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Edmonton City Centre Airport - PDF

VIEWS: 17 PAGES: 31

									Edmonton City Centre Airport
Table of Contents

1.   Briefing Notes Summary
2.   Briefing Notes: Consolidation
3.   Briefing Notes: Top ECCA Destinations
4.   Briefing Notes: Top ECCA Users
5.   Briefing Notes: Northern Statistics
6.   Briefing Notes: Medical In Flight Emergencies
7.   Briefing Notes: Air Ambulance Infrastructure at EIA
8.   Briefing Notes: Executive, Business, Corporate and GA Services at EIA
9.   Briefing Notes: Villeneuve – Alternate Airport
Briefing Notes Summary

 Consolidation Documentation
 Summary Points:
 Air Service Growth:
        EIA was Canada’s fastest-growing major airport from 2006-2008.
            o   From 2004 to 2008, EIA served over two million more passengers, leaping from
                4.1 million to 6.4 million passengers – a more than 50% growth rate.
        EIA served a record 6.4 million passengers in 2008 and 6.1 million passengers in 2009.
        Since consolidation in 1996, EIA domestic passenger traffic has increased by 82%;
        transborder by 120%; and international by 404%.
            o   In 1995, prior to consolidation, EIA served 1.9 million passengers and ECCA
                served 0.9 million, for a total of 2.8 million.
            o   In 1996, the year of consolidation, EIA served 3.1 million passengers and ECCA
                served 0.5 million, for a total of 3.6 million.
            o   In 2009, passengers at EIA increased a total of 95% since 1996, compared to the
                Edmonton region population growth of 30% and Alberta GDP growth of 53%.
        Growth has outpaced both Edmonton Region population growth and Alberta GDP
        growth, indicating that consolidation has stimulated air service and passenger growth
        beyond what could be attributed to a strong local and regional economy. Consolidation
        has also allowed Edmonton to better realize its market potential.
        In 1995, prior to consolidation, there were 15 scheduled non-stop destinations served
        from Edmonton.
            o   Today, there are over 50 scheduled non-stop destinations served from EIA
                (including seasonal charter services). This represents the best air service in our
                region’s history.
            o   At EIA, prior to consolidation, there were only two transborder destinations
                (Minneapolis and Salt Lake City). Today, there are 12 (Chicago, Denver,
                Houston, Kahului/Maui, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Orlando, Palm
                Springs, Phoenix, San Francisco and Seattle).
            o   In 2009, EIA introduced US Quick Connect, primarily to make northern travellers’
                US connections easier.
            o   Air service for the North has improved since consolidation, with increased
                service to northern destinations and improved connections through EIA.
            o   EIA now serves 11 destinations north of latitude 54: Yellowknife, Fort McMurray,
                Grande Prairie, Whitehorse, High Level, Inuvik, Fort St. John, Norman Wells, Hay


 Created: June 2009                                                                                  1
 Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
 Last Reviewed: August 17, 2010
 Notes: all data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
               River, Fort Smith and Rainbow Lake. By comparison, Calgary only serves five
               northern destinations.
           o   Scheduled seat capacity to the North has grown at EIA from 934,000 seats per
               year in 2004 to about 1.2 million in 2009. This represents a 31% increase in seats
               between northern points and EIA.


Airline Economics:
       Airline margins are slim; even a few passengers “leaked” to other markets/airports can
       make or break the viability of a service, with a cascading effect on other destinations
       due to airlines not hubbing traffic through EIA.
       Airlines are increasingly focused on deploying their primary resource (aircraft) only to
       routes with the highest yield and the least risk.


Position of Edmonton Airports Board affirming consolidation:
       The Board of Directors and Management have developed a five-year strategic plan,
       which includes a $1B capital program, based on consolidation remaining in place.
       Edmonton Airports has strongly affirmed its position on consolidation of scheduled air
       services.


Documentation by the City of Edmonton affirming consolidation:
       The City of Edmonton has provided documentation recognizing and reassuring
       Edmonton Airports’ lenders of restrictions on passenger services.


Top ECCA Destinations Statistics
Summary Points
       The top 25 airports where ECCA flights originate or terminate make up 87% of the total
       airports in the population.
           o Of these top 25 airports, 41% of flights are ECCA local or originate and
               terminate at ECCA without landing at another airport.
           o Of these top 25 users, 10 are northern airports, comprising 20% of total
               movements.
       Calgary is the third-busiest destination airport from ECCA
       Flights leaving ECCA and returning to ECCA are the most common (#1), and Fort
       McMurray Airport the second-busiest destination airport from ECCA (#2).




Created: June 2009                                                                                2
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Last Reviewed: August 17, 2010
Notes: all data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
Top ECCA Users Statistics
Summary Points
       The top 25 users at ECCA make up nearly 75% of all movements in 2008. While there is
       a diverse group of users, the majority of movements are consolidated amongst a small
       group of clients. This group is comprised of local flight training schools, corporate
       clients and charter providers.
       Of these top 25 users, 9 are corporate aircraft; the 16 other users are primarily charter
       operators, air ambulance, flight training and government.
       Of these top 25 users, 18 also commonly use EIA.
       EA is not releasing specific names to respect privacy.


Northern Statistics
Summary Points
All EA-operated airports serve the North, although at significantly different scales.
EIA serves as the primary airport serving the North.
       There were 133,000 landed seats from the North to ECCA and 778,000 from the North
       to EIA in 2008.
       At EIA, of the northern departures (aircraft movements) 70% are scheduled service, 18%
       are non-scheduled and 12% provide oil sands related crew changes.
       At ECCA, of the northern departures (aircraft movements) 24% are scheduled service,
       71% are non-scheduled and 5% provide oil sands related crew changes.
ECCA
       Of 82,000 aircraft movements at ECCA, 22,000 (27%) are northern flights (to and from).
       See pie chart.
       The ECCA air access policy permits up to a maximum of 65,520 scheduled seats
       annually to a maximum of four northern destinations (Fort McMurray, Grande Prairie,
       High Level and Peace River). The airlines that serve these communities have reported to
       Edmonton Airports that in 2008 they carried 17,578 passengers (enplaned and
       deplaned) or 27% of the allowable total.
       Currently, using June 2010 statistics, only 7.8% of allowable seats were flown from
       ECCA.




Created: June 2009                                                                             3
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Last Reviewed: August 17, 2010
Notes: all data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
                                       Landed Seats From the North by Client Type
                     800,000


                     700,000


                     600,000


                     500,000


                     400,000


                     300,000


                     200,000


                     100,000


                            -
                                                                                                                               Total Landed
                                     scheduled &         GA-                     GA-Other                    GA-Private -
                                                                   GA-Military               GA-Private                         Seats From
                                       charter        Government                 scheduled                    Corporate
                                                                                                                                  North
       Seats From the North ECCA       87,849           7,166          16           28        16,299           21,244            132,602
       Seats From The North EIA        762,761           28            92          7,727       2,209            4,846            777,663




                                   2008 ECCA Total Air Movements by Segment
                                                                                                   Edmonton Police Services
                                                                                                             2%
             Flight Training &
             Other Commercial
                    41%                                                                                Government of Alberta
                                                                                                               2%

                                                                                                                   Other Government
                                                                                                                          4%



                                                                                                                             Military
                                                                                                                               1%


                                                                                                                            Medevac
                                                                                                                              5%




           Private
            15%

                                                                                                                  Charter
                                                                                                                   27%


                                Scheduled Passenger
                                     Services
                                        3%




Created: June 2009                                                                                                                            4
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Last Reviewed: August 17, 2010
Notes: all data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
                                2008 Northern ECCA Air Movements by Segment

                              Private - North
                                   3.6%
                            Scheduled Passenger
                              Services - North
                                   2.7%



                                                           Movements Not
          Charter - North                                   Related to the
             15.1%                                              North
                                                               68,500
                                                                73%




            Medevac - North
                3.5%


                    Military - North
                          1.0%


             Other Government - North
                      0.3%



               Government of Alberta -
                      North
                      0.3%




Medical In-flight Emergencies
Summary Points
       Serious medical situations arise regularly on commercial flights. In addition to the
       planned air ambulance operations which already occur at EIA, unplanned responses are
       common, and a successful program with health care providers to manage these
       unplanned emergencies is in place.
       There were 493 incidents requiring response at EIA in 2009
       Response to these medical situations is planned and exercised at EIA with health care
       providers.
       In-flight emergencies are an example of a common situation at EIA that requires
       emergency medical response.


Air Ambulance Infrastructure at EIA
Summary Points
       Air ambulance can continue to use ECCA with one runway.
       It will only transition when planning and facilities are complete at EIA.
       New facilities at EIA would be integrated, allowing for significant building and
       emergency response efficiencies through on-site collaboration of ground, fixed and
       rotary winged transport.


Created: June 2009                                                                          5
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Last Reviewed: August 17, 2010
Notes: all data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
       Serious interest in developing a dedicated air ambulance facility at EIA has been voiced
       and would support the relocation of services from ECCA.
       Operating costs for new buildings at EIA are typically lower than older buildings at
       ECCA.
       Response priority, safety protocol, air ambulance declared landings and security
       services are consistent at ECCA and EIA and, therefore, would not be a barrier for air
       ambulances at EIA.



Executive Business, Corporate and General Aviation Services at EIA
Summary Points
       General, business and corporate aviation has a significant presence and infrastructure at
       EIA through dedicated services at Apron 2.
       Approximately 380,000 landed seats are served through Apron 2 per year.
       GA at EIA is primarily charter and corporate business aviation.
          o Apron 2 serves the interests of northern development, in particular.
       GA at EIA is tied closely to the second-largest oil/gas industrial park in North America –
       Nisku. Service and access are key for importers/exporters located in Nisku. Scheduled
       and charter services that are supplied by the GA community at EIA are key to these
       companies.
       There is room for additional GA infrastructure at EIA.
           o   There has been serious interest from the GA community in expansion of the
               infrastructure at EIA. Businesses such as Fixed Base Operators (FBOs),
               government and medical transportation have expressed interest in developing
               permanent locations at EIA.



Villeneuve Alternate
Summary Points
       Villeneuve is already the primary training airport and would continue to fulfill that role.
       With investment in navigational infrastructure it could play an expanded role in flight
       training. We have already invested in GPS.
       With this same investment in infrastructure at Villeneuve, the airport use would expand
       to be available as an alternate for aircraft capable of using the shorter runways (currently
       3,500 feet), including most aircraft used for air ambulance trips when ECCA closes.
       Flight training occurs at EIA, ECCA and Villeneuve Airports.
       Villeneuve handles the highest volume of overall flight training, with EIA handling the
       highest volume of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) training.
       Many of the training flights included in the ECCA number are training flights that left
       from ECCA, conducted their training circuits at Villeneuve and returned back to ECCA.




Created: June 2009                                                                                6
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Last Reviewed: August 17, 2010
Notes: all data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
Briefing Note: Consolidation
Summary Points:
Air Service Growth:
       EIA was Canada’s fastest-growing major airport from 2006-2008.
           o   From 2004 to 2008, EIA served over two million more passengers, leaping from
               4.1 million to 6.4 million passengers – a more than 50% growth rate.
       EIA served a record 6.4 million passengers in 2008 and 6.1 million passengers in 2009.
       Since consolidation in 1996, EIA domestic passenger traffic has increased by 82%;
       transborder by 120%; and international by 404%.
           o   In 1995, prior to consolidation, EIA served 1.9 million passengers and ECCA
               served 0.9 million, for a total of 2.8 million.
           o   In 1996, the year of consolidation, EIA served 3.1 million passengers and ECCA
               served 0.5 million, for a total of 3.6 million.
           o   In 2009, passengers at EIA increased a total of 95% since 1996, compared to the
               Edmonton region population growth of 30% and Alberta GDP growth of 53%.
       Growth has outpaced both Edmonton Region population growth and Alberta GDP
       growth, indicating that consolidation has stimulated air service and passenger growth
       beyond what could be attributed to a strong local and regional economy. Consolidation
       has also allowed Edmonton to better realize its market potential.
       In 1995, prior to consolidation, there were 15 scheduled non-stop destinations served
       from Edmonton.
           o   Today, there are over 50 scheduled non-stop destinations served from EIA
               (including seasonal charter services). This represents the best air service in our
               region’s history.
           o   At EIA, prior to consolidation, there were only two transborder destinations
               (Minneapolis and Salt Lake City). Today, there are 12 (Chicago, Denver,
               Houston, Kahului/Maui, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Orlando, Palm
               Springs, Phoenix, San Francisco and Seattle).
           o   In 2009, EIA introduced US Quick Connect, primarily to make northern travellers’
               US connections easier.
           o   Air service for the North has improved since consolidation, with increased
               service to northern destinations and improved connections through EIA.
           o   EIA now serves 11 destinations north of latitude 54: Yellowknife, Fort McMurray,
               Grande Prairie, Whitehorse, High Level, Inuvik, Fort St. John, Norman Wells, Hay



Created: June 2009                                                                                  1
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Last Reviewed: August 17, 2010
Notes: all data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
               River, Fort Smith and Rainbow Lake. By comparison, Calgary only serves five
               northern destinations.
           o   Scheduled seat capacity to the North has grown at EIA from 934,000 seats per
               year in 2004 to about 1.2 million in 2009. This represents a 31% increase in seats
               between northern points and EIA.


Airline Economics:
       Airline margins are slim; even a few passengers “leaked” to other markets/airports can
       make or break the viability of a service, with a cascading effect on other destinations
       due to airlines not hubbing traffic through EIA.
       Airlines are increasingly focused on deploying their primary resource (aircraft) only to
       routes with the highest yield and the least risk.


Position of Edmonton Airports Board affirming consolidation:
       The Board of Directors and Management have developed a five-year strategic plan,
       which includes a $1B capital program, based on consolidation remaining in place.
       Edmonton Airports has strongly affirmed its position on consolidation of scheduled air
       services (see attached Board Resolution).


Documentation by the City of Edmonton affirming consolidation:
       The City of Edmonton has provided documentation recognizing and reassuring
       Edmonton Airports’ lenders of restrictions on passenger services (see attached letter).




Created: June 2009                                                                                2
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Last Reviewed: August 17, 2010
Notes: all data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
Created: June 2009                                                               3
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Last Reviewed: August 17, 2010
Notes: all data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
Created: June 2009                                                               4
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Last Reviewed: August 17, 2010
Notes: all data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
Briefing Note: Top ECCA Destinations

Background

There has been considerable discussion around who uses ECCA, and whether it is Edmonton’s
Gateway to the North. This Briefing Note looks at the destinations utilized by ECCA users.

Summary Points
       The top 25 airports where ECCA flights originate or terminate make up 87% of the total
       airports in the population.
           o Of these top 25 airports, 41% of flights are ECCA local or originate and
               terminate at ECCA without landing at another airport.
           o Of these top 25 users, 10 are northern airports, comprising 20% of total
               movements.
       Calgary is the third-busiest destination airport from ECCA
           o Flights leaving ECCA and returning to ECCA are the most common (#1), and
               Fort McMurray Airport the second-busiest destination airport from ECCA (#2).




Created: June 2009                                                                          1
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Last Reviewed: August 2010
Notes: all data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
ECCA Origin/D es tination Airports

Airport                                                          Grand Total % of Total
CYXD - Edmonton Muni                                                 33,386       40.5%
CYMM - Fort Mcmurray                                                  6,838         8.3%
CYYC - Calgary Intl                                                   6,312         7.7%
CZVL - Edmonton Villeneuve                                            4,934         6.0%
CYQU - Grande Prairie                                                 2,597         3.1%
Unknown Destination                                                   2,266         2.7%
CYPE - Peace River                                                    1,844         2.2%
CYEG - Edmonton Intl                                                  1,650         2.0%
CFB6 - Josephburg                                                     1,327         1.6%
CYZH - Slave Lake                                                     1,218         1.5%
CYBW - Calgary Springbank                                             1,068         1.3%
CYLB - Lac La Biche                                                   1,018         1.2%
CYZF - Yellowknife                                                       891        1.1%
CER4 - Fort McMurray, Mildred Lake                                       797        1.0%
CEZ3 - Cooking Lake                                                      790        1.0%
CYXE - Saskatoon                                                         607        0.7%
CYOJ - High Level                                                        574        0.7%
CYLL - Lloydminster                                                      571        0.7%
CYQF - Red Deer Industrial                                               530        0.6%
CAL4 - Fort McKay/Albian                                                 517        0.6%
CYVR - Vancouver Intl                                                    489        0.6%
CEW7 - Edmonton (U of A Hospital)                                        392        0.5%
CYWG - Winnipeg                                                          354        0.4%
CYQR - Regina                                                            340        0.4%
CEZ4 - Fort Vermillion                                                   326        0.4%
                                                                    71, 636      8 6. 9%

Total M ovements                                                     8 2, 454




Created: June 2009                                                                         2
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Last Reviewed: August 2010
Notes: all data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
Briefing Note: Top ECCA Users

Background

There has been considerable discussion around who uses ECCA, and whether it is a “private”
airstrip for a few or used by a wide variety of people and businesses. This Briefing Note looks
at the top ECCA user statistics

Summary Points
       The top 25 users at ECCA make up nearly 75% of all movements in 2008. While there is
       a diverse group of users, the majority of movements are consolidated amongst a small
       group of clients. This group is comprised of local flight training schools, corporate
       clients and charter providers.
       Of these top 25 users, 9 are corporate aircraft; the 16 other users are primarily charter
       operators, air ambulance, flight training and government.
       Of these top 25 users, 18 also commonly use EIA.
       EA is not releasing specific names to respect privacy.




Created: June 2009                                                                                1
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Last Reviewed: August 2010
Notes: all data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
Briefing Note: Northern Statistics
 Background

 There has been considerable discussion around the activity at ECCA and how it services
 northern Alberta and Canada. This Briefing Note looks at the how the North is served by the
 various airports that are operated by Edmonton Airports.

 Summary Points
 All EA-operated airports serve the North, although at significantly different scales.
 EIA serves as the primary airport serving the North.
         There were 133,000 landed seats from the North to ECCA and 778,000 from the North
         to EIA in 2008.
         At EIA, of the northern departures (aircraft movements) 70% are scheduled service, 18%
         are non-scheduled and 12% provide oil sands related crew changes.
         At ECCA, of the northern departures (aircraft movements) 24% are scheduled service,
         71% are non-scheduled and 5% provide oil sands related crew changes.
 ECCA
         Of 82,000 aircraft movements at ECCA, 22,000 (27%) are northern flights (to and from).
         See pie chart.
         The ECCA air access policy permits up to a maximum of 65,520 scheduled seats
         annually to a maximum of four northern destinations (Fort McMurray, Grande Prairie,
         High Level and Peace River). The airlines that serve these communities have reported to
         Edmonton Airports that in 2008 they carried 17,578 passengers (enplaned and
         deplaned) or 27% of the allowable total.
         Currently, using June 2010 statistics, only 7.8% of allowable seats were flown from
         ECCA.



 Overview
         The top five northern destinations to EIA are Fort McMurray, Grande Prairie,
         Yellowknife, Horizon Project (Fort McMurray) and Fort St. John.
         The top five northern destinations to ECCA are Fort McMurray, Grande Prairie, Peace
         River, Slave Lake and Lac La Biche.




 Created on: June 10, 2009                                                                     1
 Purpose: City of Edmonton Public Input Process
 Owner: Theresa
 Last reviewed: August 2010
 Notes: All data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
Landed Seats From the North by Client Type


                            2008 ECCA Total Air Movements by Segment
                                                                                 Edmonton Police Services
                                                                                           2%
        Flight Training &
        Other Commercial
               41%                                                                 Government of Alberta
                                                                                           2%

                                                                                               Other Government
                                                                                                      4%



                                                                                                        Military
                                                                                                          1%


                                                                                                    Medevac
                                                                                                      5%




       Private
        15%

                                                                                              Charter
                                                                                               27%


                        Scheduled Passenger
                             Services
                                3%




Created on: June 10, 2009                                                                                          2
Purpose: City of Edmonton Public Input Process
Owner: Theresa
Last reviewed: August 2010
Notes: All data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
                            2008 Northern ECCA Air Movements by Segment

                          Private - North
                               3.6%
                        Scheduled Passenger
                          Services - North
                               2.7%



                                                             Movements Not
      Charter - North                                         Related to the
         15.1%                                                    North
                                                                 60,500
                                                                  73%




        Medevac - North
            3.5%


                Military - North
                      1.0%


         Other Government - North
                  0.3%



           Government of Alberta -
                  North
                  0.3%




Created on: June 10, 2009                                                        3
Purpose: City of Edmonton Public Input Process
Owner: Theresa
Last reviewed: August 2010
Notes: All data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
                                  Landed Seats From the North by Client Type
                  800,000


                  700,000


                  600,000


                  500,000


                  400,000


                  300,000


                  200,000


                  100,000


                        -
                                                                                                                 Total Landed
                                scheduled &      GA-                     GA-Other                 GA-Private -
                                                           GA-Military               GA-Private                   Seats From
                                  charter     Government                 scheduled                 Corporate
                                                                                                                    North
    Seats From the North ECCA     87,849        7,166          16           28        16,299        21,244         132,602
   Seats From The North EIA      762,761         28            92          7,727       2,209         4,846         777,663




Created on: June 10, 2009                                                                                                       4
Purpose: City of Edmonton Public Input Process
Owner: Theresa
Last reviewed: August 2010
Notes: All data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
Briefing Note: Medical In-flight Emergencies at EIA
 Background

 There have been questions about whether critical emergency care can be provided at EIA.

 Summary Points
         Serious medical situations arise regularly on commercial flights. In addition to the
         planned air ambulance operations which already occur at EIA, unplanned responses are
         common, and a successful program with health care providers to manage these
         unplanned emergencies is in place.
         There were 493 incidents requiring response at EIA in 2009
         Response to these medical situations is planned and exercised at EIA with health care
         providers.
         In-flight emergencies are an example of a common situation at EIA that requires
         emergency medical response.

 Commercial aircraft using EIA regularly require response to medical emergencies onboard.
 Emergency Response Services (ERS) are provided by a team that includes Edmonton Airports’
 ERS and Alberta Health Services (AHS).

 There is a well-exercised program to respond to a variety of in-bound medical emergencies
 that ensures priority response to the patient. These medical emergencies arise once an aircraft
 is airborne; they are not transporting already declared medical situations. These medical
 emergencies differ from air ambulance operations in many ways:

         -   They are not planned. They occur in the air or at boarding/deplaning.
         -   There are no medical personnel or equipment onboard to work with the patient.
             The exception to this would be if a fellow passenger had medical knowledge.
         -   Upon arrival at the airport, the patients have not been stabilized. Air ambulance
             patients are generally stabilized prior to transport in the aircraft.

 If more than 10 minutes notice of inbound medical onboard an aircraft, AHS will have an
 ambulance onsite prepared to deal with the emergency upon aircraft arrival. If not onsite, an
 ambulance is dispatched to the airport upon notification by the airline and often reaches the
 site in advance of the patient. The ambulance may be directed to airside to meet the incoming
 flight if that is deemed the most expeditious, or the ambulance personnel are escorted directly
 to the point in the terminal where the aircraft will arrive. EMS personnel may board the aircraft
 and treat the patient on the aircraft, or they may treat the patient in-terminal. Once the patient
 is ready for transport, they are escorted directly to the ambulance.
 Created on: June 10, 2009                                                                  Page 1
 Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
 Owner: Theresa
 Last reviewed: August 2010
 Notes: All data is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
Briefing Note: Air Ambulance Infrastructure at EIA
 Background
 Concerns have been raised over how air ambulance services at EIA would be facilitated if
 ECCA were redeveloped.

 Summary Points
         Air ambulance can continue to use ECCA with one runway.
         It will only transition when planning and facilities are complete at EIA.
         New facilities at EIA would be integrated, allowing for significant building and
         emergency response efficiencies through on-site collaboration of ground, fixed and
         rotary winged transport.
         Serious interest in developing a dedicated air ambulance facility at EIA has been voiced
         and would support the relocation of services from ECCA.
         Operating costs for new buildings at EIA are typically lower than older buildings at
         ECCA.
         Response priority, safety protocol, air ambulance declared landings and security
         services are consistent at ECCA and EIA and, therefore, would not be a barrier for air
         ambulances at EIA.


 Overview

 Operating Costs

 Q. Will Air Ambulance Operating Costs be more expensive at EIA?


 A. Overall operating costs for air ambulances operating out of EIA vs ECCA for landing,
 hangarage and other fees will be the same or lower at EIA than ECCA (both fixed wing and
 helicopter).

 Hangar costs:
       Inquiries to develop a dedicated facility: EIA has received several serious inquiries from
       developers interested in building a new dedicated air ambulance facility at EIA. EIA
       would work closely with the developer to enable the design and development of an
       operationally efficient, state-of-the-art facility that is fully integrated into regular airport



 Created on: June 10, 2009                                                                       Page 1
 Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
 Owner: Theresa
 Last reviewed: August 2010
 Notes: All data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
           operations and allows excellent ground vehicle (including ambulance) access from the
           facility to and from the QE2 Highway.

           Operating Costs: Operating costs for new buildings are typically lower than older
           buildings found at the ECCA site. One would expect that unit operating costs at this
           facility will be less, dependent on the type and size, and amenities of the new facility
           that is ultimately built.

           Overnighting aircraft: The home base for air ambulance operators is generally in the
           origin community (versus Edmonton), and therefore the need for hangar space is only
           for those limited times when the aircraft must overnight or when unplanned repairs are
           required. In these cases, and even in advance of a dedicated facility development,
           there is some capacity immediately available at the new Executive Flight Centre hangar
           at EIA.


Priority


Q. Will helicopters get priority at EIA, like they do at ECCA and selectively, from
Calgary?


A. Yes. Medical flights are provided priority at all airports in Canada through communication
with NAV Canada. NAV Canada’s own internal operations manual provides national direction
regarding medical flights and how to deal with these flights as follows:

Departures and arrivals are conducted on a first-come, first-served basis. However, exceptions
are based upon a priority system:

           Aircraft who have declared an emergency.
           Aircraft in a state of emergency but are unable to communicate with NAV Canada.
           Medical flights.


Q. Will the additional scheduled traffic and increased activity at EIA slo w down
helicopter (and/or fixed-wing) access as compared to ECCA?


A. No. Since medical flights are provided priority landing, the increased activity at EIA would
not affect arrival times for fixed-wing aircraft. Helicopters do not use the same approach
procedures as fixed-wing and can be brought in perpendicular to the runway to land on an
apron area, with no impact from scheduled traffic.

Created on: June 10, 2009                                                                       Page 2
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Owner: Theresa
Last reviewed: August 2010
Notes: All data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
Alternate locations


Q. Would air ambulance flights from Yellowknife have sufficient fuel capacity to fly
to EIA, using Calgary International Airport as their alternate, without having a fuel
stop enroute?


A. Information provided from air ambulance operators confirms that there are some aircraft
used for air ambulance operations that would not require a fuel stop enroute. Where heavier
aircraft are used, and when wind and weather conditions are poor, a fuel stop could be
required.



Q. Could Villeneuve Airport be a destination or an alternate (instead of Calgary
International Airport) for air ambulance flights?


A. Yes, with investment in additional infrastructure.

A GPS approach has been developed. A full Instrument Landing System is not currently
scheduled for this airport by NAV Canada; however, if lands at ECCA were redeveloped and
scale of airport use expanded at Villeneuve Airport, it is expected that NAV Canada would
review the need and adjust future capital programs.


Air Ambulance Operations at EIA


Q. What facilities currently exist?


A. The following describes how current air ambulances are handled now and how expanded air
ambulances would be handled with facilities currently available.

Expanded air ambulance operations would be located off Apron 2/ taxi lane Sierra under the
current infrastructure (as they are now). They would operate either from Executive Flight Centre
or Shell Aerocentre depending upon which Fixed Base Operator (FBO) the air ambulance
selects. Ground ambulance would access airside by the FBO’s gate or Guardhouse 2 and be
escorted in via the FBO ground crew. Ambulance crews do not require security passes as they
are deemed emergency services and respond directly to the aircraft. Medical crews on board
or boarding aircraft are under the care and control of the pilot and therefore do not require


Created on: June 10, 2009                                                                 Page 3
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Owner: Theresa
Last reviewed: August 2010
Notes: All data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
security passes. Pilots are cleared under their pilot licence so no further security restrictions are
applicable to them.

All other operations would be as it is at ECCA - the aircraft would taxi in and park by the
ambulance, the patient would be offloaded and transported by ground ambulance to the
designated hospital.


Q. Are there plans for future facilities and where would they be located?


A. As indicated above, there have been serious inquiries by developers to build a new
dedicated air ambulance facility at EIA. EIA would work with FBOs or air ambulance providers
to design and develop a facility that would be efficient in patient transfer, meeting all
aerodrome standards. With a new dedicated facility, air ambulances would be co-located.
Fixed wing, rotary, and ground ambulance infrastructure would be integrated and operated in
a dedicated area of the airport through a dedicated facility. The design would also co-locate
the gate and apron to enable an ambulance to enter without escort as long as it is under the
care and control of the FBO. The location of the dedicated facility would be selected to enable
premium efficient access to ground transportation (ground ambulance).

Specifically, the operation of a new facility would accommodate ground ambulance via a gate
allowing the vehicle and crew easy access to the aircraft. This could be completed in various
ways such as allowing the gate operation to be adjacent to a staffed location so the ambulance
is always under care and control to the aircraft, or by the FBO ground handling the flight
escorting the ambulance. Regular ambulance attendants could be provided security access
through Restricted Airport Identification Cards. In other airport locations there are restrictions
with driving on airside. At a new planned facility, EIA would develop a location and system to
ensure airside access is restricted to minimal traffic areas on an apron. A clear vehicle path
could be provided to reduce any vehicle/aircraft interaction on the apron for ambulance
attendants.

Security requirements would be consistent with those currently in place.

The maps below outline where air ambulance facilities would operate.



Map Showing Location of Current Facilities and Location of New Integrated Facility




Created on: June 10, 2009                                                                     Page 4
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Owner: Theresa
Last reviewed: August 2010
Notes: All data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
New Facility




Created on: June 10, 2009                                                        Page 5
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Owner: Theresa
Last reviewed: August 2010
Notes: All data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
Layout of New Facility




Security



Q. Will there be additional security measures for staff, patients and medical
equipment at EIA compared to ECCA?


A. The level of safety and security requirements for private, general aviation and air ambulance
aircraft at EIA and ECCA are consistent.

Security is not an issue at EIA since security clearances are not required for emergency
personnel (EMS), and air ambulance crew (pilots) are cleared under their pilot’s licence.
Medical crew who may join the aircraft either on departure or arrival are considered under the
care and control of the pilot and therefore do not require security clearance. For those medical
personnel who frequent the airport on a regular basis, Restricted Area Identification Cards
could be provided allowing independent access to any airside area required to perform their
duties.

Rotary wing aircraft would continue to go directly to the hospital so no additional security
regulations would apply.


Created on: June 10, 2009                                                                  Page 6
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Owner: Theresa
Last reviewed: August 2010
Notes: All data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
Safety would be ensured with both the current infrastructure and with the development of a
new dedicated facility. Under the current design, ambulances would be escorted onto Apron 2
by the Fixed Base Operator handling the air ambulance either through Guard House 2 or their
own gate. In a new design, the gate and apron would be co-located so an ambulance could
enter without escort as long as it was under the care and control of the Fixed Base Operator.




Created on: June 10, 2009                                                              Page 7
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Owner: Theresa
Last reviewed: August 2010
Notes: All data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
Briefing Note: Executive Business, Corporate
and General Aviation Services at EIA (Apron 2)
Background

Most people in the Edmonton region think of the main terminal when they think of EIA and are
not aware of the significant executive activity on Apron 2 (on the north side of the airport
property 02/20) and its broad range of executive business, corporate and GA services.

There have been suggestions only ECCA has executive, private business services for GA
customers.

Summary Points
        General, business and corporate aviation has a significant presence and infrastructure at
        EIA through dedicated services at Apron 2.
        Approximately 380,000 landed seats are served through Apron 2 per year.
        GA at EIA is primarily charter and corporate business aviation.
           o Apron 2 serves the interests of northern development, in particular.
        GA at EIA is tied closely to the second-largest oil/gas industrial park in North America –
        Nisku. Service and access are key for importers/exporters located in Nisku. Scheduled
        and charter services that are supplied by the GA community at EIA are key to these
        companies.
        There is room for additional GA infrastructure at EIA.
           o There has been serious interest from the GA community in expansion of the
               infrastructure at EIA. Businesses such as Fixed Base Operators (FBOs),
               government, and medical transportation have expressed interest in developing
               permanent locations at EIA.

Overview
Serving General Aviation at EIA are two FBOs – Shell Aerocentre and Executive Flight Centre.
FBOs provide a range of services including aircraft maintenance, fuelling, passenger services,
cargo services, and pilot/crew services.

Also serving GA at EIA is a terminal dedicated to the air transfer of passengers bound for the
Horizon Oil Sands project.

The terminals operated by these firms include hangars, passenger lounges, executive lounges,
and customer parking. Shuttle services to/from the main terminal are also offered to

Created on: June 10, 2009                                                                  Page 1
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Last reviewed: August 2010
Notes: All data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
accommodate customers (crew changes) connecting to/from scheduled air service, and then
beyond to northern resource projects.

A number of GA charter companies operate at EIA, including Alta Flights, Flight Tech Aviation,
North Cariboo Air, Ken Borek and Airco. A number of corporate aircraft are also resident or
operate out of EIA such as Cathton Aviation who operate a Falcon 50 and Hawker 800. Aircraft
sizes range from B737-800’s, B1900D, DHC-8-300’s to King Air and small private aircraft.

Customers of the services offered at Apron 2 include the northern resource industry (crew
changes as well as business traffic) and the military. Approximately 380,000 landed seats are
served through Apron 2 per year.

Quick Facts
        Up to 4,000 CNRL Horizon project workers alone connected monthly from EIA’s
        commercial flights to the company’s charter operation, located on Apron 2.
        Northern projects such as Mackenzie Gas Pipeline, Diavek Diamond Mines, Albian Oil
        Sands, Athabasca Oil Sands and Cold Lake Oil projects all require immense resupply of
        goods and skilled labour; much of this occurs from EIA. General aviation has the
        flexibility to provide services that are unique and diversified, like our energy and mining
        sectors. Perishable product, hot shot air service (quick courier), etc.
        Aircraft sizes range from B737-800’s, B1900D, DHC-8-300’s to King Air and small
        private aircraft. Military Aircraft come in various sizes and functions from CF-18 Hornets,
        C130 Hercules, refuelling aircraft and passenger aircraft.
        Connectivity between EIA commercial activities and the GA area, enables skilled
        workers to quickly transition between work charters and flights home.
            o This allows the northern resource industries to attract workers from across North
                 America including Mexico.
        GA providers have a lot of flexibility on routes; they can fly to Belize to drop off a part
        required for offshore drilling one day, then fly to Whitehorse with passengers. GA can
        respond quickly to customer needs as they have the speed, ingenuity and flexibility to
        handle almost any request.




Created on: June 10, 2009                                                                    Page 2
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Last reviewed: August 2010
Notes: All data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
Photos




Apron 2




                                                         Apron 2 Hangar




Apron 2



                                                         Executive lounge and passenger lounge
                                                         interior, Executive Flight Centre




Dash 8, North Cariboo Air, from Apron 2




Created on: June 10, 2009                                                               Page 3
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Last reviewed: August 2010
Notes: All data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
Briefing Note: Villeneuve – alternate airport

Background
Questions have been raised about Villeneuve Airport and its role as a secondary airport to EIA
when ECCA closes. Specific queries have focused on flight training and Villeneuve as an
alternate landing site for air ambulance when ECCA closes.

This briefing note looks into the future state, at the time of ECCA closure.

Summary Points
        Villeneuve is already the primary training airport and would continue to fulfill that role.
        With investment in navigational infrastructure it could play an expanded role in flight
        training. We have already invested in GPS.
        With this same investment in infrastructure at Villeneuve, airport use would expand to
        be available as an alternate for aircraft capable of using the shorter runways (currently
        3,500 feet), including most aircraft used for air ambulance trips when ECCA closes.
        Flight training occurs at EIA, ECCA and Villeneuve Airports.
        Villeneuve handles the highest volume of overall flight training, with EIA handling the
        highest volume of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) training.
        Many of the training flights included in the ECCA number are training flights that left
        from ECCA, conducted their training circuits at Villeneuve and returned back to ECCA.

Overview
        Aircraft must identify an alternate airport when flying IFR (Instrument Flight Rules) and
        must carry enough fuel to reach the alternate airport (with an additional 45 minutes of
        fuel above that). At the present time, aircraft destined to ECCA identify EIA as their
        alternate.
        With the closure of ECCA, aircraft then destined for EIA would most likely identify
        Calgary International Airport as their alternate. This requires more fuel and, for some
        aircraft, during some weather conditions, this may mean a requirement for fuel stop
        enroute. The use most sensitive of this need is aircraft on air ambulance trips.
        However there are solutions:
            o For example, the provincial government (responsible for air ambulance) could
                 require longer-range and/or faster aircraft to serve routes.
            o For example, with investment in additional infrastructure, Villeneuve Airport can
                 be available as an alternate airport to EIA) and the need to carry additional fuel
                 and provide for an enroute fuel stop may be eliminated.
        The result would be that Villeneuve could be used as an alternate under applicable
        weather conditions.


Created on: June 10, 2009                                                                     Page 1
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Last reviewed: August 2010
Notes: All data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated
General messages
        Villeneuve Airport is a growing facility with almost 65,000 aircraft movements in 2009.
        Commercial development at the airport has more than doubled in the last year.
        Between EIA and Villeneuve, we can accommodate all of the land leases at ECCA.
        Villeneuve Airport is the region’s principal flight training facility.
         o Villeneuve is the primary training centre for rotary aircraft (helicopters)
         o Flight training that originates at ECCA typically lands at Villeneuve.
        Villeneuve Airport is an attractive destination with lots of land ready for development
        and easy access just nine kilometers west of St. Albert.
        The airport is 1,400 acres in size, with over 800 acres of land available for commercial
        development.
        Air ambulance: over the long-term, when ECCA closes, Villeneuve can be developed as
        the formal alternate to EIA.




Created on: June 10, 2009                                                                 Page 2
Purpose: City of Edmonton public input process
Last reviewed: August 2010
Notes: All data used is that known as of June 2009, unless otherwise indicated

								
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