s DRAFT Executive Summary, the Existing Land Use Map, Proposed Future Land Use Map,
and a CD containing the full DRAFT Comprehensive Plan document. Please let me know if it
would be helpful to you to have the full plan or other portions of it as paper copy.

The Village of Clinton has scheduled its public hearing on the Comprehensive Plan for June 24,
2008, so it would help us to receive your comments by June 17.

We appreciate your review and look forward to your comments.

Thank you for your time!

Sincerely,


Pamela A. Lazaris, AICP
Planning Service & Solutions LLC

Enclosure

cc: Philip E. Rath, Village Administrator




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                               Page A-16
Exhibit A 09/02/2008
                             Notification to Non-Metallic Mining Interests


                                                                             Pat Strachan
Brett Frank                          Mark Madson
                                                                             Mule Hill Materials &
Frank Brothers, Inc.                 Little Limestone, Inc.
                                                                             Nursery, Inc.
2501 Morse Street                    8609 East Little Lane
                                                                             5189 Aurora Road
Janesville, WI 53545                 Clinton, WI 53525
                                                                             Hartford, WI 53027

Ryan Spies                           Kurt Nelson                             Richard Churchill
Rock Road Companies Inc.             Mann Brothers, Inc.                     Richard and David Churchill
P.O. Box 1779                        P.O. Box 48                             940 Sharon Road
Janesville, WI 53547                 Elkhorn, WI 53121                       Janesville, WI 53546

                                     Dan Silha
Todd J. Halderson                                                            Vickie Hanson
                                     Frank Silha & Sons Excavating
Custom Ditching Inc.                                                         Prairie Avenue Concrete
                                      and MS Properties of Rock County
2175 Townhall Road                                                           3527 S. Prairie Avenue
                                     348 E. Hwy 14
Beloit, WI 53511                                                             Beloit, WI 53511
                                     Janesville, WI 53546

Jackson A. Dunn and Kurt Nelson      Dave Zumbrunn                           James R. Lathers
Dunn Trucking & Limestone Co.        Beverly Excavation, LLC                 Lathers Sand & Gravel, Inc.
6404 South Dunn Road                 1100 Brandt Dr.                         3621 E. Hart Rd.
Clinton, WI 53525                    Elgin, IL 60120                         Beloit, WI 53511


Ronald Peterson                      William N. Yoss                         John Lader
B.R. Amon & Sons, Inc.               W.N. Yoss Construction, Inc.            H&L Farms, Inc.
W 2950 Hwy 11                        6117 South Hwy G                        5821 ELT Townline Rd
Elkhorn, WI 53121                    Janesville, WI 53546                    Beloit, WI 53511




      Note: The Non-Metallic Mining Interests were also sent Public Hearing Notice, on
      February 19, 2009, of the March 24, 2009 Public Hearing on the Comprehensive Plan
      Amendments.




   Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                             Page A-17
   Exhibit A 03/24/2009
May 22, 2008

To Persons & Companies with Interests in Non-Metallic Mining Sites
   Within the General Planning Area of the Village of Clinton, Wisconsin,

This Public Hearing Notice is provided in accordance with Wisconsin State Statutes 66.1001
(4)(e) regarding advance notification of a public hearing to consider a comprehensive plan.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                             PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE
                                     VILLAGE OF CLINTON COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

     The Village of Clinton Plan Commission will conduct a public hearing Tuesday, June 24, 2008 at 7:00 PM at
Clinton Village Hall, 301 Cross Street, Clinton, Wisconsin 53525, to consider adoption of the proposed Village of
Clinton Comprehensive Plan.
     Summary of the Proposed Comprehensive Plan. The Comprehensive Plan provides a set of goals, programs,
objectives, maps, and policies for the growth, future land uses, and development patterns of the Village for the next
20 years. The Plan covers nine elements, as required by Wisconsin State Statutes 66.1001: Issues & Opportunities;
Housing; Economic Development; Transportation; Utilities & Community Facilities; Agricultural, Natural, and
Cultural Resources; Intergovernmental Cooperation; Land Use, and Implementation. Major Plan priorities include:
attracting families to secure the local work force and participate in civic activities and community life; bringing
single family homes from 65% of the total housing stock to 70% while encouraging a broad range of housing
options; improving transportation access and linkages, including street conditions, alternate through-streets, trails,
and commuter rail; maintaining Downtown as the civic and economic center of the Village, as well as the main
venue for community events; guiding future development at the I-43/Hwy 140 Interchange toward a new Business
Park and travel-oriented planned business; negotiating boundary and revenue-sharing agreements to assist growth
management; securing the long-term viability of Village facilities; and, maintaining park, trail, open space, and
urban forestry systems consistent with village growth, with initial focus on improving existing parks. Future land
use focuses residential growth to the northwest and northeast. Future general industry would be west of the existing
industrial park. Agricultural and natural resource preservation would be mainly focused in the southwest, and also
in selected portions of the northeast.
     Additional information regarding the proposed Comprehensive Plan is available from Philip E. Rath, Village of
Clinton Administrator, 301 Cross Street, Clinton, WI 53525; (608) 676-5304.
     The proposed Comprehensive Plan may be inspected before the hearing at Clinton Village Hall, 301 Cross
Street, Clinton, WI 53525, and, at the Clinton Public Library, 214 Mills Street, Clinton, WI 53525. At Village Hall
and at the Clinton Public Library, a brochure on the Plan may be obtained free of charge. A copy of the full Draft
Comprehensive Plan may be obtained at Village Hall for a charge of $36.00 and advance notice of at least two
business days. A copy of the Plan’s Executive Summary may be obtained at Village Hall for $2.00.

                                                                 Philip E. Rath
                                                                 Village Administrator
(Published in The Clinton Topper May 22, 2008.)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sincerely,


Pamela A. Lazaris, AICP
Consulting Village Planner

cc: Philip E. Rath, Village Administrator


Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                                                        Page A-18
Exhibit A 09/02/2008
From:       “Halsted, Michael S – DNR” <Michael.Halsted@wisconsin.gov>
To:         “Pamela A Lazaris” - <pal@gdinet.com>
Sent:       Monday, July 21, 2008 12:44 PM
Attach:     dlinton-village-comp-plan2.ppt
Subject:    Village of Clinton – Comprehensive Plan - Comments

Thank you for the opportunity to review and comment on the Village of Clinton Draft Comprehensive Plan.
I was impressed with the overall content of the Agricultural, Natural and Cultural Resources chapter. My
comments below are limited to natural resources as it pertains to recreation, habitat, wetlands,
waterways, groundwater and construction issues like erosion control and stormwater management.

1. Wetlands: I recommend placing a caveat paragraph in the wetland section that covers these points:

a. the location of wetlands on Map VI-9 reflect wetlands appearing on the Department of Natural
Resources - Wisconsin Wetland Inventory (WWI).

b. the WWI was completed using remote sensing techniques and the accuracy of this data is limited.

c. the location of the wetlands appearing on the maps are only to be used as a guide for planning
purpose. Every parcel of land should be evaluated for the existence of wetlands on site during the
specific planning process.

d. it is very likely that additional wetland areas exist in Town/Village of Clinton that are not shown on Map
VI-9.

e. I have attached a map of hydric soils which are known to support wetland vegetation. Note much of
this land has either been developed or is under agricultural production. Wetland conditions might not
exist if an field is drained or land is filled for development. In the case of agricultural lands, lands under
production may be "farmed wetlands" and may not be slated for development. When ag-activity ends the
land.

2. Waterways: Spring Brook Creek is located in the southwest corner of the Village. Spring Brook (T1N
R14E S31) is a seepage-and-spring-fed, nine-mile-long tributary to Turtle Creek an listed Exceptional
Resource Waterway - ERW). The stream is shallow and its flow is greatly reduced in dry years; the
stream receives flow from the Clinton wastewater treatment plant and cooling water from Hormel.
Possible temperature alterations to Spring Creek from the Hormel discharge are of concern. The stream
supports a diverse array of minnow species but much of the habitat is degraded by past channel
modification and adjacent land use practices. The Village of Clinton should encourage all best
management agricultural and construction techniques to continually protect and improve water quality in
Spring Brook Creek. This could include encouraging buffer strips along shoreland zones and
construction of stormwater management facilities designed to reduce sediments and other pollutants from
stormwater run-off.

2. Waterways: An unnamed tributary to Turtle Creek is located north of Clinton. Not much is known
about this creek. However, it is a first order tributary to Turtle Creek (ERW) and merits protection from
undue sedimentation, pollutants and controlled run-off (especially as the industrial park develops and
more storage and treatment will be needed for stormwater run-off.

3. Waterways: An unnamed tributary to Little Turtle Creek begins in the south and east side of the
Village. This waterway and stormwater management has challenged the Village to responsibly manage
stormwater runoff without impacting residents along CTH X. Little is known about the quality of the water
in this creek. The Village should continue to ensure discharge from the southeast corner of the Village
proper is treated to the maximum extent practicable.



Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                             Page A-19
Exhibit A 09/02/2008
4. Waterways: An unnamed tributary to Turtle Creek is located in the west-northwest corner of the
Village. Little is known about this waterway; however, efforts to ensure it is protected will further serve
regional goals to improve the quality of the fishery and general water quality in Turtle Creek.

5. Stormwater: Responsible development includes taking a proactive approach to stormwater
management. Communities nationwide are combining stormwater management facilities with open
space recreation. The intent is to provide natural habitat for all flora and fauna, aesthetically appealing
landscapes, water quality improvement, while maintaining safe and adequate stormwater management.
The Village should encourage existing and new development to follow this model.

6. Groundwater: A groundwater protection plan can include program to encourage recharge
groundwater resources using small scale run-off site infiltration (e.g. planting rain gardens from rooftop
runoff). The Village should seek to balance needs to protect groundwater resources from contaminants
with goals to ensure Wisconsin's groundwater resources are not unduly depleted.

7. Air Quality: I am no air expert, but I believe it will be "comprehensive" to discuss the role managing air
quality has in the development of a community. Might be worth noting that Wisconsin has made
substantial improvements in air quality. However, while Beloit's ground level ozone levels appear to be
steadily declining, communities need to continue to encourage clean industry as it relates to air quality.
Bottom line - considering air quality, whether federally regulated pollutants, local fugitive dust, or
malodorous emissions should included as a natural resource concern and planning issue.

Feel free to contact me if you have questions regarding the above comments. Thanks again!
<<clinton-village-comp-plan1.ppt>>


 Mike Halsted
Environmental Analysis & Review Specialist
Green, Rock, Jefferson & Dodge Counties
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources
() phone:        (608) 275-3301
() fax:          (608) 275-3338
() e-mail:       michael.halsted@wisconsin.gov




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                              Page A-20
Exhibit A 09/02/2008
                          Exhibit B
               Public Participation Activities &
                        News Articles

    1. Comprehensive Plan Workshop #1, Issues & Opportunities,
       September 12, 2006

    2. Comprehensive Plan Workshop #2, Clinton’s Housing Future,
       October 10, 2006

    3. Comprehensive Plan Workshop #3, Clinton’s Economic Future,
       November 14, 2006

    4. Comprehensive Plan Workshop #4, Clinton’s Transportation
       Future, January 30, 2007

    5. Comprehensive Plan Workshop #5, Utilities & Community Facilities
       in Clinton’s Future, February 13, 2007

    6. Comprehensive Plan Workshop #6, Intergovernmental
       Coordination / Agricultural & Natural Resources, March 13, 2007

    7. Comprehensive Plan Workshop #7, Parks, Trails, Urban Forestry
       & Open Space, Cultural & Historic Resources, April 10, 2007

    8. Comprehensive Plan Workshop #8 / May Open House, Land Use &
       Growth, May 8 & 12, 2007 Open Houses and May 22, 2007 Plan
       Commission Workshop

    9. May Open House on Draft Comprehensive Plan, including Plan
       Implementation Chapter, May 22, 2008.

    10. Clinton Area Business Survey, April 2008.




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                               Page B-1
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
Discussion Notes ~ 09/12/06
Comprehensive Plan Workshop #1, Issues & Opportunities

Planning Issues

   Look to grow more to the northeast. If growth continues west, the distance from the schools
      will be farther.

   Continue to attract industry / commerce.

   I-43 is an asset. Industrial growth should be closer to I-43 for handier truck access (and less
       disruption of having trucks go through town to access the industrial park). A second
       industrial area off of I-43 would help provide industrial balance.

   Preserve the Downtown.

   Preserve and continue to build quality into urban forestry and terrace trees

Community draws:
  Friendly people
  Fantastic school system
  Strong history and heritage
  Comfortable and safe community
  Streets, gutters, sidewalks well maintained
  Urban forestry, terrace trees

Hindrances:
   Lack of participation
   Significant residential growth if not balanced by enough industrial/commercial
      establishments to occupy residents. New residents do not feel a connection to the
      community if they are gone for much of the day.
   People more mobile and don’t put down roots.
   When the population becomes more transient, then this can bring more issues to the
     community. Large rental complexes tend to introduce more transient populations than
     owner-occupied homes.

Opportunities

   Mix of industry / commerce to keep people here and interested.

   Railroad through town



Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                     Page B-2
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
       1) Potential for specific industry.
       2) Proposed Metra passenger rail – project now in alternatives analysis phase

   Look at all possible sources for grant money.

Policies
   Village discussed policy, to be applied to each quadrant of the village, of limiting rental units
       to a certain percentage of total housing units.
   Balance of residential unit types.
   Continue working with streets and trees.

Village Planning Area Exercise

   Observations:
           The City of Beloit is going out three miles from its borders for planning purposes.
           The 1969 Village Comprehensive Plan had a planning area of a 1½-mile radius around
             the village.

   Discussion of 2008 Planning Area:
       Go North at least to Creek Road.
       Soil conditions have governed growth. Wet soils to the southeast limit areas where
          development is possible south of County Hwy X and east of Hwy 140.
       Subdivisions like Coleman Estates block growth.
       Look at higher-grade farmlands and steer clear of these in land use planning outside
          Clinton’s borders. It’s important to show land uses suited for growth while showing
          lands to be preserved for agriculture.

   Regional Area of Influence Discussion:
       Take care not to end up like Poplar Grove (now 5½ miles north to south). Clinton will
          lose the community feeling if it takes in everything. Don’t let the community grow
          too large or at a pace too rapid for sensible planned expansion of infrastructure.
          Growth should not be permitted to be a drain on municipal utilities.
       Regional influences include: the School District, Janesville, people who use services
          and/or shop or visit Clinton. The “regional area of influence” map is similar to the
          Clinton Library’s map of card holders. Many library card holders avail themselves of
          Clinton’s stores and services while they’re in town. Such visits influence the Clinton
          economy and influence what we do Downtown. If we look at typical commuting
          times, these distances are consistent with the “regional area of influence” map.



Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                      Page B-3
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
Discussion Notes ~ 10/10/06
Comprehensive Plan Workshop #2, Housing

Past Housing Trend

    At certain junctures over the past ten years, there have been no single-family lots available,
    so those years show no single-family construction.

Housing Market

    Regionally, we have emerged from a long period of sustained housing growth. During this
    time, many people got into buying, improving, then quickly selling homes for a profit as
    prices continued to move upward. Now, nationally, there are 560,000 to 580,000 units for
    sale.1 Until these are substantially absorbed, there won’t be much more development.

    Demand is more of a function of timing than anything else. We need to look at the target
    buyer.

Future Housing Growth

    Does Clinton want to grow and expand, and, if so, to what extent?

    How do you attract the labor force that will support the housing and commerce in the
    community? What do we want for commerce and industry?

    Future housing must be planned growth, controlled growth, not spurts of activity, and must
    be concurrent with infrastructure and utilities’ availability and capacity. Plan ahead as to
    where and how we grow.

    For future housing mix, there should be more single-family, twin-home, and duplex housing,
    not more big multi-family complexes (along with their impact on schools and contribution to
    too dense and too rapid population growth). Impacts on schools and high density are why
    we’re not encouraging quick growth.

    If the Plan Commission intends to focus on single-family and two-family housing, then what
    goals do we need to set and achieve? Where would we put more residential? We have to
    have a plan as to where new residential development can go.

1
 Orest Chryniwsky, Kennedy Development Group, Inc. This information may also be found in U.S. Housing
Market Conditions, 2nd Quarter 2006, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Policy
Development and Research, August 2006. At the end of the second quarter of 2006, there were 566,000 new homes
available for sale. This inventory, the highest since 1963, would support 6.1 months of sales at the current sales
pace. The inventory of existing homes available for sale was 3,725,000, the highest ever reported, and would
support 6.8 months of sales at the current sales pace.


Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                                  Page B-4
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
   We need to look out 1½ to 2 miles past the current village borders and ask ourselves what we
   want to see once we grow out that far. Will there be locations for rural residential? We may
   see housing growth towards the Town of La Prairie.

   High growth pressure is coming our way. Communities nearby (Beloit, Rockton, Roscoe,
   etc.) are experiencing explosive growth. For example, Staples just added 300 jobs in Beloit.

   Redevelopment is an option if growth locations become scarce.

Growth Directions

   The I-43 / Hwy 140 interchange will pull growth towards it. (Everybody who travels past it
   has billfolds in their pockets and every now and then some of them stop.)

   What do we want to see at the I-43 / Hwy 140 interchange?

   Our main directions for growth will be north and east.

   Most valuable commercial property is likely to be at the I-43 / Hwy 140 interchange. Clinton
   might start with office research, retail, commercial, hotels, things that generate a lot of
   revenue. Then expand to industrial. Then introduce residential, but apply the right densities
   to support the right amount and type of residential development that will support commercial
   development.

Important Linkages for Housing
   New elementary school.
   Churches, though, at present, churches are finding it difficult to maintain membership.
   Parks, recreation. Clinton has plenty of parkland now and should be fine for the next 15-20
      years.
   Downtown – priority for access to shopping, particularly unique shops and services. An
     example would be Dan Hahn’s hardware store and his first-rate service and attentions to
     customers. These advantages are not found in big-box stores. Clinton needs to plan on
     how to enhance Downtown businesses.
   Transportation: The South Central Wisconsin Community Transportation Study’s
      Alternatives Analysis is looking at all transportation alternatives, not just rail. We will
      reach a point where we will be sick of commuting, of sitting in cars. Wherever any
      future rail goes, there has to be a logical progression. If rail comes to Clinton, then
      Clinton will grow faster. If not, then Clinton will grow at a slower pace.
   People who care about the outcomes will exercise the opportunity for positive difference.




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                     Page B-5
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
Housing Quality

   The new Village Maintenance Ordinance is implemented on a complaint basis and enforces
   against public nuisance issues, focusing on structural integrity, health and safety issues.

Land Uses Compatible with Housing
   Churches and schools.
   Home occupations.
   Clinton should not go the way of Milwaukee with a bar on every street corner.
   Mixed residential and commercial can work Downtown (e.g. studio apartments). Mixed
      residential/retail/service could work for redevelopment of vacant Downtown lots. Such
      redevelopment should fit in with and enhance Downtown character.
   Higher density residential can serve as transitional use next to light industrial.
   For the former middle school, something that would be compatible with the neighborhood is
      needed.

Services to Support Future Growth

   With future residential expansion, we need to look at a new Village Hall, Library, Police
   Station. Do we want a community center?




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                   Page B-6
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
Discussion Notes ~ 11/14/06
Comprehensive Plan Workshop #3, Economic Development

Downtown

   Maintain character.

   Encourage specialty shops. Examples include gift shops that people can browse through and
   that lead to exploring other businesses.

   Maintain/promote cluster of health services.

   Encourage grocery store, not as large as Clinton Foods.

   For Downtown to be relatively complete, there should be accessible housing close to
   Downtown, maybe converting some deteriorating housing to accessible housing.

Business Customer Base

   The biggest area where customers come from is the North Boone area. The community
   should do whatever it can to draw people in, using signage, etc.

Tourism Potential

   Clinton is what people are looking for. One tourist segment would be people traveling from
   Central Wisconsin to Chicago. They are attracted to the Pelishek Nature Trail and to the
   parks. These amenities should be expanded/promoted. One idea is to tie Allen Street
   corridor into the Pelishek Trail. Linkage to the trail should be clear and lead to shopping and
   other local amenities. Signage should be used to make the entrance to the trail clearer.

   Southern corridor entrance features could be explored.

   Agri-tourism could be further developed. There are already on-farm activities and events that
   draw people, i.e. Minkeys’ Wheel-In Pumpkin Patch & Corn Maze. The Blacksmith Shop is
   another example.

   The internet benefits small specialty businesses. Small business use of the internet should be
   encouraged.

   Local tourism must see (and capitalize on) how it fits into the larger regional landscape.
   Basic anchors could be further developed, such as an “Antique Road.”




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                    Page B-7
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
Interchange Area

   Sometimes the hotels in Beloit are full. Maybe a hotel could be developed at the interchange.

   A second industrial park should be developed at the interchange. One of the problems with
   the existing industrial park is truck transportation. Sometimes Hwy 140 is blocked for as
   much as a mile south of Clinton because of traffic. Train blockages also hold up traffic.
   Traffic on Hwy 140 south of Clinton will become a bigger problem in the future.

   An industrial park at the interchange would solve one of the drawbacks of the existing
   industrial park: visibility.

   Manufacturing and other industry could develop at the interchange in the context of a mixed-
   use business park. Too many communities have boxed themselves in with residential
   development, which then restricted options for industrial and commercial development.

   Clinton is one of a handful of communities with an undeveloped interchange – this represents
   a challenge and an opportunity. Planning and preparedness will be important so that future
   uses at the interchange develop in a fashion that will be the most advantageous to Clinton and
   its goals as a community.

   As a note, there are plans to rebuild I-43 as a four-lane corridor from Beloit to Walworth
   County, so development pressures will increase.

   The Town of Clinton has, in its comprehensive planning efforts, found it hard to designate
   areas north of I-43 for future residential areas. The Town has carefully selected areas with
   poor agricultural potential. As far as the I-43 interchange is concerned, the Town would put
   residential in the northwest quadrant if it had to.

   In looking at future growth, it’s important to expand just where agriculture is unproductive.
   Clinton should grow but keep the small-town atmosphere.

Manufacturing and Labor Force

   How is Clinton positioned to attract manufacturing? One of the biggest issues is the labor
   pool. Enough workers, especially skilled labor, are increasingly very hard to find.
   Businesses look at labor pool by zip code for labor potential, which can amount to a
   disadvantage for communities like Clinton. Labor potential on a more regional scale is just
   not evident at the zip-code level.




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                    Page B-8
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
Discussion Notes ~ 01/30/07
Comprehensive Plan Workshop #4, Transportation
Quality of Commuting and Regional Travel

   All of the following are equally important:
       ___    Regional highway improvements to allow for faster, more efficient commuting.
       ___    Mass transit options to get to work (regional commuter rail and/or bus).
       ___    More local and home-based employment options within the community,
              lessening the need for residents to commute out of town.

   If a train station comes to Clinton, Downtown would be a good location. Rail companies
   know that communities will take care of Downtown appearance and economic health.

   People at transit stations are often switching modes of transportation and are “on a mission”
   rather than arriving at a destination. Convenient services at stations are desirable, such as
   coffee, food, dry cleaning pick-up, etc.

Stateline Transit Study - Comments by Bob Soltau, Metropolitan Planning Organization
(MPO) Coordinator, Beloit

   $2 million study of various transit alternatives, including access to the Harvard, Illinois Metra
   station. Alternatives Analysis would look at such things as types of service, potential for
   designated lanes, etc. The Study is now in Phase I, Alternatives Analysis. Once the study is
   completed, any proposed projects must be approved by the Federal Transit Authority.
   Regional commuter rail is more expensive than regional commuter bus. Regional rail is
   typically subsidized, but is a nicer alternative than bus. Commuter bus may be the more
   viable alternative, at least initially. The Alternatives Analysis will examine potential for bus,
   rail, and combination of both.
   There is a significant amount of commuting from Rock to Dane County, so the study will
   look at how to bridge an overall system into Dane County. There’s not a lot of Metra
   involvement yet. A focus on Metra now could make the study look too targeted.


Park & Ride Lots

   There are no Park & Ride lots owned by the Wisconsin Department of Transportation in
   Rock County. A proposed project near the north edge of Rock County at Newville was
   defeated. There is very little support for Park & Ride facilities in Rock County.
   Among the challenges of locating Park & Ride lots are having a party with whom to enter
   into a maintenance agreement and using (and removing from the tax base) highly valuable
   land near interchanges. Less visible locations get significantly less use.


Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                      Page B-9
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
   There have been some issues with travelers using McDonald’s or Culver’s in the Newville
   area as stand-in park and ride meeting places for carpoolers.

Freight Rail

   There are advantages as well as a few disadvantages to freight rail. There are four or five
   trains daily, at least, and trains block roads from time to time, often with switching
   movements, and drivers can be impatient. Friday traffic on Hwy 140 can be a particular
   problem if the highway is blocked. Road-blocking can also affect emergency services.
   For a number of Industrial Park businesses, freight rail is a vital link. The Village should be
   sure to advertise availability of industrial park rail.
   Rail income from business use is more than from commuter use.

I-43 Interchange and Church Street (Hwy 140) Projects – Comments by WisDOT Project
Manager Gary Sassman

   Plans for the I-43 Interchange are done, bid letting is in February 2007 and project start is
   anticipated for late Spring – Summer 2007. Pavement improvements will extend from the
   Interchange about five (5) miles east to Walworth County. Part of this project is the Church
   Street Project running from the southerly Village limits north to the Interchange.
   WisDOT will try to do half of Hwy 140 at a time, though there will be two night-time ramp
   closures at the interchange for work.
   Brad Groh, WisDOT Transportation Engineer, will coordinate detours during the project.
   During construction, to the south, the Hwy 140 detour would involve taking Hwy 67 to Co.
   Rd. C at Darien, and then west to Clinton.
   Clinton Town Board members discussed the challenges of extended detour timeframes, citing
   use of Carvers Rock Road as a detour. Because of the heavier volumes of traffic, scheduled
   maintenance on the road had to be moved up three (3) years.
   The Church Street (Hwy 140) Project will take everything out and replace it, including
   sidewalks. The new sidewalks will be 5 feet wide (replacing 4-foot wide sidewalks).
   Various trees will have to be removed. Mailboxes, utility infrastructure, traffic signs, and the
   like will be temporarily relocated. Whether new utility infrastructure can be located
   underground is yet to be determined.
   To accommodate snow storage, with a few exceptions, there will be no trees. (Some
   significant trees will be preserved.).
   There are no plans for increasing capacity on Hwy 140. Widening the roadway is not a
   viable option because right-of-way would have to be taken up for road surface and this would
   bring traffic very close to many existing buildings.




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                   Page B-10
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
   No stoplights are planned to help control traffic. The through-way, turning, and side-street
   traffic volumes are not enough to justify the signal warrants required to place stoplights at the
   intersection of Hwy 140 and Co. Rd. X.
   A turn-lane is planned for Ogden Avenue. On Peck Avenue, there will just be extra shoulder.

Interchange Land Use and Development

   Convenience commercial for the traveling public, highway-dependent businesses (gas
   stations, fast food, motel). Such businesses can complement, rather than compete with, the
   Downtown. For example, unique local-flavor restaurants would not find themselves in
   competition with convenience fast food off the interstate.
   Larger commercial uses not competing with Downtown. Wal-Mart and similar stores,
   however, would hurt Downtown. A number of Downtowns have successfully differentiated
   themselves from the typical interchange mix. Beloit and Sharon were mentioned.
   Having a good mix of uses convenient to the traveling public could pull people off at Clinton
   who would otherwise wait until they got to Beloit to get off the interstate.
   Aside from food, gas, and similar services, eye-catching signage can draw people further into
   the community, signage that signals “you’ve arrived in Clinton and there’s more to see.”
   Look at reasons why people would get off at the Clinton interchange and work on realizing
   those opportunities. Commercial uses that pull the traveling public off the interstate can
   benefit Downtown if the traveler sees that there is something more to explore than just what
   appears near the interstate.
   Clinton Town officials indicated that if town land had to go to development, then the Town
   prefers it be land north of I-43 and west of Hwy 140 as this is less productive farmland than
   other locations next to the interchange.
   Groups of businesses have the opportunity to go together on getting the blue directional signs
   on I-43 so that travelers know what services are available in Clinton. Gary Sassman and
   Todd Matheson mentioned that they could get more information on the blue sign program.
   The program is self-funded rather than subsidized by WisDOT. Perhaps the Chamber of
   Commerce could look into the program.

Bicycle and Pedestrian Options

   Look into combined-use trails that can be used by other transportation modes, such as all-
   terrain vehicles (ATVs) and horses, in addition to walking and biking. The Monroe Trail was
   mentioned as an example of a multi-use trail. While this may be an option, design would be
   critical. People walking dogs, for instance, would not be comfortable with an ATV going by
   alongside them. The big question is, if ATVs are present, will walkers be comfortable using
   the trail?




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                    Page B-11
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
   Pelishek Nature Trail allows everything except for motorized traffic. Dan DeLong, President
   of Pelishek Trail Foundation, discussed tying into community advertising for Clinton, pulling
   trail users into the community to visit parks, see the shops, go to the restaurants.
   With railroad right-of-way being 99 feet wide, there are options for designing meandering
   trails. Grants could possibly assist with trail blacktopping so that a trail could also be used by
   rollerbladers and people in wheelchairs.
   The Snowmobile Club is building a clubhouse 2½ miles out along Co. Rd. X. The Club uses
   golf carts in October to give people rides along the trial who might otherwise find accessing
   it difficult. The Club is putting a bathroom in this Spring.
   Walking and biking connections between community parks and trails are desirable.
   Clinton High School is the hardest school to walk or bike to. There has been some discussion
   about putting a sidewalk from East Street to the High School.
   WisDOT transportation planner, Franco Marcos, described the Safe Routes to School
   Program that might offer resources to assist development of solutions to enhance walking and
   biking to school. The program is often run through community officer liaisons. There is a
   Safe Routes to School website for more information. Eau Claire is an example of a
   community who uses Safe Routes to School. Todd Matheson mentioned that applications for
   Safe Routes to School are due in 1½ months and that this application cycle would be the only
   opportunity for awhile. He mentioned that Renee Callaway of WisDOT was involved with
   the Program.

Hwy 11/14 Corridor Study – Comments by Mark Westerveld, WisDOT Project Development
Engineer

   The Study is at the Purpose & Needs Statement stage. The study area extends from
   Janesville west to Darien. WisDOT is working with various advisory committees to finalize
   Purpose & Needs and to develop alternatives. The Environmental Impact Statement stage of
   the Study is anticipated in another year or two. The Hwy 11/14 Corridor Study will try to
   dovetail with the I-39 Study. Clinton has secondary impacts from the Corridor.

Street Extensions

   Take care with planned extensions close to I-43. WisDOT does not allow access within
   1,300 feet of interstate ramps.
   Additional Clinton area interchanges are unlikely for the time being. Warrants have to be
   met before a new interchange will be considered.
   Alternative truck routes to the Industrial Park should be considered.
   Street extension concepts close to I-43 are intended to reflect the need for access roads when
   property near the interchange is developed rather than as conventional streets.



Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                    Page B-12
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
Discussion Notes ~ 02/13/07
Comprehensive Plan Workshop #5, Utilities & Community Facilities
Communications

   Cost and Service Choice: Sharon Telephone offers more services at the same rate as Verizon
   does for fewer services. What are the prospects for telephone service choices? Verizon does
   not offer some expected feature/price plans.

   Cell phone reception is often intermittent. There is a communications tower north of the
   Village and U.S. Cellular and Singular are available in the area.

   Balancing aesthetics with service adequacy is important when communications tower sites
   are proposed.

   Proposed federal legislation would reduce or eliminate municipal cable franchise fees. It’s
   difficult to track legislative proposals at the federal level.

Electricity & Gas
   Electrical Upgrades Needed for Future Development. Development close to the I-43
   corridor, such as a second Industrial Park, would require routing higher-capacity electrical
   lines to the Village from the north or through the Village from the existing Alliant Energy
   substation by the current Industrial Park. (The new municipal well at the Redner property
   gets electrical service from the north.)


Municipal Water, Wastewater System & Treatment Plant, Storm Water Management
   Both the wastewater treatment plant and water tower can provide adequate service for many
   years. Another water tower in 10 to 15 years is likely and this future need is already built
   into the impact fee schedule.
   Water quality issues (rust and chlorine smell) arise from time to time (example mentioned of
   having to change a three-month water filter monthly rather than quarterly). The Village
   addresses water main size whenever water main replacements are done.
   Infrastructure Upgrades Concurrent with Street Construction or Reconstruction: If any road
   replacement is scheduled, the Village looks to see if any infrastructure replacements are
   needed within the same right-of-way. For example, 12" new water main will be installed as
   part of the Church Street reconstruction. New subdivisions must install 8" water mains. As
   water main upgrades are made, water quality should improve.
   Storm Water Management: Directing storm water flows away from the village, controlling
   post-development runoff rates at the same levels as pre-development rates, cooperating with
   neighboring towns in overall storm water management, and considering a storm water utility
   are among the planning issues for future storm water management.


Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                  Page B-13
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
Trash Collection, Recycling, Yard Waste
   The Village Yard Waste site, next to the wastewater treatment plant in the Industrial Park, is
   currently open May-November, Wednesdays, 3 to 7 PM and Saturdays, 8 AM to Noon.
   Capacity is fine as long as Industrial Park land is available for expansion. The site was once
   set up for composting. A workable composting system could alleviate future space constraints.
   Coordination of commercial / residential and/or trash / recycling services can have glitches.
   People dropping personal items into commercial containers can be a problem.
   Large-item pick up is on a call-in basis.

Fire / EMS and Police
   The Fire / EMS facility is adequate. The Department is keeping up with equipment (new
   ambulance in 2006). New EMTs and drivers are needed.
   There is concern with the Fire District Agreement with the two neighboring townships for
   Fire / EMS. How the agreement is structured and who pays for what are ongoing issues.
   The Police Department is getting by in its current space and is keeping up with vehicle needs.

Churches
   Adequate parking can be a concern for some of the churches.
   Future prospects for churches are a concern because of the community uses taking place in
   these facilities that would be displaced if a church shut down. For example, St. Stephen’s
   Catholic Church is probably one of the only large meeting facilities in the community.
   Currently, this church has 125 families and is in discussion with the Beloit area church to
   discuss its future and its fit with the Diocese. The Church is taking a look at the use of its
   hall as a community facility and is in the middle of reorganization. Some of the other
   churches in Clinton are experiencing declining membership (and sometimes aging
   congregation with few young people coming up) while other churches are maintaining or
   increasing membership.

Schools
   Clinton Community Schools has a Charter School at the Elementary School focused on
   English as a Second Language (ESL) for grades K-2 having 18 to 20 seats that are available
   by lottery. A second Charter School is planned for the Middle School focused on a Science
   and Math hands-on kinetic-style learning environment. There is an alternative school in
   Milton for teens with discipline issues.
   Blackhawk Technical College in Beloit offers employee training classes used by some
   Clinton employers and offers trades training available to high school students. The College
   has strong programs in various trades, as well as emergency medical services and criminal
   justice. The College also has a community and business development program.



Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                   Page B-14
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
Municipal Facilities
   Village government services are just getting by in Village Hall. The facility is not efficient,
   not a good arrangement, not productive. For example, the Municipal Court has no waiting
   room space. People have to stand in the hallway to wait for their cases to come up. Election
   Day is very difficult because of space constraints. Financially, however, it’s necessary to
   continue the current building for the next several years.
   More meeting space is the Village’s biggest facility need. The Library uses the Village Board
   Room for programs, but scheduling is very tight and must be adjusted from time to time to
   avoid scheduling conflicts. Though common meeting space is good, the current Village
   Board Room is too small for both the library’s needs and for Village government needs.
   There needs to be a parallel discussion on financing all of the future facility projects and in
   financing their day-to-day operations when considering the future of municipal facilities and
   services, including police, public works and park services. Planning for the future needs of
   municipal facilities and services should take place in a few years, whether for current facility
   expansion and/or renovation, or for a new site. All departments, including public works (and
   parks) would gain some advantage from co-location, such as sharing of office equipment (i.e.
   fax and copy machines) and office functions.
   Municipal facilities should maintain a Downtown / Central presence, not pull away from the
   core. The bank, post office, pharmacy are examples of close-in places that can be visited in
   one trip. We should not be pushing our facilities out. Allen Street, however, should stay
   focused on businesses, rather than, for example, on industry or offices.
   Do we start looking at planning a town square?
   The Village should consider arrangements for emergency services (beyond existing County
   protocol for emergency assistance). What about a portable emergency power generator in the
   $3000 to $5000 range to set up an emergency command post, say at the Fire Station, to keep
   things running for at least a few hours? Might there be a Homeland Security grant for this?

Library
   The biggest issue is physical space. The current library has 2,340 square feet. The library
   has approximately 2,700 patrons, current annual circulation of approximately 32,000 pieces,
   and six (6) internet computer stations, for which a five- to six-person waiting list is common.
   There is no space for more stations. Library consultants have advised that for current
   operations, the library should have at least 5,000 square feet, and that, projecting ahead, it
   should aim for 10,000 square feet.
   Compared to comparable-sized communities, staffing level is on target for what’s
   recommended, though existing staff is very busy. More part-timers would be helpful. A 15-
   hour per week volunteer is leaving at the end of the summer and there is no one yet to replace
   this individual.
   For operations, more phone lines are needed. (There is just one phone line now.)



Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                   Page B-15
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
   Circulation has increased rapidly; clients have increased steadily, typically in inverse
   relationship to the economy (more increase during economic slow-downs, less during strong
   economic times).

Public Works and Parks Facilities
   Thinking about local parks, the main needs are: accessibility, including networked routes to
   walk and bike among parks, residential areas, schools, Pelishek Nature Trail, and other
   community destinations; park development, including equipment upgrading and installation;
   and, coordination with School facilities (shared community use). Total acreage (about 60 to
   65 acres) is sufficient at present.

Health Care, Nursing Care, and Assisted Living Facilities
   Health care services are adequate. There are three (3) hospitals within 20 miles of Clinton
   and the local clinic offers urgent care. Generally, there is a full range of health and fitness
   services locally; though, at present, there is no local eye doctor.
   Assisted living facilities that are more accessible to the Downtown and senior residential
   facilities within easy walking distance of Downtown would be desirable.

Senior Citizens Center
   The Center lacks private spaces for Social Security consultations and health screening
   services.
   The Center is in a Village-owned building managed by the American Legion who rents the
   facility to the Senior Citizens and, in return for building management, keeps the rent money.

Post Office
   Workshop participants were not aware of any particular Post Office facility issues or plans.

Cemetery
   The Cemetery is privately owned with its own Board.

Service Clubs & Organizations
   Many service organizations suffer from lack of participation. It’s hard to get people active
   and involved; people get burned out. It’s important to see that new people are welcomed and
   encouraged to participate. The Junior Women’s Club used to come in and get new water
   customers every six (6) months, but this has dropped off.
   The Historical Society wants to establish a local history museum. Currently, some items are
   at the Library, some at Clinton Junction coffee shop, but most in storage and at risk of water
   damage of mildewing.



Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                     Page B-16
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
Discussion Notes ~ 03/13/07
Comprehensive Plan Workshop #6,
Intergovernmental Coordination, Agricultural and Natural Resources

Intergovernmental Coordination

   The Town of Turtle has an agreement with the City of Beloit, expiring in 2021. The Town
   also has an on-going agreement with the Village of Clinton for highway equipment exchange.

   The Town of Clinton has an agreement with the County to do highway work and also uses
   the County Sheriff Department for town policing.

   The Library is part of the Arrowhead Library System.

Land Use and Growth Management: Discussion on Areas for Preservation and Areas for
Development

   Town Land Use & Growth Management Concerns
       Town of Clinton Chairman Pete Tiffany said that the Town wants the “Great Wall of
       China” (to hold off growth pressure). The Town feels stuck in the middle with the
       stateline to the South and Walworth County to the East. At the same time,
       communications between the three towns (Clinton, Bradford, Turtle) is “100 times
       better” than it was 10 years ago. The Town would rather a new subdivision be in the
       town than incorporated into the Village so that the town can realize the tax revenue.
       A lot of Clinton township is not feasible for development. The northwest corner (of the
       interchange) is the area where development (if it had to occur) could go. The areas south
       and east of the Village should remain farmland. In looking at suitable land uses, the
       Town of Clinton feels that there is no reason why rural uses like golf courses and
       nurseries can’t be permitted to co-exist with agriculture. The Town of Clinton has an
       ordinance to prevent the hauling away of topsoil (so as not to compromise soil quality).
       The Town of Clinton has completed its Visioning Session for its Comprehensive Plan.
       The #1 issue was annexation. The Town indicated that it was not interested in
       commercial or industrial development. The “Issues & Opportunities” element is done for
       the Towns of Clinton, La Prairie, and Turtle

   Second Business Park at Interchange
       Consolidating business operations in Clinton is a challenge because it is not clear where
       industry can locate next to the interchange (for businesses that require efficient access to
       I-43 without having to go through the village). Where would 15 to 20 acres be available
       next to the interchange?



Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                    Page B-17
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
       A second industrial park / business park is needed next to the interchange. Among the
       location challenges is staying at least 1,300 feet from the bottom of the interstate ramp.
       Can we work with Wisconsin Department of Transportation to pursue a business park
       location at the interchange that will satisfy the Department’s site standards? Could Rock
       County Economic Development Manager James Otterstein help the Village to work on
       an interchange business park?
   Street Planning Near Interchange
       The Village Official Map shows streets parallel to I-43 more as a concept than a defined
       location, realizing that there has to be some kind of road system in the future.
   Boundary Agreements & Intergovernmental Planning of Border Areas
       Town of Turtle Chairman Jim Brandenburg talked about the Town’s boundary agreement
       with the City of Beloit that incorporated revenue sharing for land annexed into the City.
       He suggested that the Town of Clinton do the same thing with the Village of Clinton. He
       said that the only way the Town of Turtle has to exist is to co-exist with the City.
       Business prospects have to be shown what a municipality has to offer. A driving factor is
       sewer. Town / City or Town /Village boundary agreements and cooperative planning
       help to define and prepare border areas where economic development opportunities could
       be realized that would benefit both jurisdictions. If the Village and Town of Clinton do
       not work out boundary issues, prospects will go to Beloit. If a planned business park
       attracts interest, others will be interested as well. Once the new Clinton Town and
       Village Boards are seated, the Boards should get together to discuss a boundary
       agreement and planning at the border areas.
   Directions for Residential Growth:
          East of High School, between the High School and Coleman Estates
          East of Cemetery
          West of current Industrial Park, with appropriate buffering and multi-family
           transitioning to single-family
          West of railroad tracks, north of Co. Rd. X by Co. Rd. J. (The Village has discussed
           this at various times in the past.)




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                  Page B-18
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
Discussion Notes ~ 04/10/07
Comprehensive Plan Workshop #7,
Parks, Trails, Urban Forestry & Open Space; Cultural & Historic Resources

Parks & Recreation Facilities

   Community and neighborhood park acreage is now more than needed given the population
   and should be adequate over the next 20 years. The biggest needs for these parks are
   maintenance and development. The only gap in the park system is mini-parks and these
   should be dedicated in new residential developments.

   If the community grows north of I-43, then more parkland can be considered in that area.

   Enough staff and volunteer help are key to successful maintenance. The Park Department’s
   new tractor will help mow parks more efficiently, but having enough people to maintain
   plantings is important. At Herb Refue Park, a volunteer has been maintaining plantings, but a
   long-range plan for maintaining park plantings will still be an important consideration.

   The former Youth Sports Organization still has funds. (Could they be available to assist with
   future park development needs?)

   Private and volunteer efforts have made a difference in getting new equipment into existing
   parks and in maintaining and repairing what is there. Although park maintenance days are
   widely publicized, few members of the general population turn out to assist the Park Board
   volunteers.
   Participation from high school kids and their families is important in planning for the future
   of parks and recreation in Clinton. (Don’t forget to involve who you’re looking to serve.)
   Fantastic ideas can arise out of discussions with junior high and high school students.
   Involvement of skateboard kids is an example.

   The Tree Board does forestry presentations to Elementary School children, and this could be
   an opportunity to ask them what would make them want to go to parks more. The next
   presentation is coming up in about 1½ weeks.

   Park development needs include:

       Heldt-Paulson Community Park:
          Pavilion, swing sets and other playground equipment, ball diamond, designated dog
          area with containers, walking trail connection to Kennedy development.
          Heldt-Paulson Community Park is now used for soccer, but younger siblings have no
          place to play and parents have no place to sit while the game is on. Young parents
          want to see playground equipment, places to sit, and smoother surfaces for bringing


Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                   Page B-19
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
            in strollers, as well as to assist mobility for grandparents who want to watch the
            game.
            The pavilion should be installed within the next 10 years. A Heldt-Paulson park plan
            should be completed over the next two years. Next year, the parking lot is to be
            enlarged
            Once permanent equipment and fixtures are installed, then trees, flowers, and other
            landscaping can be added.

         Gert Wolter and Herb Refue Neighborhood Parks:
            Maintenance and repair should be the focus over the next five years. One example of
            a maintenance need is the base underneath park equipment. It’s now down to bare
            dirt in some areas. Re-forestation of Gert Wolter Park is planned this year; re-
            forestation of Herb Refule Park is planned for next year.

         Recreation Programs & Facilities in Clinton
            The Clinton Public Library and Soccer should be added to the list.

Trails

   The Pelishek Trail Foundation hopes to blacktop part of the trail for handicapped and stroller
   accessibility. Rock County is planning more trail signage. Restrooms are also being
   planned.

   Trail linkages should be made between the Pelishek Nature Trail, Heldt-Paulson Community
   Park, and the Kennedy development (Jefferson Crossing). Now there is a 0.4-mile walking
   path at Heldt-Paulson Community Park and it would be nice to have at least ½ mile so
   walkers can time themselves.

   Planned trail connections in the Heldt-Paulson and Jefferson Crossing areas include trail
   connection from Heldt-Paulson northward, behind the proposed church, into Jefferson
   Crossing, and connecting to the planned east-west trail way along the extended Ogden
   Avenue.

   Trails should run between Heldt-Paulson, the High School, Coleman Estates, and Pelishek
   Nature Trail. It’s important to look at the big picture for comprehensive trail linkages both
   around and throughout the community. Clinton does not have a safe way of connecting the
   parks and getting across Hwy 140. Eventually, there might be stoplights at Hwy 140 and
   Ogden Avenue that would add to the safety of a future Ogden Avenue trail corridor.
   There should be trail connection between Pelishek Nature Trail and the Downtown
   (connecting to the head of Front Street), and between Pelishek Trail and the north end of
   town.




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                    Page B-20
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
   Eventually, there should be trail connections to Roscoe and Sharon.

   The main focus for developer dedications should be on trail connections and access to the
   parks that Clinton already has. It takes a lot of money to keep up parks, and trails are cheaper
   to put in and maintain.

Urban Forestry & Open Space

   One thing that people are uninformed about is the importance of maintaining a balance of
   trees in the community. When a tree species suffers from a disease, it can take a toll on the
   whole tree population. An example would be the Emerald Ash bore that kills all Ash trees
   except for Mountain Ash. An appropriate balance of trees can prevent too much
   representation by just a few species.

   There are still a lot of vacant terraces that should have trees. The trees make the community
   more livable and add to overall quality-of-life.

   One challenge is balancing the benefits of terrace trees with maintenance issues arising from
   leaves, broken limbs, keeping trees healthy, and handling storm damage. The Tree Board is
   heavily involved in pruning, trimming, and management practices. Last year, an estimated
   1,200 to 1,500 hours of volunteer work was estimated, with about 1,000 hours actually
   documented. It will be important for the community to look at the long-term viability of its
   urban forestry maintenance program.

   Criteria such as percentage of canopy cover should be considered. DNR South Central
   Regional Urban Forestry Coordinator Jeff Roe suggested looking at photos that Rock County
   has to get ideas about ideal canopy percentages. (A sample objective: 40% canopy-shaded
   terrace.)

Cultural & Historic Resources

   The 1895 Water Tower needs to be restored. The Clinton Historical Society tried to get a
   grant, but attached restrooms disqualified the structure. If the overhang section of the roof is
   removed, then the restrooms would be considered detached. Estimates for restoration work
   have been in the $60,000 to $70,000 range.

   A historic preservation ordinance was considered a few years ago, but historical maintenance
   requirements discouraged proceeding with it. There can still be successful efforts with
   historically significant buildings and with design enhancement through urban forestry.
   Downtown Design & Image: The Chamber of Commerce takes care of the Downtown
   planters. The Downtown should be user-friendly for bicyclists (Sam’s Club 12-slot sturdy
   $60 bike racks mentioned) while still addressing safety issues (keeping skateboarders and
   bicyclists from riding on the sidewalks).




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                    Page B-21
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
   Maintaining a healthy Downtown should be a critical component of the overall plan for the
   community.

   Community image should be characterized by a welcome atmosphere, including amenities to
   help people feel welcomed, like percent of shade, Downtown benches, waste receptacles, and
   directional signs. Current/recent efforts include: the planned Kiwanis’ banners, Allen Street
   improvements, new light fixtures when Hwy 140 is redone.

   Entrance signs and welcoming signage and information kiosk as close to I-43 as possible
   would help to create a welcoming atmosphere and show what the community has to offer.

   Entrance corridor features such as an archway could be incorporated into overall community
   design. There should be a planned design and color scheme to entrance corridor and main
   street features. The planned maroon banners will coordinate with the Downtown streetscape
   brick. Additional enhancements should provide continuity of color, style, and quality.

   Donated benches of uniform quality and style could replace the existing benches. Donation
   plaques on the old benches could be relocated to new ones, and other opportunities to sponsor
   benches would exist. (An example of a high-quality bench would be like the one donated to
   Gert Wolter Park.)
   Little attention has been paid to the value of tourism. Amenities such as a hotel and
   welcoming signage and features can help to draw people into the community. There is a
   perceived discontinuity of elements and services. The Downtown does have the potential to
   attract tourists, but to realize this potential will take involvement from businesses. There
   needs to be a synergy of efforts toward attractive storefronts and toward recruiting businesses
   having good economic fit and contributing to the Downtown mix. The goal would not be to
   make Clinton a tourist hub, but to find its niche. Clinton can attract people taking day trips
   out of Chicago. Festivals and events unique to Clinton would attract people and pull them
   off the interstate, but publicizing these festivals and events is a first step. The community
   might consider an event that spans a week, including the “bookend” weekends, so that it
   would look like a really big party with something happening every day.

   Work on a new community brochure is underway. The brochure will not just point out places
   to shop but points of interest as well. It will cover businesses, churches, opportunities to
   volunteer, etc.

   Improvements could be made to the Village web site, including a link to the Historical
   Society. Evansville was mentioned as an example of a community with a revamped web site.
   Maybe high school students could maintain a web site and get their names listed on it. (In
   addition to the web site, the Village also has an annual newsletter that is distributed with the
   tax bill.)

   Clinton used to have a Welcome Wagon run by the Junior Women’s Club. Now it is as
   though the community ignores newcomers. Businesses and realtors could get in on a
   Welcome Wagon effort


Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                   Page B-22
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
   “Come in and slow down,” could be a slogan idea. The idea would be to inspire people not
   to hurry through Clinton, but get them to slow down and take time to enjoy the community.
   The Allen Street boulevard parkway helps people to want to slow down and stay awhile in
   the community.

   What makes Clinton distinctive? Events such as Prairie Days Parade, the Muscular
   Dystrophy Association (MDA) Tub Run, Taste of Clinton events and attractions, and urban
   forestry. (The June 16, 2007 Taste of Clinton will include antique car show, farmer’s market,
   clowns, petting zoo, dunk tank, dancers, and Clinton High School Band.)

   The Clinton community reflects three main values/characteristics:
       1) Friendly
       2) Caring
       3) Appealing

   Meeting participants shared what attracted them or attracts them to Clinton:

       Friendly community, good school system, a lot of very old and very appealing churches,
       wonderful setting for photographers and artists. (Beloit College art classes come to
       Clinton.)

   The more the community enhances what sets it apart, the more people it can attract, and the
   more people will want to be involved to carry out special events and build quality into the
   community. Clinton already has a lot to offer. The key is to get more people to feel as
   passionate about the same things as those involved already love about the community.




   Attachment: Written comments by Art Bushue




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                Page B-23
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan   Page B-24
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan   Page B-25
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
Discussion Notes ~ Tuesday, May 8, 2007 / Saturday, May 12, 2007
Comprehensive Plan Open House (Workshop #8), Future Land Use & Growth
and Plan Commission Meeting of Tuesday, May 22, 2007

Participants engaged in a land use exercise and visual preference exercises, the results of which
are set forth in Chapter VIII, Land Use.




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                   Page B-26
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
DRAFT Comprehensive Plan Open House, Thursday, May 22, 2008

The Village of Clinton offered a Draft Comprehensive Plan Open House from 6:00 to 8:00 PM at
the Clinton Fire Station, 145 Ogden Avenue, on Thursday, May 22, 2008.

Available for public viewing were a poster-sized proposed future land use map, several 11” x
17” proposed land use maps, two full Draft Comprehensive Plan documents, and 12 Draft Plan
Executive Summaries. Thirty (30) Draft Comprehensive Plan Brochures were available as free
handouts and the Draft Plan Executive Summaries were available for purchase at $2 each.

Clinton Board President and Plan Commission Chair Mary A. Jensen and Consulting Village
Planner Pam Lazaris were available to meet with the public. Village Administrator Philip E.
Rath was present for part of the time. No members of the public came to the Open House.




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                               Page B-27
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
                       VILLAGE OF CLINTON
                                301 Cross St. P.O. Box 129
                               Clinton, Wisconsin 53525-0129
                                       (608) 676-5304



       <Date>



       <First Name> <Last Name>
       <Company>
       <Address1>
       <Address2>
       <City>, <State> <Zip Code>

       Dear Mr./Ms. <Last Name>:

       As the Village of Clinton completes work on its Comprehensive Plan, current
       information on the local workforce and the opinions of Clinton area employers
       will help us to understand today’s Clinton economy and to shape the Village’s
       long-range planning priorities.

       Enclosed is the employer survey questionnaire. Please answer each question as
       completely as possible. Individual company information will be treated
       confidentially.

       Thank you for participating in this survey. After you have finished the
       questionnaire, just seal it in the enclosed postage-paid envelope, and send it back
       by April 30, 2008.

       Thank you for your time.

       Sincerely,



       Mary A. Jensen
       Village President

       Enclosures




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                   Page B-28
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
                        Clinton Employer Survey
     Insights Into The Present & Future of the Clinton Economy
        Informing the Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan 2008

1.     How many employees are now at your Clinton facility/facilities?
       _____ FTE employees        _____ Part-time employees

       Any Seasonal Employment? If so, please describe (time of year, number of employees, etc.):
       ______________________________________________________________________________

2.     Please indicate the kinds of occupations represented by your company by number of
       employees working in each type of occupation, the number of employees hired since
       January 1, 2007 for each occupation, and the wage level or range for each occupation.

       Position Title                                   Number of       Number Hired      Wage Level
                                                       Employees in    Since January 1,   or Range for
                                                       This Position        2007          This Position




       How many of the employees listed above represent new positions with your company? _____

       How many of the new employees increased your company’s total employment? ______

3.     Over the past 5 years, has your company’s employment level:

        Increased         Decreased          Stayed the Same

4.     Over the next 5 to 10 years, do you anticipate your company’s workforce to:

        Increase          Decrease           Stay the Same


Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                      Page B-29
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
5.     Approximately what percentage of employees:
            Live in the Clinton area (Clinton address)?                                _____%

            Commute to Clinton from locations within a 20-mile radius of Clinton?      _____%

            Commute to Clinton from within 20 to 40 miles of Clinton?                  _____%

            Commute to Clinton from outside of a 40-mile radius of Clinton?            _____%


6.     Please rate workforce availability as it relates to your business.

                                                                                             Not
                                                           Low       Medium      High
                                                                                           Applicable
       Availability of workers
       Quality of workforce
       Stability of workforce
       Workforce training opportunities


7.     Do you find that the number of positions you have open but cannot fill is:

        Increasing           Decreasing          Stable

8.     Over the next 5 to 10 years, does your company anticipate a physical expansion?

        Yes          No

       If Yes, would your company:
              Expand in place
              Relocate to the new area of the Clinton Industrial Park
              Relocate to a new Business Park (if available) at the I-43 / Hwy 140 Interchange

9.     Please indicate whether the following utility needs for your facility or facilities are expected
       to increase, decrease, or remain stable over the next 5 to 10 years.


           Utility Type                                          Increasing    Stable       Decreasing
           Electric
           Gas
           Water
           Sewer
           Telecommunications




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                        Page B-30
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
       If increasing or decreasing, please describe: __________________________________________
10     What are your views on community needs overall? Please rank what you feel are the top
       seven (7) community needs, with “1” being most important, “2” next important, and so on,
       with “7” being the least important.

       ___ More Single-Family Homes, Low to Moderate Prices
       ___ More Single-Family Homes, Moderate to Upscale
       ___ More Attached Homes or Townhouses, for Owner-Occupancy, Low to Moderate Prices
       ___ More Attached Homes or Townhouses, for Owner-Occupancy, Moderate to Upscale
       ___ More Attached Homes or Townhouses, for Renter-Occupancy, Low to Moderate Prices
       ___ More Attached Homes or Townhouses, for Renter-Occupancy, Moderate to Upscale
       ___ More Apartments, Low to Moderate Prices
       ___ More Apartments, Moderate to Upscale
       ___ Residential developments for senior citizens, independent lifestyle
       ___ Residential developments for senior citizens, assisted living
       ___ Nursing care
       ___ Elder day care
       ___ Temporary residential options

       ___ Park development/enhancements
       ___ Pedestrian & Bike Trail development
       ___ Street improvements
       ___ Truck service
       ___ Freight rail service.
       ___ Future commuter rail station in Clinton
       ___ Water service
       ___ Sewer service
       ___ Electric service
       ___ Police protection
       ___ Fire protection
       ___ Emergency Management Services (EMS)
       ___ Library facility and services
       ___ Schools

       ___ Health care
       ___ Child care

       ___ Farmland preservation outside of the village borders
       ___ Agribusiness development
       ___ Downtown development
       ___ Manufacturing industry growth
       ___ Technology industry growth
       ___ Regional office development
       ___ Distribution facilities

       ___ Other ______________________________
       ___ Other ______________________________


Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                Page B-31
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
11.    Please check your viewpoint with regard to the following statements.

                                                                                          Neutral or
                                                                      Agree    Disagree
                                                                                          No Opinion
       Future housing mix should focus on single-family homes.
       Future housing mix should have a wide range of choices.
       Housing developments for people 65+ will be important.

       Downtown should be the commercial, cultural, and civic
       center of the community.
       The Interchange area should include planned business focused
       on travel- and commuter-oriented services.

       The southern Hwy 140 corridor should be enhanced to create
       an attractive southern gateway to the village.
       There should be a commuter rail station in Clinton.
       There should be a trail network to connect the Downtown,
       schools, places of employment, and neighborhoods.


12.    What are Clinton’s strengths as a place to do business? _______________________________
       ______________________________________________________________________________

13.    What are Clinton’s weaknesses as a place to do business? _____________________________
       ______________________________________________________________________________

14.    Are there any barriers to growth in Clinton?      Yes          No
       If so, what are they? _____________________________________________________________

       ______________________________________________________________________________

15.    Is there anything else you would like to comment on in response to this survey?

       ______________________________________________________________________________
       ______________________________________________________________________________
       ______________________________________________________________________________




                            Thank you for participating in this survey.
                 Use the postage paid envelope, and please return by April 30, 2008.

                                                



Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                     Page B-32
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
April 2008 Business Survey

As part of the Comprehensive Plan process, the Village mailed a survey in April to 108 Clinton area
businesses to solicit their opinions on long-range planning priorities, and to get as current information as
possible on the local workforce. Twenty-five (25) businesses returned their questionnaires, for a response
rate of 23%.

The 25 businesses represented a total of 176 full-time employees, 89 part-time employees, and 78
seasonal employees. Four of the businesses added new employees since January 1, 2007. The overall
average wage reported, for all types of jobs represented in the survey, was $13.32 per hour. Over the next
five years, 75% of responding businesses anticipated maintaining the same employment level and 25%
anticipated adding employees.

Businesses were asked where employees came from. Total results from responding businesses showed
that 54% of the employees came from Clinton (Clinton address), 35% came from within a 20-mile radius
of Clinton, 8% came from within 20 to 40 miles of Clinton, and 3% came from more than a 40-
mile radius of Clinton.

                               Where Employees Come From
                            Clinton Employer Survey, April 2008




                                 8%        3%




                 35%                                                        54%




                                  Clinton (Clinton address)
                                  20 miles from Clinton
                                  20 to 40 miles from Clinton
                                  More than 40 miles from Clinton



In rating Workforce Availability, Quality of Workforce, and Stability of Workforce, more than half of the
responding businesses reported workforce availability, quality, and stability at “Medium” levels, 40%
reported “High” quality, 30% reported “High” stability, and 15% reported “High” availability. None of
the responding businesses reported “Low” workforce quality. Ten percent reported “Low” availability
and five percent reported “Low” stability of workforce. All other responses were “Not Applicable.” For
Workforce Training Opportunities, 39% of responding businesses reported "Medium" level of
opportunities, 22% reported "High" level of opportunities, 17% reported "Low" level, and 22% indicated
"Not Applicable."




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                           Page B-33
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
The businesses were asked to rank the top seven community needs out of a list of 36, plus two "Other"
listings. The top-ranking needs were:

    1. Street Improvements,              4. Commuter Rail,               7. Assisted Living
    2. Downtown                          5. Farmland Preservation,
       Development,                      6. Schools, and
    3. Manufacturing Growth,

When asked about whether they agreed, disagreed, or were neutral/no opinion on a set of statements,
business respondents answered as follows.

                                                                                              Neutral / No
Opinion Statement                                                    Agree       Disagree
                                                                                               Opinion
Future housing mix should focus on single-family homes.               56%          22%           22%
Future housing mix should have a wide range of choices.               53%          21%            26%
Housing developments for people 65+ will be important.                61%           6%            33%
Downtown should be the commercial, cultural, and civic center
                                                                      90%           5%             5%
 of the community.
The Interchange area should include planned business focused
                                                                      70%           5%            25%
 on travel- and commuter-oriented services.
The southern Hwy 140 corridor should be enhanced to create
                                                                      62%          10%            28%
 an attractive southern gateway to the village.
There should be a commuter rail station in Clinton.                   57%          19%            24%
There should be a trail network to connect Downtown, schools,
                                                                      45%          15%            40%
 places of employment, and neighborhoods.

In listing Clinton's strengths as a place to do business, 62% of those responding to the question listed
people and/or community, many referring to friendly people, loyal local customers, small-town
atmosphere; 33% cited location; 24% referred to the local business climate, referring to progressive
attitude, helpful staff, etc. (Percentage totals exceed 100% because some respondents cited more than one
reason.)

In listing Clinton's weaknesses as a place to do business, 55% referred to insufficient Downtown traffic
and exposure to maintain businesses, as well as competition from large shopping centers nearby. Other
reasons cited were street conditions, disruption from construction projects, water, sewer, and tax rates,
and lack of business development incentives.

Of the businesses that responded as to whether there are any barriers to growth in Clinton, 74% said
"Yes," and 26% said "No." For those who said "Yes," 50% cited taxes and/or water & sewer rates. Other
reasons included farmland (at village periphery), local attitudes against change, and industrial park access
to I-43.

Eleven businesses responded when asked if there were any other comments. Topics covered included
securing the local economy, especially the Downtown; attending to overall orderliness of the community
(neat properties, zoning enforcement, faster street repair work); alternate truck route through town; and
commuter rail support.




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                                           Page B-34
Exhibit B 09/02/2008
                    Exhibit C
     Comprehensive Planning Grant Documents

    1. Village Board Resolution No. 2004-9, Agreement Between the
       Village of Clinton and Rock County to Apply for a Grant for the
       Development of a Multi-Jurisdictional Comprehensive Plan,
       October 5, 2004.

    2. 2005 Comprehensive Planning Grant Application, October 28,
       2004.

    3. Wisconsin Department of Administration Letter on 2005
       Comprehensive Planning Grant Agreement between State of
       Wisconsin and Rock County.

    4. Village Board Resolution No. 2005-11, Adoption of Citizen
       Participation Plan for Comprehensive Planning Process, September
       6, 2005.

    5. FY 2005 Multi-Jurisdictional Comprehensive Planning Grant
       Agency Services Agreement Between Village of Clinton and Rock
       County.

    6. Wisconsin State Planning Law, State Statutes, Section 66.1001.




Village of Clinton Comprehensive Plan                                   Page C-1
Exhibit C 09/02/2008

				
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