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					Duquesne University
    School of Education
        Graduate Catalog

          Updated: 05/31/11




          Pittsburgh, PA
       www.education.duq.edu
RIGHT TO AMEND

The material contained herein is subject to change from time to time and this publication cannot be considered an
agreement or contract between individual students and the School. The School of Education reserves the right to
alter or amend the terms, conditions, and requirements herein, and to eliminate programs or courses as
necessary. Once enrolled, students should consult on a regular basis with their Faculty mentor and/or Faculty
Advisor for specific information regarding academic policies pertaining to their respective program.

NOTICE OF NONDISCRIMINATION AND NONHARASSMENT POLICY

Duquesne University, motivated by its Catholic identity, values equality of opportunity, human dignity, racial,
cultural and ethnic diversity, both as an educational institution and as an employer. Accordingly, the University
prohibits and does not engage in discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin,
sex, age, disability or status as a veteran or disabled veteran. Further, Duquesne University will continue to take
affirmative steps to support and advance these values consistent with the University’s mission statement. This
policy applies to all educational programs and activities of the University, including, but not limited to, admission,
educational policies, scholarship and loan programs and athletic or other University-sponsored programs. This is a
commitment by the University in accordance with its religious values and applicable federal, state, and local laws
and regulations. Nothing herein, however, should be interpreted as a waiver by the University of its own
Constitutional and legal rights based upon its religious affiliation. The person responsible for coordinating its
efforts under this policy is Dr. Judith Griggs, Affirmative Action Officer, ground floor, Administration Building,
University extension 6661.

SECURITY STATISTICS, POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

In accordance with the College and University Security Information Act (Pennsylvania Act 73 of 1988) and the U.S.
Student Right to Know and Security Act (RC. 101-542), information regarding Duquesne University’s crime
statistics, security policies and procedures is available in the Admissions Office, and daily crime logs are available
for review in the Public Safety Dept.

CRISIS RESPONSE INFORMATION

See Appendices for the following documents: In the Wake of Trauma, Managing your Stress, and Mind & Body
Health. These documents are prepared by the University Employee Assistance Program (EAP) and are intended to
assist faculty and administrators to learn about ways to handle stressful situations as well as to respond to the
potential after effects.



Information contained in this catalog is accurate to the date of publication.

Published by Duquesne University, 600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15282




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                                                                     TABLE OF CONTENTS

GENERAL INFORMATION ............................................................................................................................................... 7

   HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY .................................................................................................................................... 7

SUMMARY STATEMENT OF MISSION AND GOALS ........................................................................................................ 7
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION HISTORY ................................................................................................................................. 8

ACCREDITATION AND AFFILIATION ............................................................................................................................... 8
   THE UNIVERSITY......................................................................................................................................................... 8
   SCHOOL OF EDUCATION ............................................................................................................................................ 9
   PHYSICAL FACILITIES ................................................................................................................................................ 10
DIRECTORY OF IMPORTANT CONTACTS ...................................................................................................................... 12
   SCHOOL OF EDUCATION FACULTY AND STAFF ........................................................................................................ 12
   SCHOOL OF EDUCATION CONTACTS........................................................................................................................ 12
   UNIVERSITY-WIDE SERVICES .................................................................................................................................... 13

ADMISSION, TUITION AND FEES .................................................................................................................................. 15

   ADMISSION .............................................................................................................................................................. 15
   INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS..................................................................................................................................... 17
   TEMPORARY TRANSFER ........................................................................................................................................... 18
   TUITION AND FEES ................................................................................................................................................... 18
   STUDENT LOANS ...................................................................................................................................................... 19
   STUDENT ACCOUNTS AND E-BILLS .......................................................................................................................... 19
   HEALTH INSURANCE ................................................................................................................................................ 19

ACADEMIC POLICIES FOR GRADUATE STUDY .............................................................................................................. 19
   ACADEMIC GRIEVANCE APPEAL PROCESS ............................................................................................................... 19
   ACADEMIC INTEGRITY.............................................................................................................................................. 20
   ACADEMIC STANDING ............................................................................................................................................. 20
   ADVANCED STANDING............................................................................................................................................. 20
   AUDITING COURSES ................................................................................................................................................. 21
   CHANGE OF GRADE POLICY FOR GRADUATE COURSES ........................................................................................... 21
   CHANGE OF SCHEDULE (DROP/ADD)....................................................................................................................... 21
   CONTINUOUS REGISTRATION .................................................................................................................................. 21
   COURSE WITHDRAWAL............................................................................................................................................ 22
   CROSS-REGISTRATION ............................................................................................................................................. 22
   CUMULATIVE GPA.................................................................................................................................................... 22
   DEGREE APPLICATIONS/COMMENCEMENT ............................................................................................................ 23
   EMAIL COMMUNICATION TO STUDENTS ................................................................................................................ 23
   INCOMPLETE GRADES .............................................................................................................................................. 23
   INDEPENDENT STUDY .............................................................................................................................................. 23
   IN PROGRESS “IP” GRADE POLICY............................................................................................................................ 23
   IRB POLICY ............................................................................................................................................................... 24

                                                                                                                                                                              3
   NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY ................................................................................................................................. 24
   PASS/FAIL GRADES................................................................................................................................................... 24
   REGISTRATION ......................................................................................................................................................... 24
   STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS ....................................................................................................................................... 24
   STUDENT STANDING PETITIONS .............................................................................................................................. 25
   SEXUAL HARRASSMENT POLICY............................................................................................................................... 26
   STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES ................................................................................................................................. 26
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATIONAL STUDIES PROGRAM ...................................................................................... 27
   PROGRAM OVERVIEW ............................................................................................................................................. 27
   THREE PROGRAM OPTIONS: A DYNAMIC AND FLEXIBLE PROGRAM OF STUDY ..................................................... 28
   FEATURES AND BENEFITS OF THE MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATIONAL STUDIES .............................................. 29
   ADMISSION CRITERIA............................................................................................................................................... 29
   PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ..................................................................................................................................... 30
   PROGRAM ADMISSION ............................................................................................................................................ 33
   PROGRAM ADVISEMENT AND REGISTRATION ........................................................................................................ 33
   PROGRAM EVALUATION AND RESEARCH ................................................................................................................ 33
   PROGRAM EVALUATION AND RESEARCH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ......................................................................... 34
EXECUTIVE DOCTORAL PROGRAM IN COUNSELOR EDUCATION AND SUPERVISION (EXCES) .................................... 36

   PROGRAM APPROVAL ............................................................................................................................................. 37
   THE EXCES MISSION ................................................................................................................................................. 37
   GOALS OF THE EXCES DOCTORAL PROGRAM .......................................................................................................... 37
   PROGRAM FOCUS .................................................................................................................................................... 38
   KEY PROGRAM FEATURES........................................................................................................................................ 38
   PROGRAM CURRICULUM ......................................................................................................................................... 41
   COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ........................................................................................................................................... 41
   ADDITIONAL COURSE WORK ................................................................................................................................... 46
   ADMISSION POLICIES ............................................................................................................................................... 46
   ADMISSION CRITERIA............................................................................................................................................... 47
   ADMISSION PRIORITIES ........................................................................................................................................... 49
   APPLICATION PROCEDURES ..................................................................................................................................... 49
INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY ................................................................................................................................... 50

   DOCTORAL PROGRAM IN INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY ...................................................................................... 50
   DOCTORAL PROGRAM IN INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ................................................ 53
   MASTERS OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY .............................................................. 56
   GRADUATE INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ...................................................................... 58
GRADUATE ELEMENTARY LEADING TEACHER PROGRAM ........................................................................................... 60
   ENTRANCE TRACK = 8 CREDITS ................................................................................................................................ 60
   PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION TRACK = 31 CREDITS.............................................................................................. 60
   STUDENT TEACHING TRACK = 7 CREDITS................................................................................................................. 61
GRADUATE EARLY CHILDHOOD AND EARLY CHILDHOOD/ELEMENTARY LEADING TEACHER PROGRAMS ................. 61


                                                                                                                                                                          4
   COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ........................................................................................................................................... 61
GRADUATE SECONDARY LEADING TEACHER PROGRAM ............................................................................................. 64
   ENTRANCE TRACK .................................................................................................................................................... 64
   GATEWAY 1: TECHNOLOGY .................................................................................................................................... 65
   INTRODUCTION TO THE FIELD ................................................................................................................................. 66
   DIVERSITY TRACK ..................................................................................................................................................... 66
   GATEWAY 2: DIVERSITY .......................................................................................................................................... 67
   PROFESSIONAL EDUCATOR CERTIFICATION TRACK ................................................................................................. 67
   GATEWAY 3: READINESS FOR STUDENT TEACHING ............................................................................................... 68
   STUDENT TEACHING TRACK..................................................................................................................................... 68
   GATEWAY 4: LEADERSHIP ....................................................................................................................................... 69

SECONDARY EDUCATION............................................................................................................................................. 70
   ENTRANCE TRACK – 11 CREDITS .............................................................................................................................. 70
   DIVERSITY TRACK – 9 CREDITS ................................................................................................................................. 70
   PROFESSIONAL EDUCATORS CERTIFICATION TRACK – 10 OR 13 CREDITS .............................................................. 71
   STUDENT TEACHING TRACK – 6 CREDITS................................................................................................................. 71
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ............................................................................................................................................... 71
   SECONDARY EDUCATION ......................................................................................................................................... 71
   READING .................................................................................................................................................................. 73
   RESEARCH ................................................................................................................................................................ 73
   SPECIAL EDUCATION ................................................................................................................................................ 74
   ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE ......................................................................................................................... 74
   FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION ............................................................................................................................... 74

READING AND LANGUAGE ARTS ................................................................................................................................. 74
   READING AND LANGUAGE ARTS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ....................................................................................... 76

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE ............................................................................................................................. 78

   ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ................................................................................... 79

INTERDISCIPLINARY DOCTORAL PROGRAM FOR EDUCATIONAL LEADERS (IDPEL) ..................................................... 82
   PROGRAM BELIEFS AND MISSION STATEMENT....................................................................................................... 82
   PROGRAM DESIGN................................................................................................................................................... 84
   ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS ................................................................................................................................. 84
   PROGRAM SEQUENCE FOR THE COHORT OF 2012.................................................................................................. 85
   IDPEL COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ................................................................................................................................. 86
COUNSELOR EDUCATION ............................................................................................................................................ 89

   COUNSELOR EDUCATION - SCHOOL COUNSELING MAJOR ..................................................................................... 90
   COUNSELOR EDUCATION - COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING SERVICES MAJOR ................................. 91
   COUNSELOR EDUCATION - MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY MAJOR .................................................................. 92
   GRADUATE COUNSELOR EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ............................................................................... 94


                                                                                                                                                                              5
MASTER OF SCIENCE (M.S.ED.) IN EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION .......................................... 99
   PENNSYLVANIA COMPREHENSIVE PRINCIPAL CERTIFICATION ................................................................................ 99
   PENNSYLVANIA SUPERVISOR’S CERTIFICATION..................................................................................................... 100
   SUPERVISOR OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION CERTIFICATION ..................................................................... 101
   COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ......................................................................................................................................... 101
SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY ............................................................................................................................................... 104

   DOCTORATE (PH.D.) IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY ..................................................................................................... 104
   CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE STUDY (CAGS) IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY .............................................. 106
   MASTER'S DEGREE (M.S.ED.) IN CHILD PSYCHOLOGY ........................................................................................... 109
   SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY (GPSY) COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ......................................................................................... 110
SPECIAL EDUCATION.................................................................................................................................................. 115

   SPECIAL EDUCATION - COGNITIVE, BEHAVIOR, PHYSICAL AND HEALTH DISABILITIES (CBP/HD) ..........................115
   SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAM COURSES ............................................................................................................ 116
   SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAM: COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH / SPECIAL EDUCATION SUPPORT ...................118
   SPECIAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ....................................................................................................... 121
   M.S.ED. LEADING TEACHER IN SPECIAL EDUCATION DEGREE AND ADDITIONAL CERTIFICATION (MAJOR CODE
   2285) ...................................................................................................................................................................... 125
   M.S. LEADING TEACHER IN SPECIAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS:........................................................... 127

APPENDICES............................................................................................................................................................... 130
   STUDENT STANDING PETITION .............................................................................................................................. 131
   IN THE WAKE OF TRAUMA: TIPS FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS .................................................................................. 133
   MANAGING YOUR STRESS: TIPS FOR SURVIVORS OF A TRAUMATIC EVENT ........................................................ 134
   MIND AND BODY HEALTH: THE EFFECTS OF TRAUMATIC STRESS ........................................................................ 137




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GENERAL INFORMATION

HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY

Duquesne University first opened its doors as the Pittsburgh Catholic College of the Holy Ghost in October 1878
with an enrollment of 40 students and a faculty of seven. From a humble original location on Wylie Avenue in the
City’s Uptown section to its present beautifully self-contained campus, Duquesne is a hilltop vista overlooking one
of the nation’s most attractive cities.

Today Duquesne University is a progressive educational facility which has more than tripled from its early 12.5
acres to its present, self-enclosed 43-acre campus overlooking the city of Pittsburgh. Duquesne was cited by USA
Today as having one of the safest urban campuses in the nation.

Several renovations have recently taken place and have added to Duquesne’s already-rich physical plant, including
a state-of-the-art health sciences facility, three parking garages, a multipurpose recreation center, a Victorian
campus throughway, a theatre/classroom complex, the Arthur J. Rooney football/soccer field in the center of
campus, 45 new multimedia classrooms, and a state-of-the-art classroom building.

Recently named one of the top ten national Catholic universities in the United States, Duquesne’s academics are
recognized both nationally and internationally. As a result of its academic excellence known worldwide, the
University has signed agreements with institutions in Belgium, Germany, France, Spain, Ireland, England, China,
Japan, and Italy as well as the new Commonwealth of Independent States.

Duquesne’s recent growth has been tremendous with students in 10 schools of study: McAnulty College and
Graduate School of Liberal Arts (1878); School of Law (1911); Business Administration (1913); Pharmacy (1925);
Music (1926); Education (1929); Nursing (1937); Health Sciences (1990); Natural and Environmental Sciences
(1994); and Division of Continuing Education. Duquesne’s 10 schools offer degree programs on the baccalaureate,
professional, master’s and doctoral levels.

SUMMARY STATEMENT OF MISSION AND GOALS

Duquesne University of the Holy Ghost is a Catholic university, founded by members of the Spiritan Congregation,
and sustained through a partnership of laity and religious.

The motto of Duquesne University is Spiritus est qui vivificate, “It is the Spirit that gives life.” Enriching the life of
the mind and the life of the spirit of every member of its community is the mission of Duquesne.

It is Duquesne University’s special trust to seek truth and to disseminate knowledge within a moral and spiritual
framework in order to prepare leaders distinguished not only by their academic and professional expertise but also
by their ethics, and guided by consciences sensitive to the needs of society.

Therefore, Duquesne is a community of students, faculty, administrators, and others who are willing to make these
commitments:

  •    To create undergraduate and graduate education of the highest quality in liberal and professional
       disciplines.

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  •    To examine the moral and ethical foundations of their thought and action, and to develop their personal
       values and ethical commitment.

  •    To participate in an ecumenical dialogue open to all beliefs.

  •    To extend educational opportunities to those with special financial, educational, and physical needs.

  •    To promote world community through the development of an international and intercultural vision of the
       global needs and international responsibilities for peace, justice, and freedom.

Duquesne serves God by serving students – through an academic community dedicated to excellence in liberal and
professional education, through profound concern for moral and spiritual values, through the maintenance of an
ecumenical atmosphere open to diversity, and through service to the Church, the community, the nation, and the
world.

Duquesne offers a wide variety of programs and curricula from which students may select freely in accordance
with their interests, capabilities and goals in life.

Complemented by a broad spectrum of nonacademic activities and programs, the curriculum at Duquesne
University is designed to prepare young men and women who, upon entering their chosen careers, will possess a
broad, well balanced and fully integrated education and perspective of themselves and the world.

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION HISTORY

Prior to 1929, teacher preparation courses were offered through a department of the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences. In that year the newly organized School of Education granted its first degrees in programs of secondary
education. Since then, programs have been approved by the Department of Education of the Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania for music education (1930), graduate education (1936), elementary education (1937), counselor
education (1952), school administration (1952), special education (1964), reading specialist and reading supervisor
(1969), school psychology (1969), school supervision (1976), interdisciplinary doctoral program for educational
leaders (IDPEL; 1993), superintendent’s letter of eligibility (1993), instructional leadership excellence at Duquesne
doctoral program (ILEAD; 1997), executive counselor education and supervision doctoral program (ExCES; 1997),
instructional technology (1999), early childhood education (1999), program evaluation (1999), school psychology
doctoral program (2001), and instructional technology doctoral program (EdDIT; 2002).

ACCREDITATION AND AFFILIATION

THE UNIVERSITY

ACCREDITATION

Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools
State Board of Education of the Pennsylvania Department

MEMBERSHIPS

American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers

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American Council on Education
Catholic Council on Education
Catholic College Coordinating Council
College Entrance Examination Board
Council for Advancement and Support of Education
Council of Independent Colleges and Universities
Middle States Association of Collegiate Registrars and Officers of Admissions
National Association of College Admission Counselors
National Association of College and University Business Officers
National Association of Foreign Student Administrators
National Association of Student Personnel Administrators
National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators
Pennsylvania Association of Catholic College Admissions Officers
Pennsylvania Association of Colleges and Universities
Pennsylvania Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators
Pittsburgh Council on Higher Education

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

ACCREDITATION

Department of Education of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs
NCATE National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education
Pennsylvania Department of Education
Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs
American Psychological Association
University Council on Educational Administration
National Association for Education of Young Children
Educational Leadership Constituent Council
Association for Childhood Education International
Association for Educational Communications & Technology
Council for Exceptional Children
National Association of School Psychologists

MEMBERSHIPS

American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education
Association of Independent Liberal Arts Colleges for Teacher Education
The Pennsylvania Association of Colleges and Teacher Educators
International Council on Education for Teaching

GRADUATE STUDY

The graduate programs in the School of Education are devoted to providing opportunities for qualified students to
pursue advanced study in education for the purpose of:

    1.   Increasing knowledge and deepening appreciation of life and learning;
    2.   Acquiring professional skills.



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DEGREE

The School of Education confers the Master of Science in Education degree, Certificate of Advanced Graduate
Study, Doctor of Education, and Doctor of Philosophy.

PHYSICAL FACILITIES

Canevin Hall, built in 1922, is the home of the School of Education. In addition to 10 regular classrooms, art,
math/sciences and special education methods rooms, the facilities include Computer Laboratories, Multi-Media
Center, Guidance and Reading Clinic, several conference areas, student organizations commons area and offices
for the departments, faculty, staff and dean.

Assumption Hall which opened during the 1950s can accommodate approximately 300 residents. Assumption
houses students who are at various levels in their academic studies from freshmen to senior students. Assumption
Hall is home to residents who are a part of the University’s Honors College. The staff here works closely with the
staff in the Honors College to integrate students’ learning inside and outside the classroom. Assumption has a
small fitness room, a 24 hour computer lab, and a laundry facility on the Ground floor.

Brottier Hall purchased in 2004, became Duquesne University’s 6th Living/Learning Center. It is a 20-story
apartment building and can house more than 750 students. Brottier offers studio, 1-bedroom, and 2-bedroom
apartments to juniors and above. Unlike the traditional buildings, each apartment is equipped with a full kitchen
including refrigerator electric stove and microwave. All apartments have a private bath which includes bathtub and
shower combination. Two bedroom apartments include their own dishwasher and a second bathroom. In order to
allow students to experience apartment living, apartments are currently being offered as furnished or unfurnished
apartments. As an added benefit, Brottier apartments include a spectacular view of the Duquesne campus or the
Pittsburgh skyline.

Duquesne Towers, a 17 story air-conditioned double-tower residence for 1,176 men and women featuring
separate housing wings, was dedicated in 1970. The facility features a full size indoor swimming pool with a
sundeck, an office of Campus Ministry, the Campus Health Services area, a main student lounge, and smaller
lounges on each floor, telephones in each room, and a resident dining hall. The facility includes a front desk area
equipped with security cameras and ID cardreaders and each student room has access to the campus computer
mainframe. Dining areas for resident and commuting students are also located in the Duquesne Union.

 As the largest of our Living Learning Centers, Duquesne Towers (commonly referred to as the Towers) is home to
nearly 1,200 students at the sophomore level or above. Towers is home to our fraternities and sororities, as well as
“Group Housing”, in which students choose to live together with others who share a common interest. There are a
variety of lounges throughout the building, as well as a large laundry facility on the top floor. This seventeen story
building contains the Hogan Dining Center, Student Mail Center, Brottier Campus Ministry Center, Health Service
and the swimming pool.

St. Ann opened in the 1960s and houses men and women in their freshmen year at Duquesne. St. Ann's has a
capacity of approximately 525 residents, and offers an array of advantages and conveniences. Beginning in the Fall
of 2005, St. Ann is home to the Orbits, Personae and Artes Learning Communities for students in the McAnulty
College of Liberal Arts. St. Ann hall contains primarily double rooms. Male students reside in the East wing of the



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building, and female students reside in the West wing of the building. The two wings are connected by a common
lobby. Laundry facilities are provided in each wing of the building.

St. Martin which opened in 1961, has undergone considerable renovations in the past years. Home of
approximately 550 freshmen residents, St. Martin offers rooms with a fantastic view of Pittsburgh historic South
Side, the Monongahela River as well as a view of Pittsburgh's downtown area. Most rooms in St. Martin are double
rooms, although some single rooms are available. Male students reside on the lower floors, while female students
live on the upper floors. Beginning with the Fall, 2005 semester, St. Martin is home to the Questio, Ratio and
Civitas Learning Communities for students enrolled in the McAnulty College of Liberal Arts. St. Martin houses a
small fitness room, laundry on every floor, and a computer lab that is open 24 hours per day.

Vickroy Hall which opened for the fall 1997 semester, houses approximately 280 students at the sophomore level
and above. Vickroy affords students the opportunity to share a suite with friends. Each suite consists of two double
rooms connected by a private bathroom. Vickroy Hall has laundry facilities on each floor, a multi-purpose room
that is available for study groups, and a small fitness room.


GUMBERG LIBRARY

The Gumberg Library, opened in 1978 and rededicated in 1995, is a modern, attractive five-story structure.
Architects Gerard-Nagar Associates were cited by the Pittsburgh Chapter of the American Institute of architects for
their creative design in their renovation and expansion of the original structure constructed in the 1920s.

The Gumberg Library holds an extensive collection of books, journals, electronic resources, microprint, and
audiovisual resources. Fully networked and automated, the library offers both onsite and remote access to over a
hundred online databases and over two thousand electronic journals.

Among the Library’s special collections are:

The Simon Silverman Center Phenomenology Collection – Focusing primarily on the work of German philosopher
Edmund Husseri and his predecessors, Kierkegaard and Nietzsche. The various disciplines which utilize or offer
criticism of the phenomenological approach are represented in the collection.

Cardinal Wright Collection – Included in this collection are the Cardinal’s personal library, with emphasis on
deliberations from Vatican Council II and the Synods. His sermons, addresses and papers cover the field of
spirituality, including the role of the laity in the Church and relations of Church and State.

Rabbi Herman Hailperin Collection – Rabbi Hailperin was the spiritual leader of Pittsburgh’s Tree of Life Synagogue
from 1922-1973. This collection of more than 2,600 volumes focuses on Judeo-Christian intellectual and
theological relations during the Middle Ages.

Honorable Michael A. Musmanno Collection – A Collection of the papers and personal library of the former State
Superior Court Justice, U.S. Congressman, Nuremberg War Crimes judge, and author. Many interesting topics of
local, U.S. and international history are represented in this collection through primary source material, including
the abolition of Coal and Iron Police, interrogations of the close associates of Adolf Hitler, transcripts of the
Nurenberg trial that Musmanno presided over, and information on the Sacco and Vanzetti trial in which
Musmanno was part of the defense team.


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In keeping with its mission to support teaching, learning and research of Duquesne’s students and faculty, the
library offers instruction in a state of the art classroom that is available to students for their personal use
whenever there is no class in session. Library faculty collaborate with faculty from the Department of
Mathematics and Computer Science and the School of Music to teach a one-credit computer and information
literacy course for freshman.

The Maureen P. Sullivan Curriculum Center is a unique resource center for students, student teachers, faculty,
and staff of the School of Education and the University. The Curriculum Center is housed on the 5th floor of the
library. The collection specializes in providing users with elementary and secondary school teaching resources for
all subject areas. Materials range from textbook kits, to activity and lesson plan books, children’s and young adult
literature, big books, audiovisual materials, software, Praxis exam study materials, math manipulatives, puppets,
and an Ellison Die-Cut Machine with a wide variety of dies. Laminating and plastic comb binding services are
available for a minimal fee. The materials in the Curriculum Center can be checked out at the 4th floor Circulation
Desk. Staffed hours for the Curriculum Center are posted on the door and may change by semester. However, the
Center is accessible during library hours.

The Gumberg Library publishes BiblioTech, a print and online newsletter. A virtual tour of the library is available at
http://www/duq.edu/library

DIRECTORY OF IMPORTANT CONTACTS

Duquesne University
600 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15282
Phone: 412.396.6091
Fax: 412.396.5585
http://www.education.duq.edu/

DIRECTORY:                          http://www2.duq.edu/locator/directory.cfm
CAMPUS MAP:                         http://www.duq.edu/frontpages/main/map/map.html
ACADEMIC CALENDARS:                 http://www.registrar.duq.edu/acaCalen.html
DISSERTATION & RESEARCH:            http://www.education.duq.edu/currentStudents/dissertations.html
INCLEMENT WEATHER:                  412-396-1700

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION FACULTY AND STAFF

http://www.education.duq.edu/departments/directory.html

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION CONTACTS


DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
107 Canevin Hall
Phone: 412.396.1360
http://www.education.duq.edu/FacultyStaff/welch.htm




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DEPARTMENT OF COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY & SPECIAL EDUCATION
109 Canevin Hall
Phone: 412.396.5567
http://www.education.duq.edu/departments/CPSEindex.html


DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION & LEADERSHIP IN EDUCATION
414-B Canevin Hall
Phone: 412.396.5569
http://www.education.duq.edu/departments/ILindex.html


DEPARTMENT OF FOUNDATIONS & LEADERSHIP
401 Canevin Hall
Phone: 412.396.5568
http://www.education.duq.edu/departments/FLindex.html


STUDENT AND ACADEMIC SERVICES (SAS)
Graduate Admissions Office
213 Canevin Hall
Phone: 412.396.6091 / 6092
http://www.education.duq.edu/departments/ESindex.html


STUDENT TEACHING / FIELD PLACEMENT OFFICE
209D Canevin Hall
Phone: 412.396.6117
http://www.education.duq.edu/currentStudents/student_services.html


SCHOOL OF EDUCATION CAREER & ALUMNI SERVICES
Phone: 412.396.6647
http://www.education.duq.edu/currentStudents/csocon.html

UNIVERSITY-WIDE SERVICES


CAREER SERVICES CENTER
Rockwell Hall
Phone: 412.396.6644
http://www.careerservices.duq.edu/


CASHIER – PAYMENT OF TUITION & FEES
Ground Floor, Administration Building
Phone: 412.396.6585 / 6587 / 6588
http://www.controller.duq.edu/cashierservices.html


COMMUTER AFFAIRS
117 Duquesne Union

                                                                     13
Phone: 412.396.6660
http://www.commuteraffairs.duq.edu/


FINANCIAL AID
Ground Floor, Administration Building
Phone: 412.396.6607
http://www.financialaid.duq.edu/


IDENTIFICATION CARDS
203 Duquesne Union
Phone: 412.396.6191
http://www.duq.edu/aboutdu/DUcard/


INFORMATION CENTER
For University Activities
Third Floor, Duquesne Union
Phone: 412.396.6632 / 6633
http://www.studentactivities.duq.edu/roomreservations_union.htm


PUBLIC SAFETY
Public Safety Building
For Emergency, call 412.396.4747
http://www.duq.edu/administration/publicsafety/resources.html


REGISTRAR
Ground Floor, Administration Building
Phone: 412.396.6212 - General Office
412.396.6523 – Transcripts
http://www.registrar.duq.edu/


RESIDENCE LIFE
Director of Residence Life, Assumption Hall
Phone: 412.396.6655 / 5028
Housing Contract
Room Assignments for Graduate Students
http://www.residencelife.duq.edu/


STUDENT ACCOUNTS
Administration Building, Room 208
Phone: 412.396.6585 / 6587 / 6588
http://www.controller.duq.edu/stuacct.html


UNIVERSITY COUNSELING CENTER
308 Administration Building
Phone: 412.396.6204 / 6208

                                                                  14
http://www.counselingcenter.duq.edu/

ADMISSION, TUITION AND FEES

ADMISSION

BASIC REQUIREMENTS

Graduates with a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college, university, or seminary will be considered for
admission to graduate study in the School of Education by complying with the details outlined under Application
Requirements. General admission is based on an applicant’s previous academic record as shown by official
transcripts of all previous study.

The guidelines are as follows:


INITIAL CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS

(1) Applicants admitted to an initial certification program must have completed prior college, university or
seminary coursework with a minimum overall 3.0 grade point average; or GPA may be calculated on the most
recent 48 credits prior to entry into an Initial Professional Educator Preparation Program.

(2) As an alternative to the 3.0 GPA admissions standard I paragraph 9, applicants must have achieved an overall
2.8 GPA and qualifying scores on the Praxis I pre-professional skills test required for certification.

(3) The School of Education may accept a limited number of applicants to initial certification programs that do not
meet the criteria in (1) and (2) above based upon criteria developed and documented by the School.


ADVANCED PREPARATIONS PROGRAMS

The criteria for admission to advanced preparation programs shall include:

    a.   An overall minimum 3.0 GPA

    b.   A minimum score of 4.0 on the Miller Analogies or passing scores established by the Department/Program
         on GRE

    c.   Two faculty or professional recommendations

    d.   A record of competence and effectiveness in professional work


10% EXCEPTION POLICY

General: Applicants who qualify for this exception need to present compelling evidence that would auger their
successful completion of the program to which they are applying. Such evidence might include, but not be limited
to, an interview with the program director and/or faculty, a writing sample, a formal statement of participation



                                                                                                                   15
purpose, and other materials or substantiation of the applicant's request for admission as required by the
respective program director.

For initial certification programs with rolling admissions, the number of admitted students over the previous
academic year admission cycle will serve as the basis for determining how many students can be admitted under
the 10% exception for admission in the current academic year. Applicants who qualify for this exception need to
have qualifying scores on the Praxis.

For advance preparation programs and additional certificate students with rolling admissions, the number of
admitted students over the previous academic year admission cycle will serve as the basis for determining how
many students can be admitted under the 10% exception for admission in the current academic year. Applicants
who qualify for this exception need to have qualifying scores on the GRE.

For graduate programs with discrete admissions, the number of applicants in the current cycle determines how
many can qualify for the 10% exception. Initial certification applicants who qualify for this exception need to have
qualifying scores on the Praxis PPST examinations. Advanced preparation program applicants and additional
certificate students who qualify for this exception need to have qualifying scores on the GRE.


OTHER PROGRAMS

Applicants admitted to other certification/licensure programs, Community Counseling Services, Marriage and
Family Therapy, Educational Studies, Program Evaluation, School Psychology or Community Mental Health/Special
Education Support must have completed prior college, university or seminary coursework with a minimum 3.0
grade point average. Individual programs have additional guidelines for admission for students with less than 3.0
grade point average.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Candidates are admitted to the Master’s Degree Programs in the Graduate School of Education through the
Graduate Admissions and Advisement Office. At the discretion of each program, students are admitted to degree
candidacy upon successful completion of 6-9 credits of screening courses and recommendations by the program
faculty. Applicants for admission to initial and advanced preparation programs must meet state requirements for
academic preparation and academic performance prior to admission to degree candidacy. Academic preparation
includes (1) at least 6 semester hour credits in college level mathematics and (2) at least 3 semester hour credits in
college level English Composition and 3 semester hour credits in English/American Literature prior to formal
admission into a program. Please contact your advisor or Program Coordinator for specific information regarding
the candidacy process in your major area of study.

GRADE POINT AVERAGE

All references to a grade point average (GPA) are relative to a 4.0 scale. Students or transfer students with credits
on other scales must have the equivalent GPA: for example, a 3.75 if on a 5.0 scale.

EFFECTIVE CATALOG

The material contained herein is subject to change and this publication cannot be considered an agreement or
contract between individual students and the School. The School of Education reserves the right to alter or amend

                                                                                                                    16
the terms, conditions, and requirements herein, and to eliminate programs or courses as necessary. Once
enrolled, students should consult on a regular basis with their Faculty Mentor and/or Faculty Advisor for specific
information regarding academic policies pertaining to their respective program.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS


POLICY STATEMENT ON INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION

The mission of Duquesne University’s founders, the Spiritans (Congregation of the Holy Ghost), has always
included service to peoples outside of the United States. Duquesne University also is committed to providing an
educational environment which recognizes cultural and national pluralism. Duquesne welcomes qualified students
throughout the world and encourages its students and faculty to take advantage of opportunities to study and
teach abroad.

The University believes that the sharing of the multiple traditions and mores of societies is an invaluable element
in the educational process. In a world that is growing ever smaller, it is imperative that Duquesne reach out to
peoples of different cultures to afford them the opportunity to acquire educational experiences not otherwise
available to them. Interaction among international and American faculty and students will enrich all and enhance
their ability to be better citizens of our shared world.

Duquesne University asserts its commitment to develop and to maintain programs, services and practices which
promote and express respect for persons of diverse cultures and backgrounds and which provide educational
bridges linking the peoples of the world.


INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADMISSIONS

Students from other countries are welcome at Duquesne University in the Graduate Education program. They are
considered for admission on the same basis as students from the United States and must fulfill the same
requirements. They will, however, be required to submit evidence of proficiency in English. TOEFL scores are
required as part of Duquesne University Graduate Admissions criteria for international students. If you have not
taken the TOEFL, or if your TOEFL score is below that required, your acceptance will be conditional upon taking the
Duquesne University English Placement Tests upon arrival and upon successful completion of any required English
language course work. This may involve at least one semester of course work or until such time as your English
language sufficiently improves to take graduate-level courses on a full-time basis. This may be done by taking the
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Details are given in a Department of State Bulletin of Information
which is usually available to prospective students and their teachers from U.S. Embassies and Consulates around
the world. Further information may be obtained by writing to:

         Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey 08540

The SoE minimum requirement TOEFL score is 550 for the paper version and 80 for the computer based version. In
addition to transcripts of record and evidence of confident mastery of both written and spoken English,
international students should have letters of recommendation submitted by persons in authority at their former
institutions, one of which should be from the chair of the department in which they completed their major field of
study.

                                                                                                                     17
Several months before coming to Duquesne, the prospective student should write to the Graduate Education
Admissions and Advisement Office and send, on the proper forms, full information about all academic and
professional preparation, together with country and date of birth. They must obtain an admission status to qualify
for a student visa.

Applicants are required to have a financial institution document their ability to finance their entire education and
living expenses while in this country. If governments or parents supply financial support, an affidavit certifying to
the amount to be furnished must be submitted. Financial information from banks, governments or parents must
be written in English, with currency translated into United States dollars.

Unless they are a citizen of the U.S. or hold a resident alien (green card) and have signed a declaration of intent to
become a citizen (except for certified to teach foreign language) they can’t get certified in PA.

Pennsylvania Department of Education website for Foreign-Educated Graduates:

         http://www.education.duq.edu/it/pdecert.htm

International students are expected to maintain full-time status, which is six credits (semester hours) each term.

All international students must have major medical coverage.

Information regarding immigration law may be obtained from the nearest U.S. Consular Embassy. Students
entering this country should make certain that they have the proper visa to study here. To accept part-time
employment, international students must have completed two semesters of study and apply to the U.S.
Immigration and Naturalization Service for this permission. All international students at Duquesne are referred to
the Office of International Affairs regarding these and other questions on immigration.

TEMPORARY TRANSFER

This status is granted to students in good standing in any recognized graduate school who wish to enroll in the
Graduate Education Department of Duquesne University for any one term or summer session. They will be
required to submit a full transcript of credits and must apply for graduate status in the School of Education.

TUITION AND FEES

Semester Tuition and Fee Charges http://www.education.duq.edu/prospectiveStudents/tuition.html

The University reserves the right to change the tuition and fee charges herein at any time. Additional information
is available at www.controller.duq.edu.

IMPORTANT: Registrations will not be processed or recognized as official registrations unless satisfactory financial
arrangements have been finalized. Students must:

    1.   Make payment in full or

    2.   Come to final registration and utilize the student financing program.

    Delay or postponement of payment will cause forfeiture of class places obtained.

                                                                                                                     18
    All charges and computations made at final registration will be computer audited.

Resulting corrections will be either credited to the student’s account for overpayment or billed to the student for
underpayment.

Student with a balance due to the university for the current semester or prior terms are not permitted to register
for the next semester.

STUDENT LOANS

Federal Direct Stafford Loans are limited to an academic year. There is a maximum amount available for a
graduate student to borrow. If a student has not utilized the maximum in the Spring and Fall semester, they can
submit a Summer application for more loan money, as long as it does not go exceed their allotted amount.
However, if a student does borrow their maximum, they can apply for Direct Plus loans which will cover their cost
of attendance. A student may not borrow more than the cost of education minus any other financial aid received.
The link to the information about Graduate Plus loans is http://www.duq.edu/financial-aid/programs/loans.cfm.

STUDENT ACCOUNTS AND E-BILLS

The mission of the University Student Accounts Office is to ensure that all students receive accurate billing of their
student account as well as confidential and considerate guidance and direction regarding bill payments. Prompt
and courteous service is a priority when servicing the students. These goals are achieved through departmental
teamwork, cross training, and a dedication to providing exceptional customer service.

Send e-mail to studentaccounts@duq.edu -It is our intention to answer all email messages within one business
day. Unfortunately, during peak times (after invoices are sent and the beginning of semesters) the email and
phone call volume is extremely high and we may not able to meet the one business day commitment. The
messages are answered in the sequence in which they are received.

The Student Accounts Office is responsible for the billing and collection of the accounts of all registered students at
Duquesne University.

http://www.controller.duq.edu/ebills1.htm

HEALTH INSURANCE

http://www.studentlife.duq.edu/handbooksec18.html

ACADEMIC POLICIES FOR GRADUATE STUDY

ACADEMIC GRIEVANCE APPEAL PROCESS

If a student believes that “the actions of a faculty member have resulted in serious academic injury,” the student
will be afforded the following appeal process:

A. It is the student’s responsibility to first contact the course instructor in writing to discuss and resolve the issue.

                                                                                                                        19
B. If the issue is not resolved, the student may submit a written request to the Program Director, if one exists, for a
review of the course instructor’s decision. The written request should include a summary of the previous
communications with the course instructor and an explanation of why a resolution was not reached. This request
should include all relevant facts. In the event that the course is not overseen by a Program Director, the appeal
goes directly to the Department Chair.

C. If the issue is not resolved as a result of the review by the Program Director or a Program Director is not
involved, the student may submit a written request for a review of the decision by the Department Chair. This
request should include a brief statement of the reason for review and a summary of the previous meetings in
which a resolution was not reached.

D. If attempts to resolve the issue are not successful at the department level, the student may request that the
case be submitted to the Office of the Dean for review. A written summary of prior communications regarding the
unresolved issue must be submitted to the Office of the Dean.

E. If the student does not believe that the issue has been resolved, the student may file a written Academic Due
Process Grievance with the Academic Vice President of the Student Government Association. The grievance shall
state with particularity the allegation that the student is making and the basis on which the allegation is being
made. It shall include statements from any witness or written matter, which may be helpful. This grievance must
be filed within sixty (60) days after the beginning of the semester subsequent to that in which the grievance
allegedly occurred. At this point, the student may contact the Student Government Association at
www.sga.duq.edu for further information.

Reference for full description of Academic Due Process Grievance procedures; please see the Duquesne University
Faculty Handbook, pp. 58-63 at http://www.sites.duq.edu/academic-affairs/_pdf/faculty-handbook-may-08.pdf.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

http://www.studentlife.duq.edu/handbooksec5.html

ACADEMIC STANDING

Graduate students must maintain a letter grade average not lower than a “B” (3.00 Quality Point Average).
Students failing to meet this standard may be subject to Graduate School action, including dismissal, for failure to
maintain normal progress toward a degree. Any student having less than a 3.00 as a final quality point average at
the conclusion of coursework will be ineligible for graduation.

ADVANCED STANDING

On recommendation of a Program Director, a student may transfer a maximum of 12 credits of appropriate
graduate work (3 per every 15 required graduate credits) taken at other approved colleges or universities. The
transfer of credits within Duquesne University, as well as the maximum credits accepted, will be approved at the
discretion of the individual program. The transfer of credits from another degree can be permitted for
certification, at the discretion of the individual program. The transfer of credits applied toward a previous degree
can be permitted for a second degree, at the discretion of the individual program. Only courses with grades of A
or B will be considered for transfer, provided the courses are in keeping with program requirements and are within

                                                                                                                    20
the School’s six-year Statute of Limitations. Course grades lower than a B will not be considered for transfer.
Requests for transferring credits should be presented to the Graduate Admissions and Advisement Office. No
graduate credit is allowed for study in continuing education, extension courses or life and work experiences.

AUDITING COURSES

To audit courses, a student must be officially registered and pay the same charges for courses that are taken for
credit.

CHANGE OF GRADE POLICY FOR GRADUATE COURSES

Approved by Academic Council 12/3/2007

Effective 2008/2009 Academic Year

1. One year from the date that an “I” grade is recorded, the “I” grade will be converted to an “F” grade whether or
not that course is part of the regular graduate program curriculum.

2. In case of courses such as practicums, internships or dissertation study, faculty continues to have the option to
assign an “IP” grade.

3. In the case of an extenuating circumstance, the dean and registrar will discuss the situation and agree upon a
recommended course of action. Their recommendations will then be referred to the Provost Office as necessary.

4. An “I” and/or “F” grade cannot be converted to a “W”.

5. Reaffirming the existing policy, a graduate student with an “F” grade cannot graduate, regardless of whether the
failed course is part of the program degree requirements. In order to graduate, the student must retake the course
or an equivalent course.

6. The Graduate Council recommends that the last day for graduate students to be able to withdraw is 12 weeks
after the beginning of the semester. For summer sessions, the graduate student can withdraw up to the official last
day of classes for the summer session in which the class is being taken.

CHANGE OF SCHEDULE (DROP/ADD)

Students who wish to add or drop a class are permitted to do so during the registration period and the first week
of classes of the semester. Change of class schedule is not permitted after the latest date for change of schedule
announced in each semester’s academic calendar. Courses dropped after the deadline for making schedule
changes are classified as course withdrawals or complete withdrawals.

CONTINUOUS REGISTRATION

Adopted by Graduate Studies Council 5/14/10

In order to qualify for continuous registration, a master’s (thesis) or doctoral student must have completed all
required courses and have earned (or have previously registered for) all required thesis or dissertation credit. In

                                                                                                                      21
order to maintain an enrolled status once all required credit has been earned, students must be registered for a
Continuous Registration FT (GRED 702 01) class for required fall and spring terms of enrollment up to the point of
graduation. Continuous Registration FT will be charged a flat rate of $500.

For master’s or doctoral students who “stop out” and have missed required terms of continuous registration,
retroactive continuous registration sections will be created and students charged the flat rate for the number of
required semesters missed.

A student may not use continuous registration just to enable full time status while the student is still earning
credit. However, should a student who is still earning credit toward a program of study need to "stop out" the
student should simply not register for that semester. In such cases the student will remain an active student and
be able to resume classes when ready.

COURSE WITHDRAWAL

A student choosing to withdraw from a course may do so with the approval of the academic advisor and Dean up
to the deadline published in the current academic calendar (for withdrawal with a “W” grade). The deadline is 12
weeks after the start of the Fall or Spring terms, or last day of class for Summer terms. A student who withdraws
unofficially (does not have prior approval from advisor and Dean) will receive an “F” grade for the course. Tuition
refunds are not granted for course withdrawals, except in the case of a complete withdrawal from the University
and according to the published refund schedule.

CROSS-REGISTRATION

Only full-time students may take advantage of cross-registration opportunities in graduate programs at institutions
belong to the Pittsburgh Council of Higher Education (PCHE) such as Carlow College, Carnegie Mellon University,
Chatham College, LaRoche College, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, Point Park College, Robert Morris College and
the University of Pittsburgh, as well as Community College of Allegheny County (for students with less than 60
credits). Students may register for one course per semester, on a space available basis. Students should check
with their advisor concerning their program’s cross-registration regulations. Duquesne University students who
cross-register are charged tuition and university fees in accordance with the current rates charged by Duquesne
University. There is no cross-registration during the summer sessions.

The cross-registration is subject to the approval of the home dean, the student’s advisor and both the home and
host registrar. Full credit and grade will be transferred; the academic regulations of the host institution prevail.

Cross-registration forms are available in the Graduate Office, Student and Academic Services, 213 Canevin Hall and
the Registrar’s office.

CUMULATIVE GPA

Students who graduate from a graduate program and then return for additional classes have a cumulative GPA
which continues building throughout all subsequent classes and programs.




                                                                                                                       22
DEGREE APPLICATIONS/COMMENCEMENT

Students who have completed all degree requirements are conferred degrees by the University in May, August and
December. For graduation, a student must file an application for the degree and submit it to the Graduate Office,
Student and Academic Services (SAS), 213 Canevin Hall. For graduation, a student must file an application for the
degree and submit it to the Graduate Office by the following dates: May conferral, March 15

Commencement ceremonies are held each May and December. Students receiving degrees in August are invited
to participate in the December ceremony. Only students who have completed all degree requirements will be
permitted to participate in commencement ceremonies.

EMAIL COMMUNICATION TO STUDENTS

Your Duquesne University personal email account is the official method of communication for Duquesne
administrative matters. You are required to periodically check your account for time critical notices such as billing
notifications, insurance requirements or other important alerts or administrative notices requiring a
timely response. Notice will be considered received one day following the date the notice is posted to your email
account. Failure to check your email account does not excuse or exempt you from any actions required of you by
the University.

INCOMPLETE GRADES

An application for an incomplete “I” grade may be submitted to the Dean’s office for approval for any course with
the mutual agreement of the student and instructor. The Incomplete Grade Application is available on-line in the
SoE Policy and Procedure Manual.

Students who are unable to complete course work may discuss with their instructor the possibility of receiving an
"I" grade for the course. To be eligible for an “I” grade a student must be making reasonable progress in the course
and in good standing.

Once the course work has been completed, the instructor completes a Change of Grade Form. The instructor will
submit the Change of Grade Form and the “I” Grade Application to the Dean’s Office for signature. The signed
Change of Grade Form is sent to SAS for entry into the system. For Graduate Students, “I” grades not remediated
within one year become permanent “F” grades. For Undergraduate Students, “I” grades not remediated by the
date specified in the academic calendar (about midterm of the following semester) become permanent “F” grades.

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Independent study may not be used to replace a required course.

IN PROGRESS “IP” GRADE POLICY

The in progress “IP” grade is awarded for a course that normally will extend past the grading period deadline. Such
courses include practica, cognates, internship, and dissertation. The “IP” grade can only be applied to such courses



                                                                                                                   23
and does not substitute for the “I” grade. Courses that will use the “IP” grade will be designated as such during the
formation of the schedule of classes.

“IP” grades are changed to a permanent grade via the Change of Grade Form, available from the office of Student
and Academic Services (SAS).

IRB POLICY

The revisions requested must have the IRB chair’s approval within 90 calendar days after the date of this letter.
Otherwise this file will be de-activated and you will need to submit a new protocol and assigned a new protocol
number.

NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY

Duquesne University, motivated by its Catholic identity, values equality of opportunity, human dignity, racial,
cultural and ethnic diversity, as an educational institution and as an employer. Accordingly, the University prohibits
and does not engage in discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age,
disability or status as a veteran or disabled veteran. Further, Duquesne will continue to take affirmative steps to
support and advance these values consistent with the University’s Mission Statement. This policy applies to all
programs and activities of the University, including, but not limited to, admission and employment practices,
educational policies, scholarship and loan programs and athletic or other University-sponsored programs. This is a
commitment by the University in accordance with its religious values and applicable federal, state, and local laws
and regulations. Nothing herein, however, should be interpreted as a waiver by the University of its own
constitutional and legal rights based upon its religious affiliation. The person responsible for coordinating its
efforts under this policy is Affirmative Action Officer Dr. Judith R. Griggs, Ground Floor Administration Building,
(412) 396-6661.

PASS/FAIL GRADES

Unless otherwise specified in course or program documentation (catalog, program sheets, advisement handbooks,
syllabi), graduate courses in the School of Education may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. A required course may
not be taken as a pass/fail option.

REGISTRATION

All students register with their academic advisors. The advisor's signature is required on all registration forms.
There are several registration periods available for students to register for classes and make changes to their
schedules.

STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS

A student is required to satisfy the Master of Science in Education degree requirements within six years from the
beginning of graduate study at the University. If the degree requirement is 45 credits or more, the Statute of
Limitations is seven years.


                                                                                                                     24
For doctoral students, the following statute of limitations applies. All students are expected to complete all
requirements: coursework, practica/internships/field experiences, mentoring, talking papers, proposals, all
required forms, the dissertation, IRB approvals, the dissertation defense, formatting and other changes, payment
of all financial obligations, and any other relevant requirements, within eight (8) calendar years from the first date
of course work. First date of course work is defined as the last day of the semester in which the student was first
enrolled. Students may petition for one or more one (1) year extensions (years 9 and 10) with written support
from their chair and approval of the doctoral program.

STUDENT STANDING PETITIONS

Charge: The School of Education Committee on Student Standing (CSS) reviews petitions submitted by School of
Education students, both graduate and undergraduate, requesting exceptions to existing policies, procedures and
academic decisions within the School of Education and Duquesne University.

Membership: The CSS is comprised of one representative and one alternate elected from each Department within
the School of Education, two undergraduate advisors, with the Associate Dean for Teacher Education serving as
Committee Chair.

Procedures for submitting Petitions:
    • The CSS holds monthly meetings. Additional meetings are scheduled as needed. Student petitions must
        be submitted by the 1st Friday of the month to be included on the agenda for the meeting that month.
    • There is a Student Standing Petition Form for these procedures (see Appendices for SSP). You may add
        the information regarding your petition to the form, or you may use this form as a guide in writing your
        petition. Hard copies of the form are available in the rack outside the Department of Student and
        Academic Services, 213 Canevin Hall. Make sure you include all the requested information.
    • Petitions must include the following information:
              Student Name, Mailing Address, Email Address, Telephone Number
              Major Area of Study / Name of Academic Advisor
              Specific Statement of Request / Reason for Petition
              Description of rationale for request / Any Extenuating Circumstances
              Requested Outcome
              Attach any relevant background documentation
    • Petitions should be submitted to:
         Committee on Student Standing
         Attention: Gail Freynik
         Duquesne University School of Education
         107 Canevin Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15282
        or emailed to freynikg@duq.edu.

CSS Decisions: Following deliberations, the decision of the CSS will be transmitted to the petitioner in a letter
mailed within three days to the address provided in the petition. A copy of the letter will be included in the
petitioner’s file and additional copies will be distributed as needed to staff and/or faculty (i.e., missing the deadline
to apply for graduation requires a copy be sent to the Registrar).

Appeals to dismissals from the University must be received by the Committee no later than 4:00 PM on the day
before the beginning of Final Registration for the fall semester and no later than 4:00 PM of the first class day of
the spring semester.



                                                                                                                       25
SEXUAL HARRASSMENT POLICY

http://www.studentlife.duq.edu/handbooksec18.html

No member of the Duquesne University community may sexually harass another. Employees and students will be
subject to disciplinary action for violation of this policy.
Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and verbal or physical contact of a sexual nature
constitute sexual harassment when:

    1.   Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a condition of an individual’s academic
         or employment continuation or advancement.
    2.   Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as a criteria for academic or
         employment decisions affecting that individual.
    3.   Such conduct has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an individual’s academic or
         employment performance or creates an intimidating, hostile, embarrassing or offensive employment,
         educational or living environment.

Because of the potential for sexual harassment in certain situations, the University prohibits romantic and/or
sexual relationships in the following situations:

    1.   No faculty member may engage in a romantic and/or sexual relationship or in romantic and/or sexual
         conduct with any student currently enrolled at Duquesne University.
    2.   No athletic department employee may engage in a romantic and/or sexual relationship or in romantic and
         /or sexual conduct with a student athlete.
    3.   No campus police officer or security officer may engage in a romantic and/or sexual relationship or in
         romantic and/or sexual conduct with any student currently enrolled in Duquesne University.
    4.   No Residence Life staff member may engage in a romantic and/or sexual relationship or in romantic
         and/or sexual conduct with any student currently enrolled in Duquesne University.
    5.   A supervisor may not engage in a romantic and/or sexual relationship or in romantic and/or sexual
         conduct with any employee in the supervisor’s department or division.

Any student or employee having a complaint of sexual harassment should notify the University’s Affirmative Action
Officer. Written complaints will be promptly investigated. Because of the potential for abuse, as well as the
possibility of serious personal and professional consequences resulting from an allegation of sexual harassment,
anonymous statements will be disregarded.

If the victim refuses to file a complaint, the matter may be investigated by the University and the final disposition
will be determined by the appropriate University officials.

Complaints of sexual harassment should be filed with the University Affirmative Action Officer. (Phone: 412-396-
6661).

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

http://www.fdss.duq.edu/specialstudentservices.htm


                                                                                                                      26
Students with Disabilities are entitled to reasonable accommodations, as determined by the institution, after
proper documentation of the disability has been received. At Duquesne University, the Office of Freshman
Development and Special Student Services, located in Room 309 Duquesne Union (412) 396-6657, is responsible
for determining reasonable accommodations and for assisting students in communicating these to faculty.
Students should notify the faculty member, at the beginning of the term, if any reasonable accommodations are
needed. Students need to be registered with the Office of Freshman Development and Special Student Services.
Before accommodations will be granted, the faculty member should receive a memo confirming the
recommendations for reasonable accommodations from the Office of Freshman Development and Special Student
Services. The purpose for implementing reasonable accommodations is to allow for equal opportunity for students
with disabilities. It is the student’s responsibility to demonstrate that the cognitive, behavioral and professional
competencies have been acquired to a satisfactory degree in order for successful completion of the course.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATIONAL STUDIES PROGRAM

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The Master of Science in Educational Studies Program at Duquesne University School of Education is a fully
accredited degree program that is perfect for individuals who desire a graduate degree in education but who do
not desire additional certification. Our candidates come from diverse backgrounds and are engaged in a wide-
range of careers across the nation and around the world.

For teachers and other educators who already possess certification, the Master of Science in Educational Studies
Program will deepen your professional knowledge base, increase your understanding of relevant theory and
research as it operates in effective educational practice and strengthen your ability to deliver high quality
instruction and design meaningful learning opportunities for all learners. Pennsylvania educators who hold initial
certification have used the program to earn their permanent teaching certification and to satisfy the requirements
for continuing licensure (Act 48). Educators from other states have enrolled in the program to enhance their
credentials or to meet continuing education requirements in their respective states.

For professionals in environments other than schools, the Master of Science in Educational Studies will prepare
you to understand and address educational issues in diverse settings such as business, health care, service,
industry, government agencies, zoos, museums, churches, not-for-profit organizations, and the military.

The Master of Science in Educational Studies is a fully accredited, 30-credit hour program providing both academic
breadth and rigor. The program’s excellence has been recognized regionally, nationally, and internationally over its
long and renowned history.

Candidates pursuing a Master of Science in Educational Studies can customize course selection by taking
advantage of the program’s 18 elective credits to design distinctive, individualized learning agendas. What’s more,
the unique pace of the program affords candidates the opportunity to determine how quickly they progress
through their studies. Some candidates complete the program in as few as 15 months, while others elect to spread
their coursework over several years.

With the addition of the online option in 1999, candidates enjoy even greater flexibility.
Master of Science in Educational Studies Program candidates can:


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•        Complete coursework online, on-campus, or through a combination
of online and face-to-face classes.

•         Design a program that meets their unique professional needs
and fits their demanding schedules.

•       Complete the degree program with or without a thesis.


PROGRAM ADVISOR
Dr. Connie M. Moss
Director, Center for Advancing the Study of Teaching and Learning (CASTL)
406 Canevin Hall
Duquesne University
Pittsburgh, PA 15282
Ph. 412-396-4778 Email: moss@castl.duq.edu http://www.castl.duq.edu/Ed_Studies.htm

THREE PROGRAM OPTIONS: A DYNAMIC AND FLEXIBLE PROGRAM OF STUDY


Online OR On-campus OR In Combination—Three Options

Option 1—Complete the program entirely online.
The resources required to complete the program—both human and informational—are available on demand 24
hours a day, 7 days a week, from anywhere in the world. These online learning environments are designed and
maintained by the Center for Advancing the Study of Teaching and Learning (CASTL) are secure, cutting edge, and
highly personal and interactive. Completing the program using the online option maximizes a candidate's ability to
accommodate family and work schedules.

Option 2—Complete the program entirely on the Duquesne campus.
Candidates can take all of their coursework on the Duquesne campus by taking advantage of traditionally offered
courses.

Option 3—Combine Online and On-Campus Learning
Candidates may choose to combine online learning experiences with traditionally offered courses. Many
candidates in the program—especially practicing teachers—prefer to earn credits online during the school year
and to come to campus for coursework in the summer.


CONCENTRATED STUDY OR UNIQUE COURSE COMBINATIONS

Create an Area of Concentration
Candidates who elect to earn credits online determine their own learning agenda rather than follow a sequence
and schedule of topics determined by an instructor. By taking at least 15 credits of coursework in Teaching as
Intentional Learning, a candidate can develop a unique area of concentration that can be documented on the
graduate's transcript.

Create a Unique Program of Coursework

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Candidates who elect to take at least some of their coursework on-campus have the option to enroll in graduate
courses in any program in the Graduate School of Education or any graduate school in the University for which
they are qualified.


THESIS OR NO THESIS

Degree without Thesis
The program does not require a master's thesis. The Master's Degree in Educational Studies can be earned by
completing 30 credit hours online, on-campus, or by combining online and on-campus study.

Degree with Thesis
Graduate candidates may elect to complete the degree with a thesis by completing a thesis while taking an
additional 6 credits of thesis study. Some candidates elect the thesis option because the thesis can help them
achieve their aspirations for doctoral study or because a thesis study will contribute both to their organization and
career advancement. The decision to take the thesis option is best made in consultation with the program advisor.

FEATURES AND BENEFITS OF THE MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATIONAL STUDIES

Personalized Advisement from Admission to Graduation
The program advisor contacts candidates regularly so that the individual needs of the graduate candidate and his
or her professional and family obligations can be accommodated through class scheduling.

Access to State-of-the-Art Learning Resources
Candidates in the online courses of the program have ready access to carefully selected and annotated information
resources housed in the CASTL Information/Resource Library and specifically designed and intuitively connected
academic resources in CASTL’s Paths of Inquiry Networks (CASTL POINTS).

The Respect of High Standards
Although flexible and sensitive to the needs and desires of graduate candidates, the program respects its
participants by maintaining very high standards of performance, requiring and reflecting rigorous study and
significant learning. The program's rigor is attributable to the online learning environment that supports
candidates as they engage in significant systematic and intentional inquiry learning. That environment is called
Teaching as Intentional Learning (TIL) (Moss, 1996, 1998, 2000). TIL has been recognized as a state-of-the-art
online learning environment by, among others, the Pennsylvania Academy for the Profession of Teaching, the
Association for Educational Communications and Technology, and the Norham Centre for Leadership Studies
(University of Oxford). Enrollment is limited to ensure that each candidate's learning meets the program's high
standards.

ADMISSION CRITERIA

Admissions criteria for the Master’s in Educational Studies program are consistent with those required in other
master’s degree-level programs at Duquesne University. The admissions process takes into consideration the
characteristics deemed essential to successfully complete the degree.




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The criteria used in determining admission to the Master’s in Educational Studies
program include:

    1.   Completion of a bachelor’s degree from a nationally accredited institution.
    2.   A minimum GPA of 3.0 (on a 4.00 scale).
    3.   Applicants for whom English is a Second Language (ESL) must work with the International Programs office
         to meet TOEFL requirements.
    4.   Completion of an application for admission and submission of a $50 application fee.
    5.   Two recommendations from professors or professionals who are qualified to evaluate your potential for
         completing graduate studies.
    6.   Official transcripts from all postsecondary schools attended.

All required admissions documentation and criteria will be reviewed and evaluated, and no applicant
can be considered for admission without a complete application packet. Applicants will be notified regarding
acceptance.



PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

•   The Master of Science in Educational Studies Program requires the completion of 30 graduate credits (without
    thesis) or 36 graduate credits (with thesis).
•   A minimum of 12 credits must be taken within Educational Foundations, including 3 credits in educational
    research.
•   The remaining 18 elective credits afford candidates the flexibility to design a unique learning agenda and, if
    they wish, to establish an area of concentration. Those opting to complete a thesis must take 6 credits of GFDE
    700.
•   The program carries a continuation of enrollment requirement that is consistent with those required in other
    master’s degree-level programs at Duquesne University. Candidates are expected to register for each term,
    once admission has been granted. Any candidate who fails to register during any semester prior to
    completion of the degree, and who does not have an official leave of absence from study granted by the
    Graduate School, may be required to apply for re-admission to the program according to the procedures and
    standards in effect at the time of reconsideration.
•   Brief descriptions of the courses in Educational Foundations are provided below. Information about other
    graduate coursework in the Graduate School of Education or in other graduate schools at Duquesne can be
    obtained in catalog descriptions and/or through web pages that can be accessed via Duquesne University's
    website: http://www.duq.edu.

ONE OF THE FOLLOWING RESEARCH COURSES IN EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS IS REQUIRED:


GFDE 502. ACTION RESEARCH IN EDUCATION 3 CR.

This course is designed for classroom teachers. Action research is scholarly investigation conducted
by practitioners for the purpose of informing their own practice. For education, this means research conducted by
teachers with the intent of taking some action that will enhance instruction and, consequently, student learning.
This course also introduces issues of classroom data collection and interpretation.

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GFDE 504. STATISTICS IN BEHAVIORAL RESEARCH 3 CR.

Skills necessary for critical analysis of quantitative research in the behavioral sciences are emphasized. The major
goal is to understand and interpret the statistical analyses used to describe distributions and to test hypotheses
that are commonly used in empirical studies employing quantitative data.


GFDE 580. ACTION RESEARCH SEMINAR 3 OR 6 CR.

The Action Research Seminar can be taken online or on-campus. The seminar focuses on applying
the methods by which action research (also known as teaching inquiry or practitioner research) can
be planned and carried out to a specific learning agenda that is determined by each candidate. Enrollment in the
seminar is limited; permission of the instructor is required.


GREV 525. EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH LITERACY 3 CR.

This course is designed to give students the skills and knowledge base necessary for the conceptual understanding
of research presented in the literature. In doing so, it will provide the students with
the foundation to become critical readers of research.

IN ADDITION TO 3 CREDITS IN RESEARCH, 9 ADDITIONAL CREDITS IN EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS
ARE REQUIRED FROM THE COURSES LISTED BELOW AND OTHER COURSES THAT MAY BE ADDED TO
COURSE LISTINGS FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF FOUNDATIONS AND LEADERSHIP.


GFDE 503. MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION 3 CR.

Examines principles of adapting school programs and materials to the interests of a pluralistic society. Addresses
specific approaches for implementing a curriculum responsive to diverse and multi-ethnic populations
incorporating cultural, racial, socio-economic, gender, and individual differences.


GFDE 507. HISTORY OF AMERICAN EDUCATION 3 CR.

An inquiry into and study of the history of American education. The course of study provides opportunities to
understand the historical reasons for why education is institutionalized as it is in American society.


GFDE 508. HISTORICAL, PHILOSOPHICAL AND SOCIOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF
EDUCATION 3 CR.

The course addresses fundamental contemporary educational issues from historical perspectives. The interaction
of philosophical theories and societal dynamics in the development of American education are explored.




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GFDE 509. INDEPENDENT STUDY 1–3 CR.

This course provides candidates the opportunity to develop a project or investigate through supervised research.
Enrollment in an appropriate area with consent of a full-time member of the faculty and approval by the Dean are
required. Candidates interested in Independent Study should consult the program advisor.


GFDE 510. THEORIES OF THE TEACHING AND LEARNING PROCESS 3 CR.

This course can be taken online or on-campus. The course provides opportunities to analyze assumptions about
knowing, teaching, and learning; to study theories of human learning and their relationships to motivation,
development, and teaching; and to reflect on and project one's own teaching and learning practice based on
theoretically sound principles.


GFDE 513, 514, 515, 516. TEACHING AS INTENTIONAL LEARNING I, II, III, IV 3, 6 CR.

TIL courses are available online only. The courses provide an online environment for aspiring teachers, practicing
teachers, and teacher educators to examine collegially the operation of relevant theory in effective practice.
Authentic problems from classrooms are framed and solutions to those problems are proposed and tested.
Learning teams are encouraged and supported in their efforts to share the results of their learning. Specific
requirements are determined by the number of credits taken. Special permission is required for enrollment. The
TIL courses are taken in sequence; a minimum of 15 credits must be taken in TIL in order to develop an area of
concentration.


GFDE 570. EDUCATIONAL LANGUAGE POLITICS AND POLICIES 3 CR.

This course is designed to raise awareness of the role of language education in teacher education programs and in
general education study through exploration of current educational language policy debates. Content includes
features of language, historical patterns of language politics, and roles of schools in creating democratic language
policies.

CANDIDATES WHO ELECT TO COMPLETE THE DEGREE WITH A THESIS MUST TAKE THE FOLLOWING
COURSE.


GFDE 700. THESIS-EDUCATION 3–6 CR.

Thesis credit is taken as the candidate is actively engaged in completing a master's thesis. The credits are typically
taken over the course of two semesters. A candidate completing a thesis will form a committee of faculty
members who will supervise the thesis. The chair of the candidate's thesis committee will issue the grade for thesis
credits.




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PROGRAM ADMISSION

•   Admission to the Master of Science in Educational Studies program requires that you be admitted
    to the Graduate School of Education at Duquesne University
    http://www.education.duq.edu/edservices/gradadmit.htm
•   To apply for admission, complete all forms contained in the Master of Science Educational Studies Application
    Packet located at http://www.castl.duq.edu/Ed_Studies.htm and submit official transcripts documenting your
    undergraduate degree and any other graduate work you may have completed. The application packet contains
    an application checklist that will guide you through the steps of the application process and provide you with
    specific addresses for submission.
•   Applications for admission to the Master of Science in Educational Studies Program can be submitted anytime.
    Admission to the program is based on qualifications of the candidate and on availability of space. Applicants
    should allow sufficient time for gathering needed documents and completing the application process well in
    advance of the first semester for which they intend to register.
•   After an application for admission and official transcripts have been favorably reviewed, the Graduate Office
    will send an official notification of admission to graduate study and a referral to the program advisor.
    Candidates whose applications are not favorably reviewed will receive notice to that effect.

PROGRAM ADVISEMENT AND REGISTRATION

•   Dr. Connie M. Moss serves as the academic advisor to all participants in the Master of Science in Educational
    Studies program. She is available online, by phone or in person
    to consult with candidates.
•   Because the program affords flexibility, encourages diversity, and requires rigorous study, advisement in the
    program is personalized according to the learning and career goals of each candidate in the program.
•   Candidates in the program should consult Dr. Moss each semester to ensure that adequate progress toward
    the degree is being made and to ensure timely registration for courses and credits.

Dr. Connie M. Moss
Advisor, Master of Science in Educational Studies
406 Canevin Hall
Duquesne University
Pittsburgh, PA 15282

For more information regarding the Master of Science in Educational Studies Program and to obtain a copy of the
Educational Studies Application Packet, please visit the program website at:

http://www.castl.duq.edu/Ed_Studies.htm

PROGRAM EVALUATION AND RESEARCH

The Master's Degree in Program Evaluation, which consists of 39 credit hours, is designed for graduate students
who work or expect to work in organizations where their duties include conducting program evaluation activities.
Graduates are prepared to work as program evaluators in government agencies, human service organizations,
educational policy agencies, school districts, colleges and universities, health care facilities, and corporations. The


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program goals are: (a) to enhance students' understanding of and skills in evaluation methodology; (b) to enhance
students' skills in using evaluation information for program planning; and (c) to encourage evaluation practice in
education and other human service fields.

Communication, Planning, and Project Management

GREV    501*     Program Planning and Evaluation              3

GREV    502*     Proposal and Grant Writing                   3

GREV    503*     Business and Project Management              3

GREV    601      Program Evaluation Practice                  3

GREV    602      Decision-Oriented Educational Research       3

GREV    603      Program Evaluation Practicum                 3

Research and Evaluation Methods

GREV    510*     Statistics I                                 3

GREV    511*     Research Methods                             3

GREV    514*     Qualitative Research Methods I               3

GREV    515      Educational Measurement I                    3

GREV    610      Statistics II                                3

GREV    614      Qualitative Research Methods II              3

Supervised Practicum and Report

GREV    650*     Supervised Practicum in Program Evaluation 3

*Required for Certificate in Program Evaluation

PROGRAM EVALUATION AND RESEARCH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


501. PROGRAM PLANNING AND EVALUATION 3 CR.

An overview of evaluation models, theory, and techniques for conducting program evaluations. Content includes:
measuring variables; reporting evaluation findings; using the results; and relationships among policy, planning, and
evaluation.




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502. PROPOSAL AND GRANT WRITING 3 CR.

Students are provided an overview of the process of identifying funding sources, receiving, and responding to
Requests for Proposals. Content includes: resources for locating funding sources, including electronic resources;
requests for proposals, parts of a grant proposal, writing and submitting proposals, budget planning and
justification.


503. BUSINESS AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT 3 CR.

Overview of the principles and practice of managing programs and projects. Content includes: basic business
administration principles, leadership, recordkeeping and reporting, legal and ethical responsibilities of project
management. Taught as a Business course.


510. STATISTICS I 3 CR.

Study of basic statistical concepts. Content includes descriptive statistics; correlation; t-test; chi-square; and the
use of computer programs for data analysis.


511. RESEARCH METHODS 3 CR.

Overview of foundations of research design and the uses and interpretation of results. Content includes: reviewing
the literature; developing research problems/questions; hypothesis testing; experimental, quasi-experimental and
other research designs; and evaluating research studies.


514. QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS I 3 CR.

Study of philosophical and methodological foundations of qualitative inquiry combined with practical experience
of working on a project. Content includes: theoretical principles and models; data collection and interpretation;
and examining qualitative research studies.


515. EDUCATIONAL MEASUREMENT I 3 CR.

Overview of theory and practice of testing and measurement in educational settings. Content includes assessment
purposes; validity and reliability; assessment techniques; and communicating assessment findings.


601. PROGRAM EVALUATION PRACTICE 3 CR.

Prerequisite: Program Planning and Evaluation Continuation of Program Planning and Evaluation. Advanced study
of evaluation models, theory, and techniques in program evaluation. Content includes experimental design, cost
analysis, public program evaluation, and ethics. Students participate in field applications.




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602. DECISION-ORIENTED EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH 3 CR.

Prerequisite: Research Methods Course focuses on the vital role of research for improving educational policy and
managing educational systems. Content includes: the systems approach to educational research and evaluation;
client and stakeholder participation; monitoring educational systems; and developing and using management
information systems.


603. PROGRAM EVALUATION PRACTICUM 3 CR.

Prerequisite: Program Evaluation Practice and Advisor Approval Course designed for individual students seeking
advanced understanding and skill development in program evaluation. Students participate in field site program
evaluations under the supervision of an approved faculty member.


610. STATISTICS II 3 CR.

Prerequisite: Statistics I Content includes theoretical concepts and procedures for simple and multiple regression,
ANOVA and ANCOVA and use of computer programs for data analysis.


614. QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS II 3 CR.

Prerequisite: Qualitative Research Methods I and Advisor Approval Course designed for individual or seminar
students seeking advanced understanding of and practice in qualitative inquiry.


650. SUPERVISED PRACTICUM IN PROGRAM EVALUATION 3 CR.

Prerequisite: Advisor Approval Students work under supervision on a project approved by the advisor. The
research paper/evaluation report must demonstrate ability to do independent work and show evidence of
professional writing ability.

EXECUTIVE DOCTORAL PROGRAM IN COUNSELOR EDUCATION AND SUPERVISION (EXCES)

The Executive Doctoral Program in Counselor Education and Supervision (ExCES) at Duquesne University is
designed for experienced counselors interested in enhancing their professional capabilities. This Ph.D. program is
appropriate for professional counselors whose career interests include teaching, supervision, and research in
counselor preparation programs, or to obtain supervisory positions in schools and agencies.

Graduates of the ExCES Program are well prepared to pursue careers in research, university teaching, or
supervision in schools and/or agencies. Our faculty believes that effectiveness as a practitioner is a prerequisite
for success in teaching and supervision. Doctoral students participate in a cohort with whom they will work for at
least three years of full-time graduate study. The Program requires completion of academic course work, teaching
and supervision of master’s students, the passing of a written and an oral comprehensive examination, completion
of a one-year internship, and submission of an approved dissertation.




                                                                                                                  36
PROGRAM APPROVAL

The Executive Doctoral Program in Counselor Education and Supervision has been approved by the Pennsylvania
Department of Education and is nationally accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related
Educational Programs (CACREP).

THE EXCES MISSION

The mission of the Duquesne University Doctoral Program in Counselor Education and Supervision is to prepare
professional educators and supervisors who will promote the well being of individuals, families, organizations and
communities. It is believed that such professionals stand for social, economic and political justice, and that they
are sensitive to life span developmental issues, demonstrate multicultural competency and recognize a global
perspective as integral to the preparation and development of future counseling professionals. In keeping with the
University mission, Program graduates will use moral and ethical principles and personal values when making
professional decisions.

GOALS OF THE EXCES DOCTORAL PROGRAM

•   Ensure that professional activities are guided by intellectual curiosity, social responsibility, compassion and
    high ethical standards.

•   Acknowledge that truth is not singular and seek a more complex and complete understanding of human
    behavior.

•   Create a learning community that promotes democratic values and constructivist learning practices.

•   Acknowledge the evaluation responsibility of educators including the promotion of informed, data-based,
    formative and summative feedback.

•   Challenge dogma encountered in classrooms and clinics and encourage inquiry.

•   Utilize critical thinking and social vision to promote program transformation and policy development.

•   Promote a systems perspective on intrapersonal and interpersonal dynamics, as well as on social and political
    transactions.

•   Commit to an interdisciplinary, collaborative approach to facilitating change.

•   Transcend the University’s physical boundaries and link with the community in order to improve educational
    opportunities for children, adults and families.

•   Recognize the interconnectedness of teaching, research, service and clinical practice in the professional
    practice of counselor educators and supervisors.

•   Support helping professionals in their ongoing attempts to address their own emotional, intellectual, spiritual
    and physical well-being.


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PROGRAM FOCUS

The Doctoral Program in Counselor Education and Supervision is defined by its focus on the development of
competence in the general areas of teaching, supervision, research and service.


TEACHING

Doctoral students in the Counselor Education and Supervision Program will demonstrate high levels of teaching
competence that meets or exceeds the standards of the Program, the University and the Council for Accreditation
of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). To meet these standards and to demonstrate high
levels of teaching competence, students will engage in varied classroom and practicum experiences. The faculty
will help the students develop increased competence in teaching through modeling, team teaching and
supervision.


SUPERVISION

Doctoral students in the Counselor Education and Supervision Program will expand their knowledge and skills of
supervision. This process involves academic instruction and practical experiences. An initial course introduces
supervision theory and techniques and requires students to demonstrate their knowledge of supervision by
investigating the development of their personal approach and underlying theory of supervision. This is followed by
two years of supervision practicum where the doctoral students are assigned to supervise the clinical work of
counselors-in-training in our master’s program. In the third year of doctoral study, students complete an
internship, part of which involves the supervision of practicing counselors.


RESEARCH

Doctoral students in the Counselor Education and Supervision Program will propose and conduct research that
supports their development, the mission of the University, and the counseling profession. The research should
extend the knowledge base and improve counseling services. To meet these research goals, the faculty will
support graduate students in their research activities and assist in the dissemination of research findings through
appropriate journals and presentations at state, regional, national, and international conferences.


SERVICE

Doctoral students in the Counselor Education and Supervision Program will utilize their teaching, supervisory,
consultative and clinical skills to provide service in schools and other related settings. Doctoral service may include:
workshops for practicing professionals, designing and delivering staff development activities for school personnel,
and participating in state, regional, and national professional organizations.

KEY PROGRAM FEATURES

1. ORIENTATION TO THE DOCTORAL PROGRAM




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All cohort members are required to participate in a residential orientation program prior to the initial fall semester
of training. The orientation is usually held from Thursday evening until Saturday afternoon in mid-June. There will
be a fee to cover the actual cost of the orientation program.

2. RESIDENCY/CONTINUOUS ENROLLMENT

The Program has a cohort residence requirement of at least three years of full-time, block scheduled study. This
Program cannot be completed on a part-time basis. Students are required to complete the entire Duquesne
University Counselor Education and Supervision Doctoral Program curriculum, as outlined for their cohort. Failure
to maintain continuous enrollment and satisfactory progress may lead to dismissal from the Program.

3. ENCOURAGEMENT FOR CONTINUOUS EMPLOYMENT

The Counselor Education faculty endorses the concept that education and relevant employment are
complementary to achieving the goals of the ExCES Program. Students are encouraged to maintain full-time
employment during their doctoral studies. The ‘executive’ model used to schedule course work allows doctoral
students to have the option of maintaining full-time employment during their studies. Classes and clinical
experiences are scheduled for Saturdays and evenings in order to facilitate simultaneous full-time study and full-
time employment.

4. PART-TIME FACULTY OPPORTUNITIES

As a result of their experience and the significant supervisory responsibilities and co-teaching required in the
Program, enrolled doctoral students may be offered the rank of adjunct or part-time faculty in the Counselor
Education Program during their course of study. In addition, during the semesters when they are assigned to
supervise students in the Duquesne University masters’ program in counseling, they are granted tuition remission
for three graduate credits.

5. CONTINUOUS REGISTRATION

Students are required to maintain continuous enrollment and satisfactory progress in the Counselor Education and
Supervision Doctoral Program at Duquesne University until the degree is awarded. After completion of all required
course work, students must register for at least one doctoral credit every fall and spring semester of each year
until the degree is awarded or the statute of limitations is exceeded. Students must be registered for at least one
Doctoral Dissertation credit during the semester or summer session when the degree will be conferred. Failure to
maintain continuous enrollment and maintain satisfactory progress will lead to a student’s dismissal from the
Program.

Under extenuating circumstances, it is possible for the Program Faculty to grant a temporary leave from the
Program to a student. If granted, the duration of the leave can be for no more than one academic year (two
semesters and a summer session) and the academic statute of limitations deadline will not be extended. If the
leave is requested during the first three years of course work, the student will be scheduled to return at their point
of departure from the Program sequence with the next ExCES cohort.

6. SCHEDULE




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The sequence of courses for the cohort will be scheduled over three years. Students will register for nine to eleven
credits each fall and spring, and six credits in each summer term. The fourth year is dedicated to completing the
dissertation.

7. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Applicants will be expected to have access to a computer and a University e-mail account. Program information is
shared via e-mail. Cooperative projects require e-mail and internet linking. Students will also be required to
purchase or have access to Microsoft Word and PowerPoint, as well as the Statistical Package for the Social
Sciences, (SPSS, grad pack) for use during the research courses.

8. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FUNDS

The members of the Doctoral Program cohort will be allocated an annual budget of $600.00 to support their
participation in professional conferences and meetings. These funds may also be used to help defray the costs
associated with cognate or dissertation research. Additional support for graduate student presentations at
professional conferences is also available through the Dean of the School of Education.

9. INDIVIDUALIZED COGNATE

The cognate is a 12 credit-hour sequence of learning experiences designed to reflect your interest, expand your
professional knowledge base, and provide an opportunity for you to deepen your exploration and understanding in
a specific topic area related to the core curriculum of the Counselor Education and Supervision Program. The
selection of a cognate area and specific topic, formalized in year two of study, is an important step in developing
your professional identity.

The cognate in this Doctoral Program is somewhat unique in that the process is individualized.

Each doctoral student has the opportunity to negotiate a specific topic for their cognate with a Counselor
Education and Supervision Program faculty member. Each faculty member publishes a list of current areas of
interest suitable for cognate study that they are willing to supervise. You must find an area that houses the specific
topic you would like to pursue and secure a commitment from that faculty member to supervise your cognate. This
should be done with care so as to reflect your professional and research interests as well as expand your
knowledge base and skills in this specialized area.

10. FINANCIAL AID AND GRADUATE STUDENT ASSISTANTS

All students accepted into doctoral study will be granted three credits of tuition remission for at least their first
two years of study. This award may be extended through the third year.

A limited number of graduate assistant positions are available for doctoral students. These positions require the
student to work 20 hours per week in a Program assignment. The compensation includes the currently available
stipend, approximately $10.00/ hour, plus 18 credits of tuition remission each year.




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PROGRAM CURRICULUM

Students accepted into the ExCES cohort are expected to begin their course of studies with the Program
orientation in the summer session after admission. The orientation is a zero credit hour, fee-based, residential
experience that provides the foundation for the cohort doctoral model at Duquesne and begins the process of
building the learning community.

During the first two years of study, students will be enrolled in nine to eleven credits each fall and spring semester.
Typically, students will meet on 10 - 14 Saturdays each term to complete their course work. They will be involved
in supervisory experiences, typically on Thursday evening during each term, and participate in co-teaching courses
on at least one other evening during the week. During each of the subsequent summer terms, students complete
six credits of ExCES course work, typically on Saturdays.

During the summer session at the beginning of the third year of course work, students are expected to complete
the Comprehensive Examinations and apply for candidacy in the Doctoral Program.

The third year of course work also includes nine credits in the fall and the spring semesters. This includes a full-
year internship in teaching, supervision and counseling that is individually developed with each doctoral candidate.
Doctoral candidates may begin their formal dissertation study. Candidates must maintain continuous enrollment
until the dissertation is approved and accepted by the University. Typically, the dissertation research, writing and
approval come in the fourth year of study.

The curriculum scope, sequence and scheduling are customized for each cohort.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

(former course codes in parenthesis)


CESD 799 (GCNED 799)
EXCES DOCTORAL PROGRAM ORIENTATION (CREDITS 0)

This course is designed to familiarize the students with the curriculum, philosophy, and requirements of the
Program. This Orientation is a one weekend residential program prior to the initial fall semester of training. The
weekend is scheduled for Thursday evening through Saturday afternoon. A student fee is assessed to cover the
cost of meals and lodging. (P/F)


CESD 801 (GCNED 809)
PERSONAL GROUP COUNSELING EXPERIENCE (2)

Students will participate in a personal growth group that will emphasize their personal clinical experience as a
group member or client. This course will offer a laboratory experience of the psychological processes related to
intrapersonal development, personality, emotions, interpersonal and group dynamics, and individual differences.




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CESD 802 (GCNED 800)
COUNSELING AND CONSULTING THEORY: INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS (2)

This course provides students with advanced training in the skills and knowledge required to teach counseling and
consulting theories based on the historical and philosophical bases of counseling and psychology, with emphasis
on gestalt, cognitive, psychoanalysis, existentialism, and behaviorism. Also included is a thorough examination of
emerging consultation theories and practices.


CESD 803 (GCNED 806)
PROFESSIONAL & ETHICAL ISSUES IN CE&S: INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS (3)

This course provides students with advanced training in the skills and knowledge required to teach, counsel,
consult and supervise. The course will review ethical, legal and contemporary issues relating to current standards
and practices in counselor education, counseling, supervision, and research in counseling, psychology, and related
fields.


CESD 804 (GCNED 801)
GROUP COUNSELING: INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS (2)

This course provides students with advanced training in the skills and knowledge required to teach group
counseling based on different theoretical approaches and techniques of group therapy. The focus will be on group
dynamics as they pertain to facilitation and counseling strategies and techniques in various types of groups
including task, psycho-educational, counseling, and psychotherapeutic.


CESD 805 (GCNED 814)
CE&S IN A MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY: INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS (3)

This course provides doctoral students with the awareness, knowledge and skills required of counselors, counselor
educators and counseling supervisors if they are to be effective in a pluralistic and diverse society. This course
prepares students to be multiculturally competent. Diversity and identity issues, multicultural models and
frameworks will be explored in relation to their impact on therapeutic, instructional, and supervisory relationships.
Also emphasized are issues relating to spirituality, religion, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, age, and gender.


CESD 806 (GCNSL 804)
METHODS OF INDIVIDUAL ASSESSMENT (2)

This course provides a comprehensive examination of psychometric procedures used to develop, validate and use
psychological instruments. Students gain an understanding of the theoretical and practical basis for the statistical
analyses of groups and individuals, including test development, norms, reliability, validity, standard error, testing
procedures, and the interpretation of test scores.




                                                                                                                    42
CESD 809 (GCNED 803)
COUNSELING SUPERVISION: THEORY AND METHODS (2)

This course provides students with an overview of supervision theory and the opportunity to learn methods for
planning, conducting and documenting individual and group supervisory sessions for counselors in training.


CESD 810, 811, 812, 813 (GCNED 807, 808, 812, 813) COUNSELING SUPERVISION
PRACTICUM I, II, III & IV (1 EACH)

Each practicum provides doctoral students with a supervised experience in clinical counseling supervision.
Students will provide direct individual and group supervision to master’s degree candidates in their counseling
practicum and internship. These clinical experiences include direct and indirect clinical contacts designed to
promote the prospective counselors’ development in assessment, intervention, evaluation, cultural competence,
case conceptualization and documentation, self-evaluation, consultation, effective use of supervision and other
areas related to their competence as a counselor.


CESD 815 (GCNED 804)
INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS IN COUNSELOR EDUCATION (3)

This course provides doctoral students with the opportunity to examine historic and current theories and practices
of teaching and learning. Students will examine instructional methods that are based on individual, environmental
and psychological processes that determine knowledge and behavior change. The course offers an opportunity to
examine processes that affect learning, e.g., perception, cognition, memory motivation, modeling, decision-
making, and emotions, in a counselor education program.


CESD 816 (GCNED 805)
COUNSELOR EDUCATION TEACHING PRACTICUM (1)

This practicum experience provides an opportunity for students to work as teaching assistants in counselor
education courses under the supervision of a Counselor Education Program faculty member. These experiences
include teaching in the courses within the core curriculum areas and electives of the master’s programs in School,
Community Mental Health, and Marriage and Family Therapy.


CESD 817 (GCNED 810)
GROUP COUNSELING LEADERSHIP PRACTICUM (1)

Students will receive clinical supervision as they gain experience facilitating the personal growth group component
of the master’s degree group counseling course.


CESD 820, 821, 822, 823 (SAME) COGNATES I, II, III & IV (3 EACH)

The cognate consists of a twelve credit-hour sequence of learning experiences in a selected concentration of study
designed to provide students with opportunities to deepen their understanding in a specific specialty in Counselor


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Education and Supervision. Doctoral candidates will, in consultation with the Counselor Education Program faculty,
select their area of concentration and a faculty supervisor for the cognate.


CESD 830
PRE-PRACTICUM SEMINAR (0)

This seminar prepares students to complete the requirements to establish a Program-approved advanced
counseling practicum experience. (P/F)


CESD 831 (GCNED 811)
ADVANCED COUNSELING PRACTICUM (3)

This practicum provides a supervised counseling experience for doctoral students. Emphasis will be on the
integration of theory and research with practice in order to develop the students’ ability to conduct individual and
group counseling and consultation sessions with children, adolescents, adult clients, and other related family
members and professionals. Emphasis will be on direct and indirect clinical contact that will promote the
prospective counselors’ development in assessment, intervention, evaluation, cultural competence, case
conceptualization and documentation, self-evaluation, consultation, effective use of supervision and other areas
related to their competence as a counselor. Video and audio tape analysis of their counseling experiences will be
required.


CESD 834
PRE-INTERNSHIP SEMINAR (0)

This seminar prepares students to complete the requirements to establish Program-approved internships (I & II) in
Counselor Education and Supervision. (P/F)


CESD 835 & 836 (GCNSL 802, 803) CE&S INTERNSHIP I AND II (3 EACH)

Students will complete two, three-hundred hour internships in two successive semesters at student-selected,
faculty-approved sites. The focus of the internships will be on the development of teaching, counseling, and
supervision skills in an educational or clinical setting.


CESD 840 (GCNSL 805)
EXCES COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS (3)

Students will be required to successfully complete the written and oral comprehensive examinations before
applying for doctoral candidacy.




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CESD 841 (GCNSL 806A)
PROFESSIONAL WRITING IN COUNSELOR EDUCATION & SUPERVISION (1)

This course establishes the expectations for professional writing. It prepares students with the professional and
critical thinking and writing skills that are the basis for effective communication and documentation of their work
as counselor educators and supervisors. Emphasis is placed on learning to apply APA style and format guidelines.


CESD 842 (GCNSL 806B)
DISSERTATION PROPOSAL IN COUNSELOR EDUCATION & SUPERVISION (3)

This course provides the students with a framework to initiate the dissertation proposal process. The course
emphasis is on the development of a research topic, the steps in the development of an effective review of historic
and current literature, and the process of selecting an appropriate research design.


CESD 845 (GCNSL 810)
PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR: DOCTORAL RESEARCH PROJECT (1-3)

Students have the option of selecting an advanced research course elective or participating in this Counselor
Education & Supervision seminar. This seminar provides the doctoral candidate with an opportunity to work with
a faculty member and a small group of colleagues on the development of a research project and journal
manuscript. It includes individualized or small group exploration of the research and writing processes and
individual mentoring on the development of a student selected project that will result in a scholarly manuscript
submitted for publication. (Repeatable)


CESD 850 (GCNSL 807)
DOCTORAL DISSERTATION IN COUNSELOR EDUCATION & SUPERVISION (0-6)

This capstone experience is successfully completed when the student’s dissertation committee approves the
written and oral presentation of the originally proposed doctoral research and the finished product is electronically
submitted and accepted by the University. If doctoral candidates need time beyond the semester in which they
registered for their 6th dissertation credit, they must register for at least one credit of 850, or other doctoral
coursework, in order to maintain continuous enrollment in the Program. (Repeatable; P/F)


GREV 701/701P
RESEARCH METHODS & DESIGN AND PRACTICUM (2/1)

This course provides students with an introduction to qualitative and quantitative approaches to research design
and methodology. The selection and application of appropriate research methods and designs are explored. In-
depth investigations of design considerations, along with the strengths and limitations of various designs, are also
examined.




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GREV 510 STATISTICS I (3)

This course is an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics addressed include: basic statistical
and research concepts, graphical displays of data, measures of central tendency and variability, standardized
scores, normal distribution, probability, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, sampling distributions,
correlation, simple linear regression, t-tests, one-factor analysis of variance, and chi-square test. The SPSS for
Windows computer software package will be used.


GREV 610 STATISTICS II (3)

This course covers theoretical concepts and procedures for parametric applications of the univariate general linear
model: simple and multiple regressions, ANOVA and ANCOVA. Lab work develops skills in the use of the computer
for data analysis using SPSS for Windows.


GREV 721/721P
QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS I AND PRACTICUM (2/1)

This class provides students with knowledge and skills in the use of qualitative research techniques in educational
and clinical applications. Course content includes the historical, philosophical and cultural issues involved in
qualitative research as well as strategies for field work in ethnographic, interpretive and participatory approaches.

ADDITIONAL COURSE WORK

In addition to the sequence of courses required for completion of the doctorate, the faculty may require that
supplementary courses be added to the program of studies if a student:

         a. is admitted under the condition that significant background deficiencies in one or more of the eight
         CACREP core areas of required study be addressed;

         b. through the continuous process of student evaluation, is determined to be deficient in a competency or
         skill area by the faculty;

         c. desires to apply for certification in school counseling or supervision of school guidance services.

ADMISSION POLICIES

Duquesne University, motivated by its Catholic identity, values equality of opportunity, human dignity, racial,
cultural and ethnic diversity, both as an educational institution and as an employer. Accordingly, the University
prohibits and does not engage in discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin,
sex, age, disability or status as a veteran or disabled veteran. Further, Duquesne University will continue to take
affirmative steps to support and advance these values consistent with the University’s mission statement.

This policy applies to all programs and activities of the University, including, but not limited to, admission and
employment practices, educational policies, scholarship and loan programs and athletic or other University-
sponsored programs. This is a commitment by the University in accordance with its religious values and applicable


                                                                                                                        46
federal, state and local laws and regulations. Nothing herein, however, should be interpreted as a waiver by the
University of its own Constitutional and legal rights based upon its religious affiliation. The person responsible for
coordinating its efforts under this policy is Dr. Judith Griggs, Affirmative Action Officer, room S-1, Assumption Hall,
412-396-6661.

The Counselor Education faculty has the sole responsibility for the selection of doctoral candidates and has
established admission criteria consistent with Duquesne University Graduate Education standards. Successful
candidates must be available and capable of meeting the academic and physical rigors required for the three-year
program commitment.

Admission policies, criteria and procedures are designed to ensure the identification and selection of all
prospective students who possess the potential for doctoral level work in Counselor Education and Supervision.

Applicants are sought who have demonstrated a commitment to the profession of counseling through interest,
preparation, experience and professional leadership.

It is the intention of the Counselor Education and Supervision Program faculty to recruit and admit students to
represent a multicultural and diverse student cohort.

The doctoral cohort that will begin with orientation in June will be selected by April 30th.

Complete application packets must be postmarked no later than the first weekday in February.

Please refer to the “Application Procedures Checklist” for the steps to take in making application to the Executive
Doctoral Program in Counselor Education and Supervision.

All of the application materials submitted will become the property of the University and will not be returned.
Otherwise qualified applicants who were not selected for the current cohort will be notified of the opportunity to
keep their admissions file open through the next application cycle.

ADMISSION CRITERIA

1. Academic Background

         a. It is expected that applicants will have completed a master’s degree in counseling or a related field that
         includes eight core areas of concentration required by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and
         Related Educational Programs (CACREP). The eight areas are: Professional Identity, Social and Cultural
         Diversity, Human Growth and Development, Career Development, Helping Relationships, Group Work,
         Assessment, and Research and Program Evaluation.

         b. Applicants should have a Grade Point Average (GPA) of 3.25 or better for all relevant graduate work
         completed.

         c. Students must submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination. These scores are one factor in the
         admissions decision; however, an applicant’s overall academic record will be considered.




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2. Experience

        a. In order to prepare them for the demands of doctoral study and the Program’s expectations, applicants
        should have sufficient and related experience (minimum two years - optimal five years.) Preference will
        be given to National Certified Counselors (NCCs) and/or Licensed Professional Counselors (LPCs).

        b. Applicants will have a history of demonstrated professional leadership and advocacy as well as a
        concern for social, economic, and political justice.

        c. It is also strongly recommended that applicants have experience as a client in personal counseling at
        some point prior to admission or during the Program.

3. Personal Characteristics

        Applicants will be able to demonstrate a personal fitness for the counseling profession including evidence
        of accurate self-awareness, emotional stability and good mental health.

4. Counseling and Supervision Career Goals

        The Duquesne University Doctoral Program in Counselor Education and Supervision emphasizes training in
        counselor education and supervision. The stated career goals of applicants are reviewed to determine if
        they are an appropriate match with the goals of the Program.

5. Verbal and Written Communication

        a. Applicants will participate in a group interview where they will have an opportunity to demonstrate
        their verbal communication abilities.

        b. Applicants will demonstrate appropriate written communication skills through the submission of a
        writing sample as part of the application process.

6. Technological Competence

        a. Applicants are expected to have competence in applying technological application to the study and
        practice of teaching, supervision, and research.

        b. Applicants should, at a minimum, be familiar with the basic application of Microsoft Word, Power Point
        and the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).

7. International Student Requirements

        In addition to the previously listed requirements, general graduate admission standards for international
        students require a transcript from the home country indicating an equivalent of a grade point average of
        3.25 or higher. English language proficiency includes a minimum score of 575 on the Test of English as a
        Foreign Language (TOEFL), with a minimum of 52 on each sub-score. Further information is available from
        the International Student Office, 412-396-6113.




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ADMISSION PRIORITIES

All applicants who meet the minimum admission requirements will be evaluated by the Program faculty using the
following priority criteria.
Applicants will be ranked higher if they:
Hold a master’s degree in counseling

         Graduated from a CACREP accredited master’s program

         Hold an NCC, LPC, or school counseling credential

         Have five years or more post-master’s experience as a counselor

         Receive a superior evaluation of clinical counselor competence from supervisors

         Express career goals that are consistent with the ExCES Program focus

         Have supervisory experience

         Can discuss the development of a research agenda or have a record of professional publication

         Have experienced the counseling process as a client

         Submit recent (within five years) GRE scores

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

Candidates for the Duquesne University Doctoral Program in Counselor Education and Supervision will submit the
following items (in one packet) to: ExCES Program Director, Duquesne University, School of Education, Pittsburgh,
PA 15282-0502. ExCES Application form Official transcripts for all undergraduate and graduate study Resume or
curriculum vita Three letters of recommendation from professionals familiar with you, your academic potential, or
work experience (forms included) A supervisor’s rating of your clinical counseling skills (form included) Completed
Writing Sample Form - Personal Statement Scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) TOEFL Scores for
International Applicants All application material should be postmarked by the first weekday in February and will
become the property of the Department of Counseling, Psychology and Special Education. Duquesne University
does not accept responsibility for loss or lateness of mailed applications. To check on the status of an application,
please call Lori Jockel, the Administrative Assistant for the Counselor Education Program, at 412-396-5567.

Applicants with complete applications will be reviewed, and qualified applicants will be selected for a group
interview with the Program faculty. Applications will be reviewed and interviews will be conducted until all cohort
positions have been filled. Invitations to join the cohort will be offered by April 30th.

For additional information about the Program or the application process, please contact the ExCES Program
Director at 412-396-5567.




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INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY

DOCTORAL PROGRAM IN INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY

The Doctoral Program in Instructional Technology offers a 79 credit-hour Ed.D. curriculum that is designed for
individuals who are interested in advancing their professional careers. Classes are offered in a cohort model and
students typically enter the program with backgrounds in education, technology, administration, or other
educational related backgrounds. The Doctoral Program in Instructional Technology (IT) prepares students for a
variety of professional positions. Graduates are typically employed as university faculty, educational consultants in
K-12 settings, or as training managers in corporate settings. Graduates possess the life-long learning skills
necessary to be leaders in the evolving instructional technology market.

MISSION STATEMENT

The Duquesne University Doctoral Program in Instructional Technology is committed to the development of
educational leaders who support learning through exemplary teaching, scholarship, and service in the Spiritan
tradition of action and caring. Technology can serve as an important tool in preparing individuals to address
educational issues through the improvement of instruction across a wide variety of settings. IT students critically
and reflectively study issues of equality and opportunity and are committed to using their personal and
professional positions of leadership to promote social justice in the democratic ideology of American education.

DOCTORAL (ED.D.) IN INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY

The 79 credit-hour training program includes coursework, applied-experiences, and dissertation. The program
consists of approximately three years of coursework with additional year(s) for completing a dissertation. The IT
doctoral program is offered on a full-time basis, and most students are able to maintain full-time employment.
The doctoral program is authorized to award the Ed.D. by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and is housed
within the NCATE-Accredited Duquesne University School of Education.



Required Courses – Doctorate (Ed.D.) in Instructional Technology

Year 1
Summer Semester:
GDIT 703 Foundations of Instructional Technology
GREV 550 Instrument Design

Fall Semester:
GDIT 715 Instructional Learning Theory
GREV 510 Statistics I
GDIT 705 Courseware Design

Spring Semester:
GDIT 720 Best Instructional Practices
GREV 610 Statistics II
GDIT 706 Developing a Learning Environment Using IT


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Year 2
Summer Semester:
GREV 701 Research Methods & Design
GREV 701P Research Methods & Design Practicum
GDIT 707 Instructional Technology Design and Leadership

Fall Semester:
GDIT 708 Technology Management and Leadership
GDIT 709 Instructional Program Development
GREV 611 Statistics III

Spring Semester:
GDIT 726 Education in a Global Society
GDIT 711 Distance Learning Global Leadership Seminar
GREV 721 Qualitative Research Methods
OR
GREV 612 Statistics IV

Year 3
Summer Semester
GDIT 819 Social Justice
GDIT 734 Dissertation I

Fall Semester:
GDIT 725 Leadership & Ethics
GDIT 735 Dissertation II

An individually designed 15-credit hour cognate is also required of all students.

ADMISSIONS

Admission Requirements

    •    Master's degree in education or a technology related field, from an accredited institution.
    •    Minimum graduate GPA of 3.5.
    •    Recent scores from Graduate Record Exam (GRE) (within 5 years from application).
    •    Technology competence and access to a current computer (specifications to be provided), with high
         speed Internet connectivity.
    •    A commitment to participate in the cohort-based program of study on a full-time basis.

Admission Procedures

Applications are due December 31st before beginning coursework in May. Each participant will submit a complete
package with the following:

             a.   Each applicant must apply online via this website -
                  http://www.education.duq.edu/prospectiveStudents/apply.html
             b.   Each applicant must prepare a letter of interest to support his or her application. This letter
                  describes experiences that have prepared him or her for graduate study and outlines his or her
                  research goals and professional plans following graduation. The letter should be no longer than
                  1,500 words.

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             c.   Each applicant must submit a PowerPoint presentation that portrays his or her current
                  technological proficiency. The file may be mailed on a CD or DVD or may be sent as an electronic
                  file.
             d.   Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate work must be enclosed in the package at
                  the time formal application materials are submitted.
             e.   Each applicant must take the Verbal and Quantitative sections of the Graduate Record Exam
                  (GRE). Duquesne University GRE Code is R2196. Information and registration materials for the
                  GRE test can be obtained through the GRE website: www.gre.org or by calling 1 (800) GRE-CALL.
             f.   Each applicant must submit three letters of reference that focus on personal, professional, and
                  academic qualifications.
             g.   $100.00 non-refundable application fee made payable to Duquesne University IT Doctoral
                  Program.
             h.   All application materials including the letter of interest, transcripts, GRE scores, and letters of
                  recommendation and application fee should be sent together to: Duquesne University, Doctoral
                  Program in Instructional Technology, School of Education, Pittsburgh, PA 15282.

Following the review of submitted application material, selected applicants may be invited for an interview with
the IT Program faculty.

RESIDENCY REQUIREMENTS

The Instructional Technology program consists of a minimum of three years of full-time, graduate study. Full-time
graduate study is defined as 6 credit hours per semester for fall, spring, and summer semesters. Once admitted to
the program, it is expected that all students be enrolled continuously. This residency requirement allows students
the opportunity to interact with faculty and other graduate students and to become familiar with university
resources. All program requirements (including dissertation) must be completed within eight years after the first
semester of coursework.

Unless a student has applied for and been granted an official leave of absence, students who do not register for any
term during the course of a full year must apply for readmission to Duquesne University before they can again
register for classes.

COGNATE COURSES

A cognate area is defined as an articulated sequence of courses, ordinarily drawn from a program or department,
which supports the dissertation by strengthening the research and statistics tools or by deepening the content
mastery of the doctoral student. The cognate concentration is developed under the advisement of the IT Program
Director and the Dissertation Chair.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS

Comprehensive exams will be completed by all students prior to beginning their dissertation. Specifically, students
will prepare an electronic portfolio that contains artifacts of their work that demonstrate the alignment of their
coursework with professional standards. Students will not be admitted to candidacy until their portfolio has been
reviewed and found to be acceptable by the program faculty.

STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP




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To better prepare for the dissertation, all students are required to prepare, submit, and have accepted, a scholarly
paper by a journal or a regional, national or international conference. Manuscripts must be submitted for
publication or presentation prior to registering for dissertation credits and successful acceptance must occur prior
to graduation.

DOCTORAL PROGRAM IN INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


701     PROFESSIONAL LEADERSHIP IN TECHNOLOGY 2CR

        The major theme of this course is to help understand the critical role of leadership in the effective
        application and integration of technology into the learning process and administrative functions of an
        organization. It is critical that leaders understand the importance of developing a shared vision of the role
        of technology in the teaching-learning experience, comprehend the change process, and learn how to
        develop a strategic plan to guide the implementation and evaluation of technology.


702     LEADERSHIP AND THE FUTURE OF TECHNOLOGY 2CR

        As the field of education changes, educators are under increased pressure to reform our nation's
        elementary and secondary schools, graduate and undergraduate education programs, and corporate
        training environments. For these reasons, this course will explore all parts of the continuum of
        instructional technology education. The course will explore a new social contract to put in place
        technology-based processes to sustain the relative excellence of the nation's higher education and so
        prepare for a new century.


703     FOUNDATIONS OF INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY 3 CR

        This course offers an examination of the key foundations of teaching and learning as applied to
        instructional technology. Participants will consider the psychological, philosophical, social, and historical
        perspectives of using technology for teaching and learning. Included are topics such as taxonomy for the
        technology domain, technology-based instructional delivery media, impact of technology on the learning
        community, and the timeline of technology development.


704     PROFESSIONAL STUDIES IN INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY LEADERSHIP 3 CR

        Participants will take a leadership role in designing, summarizing, and applying various principles and
        practices of educational research in instructional technology. They will be exposed to major research
        findings and trends related to the use of technology for teaching and learning to support an integrated
        learning environment, especially as it applies to human and equity issues. Participants will practice these
        theories of learning, teaching, and instructional design and synthesize their relationship to the uses of
        technology to support learning.




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705     COURSEWARE DESIGN 3 CR

      Participants will apply instructional design principles to develop, implement, and evaluate interactive
      multimedia products using state-of-the-art authoring tools. They will assess these authoring and
      programming tools for use in various instructional environments. Participants will analyze the
      characteristics and current uses of authoring tools and appraise the design of screens, text, graphics, and
      audio and video elements in the products under review. Finally, participants will critique practice
      strategies for creating instructional materials and offer recommendations for their improvement.


706   DEVELOPING A LEARNING ENVIRONMENT USING IT 3 CR

      This course will discern the information access and delivery methodologies available for various learning
      environments that support curriculum development. Participants will analyze and categorize
      telecommunications tools that support research and instruction throughout the classroom and distance
      learning environments. They will create and deliver a multimedia presentation using advanced features of
      a selected state-of-the-art presentation tool demonstrating their understanding, research, and practice of
      these methodologies.


707   INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY DESIGN AND LEADERSHIP 3 CR

      Participants will assume a leadership role in the design and implementation of an enterprise-wide
      technology plan. Included in this plan will be a description and analysis of accepted principles of strategic
      planning, a demonstration of the system development life cycle (as well as other systems analysis
      models), and the performance standards for individuals serving in instructional technology support roles
      in various learning environments. Group processes and inter-personal dynamics are important elements
      in the change process. Participation on planning committees will improve the participant’s
      communication and consensus-building skills. Because all plans require funding, participants will identify
      alternate funding sources to help ensure the success of their plan. Some participants will serve on local
      technology planning committees.


708   TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP 3 CR

      This course is designed to develop a model of leadership that evaluates various technologies to ensure
      the proper delivery of instruction in a variety of instructional settings. Topics include, but will not be
      limited to, operating and network systems installation, configuration and management, and evaluation.
      Various licensing schemes will be introduced with particular attention to how vendors maintain, repair,
      and otherwise support the teaching and learning environment. Human resource issues will be presented
      along with the characteristics and skills required for a competent technology committee. Various
      problem-solving scenarios will be presented including issues associated with public relations, new and
      emerging technologies, professional development, purchasing, community resources, legal aspects,
      special needs learners, security, funding, facilities, and other critical issues.




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709   INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT 3 CR

      Participants will develop curricular plans based on local, state, and national, and international standards
      for the use of computers and other instructional technologies. They will demonstrate their mastery by
      incorporating diversity issues in their program development and implementation efforts. Once
      developed, the plan will contain staff development and training elements including an identification of
      resources, audience characteristics, and learner expectations. The plan will also identify the process to
      adapt the learning environment based on these characteristics and expectations.


710   DISTANCE LEARNING FIELD EXPERIENCE 3 CR

      Participant will learn a “hands-on” holistic approach to distance and online learning with a view of the
      entire process of instructional design models, curriculum development, facilitator training and continuing
      professional development. Additionally, students will learn about implementation and online interaction;
      technology augmenting curriculum, assessment. Students will present a formal evaluation of findings to
      the online cooperative educator and administration, based on a literature review in the field of
      observation, and design and teach one faculty development lesson with Act 48 credit (if applicable) to
      enhance online teaching and learning.


711   DISTANCE LEARNING GLOBAL LEADERSHIP 3 CR

      Participants will identify local, state, national, and international leaders in the field of distance and online
      learning and take a leadership role in assembling, introducing, and moderating panel discussions on
      specified topics of interest to the class. Speakers will be identified and participate through asynchronous
      discussions, synchronous discussions, face-to-face meetings, and through videoconferencing.


715   INSTRUCTIONAL LEARNING THEORY 3 CR

      The purpose of this course is to prepare instructional leaders who will be committed to teaching and
      engaged in learning. Instructional leaders are able to reflect upon and improve practice from their own
      experiences. This course is based upon three pillars: schools of educational psychology, major
      contemporary educational movements and paradigms, and established models of instruction.
      Instructional learning theory is centered on the major schools of educational psychology: behaviorism,
      cognitive learning theory, humanism, and lifelong learning. Participants will also be exposed to models of
      instruction for their consideration. Each model of instruction will be based upon the schools of
      educational psychology and movements and paradigms.


720   BEST INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES 3 CR

      This course examines best instructional practices, as identified in the literature and in study of exemplary
      schools. It also includes examination of instructional models, technology, organizational paradigms,
      interaction schemes, processes and assessments.




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725     LEADERSHIP & ETHICS 3 CR

        Provides cohort members with a broad-based, interdisciplinary knowledge of leadership and ethics theory
        as it relates to instructional technology. Cohort members will analyze and critique case studies of the
        leadership styles presented and analyze their own leadership style in the context of those theoretical
        perspectives.


726     EDUCATION IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY 3 CR

        Students will be expected to compare the educational system in the United States to systems in other
        nations with particular emphasis on the United Kingdom, New Zealand, China, Japan, and India. Specific
        issues discussed will include economics and work, comparative educational systems, migrations,
        marginalized populations, and technology.


819     SOCIAL JUSTICE 3 CR

        This course is designed to prepare educational leadership students with information to better enable
        them to be advocates of social justice for children, families, schools and communities. The course focuses
        on educational and political policies that relate to social justice and attempts to prepare educational
        leaders to make a positive contribution in this field in their role as educational leader/administrator/social
        activist/policy reformer. The primary objective of this course is to better understand how socially just,
        educational change actually happens and most importantly how it can and must be implemented in
        families, schools, and communities. The course emphasizes the unique value of every child regardless of
        race, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic level, or handicapping condition.


734     DISSERTATION I (FALL SEMESTER) 6 CR

        Successful completion of the written and oral presentation of the student’s doctoral research is required.


735     DISSERTATION II (SPRING SEMESTER) 6 CR



MASTERS OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY

The M.S.Ed. degree in Instructional Technology provides participants with the necessary knowledge, skills and
dispositions to effectively integrate technology into their classroom instruction and to assist others to integrate
technology into all curriculum. The Pennsylvania Instructional Technology Specialists Certification is awarded upon
successful completion of a fifteen-credit block of coursework or as a part of a thirty-credit Master of Science in
Education program.




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STATE CERTIFICATION – MINIMUM 15 CREDITS

Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation and Evaluation along with Theory, Experience, and Assessment
are the cornerstones of this 15-credit, graduate-level program where candidates will progress through a series of
field experiences designed to meet the needs of educators who seek to explore the use of the latest technologies
for the classroom. Students qualify for the Pennsylvania Instructional Technology Specialist Certification after
completing a program of five graduate-level courses offered in both formal classroom and distance learning
formats. 3.0 Cumulative QPA required. (Note: Successful completion of the Praxis 1 Pre-professional skills test and
any other PDE requirement is required.)

Required courses                                          Credits

GILT511            Technology and Education                   3

GILT512            Instructional Design                       3

GILT513            Instructional Applications of Technology   3

GILT514            Management of Instructional Technology     3

GILT515            Instructional Technology Practicum         3

TOTAL                                                         15


MASTER’S DEGREE AND CERTIFICATION - MINIMUM 30 CREDITS

This program requires a minimum of 30 semester hours for the degree. (Note: the 15 credits listed above are half
of the required 30 credits for the master’s degree.) The Masters of Science in Education in Instructional Technology
provides participants with the necessary knowledge and hands-on experience to effectively integrate technology
into their classroom and to work with curriculum specialists to design materials for teacher and student use.
Candidates also trouble-shoot resources and build and monitor technology plans. The degree program addresses
all the requisite skills demanded of an individual seeking a position as technology director for a school, school
district, or training-based company. The program of study meets the needs of the K-12 classroom teacher and the
trainer/instructor of the adult leaner. Successful candidates also receive the Duquesne University’s Instructional
Technology Endorsement and qualify for the Pennsylvania Instructional Technology Specialist Certification. (See
note above.)

A. Suggestive Educational Foundations and Psychology Electives. Choose ONE. (3 crs.)

Required courses                                                    Credits

GREV525            Educational Research Literacy                       3

GSCE520            Introduction to Teaching                            3

GILT631            Instructional Techniques                            3

B. Foundations of Instructional Technology (9 crs.)

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GILT511           Technology and Education                               3

GILT514           Management of Instructional Technology                 3

GILT518           Assessment of Instructional Technology                 3

C. Strand Courses (12 crs.)

GILT512           Instructional Design                                   3

GILT513           Instructional Applications of Technology               3

GILT520           Teaching with Technology Across the Curriculum         3

GILT515           Practicum                                              3

D. Suggested electives. Six credits of electives as approved by the student’s advisor (6 crs.)

GILT521           Digital Imagery for Teachers                           3

GILT524           Educational Technology Hardware Certification          3

GILT526           International Videoconferencing                        3

TOTAL CREDITS                                                            30

E. Field Experiences. Candidates observe and collaborated with instructional technology specialists in local school
districts and other learning environments.

GRADUATE INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


511. TECHNOLOGY AND EDUCATION. 3 CR.

Examines the pedagogy of teaching digitally, the use of technology as a teaching strategy for the classroom, and
the impact of school-related legislation and leadership roles available in instructional technology.


512. INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN. 3CR.

Examines K-12 instructional design theories that are universally applicable to teaching and learning. Participants
design instructional pieces for classroom application. Introduction to advanced technologies begins in this course.


513. TEACHING K-12 INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS. 3 CR.

Participants will prepare technology-based instructional lessons in K-12 subjects (Math, Science, English and Social
Studies). They will integrate their understanding of instructional design and delivery with basic learning theories
and advanced technology, such as, but not limited to: Personal Response Systems, video editing, and podcasting.




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514. MANAGEMENT OF INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY. 3CR.

Technology planning, the impact of technology on students and organizations, the multicultural effects of
technology, and project management life cycle will be considered.


515. INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY PRACTICUM. 3 CR.

The pivotal learning experience providing an opportunity to “learn by doing.” Participants will be paired with real-
world demands to implement technology in schools. Candidates assess changes in the knowledge, skills and
dispositions of students and are able to report on the efficacy of technology integration into the teaching/learning
environments. Typically taken during the final semester of the program.


518. ASSESSMENT OF TEACHING/LEARNING WITH IT. 3CR.

Examines objectives, goals, traditional and alternative assessments, evaluative methods-intentions and
interventions to enhance “best practices” for using instructional technology in the classroom.


520. TEACHING WITH TECHNOLOGY ACROSS THE CURRICULUM. 3 CR.

Examines technology across specific classroom disciplines including science, math, social studies, language arts,
etc. Views of multicultural differences and similarities will be presented.


521. DIGITAL IMAGERY FOR TEACHERS. 3 CR.

This course focuses on various uses of multimedia for enhancing course materials. Participants create and edit
digital images, implement design concepts for creating web pages, and work with video. The students will become
more comfortable with different software packages that allow for more creativity and interactivity in the
classroom and in the workspace.


524. EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY HARDWARE CERTIFICATION. 3 CR.

Examines the requirements of effectively planning and delivering instructional technologies curriculum as it relates
to the hardware and software requirements. Participants will experience the A+ certification process and
optionally install a network lab.


526. INTERNATIONAL VIDEOCONFERENCING. 3 CR.

This course will focus on the development of videoconference sessions in international settings. Consideration of
best practices and cultural differences will be emphasized.


631. INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNIQUES. 3CR.

The focus of this course is on planning for pupil involvement with particular emphasis on selection of content,
activities, materials and instructional techniques to improve school teaching in the content areas.

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GRADUATE ELEMENTARY LEADING TEACHER PROGRAM

The Graduate Elementary Leading Teacher Program (GELTP) is guided by the mission of Duquesne University, the
conceptual framework of the School of Education, and state/national standards. It is designed to prepare teacher
candidates for elementary classrooms in our nation’s schools by providing a caring and supportive learning
environment that promotes academic excellence. This program satisfies the requirements for a Master of Science
in Education Degree (M.S. Ed.) and initial certification (Instructional I) to teach at the elementary level in the
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (grades K-6). Candidates have the opportunity to develop professional and
personal competence by participating in experiences that are both theoretical and applied. They also have options
to distinguish themselves through independent research and/or international study and teaching opportunities.
This program consists of twelve academic courses (36 credits), a field-based experience (1 credit), a student
teaching experience (6 credits), and three gateways (1 credit each).

Candidates must register for a minimum of 8 credits during their first semester in the program. The Entrance Track
must be completed during the first semester or candidates will not be permitted to register for classes the
following semester. Candidates may register for a maximum of 14 credits during their first semester. This includes
the Entrance Track plus two additional courses.

ENTRANCE TRACK = 8 CREDITS
INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING (3 credits)
GELP 540 Introduction to Teaching 3
FIELD EXPERIENCE (1 credit)
GELP 541 Field-Based Orientation Experiences (FBOE) 1
EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 credits)
GPSY 619 Child and Adolescent Development OR GEPSY 514 Human Growth and
Development OR GFDED 510 Theories of the Teaching and Learning Process 3
GATEWAY 1 (1 credit)
GELP 550 Gateway 1: Technology 1

PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION TRACK = 31 CREDITS
DIVERSITY (9 credits)
GSPE 611 Persons with Disabilities OR GSPED 625 Incl. Ed: Rationale and Strategies 3
GESL 508 Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners OR GEESL 510 Theories and
Practice of Second Language Learning 3
GECE 502 Curriculum Design for Inclusive Early Childhood Education 3
(Note: This course is only offered during the spring term.)
TEACHING METHODS (21 credits)
GELP 551 The Healthy Child: Creative Expression and Movement 3
GELP 552 Teaching Elementary School Social Studies 3
GELP 553 Teaching Elementary School Language Arts 3
GELP 554 Teaching Elementary School Mathematics 3
GELP 555 Teaching Elementary School Science 3
GRLA 521 Reading Programs & Instruction OR GRLA 524 Psychology of Reading 3
GELP 556 Instructional Techniques OR GITED 511 Technology and Education 3
GATEWAY 2 (1 credit)
GELP 560 Gateway 2: Diversity 1



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STUDENT TEACHING TRACK = 7 CREDITS
GELP 561 Elementary School Student Teaching Experience (15 weeks) 6
GELP 562 Elementary School Internship Experience (full year) 3-6
Candidates can register for 3 credits each semester or 6 credits for one semester.
GELP 563 Elementary School Student Teaching Experience Abroad (20 weeks) 3-6
Candidates can register for 3 credits each 10 weeks or 6 credits for 20 weeks.
GATEWAY 3 (1 credit)
GELP 570 Gateway 3: Leadership 1


GRADUATE EARLY CHILDHOOD AND EARLY CHILDHOOD/ELEMENTARY LEADING TEACHER
PROGRAMS


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ENTRANCE TRACK:

INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING



GECE 573 ORIENTATION TO THE EARLY CHILDHOOD PROGRAM – 0 CREDIT:
This required course is an orientation meeting designed to introduce new candidates to the Graduate Leading
Teacher Program. It is held each semester for new candidates in their first term of enrollment in the program.
New candidates receive information about program of study guidelines, performance assessments, field
observations student teaching and exit requirements.


GECE 540 INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING:
This course is designed to provide an introduction to teaching for candidates seeking early childhood, elementary
and/or secondary certification. Topics include professionalism, curriculum and instruction, motivation,
management, assessment and evaluation, classrooms as learning communities, and reflective practices.
Integrated within the content of the topics are elements for special education, technology education, and
multicultural education. Micro-teaching will be utilized as a practical reinforcement of the topics. *Technology –
candidates are required to create several instructional technology based materials for lesson presentations


GECE 541 FIELD BASED ORIENTATION EXPERIENCES – 0 CREDIT:
All graduate candidates are required to complete a variety of field based assignments during Introduction to
Teaching. These assignments will familiarize the candidates with current issues and practices related to early
childhood. During the experience candidates are expected to be actively involved in the classroom by conducting
small and large group activities, tutoring individual students and assisting the classroom teacher as needed.

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (CHOOSE ONE)


GPSY 514 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT:
A survey of growth, adaptation and development patterns in infancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood with
implications for academic, emotional and social learning.

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GPSY 619 CHILD AND ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT:
This course explores child development from conception through adolescence, surveying growth, adaptations, and
developmental patterns in infancy, childhood, and adolescence with implications for academic, emotional, and
social learning.

EDUCATIONAL DIVERSITY (CHOOSE ONE)


GESL 508 CULTURALLY AND LINGUISTICALLY DIVERSE:
This course is designed to address the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse children in a school setting.


GFDE 503 MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION:
This course examines principles for adapting school programs and materials to the interest of a pluralistic society.
Addresses specific approaches for implementing a curriculum responsive to diverse and multiethnic populations
incorporating cultural, racial, socio-economic, gender, and individual differences.

INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD


GECE 500 THEORY, RESEARCH AND PRACTICE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD:
This course examines developmentally appropriate practices in early childhood education and the importance of
how to critically read and interpret research based articles as it relates to early childhood practices. Technology –
candidates are required to use the internet and present assignments using power point.

Gateway 1
1 credit


GATEWAY 1: TECHNOLOGY GILT 527:
All candidates will develop and maintain an electronic portfolio. The creation of the portfolio will be reviewed by
the early childhood director and will be maintained by the candidates and presented during the Student Teaching
exit review during Gateway 3.

PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION TRACK

EARLY CHILDHOOD CONCENTRATION


GECE 502 CURRICULUM DESIGN FOR INCLUSIVE EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION:
This course examines how curriculum must be adapted to meet the diverse and changing needs of children and
their families. It will address how teachers can create and maintain environments that are accessible both
physically and developmentally to children with special needs. Candidates will examine activities, materials,
equipment and toys to determine their age- and individual appropriateness. *field intensive course, *technology –
power point presentation, researching using the internet


GECE 504 FAMILY, SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY INTERACTION:
This course examines the importance of teachers encouraging and developing home-school relationships and
identifying and utilizing community resources. This course will provide strategies for effective parent-teacher
communication, for increasing parent involvement, and for educating parents. *field intensive course, *technology
– power point presentations, locating web based materials and references

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GECE 510 LITERACY AND LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT:
This course emphasizes the importance of emergent literacy, and the importance of quality reading, writing,
speaking and listening experiences for young children. *field intensive course, *technology – identifying web based
sites that foster literacy activities at home, power point presentations

Prior to student teaching the candidates will take the GRLA 630 course to implement their plan and write the
results.


GECE 574 EARLY CHILDHOOD PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR I:
This required course is designed to inform candidates about current issues, such as establishing a reciprocal
relationship with parents, guiding behaviors/classroom management, Developmentally Appropriate Practices, and
assessment as it relates to the field of Early Childhood. This seminar is held prior to/or during student teaching.



GECE 575 EARLY CHILDHOOD PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR II:
This required course is designed to assist candidates in their preparation for the Exit Interview Portfolio. The
required components of the portfolio will be reviewed and candidates will have an opportunity to share their
working portfolio for suggestions. This seminar is held during the student teaching semester.

SPECIAL EDUCATION CONCENTRATION


GSPE 625 INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: RATIONALE AND STRATEGIES:
This course is designed to cover the philosophy and rationale for inclusive education, as an overview of
components that are critical to successful programs. Topics include: goal selection, teaming, co-teaching, planning
and scheduling issues, grading, and support needs. *field intensive course, *technology – power point
presentations, locating web sites for parents

CONTENT SPECIFIC COURSES


GECE 505 OR 551 AESTHETIC EXPERIENCES OR HEALTHY CHILD:
Both courses are designed to provide candidates with appropriate experiences in art, music, movement, drama,
and health in designing, and implementing activities for young children.


GELP 552 TEACHING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SOCIAL STUDIES:
This course explores the structure of the social studies curriculum, goals and objectives, basic and advanced
instructional techniques and special content areas, e.g. multicultural, geography, and affective outcomes.


GELP 554 TEACHING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL MATH:
A study of the concepts and skills related to operations of whole numbers; decimals/common fractions with a
problem solving focus; issues in problem solving geometry, and measurement.


GELP 555 TEACHING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SCIENCE:
Laboratory oriented science education, using a variety of programs, units, and lessons designed to facilitate
development of scientific thinking in children. Various science programs will be studied and students will work



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with program materials. Focus will be on teacher and learner competencies in planning, implementation and
evaluation of an adaptive science learning environment.


GRLA 524 PSYCHOLOGY OF READING:
Emphasis is on the physiological, psychological and sociological aspects of children’s behavior and their
relationship to learning to read. Also examined will be learning theory and teacher and their relationship to
learning to read. Also examined will be learning theory and teacher variables; dialects and non-standard language
patterns; oral and written language development, and an understanding of affective variables that promote
reading competence.

Gateway 2
0 Credit



GECE 571 GATEWAY 2:
This gateway requires candidates to submit their graded “Final Project” assignment from the GECE 502 course and
submit a written two page reflection o how the assignment had an impact on their knowledge, skills, and
disposition regarding inclusive practices and diversity.

STUDENT TEACHING TRACK


GECE 590/690:
Candidates will register for the one full semester student teaching experience or the full year internship
experience.

Gateway 3


GECE 570 LEADERSHIP:
Candidates will complete the portfolio from Gateway 1 and present the contents during the Student Teaching Exit
Review.


GRADUATE SECONDARY LEADING TEACHER PROGRAM

ENTRANCE TRACK

All requirements are subject to change based on PDE requirements for certification, which take precedence.

Candidates are introduced to the teaching profession through learning experiences in the Entrance Track. Courses
in this track focus on content knowledge and pedagogical knowledge, skills, and dispositions. The following 11
credits comprise the Entrance Track:

    •    0 credits – Orientation
    •    3 credits – Introduction to Teaching
    •    1 credit – Field Experience (subject specific)
    •    3 credits – Reading


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    •    3 credits – Introduction to Research
    •    1 credit – Gateway 1: Technology
    •    0 credits – Praxis I: PPST (Reading, Writing, and Mathematics Skills)

GATEWAY 1: TECHNOLOGY

During the Entrance Track, candidates must demonstrate their readiness to be accepted into the Diversity and
subsequent Professional Educator Certification Track. This review is called Gateway 1.

Criteria for Gateway 1: In addition to acceptable grades in the coursework in the Entrance Track, and the
successful completion of a Field Experience, candidates must pass all Praxis I PPST tests required for certification in
Pennsylvania. Candidates will also gain knowledge and experiences that address the standards and the LTP Theme
of Technology. Faculty from the Instructional Technology program will conduct a series of three 2-hour seminars
during the semester. These seminars will be instruction for the candidates regarding how to develop and maintain
an electronic portfolio. The candidates will begin their electronic portfolio and be monitored by said faculty
throughout their program. Assessment will be based on technology standards related to electronic portfolios. The
end product will be shared with said faculty during the exit interview and portfolio presentation that occurs at the
end of student teaching.

Candidates are expected to complete all requirements for Gateway 1 and register for the Gateway during the first
or second semester of the program. It is possible to finish the Entrance Track in the first semester. However,
candidates usually take two or three classes a semester and as a result may not register for Gateway 1 until second
semester. If this is the case, candidates may register for their remaining Entrance Track courses while taking the
first few classes in the Professional Educator Certification Track. If Gateway 1 is not registered for and passed by
the end of the second semester of enrollment, candidates will not be permitted to continue taking classes in the
program.

The candidate should begin to think and plan for a research project that he/she will be doing during student
teaching. The project will be to look at student work to show the impact of the candidate’s teaching on student
learning. The project will be gradually integrated into the sequence of courses in five steps: 1.) Choose a topic or
an area of student learning that you would like to assess; e.g. How can I improve student learning regarding the
Periodic Table? 2.) Search the literature so that you have a research base for your project. 3.) Identify your
learning goals. 4.) Perform the intervention. 5.) Collect evidence of the impact of your teaching on the learning of
the students. Key classes that you take throughout the Program will help you in designing this project. These
courses are Introduction to Teaching, Educational Research Literacy, Theories of Teaching and Learning Processes,
Instructional Techniques, and the Methods class(es). The final project will be included in the portfolio.


LTP THEME OF TECHNOLOGY:

Technology: A leading teacher is an architect building learning environments that acknowledge and incorporate
the power of technology.

Candidates for certification will use technologies as a means of communicating their own learning, as well as a
means of facilitating the learning of children in their classrooms.




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INTRODUCTION TO THE FIELD

Each graduate secondary certification candidate is required to carry out field-based experiences during
Introduction to Teaching. These will familiarize the candidate with current issues in education, school functions,
and developmentally appropriate activities for children. Secondary certification is 7 – 12 so the candidate must
spend a minimum of 15 hours in middle school (7 - 8) and 15 hours in secondary school (9 – 12). School districts in
Allegheny County and surrounding counties have opened their classrooms to our candidates, offering diverse
education settings. Within less than a one-hour drive, candidates can participate in classrooms in a city, suburban,
or rural setting. Candidates may participate with one or more of our Professional Development Schools (PDS), a
dynamic cooperative venture between the School of Education and K-12 schools in the surrounding area. The
functions of the Duquesne University Professional Development Schools parallel those of the National Council for
Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) PDS Standards. The collaborative aspires to attain these standards
using an inquiry approach for functions of stronger preservice teacher education, enhanced staff development,
and increased student achievement. The candidate should contact the appropriate person) to assist with
placement(s) after they have registered with their advisor.

Duquesne candidates are expected to participate actively in teaching and learning that occurs in the classroom.
This includes but is not limited to leading small group activities, generating and using teaching materials,
conducting a lab, tutoring students, and other activities. The candidate is responsible for a sign-in form that
monitors visits to the school(s) and a Site log. For this log, the candidate is to include the date, school, grades and
subject, name of the cooperating teacher, what activities the candidate did, the educational theory underlying
these, and an evaluation of the effectiveness both from the candidate’s and the student’s perspective. The
candidate is also responsible for providing a detailed description of how the experience addresses/reflects PDE
standards and Domains and Themes of the School of Education.

    1.   The candidate must register for Field Experience in the section related to their content area along with
         Introduction to Teaching, GSCED 520.
    2.   The candidate must pick up all field experience materials from the secondary program director and return
         the front sheet to the Director of Professional Development Schools.
    3.   Before entering a school building, the candidate must obtain the following documentation:
    4.   Act 34 Clearance/ FBI clearance, Act 33/151 Clearance, and a clear Tuberculin PPD test. The forms are
         available in online. Except for the first clearance, each is valid for one year.
    5.   Field experience materials are submitted to the ADVISOR for your content area program. Packets should
         be submitted electronically or hard copy on the first day of finals. No Incomplete grades will be issued.
         Late work or failure to complete the assignment will result in an “F” grade and the experience/course will
         need to be repeated.

DIVERSITY TRACK

The courses in the Diversity Track require teacher candidates to apply the knowledge, the skills, and the
dispositions acquired in the Entrance Track to practical experiences with students in seventh through twelfth
grade. The following 9 credits comprise the Professional Educator Certification Track:

    •    6 credits – Special Education
    •    3 credits – Cultural and Linguistic Diversity

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    •    0 credit – Gateway 2: Diversity

GATEWAY 2: DIVERSITY

During the Diversity Track, candidates demonstrate understanding of and strategies to address diverse populations
of students. This is called Gateway 2. Field experiences are imbedded in some of the courses listed. Candidates are
expected to register for Gateway 2 during their semester in the Diversity Track. If Gateway 2 is not registered for
and passed, candidates will not be permitted to advance to the Professional Educator Certification Track.

Criteria for Gateway 2: Candidates are expected to successfully complete all requirements for the diversity
gateway.

LTP THEME OF DIVERSITY:

Diversity: A leading teacher is an advocate, creating learning experiences that demonstrate sensitivity,
acknowledging students of all abilities and valuing human differences.

DIVERSITY STANDARDS:

Council for Exceptional Children: CEC believes diversity means understanding and valuing the characteristics and
beliefs of those who demonstrate a wide range of characteristics. This includes ethnic and racial backgrounds, age,
physical and cognitive abilities, family status, lifestyle preferences, socioeconomic status, religious and spiritual
values, and geographic location.

Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages: Courses and experiences are designed to reflect TESOL
Standards that all children have the right to learn and that it is the teacher's responsibility to facilitate that
learning. Candidates for certification will have experiences with peers, faculty, teachers, and school children from
diverse backgrounds and with diverse needs. Candidates will explore ways to create a learning environment that
gives all children the right to learn and will demonstrate specific teaching methods that provide the opportunity
for all children to learn.

Candidates will address these competencies in the courses listed. A matrix reflecting this is attached. Assessment
of how the candidate has addressed the competencies will be determined by the specific course requirements.

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATOR CERTIFICATION TRACK

The courses in the Professional Educator Certification Track require teacher candidates to apply the knowledge,
the skills, and the dispositions acquired in the Entrance Track and the Diversity Track to practical experiences with
students in seventh through twelfth grade. The following 10 – 13 credits comprise the Professional Educator
Certification Track:

    •    3 credits – Instruction
    •    3 credits – Educational Psychology
    •    3 – 6 credits – Discipline Specific Field-Based Method Course (required field experience is associated with
         the methods class(es).
    •    1 credit – Content Methods Field experience*
    •    0 credit – Complete application for graduation


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    •    0 credit – Passing of PRAXIS II - Subject Area Specialty Test(s) (for K-12 certification – Fundamental
         Subjects)
    •    0 credit - Gateway 3: Readiness for Student Teaching

*The field experience for the Professional Educator Certification Track is similar to that described in Gateway 1 in
that a minimum of 30 hours must be spent in a 7-12 setting (spend the whole time in a single setting – middle
school or high school), the candidate must maintain the site log, the sign-in sheet, and the evaluation by the
cooperating teacher. It also reflects the structure and requirements of the LTP Content Methods Field experience:
“Each field experience provides the opportunity for teacher candidates to reflect critically on their developing
knowledge base and practical experiences in relation to the content of the course and subject area. These
experiences are designed to foster personal and professional growth in preparation for student teaching and entry
into the teaching profession.” This field experience must be carried out in the context of the methods class and, as
a result, the methods faculty will be the primary contact for setting up the location of the experience and the
specific requirements. Candidates must participate actively in the teaching and learning that occurs in the
classroom. Requirements and assessments are at the discretion of the methods instructor and field cooperating
teacher. The educational theory underlying the activities is critical at this point in the program and should be very
specifically referenced and the effectiveness from the candidate’s and the student’s perspective should be
specifically evaluated. The candidate is also responsible for providing a detailed description of how the experience
addresses/reflects PDE standards and Domains and Themes of the School of Education. This experience can also
be the basis for the project, described in Gateway 1, which the candidate will complete during student teaching.

GATEWAY 3: READINESS FOR STUDENT TEACHING

Candidates are expected to complete coursework and other requirements and register for Gateway 3 during their
final semester in the Professional Educator Certification Track. If Gateway 3 is not registered for and passed,
candidates will not be permitted to student teach or graduate. However, if candidates choose to take a course
while student teaching, then Gateway 3 will be reviewed even though one course has not been completed.
However, Methods class(es) can not be taken at the same time as student teaching. In this scenario, candidates
will register for the final course in the Professional Educator Certification Track, along with Student Teaching
during the final semester of the program.

Criteria for Gateway 3: During the Professional Educator Certification Track, candidates demonstrate readiness for
student teaching. This review is called Gateway 3: Readiness for Student Teaching. At this time, the advisor will
review the transcript/program sheet to make sure that the candidate has fulfilled all of the requirements, as listed
above, for student teaching. The advisor is one of the persons that have to approve the application for student
teaching. In addition to the coursework, a candidate must have a QPA of 3.00 in both content and education
courses in order to be able to student teach and to obtain certification.

STUDENT TEACHING TRACK

    •    6 credits – Student Teaching

A detailed list of student teaching requirements will be made available to teacher candidates at a required meeting
in January prior to scheduled student teaching (student teaching in either fall or spring semesters of the following
academic year). The Director of Student Teaching handles placements. Orientations are held for both the student


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teachers and the cooperating teachers. The student teaching handbook is available online at
http://www.education.duq.edu. Student teaching can take place in one of three ways. The first is a 15-week
experience in a secondary classroom. If a candidate is getting certification in two areas, he/she must complete a
10 week student teaching experience in each content area including both middle school and high school levels; e.g.
chemistry and physics certification: 10 weeks in chemistry at the high school or middle school level and 10 weeks
in physics at the high school or middle school level. The second option is student teaching abroad. Experiences
occur in two sessions, 10 weeks in a classroom in the Pittsburgh area and 10 weeks abroad. Presently, student
teaching abroad opportunities include Ireland and Italy. The third option is a year-long internship with an intern
certificate. To qualify for an Intern Certificate, the candidate must:

    •    be admitted to the graduate secondary program in the School of Education
    •    complete all of the content courses required
    •    pass the Praxis I (PPST) and Praxis II (Specialty area) exams
    •    apply for an Intern Certificate

Candidates may not begin an internship without an intern certificate. To maintain validity of the Intern Certificate,
the candidate must continue to enroll in the School of Education each semester. Candidates may register for three
credits each semester or six credits in the first semester of the internship. In the latter case, an “IP” grade will be
issued for the first semester and will be changed to a “P” upon successful completion of the internship.

Candidates completing the internship and meeting their university requirements and will be recommended for
graduation. The remaining time of internship is completed under contractual arrangements with the school
district. Currently, the School of Education has internship agreements with a number of school districts; check with
the Director of Student Teaching to see if a particular school district has openings for interns.

INSTRUCTIONAL I CERTIFICATION

Applications for Pennsylvania certification should be obtained from the Office of Student and Academic Services,
214 Canevin Hall, prior to graduation. Completed applications should be returned to the same office. Applications
will be submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of Education in Harrisburg after graduation dates in December,
May, or August. Certification is a separate process from the application for graduation.

GATEWAY 4: LEADERSHIP

    •    0 credit – Gateway 4: Leadership
    •    0 credit – Portfolio Presentation During Exit Interview


LTP THEME OF LEADERSHIP:

LEADERSHIP: A LEADING TEACHER IS A LIFELONG LEARNER INSPIRING A COMMUNITY OF LEARNERS
TO PURSUE CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT AND GROWTH.

Candidates for certification will be encouraged to develop the skills of reflection and critical judgment about their
own teaching practice and the curriculum; develop positions on teaching and curricular issues that are reflections
of best practice; demonstrate the ability to communicate their positions effectively so that children, parents,
colleagues, and administrators understand and value their professional contributions; develop confidence about


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their role as a teacher; and engage in lifelong learning. Evaluation of this will consist of successfully completing
student teaching and a favorable rating on the PDE 430 form and any other relevant forms completed during
student teaching.

Criteria for Gateway 4: During the Student Teaching Track, candidates must demonstrate their professional
competence in the areas of content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, skills, dispositions, and effects on student
learning. At completion of student teaching, the final requirement will be met by presenting the electronic
portfolio, first developed as a requirement for Gateway 1 and completed during student teaching, during an exit
interview. The advisor and faculty from Gateway 1 will evaluate the portfolio. Evaluation related to the Themes
and Domains of the LTP will be provided during a meeting about student teaching and the portfolio. Emphasis for
this will be on Leadership and at least three artifacts must be included in the portfolio demonstrating leadership in
the classroom and professional growth. If one or both of these are not met, the candidate will have to redo and
resubmit the portfolio in another exit interview.

SECONDARY EDUCATION

1. Master's Degree and Certification – 36 credits
2. Master's Degree only (M.S.Ed.) – 30 credits
3. Additional Certification Area – minimum 18 credits

MASTER’S DEGREE AND INITIAL CERTIFICATION

Academic Background: These programs assume the following.

     1. Must meet PDE subject area specialty standards in their discipline English, Foreign Language,
         Mathematics, Science, Social Studies
     2. Six credits of English: literature and composition
     3. Six credits of math
     4. Minimum GPA of 3.0/4.0 in academic discipline(s) (subject to change)
Academic work may have been completed at different colleges and at both graduate and undergraduate levels.

ENTRANCE TRACK – 11 CREDITS
GSCE 500 Orientation 0
GSCE 520 Introduction to Teaching 3 cr.
GSCE 58x (subject specific) Field Experience – Secondary 1 cr.
GRLA 529 Reading in the Secondary Schools 3 cr. or
GRLA 521 Reading Program and Instruction 3 cr.
GREV 525 Educational Research Literacy 3 cr.
GSCE 570 Gateway 1: Technology 1 cr.
Praxis I 0 cr.

DIVERSITY TRACK – 9 CREDITS
GSPE 611 Persons with Disabilities 3cr.
GSPE 661 Gifted and Talented 3 cr. or
GSPE 625 Inclusive Education 3 cr.

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GESL 508 Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners 3 cr.

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATORS CERTIFICATION TRACK – 10 OR 13 CREDITS
GFDE 510 Theories of the Teaching and Learning Process 3 cr.
GSCE 631 Instructional Techniques 3 cr.
Appropriate Secondary Methods Course:
GSCE 633 Teaching Foreign Languages 3 cr.
GSCE 634 Teaching Secondary Social Studies 3 cr.
GSCE 536 Teaching Middle School Mathematics 3 cr.
GSCE 635 Teaching Secondary School Mathematics 3 cr.
GSCE 636 Teaching Secondary School Science 3 cr.
GSCE 637 Teaching Secondary School English 3 cr.
GSCE 58x (subject specific) Field Experience – associated with methods classes 1 cr.
Praxis II Specialty Area Test

STUDENT TEACHING TRACK – 6 CREDITS
GSCE 591 Secondary School Student Teaching 6 cr.

36 - 39 Total

*Praxis Series Test: passing scores on both core battery and specialty tests. Effective May 1, 2007, the Praxis I Pre-
Professional Skills Test must be passed during Gateway 1 and Praxis II must be passed before student teaching.

MASTER'S DEGREE ONLY: A minimum of 30 credits. The coursework is determined by the student and graduate
advisor and includes the required professional education courses or alternatives listed above (18-21 credits) plus 9-
12 credits in Arts and Science graduate courses related to the Secondary Program as determined by advisor.

ADDITIONAL CERTIFICATION: For students having a valid Pennsylvania Teaching Certificate, an additional area
of secondary certification may be added by completing a minimum of 18 graduate credits. These are usually a mix
of professional education and Arts/Science courses. Courses already taken as part of the first certification do not
have to be retaken. Field Experience (GSCE 595) may be waived. GSCE 591 Graduate Internship does not have to
be repeated. The advisor may require GSCE 690 Practicum. The minimum of 30 hours of academic coursework
applies to the new certification area.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

SECONDARY EDUCATION


520. INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING. 3 CR.

This course will help the student conceptualize the teacher as decision maker – one who makes planning,
implementing, evaluation and management decisions as part of the instructional role.




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536. TEACHING MIDDLE SCHOOL MATHEMATICS. 3 CR.

Contemporary research in mathematics education; psychological basis of instruction; teaching models, materials,
resources; evaluation techniques and procedures.


591. SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENT TEACHING. 6 CR.

Intensive practicum in teaching under the supervision of university and public school personnel. Required for
teacher certification.


595. FIELD EXPERIENCE IN SECONDARY EDUCATION. 1 CR.

This transcripted course will provide the student primarily with experiences in secondary schools and occasionally
in agencies, and community settings. This course must be completed during Gateway 1. An additional Field
experience is required in coordination with the methods class.


631. INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNIQUES. 3 CR.

The focus of this course is on planning for pupil involvement with particular emphasis on selection of content,
activities, materials and instructional techniques to improve school teaching in the content areas. Prerequisite: 520
or equivalent.


633. TEACHING FOREIGN LANGUAGES. 3 CR.

This methods course will engage the student sin various approaches to foreign language teaching, (K-12_, identify
materials and resources, reveal interesting etymological and cultural considerations, and address the linguistic
aspects of the language.


634. TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. 3 CR.

This course will focus on providing the student with the concepts and techniques needed to successfully plan and
deliver social studies instruction in a competent and professional manner appropriate for the secondary level.


635. TEACHING MATH IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. 3 CR.

Contemporary research in mathematics education; psychological basis of instruction; teaching models, materials,
resources; evaluation techniques and procedures.


636. TEACHING SCIENCE IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. 3 CR.

Contemporary research in science education; psychological basis of instruction; teaching models, materials,
resources; evaluation techniques and procedures.




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637. TEACHING ENGLISH IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. 3 CR.

This course examines various approaches to teaching and learning the English language arts. It provides
opportunities to practice pedagogical skills through the organization and presentation of lessons in literature,
integrating reading, writing, listening, speaking, and thinking. It is focused on improving instruction in secondary
English classrooms.


690. PRACTICUM: SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHING. 3 CR.

For persons who have had at least a year of teaching experience, but are not certified in Pennsylvania. Under the
direction and supervision of master teachers, students will participate in classroom observation and instruction.
Admission with approval of Academic Advisor.

READING


GRLA 521. READING PROGRAMS AND INSTRUCTION 3 CR.

Provides an overview of reading programs. Topics include the reading-learning process, emergent literacy,
individual differences, developmental reading programs, materials, procedures, classroom management, children
with special needs, grouping, adult readers, reading in the content areas, role of parents and the administration of
the reading program.


GRLA 529. READING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 3 CR.

Major emphasis is placed on building effective reading programs at the secondary level in which reading
instruction is articulated with content instruction. Also techniques of vocabulary development, speed of
comprehension and effective study techniques are presented. The role of the reading specialist is broadened to
include not only direct instruction with secondary students but also to sere in a resource capacity to content area
teachers.

RESEARCH


GREV 525. EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH LITERACY 3 CR.

The goal of this course is to develop the skills and knowledge base necessary for the conceptual understanding of
research presented in the literature. In doing so, it will provide the foundation to become critical readers of
research.




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SPECIAL EDUCATION


GSPE 611. PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES 3 CR.

Overview of critical issues and strategies in the education of students with disabilities. Focuses on historical and
legal foundations of special education, inclusive education, diverse developmental characteristics and strategies
for accommodating students with challenges in general education environments.


GSPE 625. INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: RATIONALE AND STRATEGIES 3 CR.

Provides an overview of the philosophy and rationale for inclusive education and an overview of components that
are critical to successful programs. Topics include: goal selection, teaming, co-teaching, planning and scheduling
issues, grading, and support needs.


GSPE 661. GIFTED AND TALENTED 3 CR.

Acquaints candidates with the identification and characteristics of persons who are gifted and talented: the
educational goals, objectives and the curriculum content. Specialists and community resources for the gifted will
be utilized.

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE


GESL 508. CULTURALLY AND LINGUISTICALLY DIVERSE: 3 CR.

This course is designed to address the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse children in a school setting.

FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION


GFDE 510 THEORIES OF TEACHING AND LEARNING PROCESSES 3 CR.

This course provides opportunities to analyze assumptions about knowing, teaching, and learning; to study
theories of human learning and their relationships to motivation, development, and teaching; and to reflect on and
project your own teaching and learning practice based on theoretically sound principles.

READING AND LANGUAGE ARTS

This program designed for teachers involves a minimum of 30 semester hours for the degree. Candidates may
qualify for Reading Specialist and Reading Supervisor certificates (valid for grades K-12) by completing
requirements listed below. Reading Specialist candidates must successfully complete the Specialty teacher
examination (ETS Reading Specialist) before being certified.

Courses in Section I, II and III are all three (3) graduate education credits



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  I.     Educational Evaluation, Foundations, Psychology, or Special Education (6 credits)

         GREV 525          Educational Research Literacy

         Choose one of the following four courses from Section I:

         GFDE 510          Theories of the Teaching and Learning Process

         GPSY 514          Human Growth and Development

         GSPE 611          Psychology of Persons with Disabilities

         GSPE 662          Learning Disabilities

II.      Reading and Language Arts (24 credits)

         GRLA 521          Reading Programs and Instruction

         GECE 523          Teaching the Language Arts

         GRLA 524          Psychology of Reading

         GRLA 525          Teaching Writing K-12

         GRLA 529          Reading in the Secondary School

         GRLA 625          Reading Disabilities

         GRLA 627          Reading Diagnostic Laboratories (Prerequisite: 625)

         GRLA 628          Tutorial Laboratory (Prerequisite: 625)

         GRLA 630          Seminar in Reading and the Language Arts (Prerequisites: three

                           Reading and Language Arts courses)

         GRLA 631          Reading Laboratory Internship (Prerequisites: 625, 627 and 628)

III. Elective

         GRLA 509          Independent Study

Reading Specialist (30 credits)                      Reading Supervisor (54 credits)

Required courses:                                    Required courses: (24 credits + M.S. Ed)**

GREV 525                                             GPSY 512 Psychological Testing

GRLA 521*                                            GADS 547 Advanced Curriculum

GECE 523 or GRLA 529                                 GADS 557 Supervision


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GRLA 524*                                            GADS 559 Supervision Practicum

GRLA 525*                                            GADS 671 Elem. School Adm. & Mgmt.

GRLA 625*                                            GADS 532 Curriculum Development

GRLA 627*                                            GADS 675 Sec. School Adm. & Mgmt.

GRLA 628*                                            GADS 681 School Law

GRLA 630*                                          **M.S. Ed. Reading & Language Arts (30 cr.)

Choose one course:                                   Additional requirement:

GFDE 510                                             Five years certified service as Reading Specialist

GPSY 514

GSPE 611

GSPE 662

Certification only (21 credits listed above*) and successfully complete the Specialty teacher examination (ETS
Reading Specialist).

Each candidate’s preparation will be evaluated and adjustments made to satisfy these requirements which must
be considered as minimum for certification as a Reading Specialist and Reading Supervisor.

READING AND LANGUAGE ARTS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


521. READING PROGRAMS AND INSTRUCTION 3 CR.

Provides an overview of reading programs. Topics include the reading-learning process, emergent literacy,
individual differences, developmental reading programs, materials, procedures, classroom management, children
with special needs, grouping, adult readers, reading in the content areas, role of parents and the administration of
the reading program.


524. PSYCHOLOGY OF READING 3 CR.

Emphasis is on the physiological, psychological and sociological aspects of children's behavior and their
relationship to learning to read. Also examined will be learning theory, teacher variables, dialects and non-
standard language patterns, understanding the affective variables that promote reading competency, oral and
written language development.




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525. TEACHING WRITING K-12 3 CR.

This course will guide you whether you are a future staff developer or K-12 pre-service or in-service teacher in how
to support children’s writing and teach writing in your grade level, content area and/or school. This course is
writing intensive. Focus is on the genres of nonfiction information writing, fiction and poetry. Prerequisites
include at least two undergraduate or graduate reading and language arts courses.


529. READING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 3 CR.

Major emphasis is placed on building effective reading programs at the secondary level in which reading
instruction is articulated with content instruction. Also techniques of vocabulary development, speed of
comprehension and effective study techniques are presented. The role of the reading specialist is broadened to
include not only direct instruction with secondary students but also to serve in a resource capacity to content area
teachers.


625. READING DISABILITIES 3 CR.

Provides in-depth study of the nature of reading problems, causes of reading disabilities, understanding
exceptional children, planning of appropriate instruction, evaluation and remediation of reading problems.
Students examine and practice with evaluative instruments and case study procedures.


627. READING DIAGNOSTIC LABORATORY 3 CR.

Practicum designed to give expertise in the administration of reading tests and tests in other related areas. Each
student works with children who are enrolled in the Reading Clinic and prepares case studies of the children's
evaluation. Following the evaluation procedure the graduate candidates provide developmental, corrective or
remedial instruction as necessary. Prerequisite: Ed. 625.


628. TUTORIAL LABORATORY 3 CR.

Practicum designed to provide experience with children developing skills in the language arts and/or content
areas. The student develops techniques and materials for working with children at the developmental, corrective,
and remedial levels. Prerequisite: 625 or consent of Program Director.


630. SEMINAR IN READING AND THE LANGUAGE ARTS 3 CR.

Candidates will do an in-depth study involving a scholarly paper using current research methodologies or initiate a
primary research project to be conducted in the classroom. Discussion topics include the role of the reading
specialist/supervisor, comprehension, fluency, listening, spelling, children's literature, vocabulary, phonics, writing,
phonemic awareness, reading in the content area, written and oral expression. Prerequisite: 502 and three courses
in reading and language arts.




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631. READING LABORATORY INTERNSHIP 3 CR.

Designed to give the advanced graduate candidate supervisory and teaching experience in the Duquesne
University Reading Clinic or local school reading programs. The student will have experiences in testing, diagnosis,
remediation and clinic supervision. Prerequisites: Ed. 625, 627, 628.


690. PRACTICUM: READING AND LANGUAGE ARTS 3 CR.

Full-time internship experience conducted in conjunction with local school districts. Students should apply for
these positions through the reading program. Participants will receive a stipend. Prerequisite: A teacher's
certificate and enrollment in the Reading/Language Arts Program.


832/833. READING RECOVERY I AND II 3 CR.

This training program prepares teachers to work with at-risk first grade students. Teachers enrolled in this class
must work daily with four identified students. This clinically oriented course will focus on the skills needed to
implement a Reading Recovery Program. Interested teachers should request a brochure that explains enrollment
requirements.

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

This graduate program is designed for persons who hold an Instructional I or Instructional II teaching certificate in
the State of Pennsylvania who wish to extend their certification to teaching English as a Second Language. The
program may be completed as a 15 credit certificate program or a 30 credit master's degree program. The program
of study provides candidates with the knowledge, skills and dispositions to successfully work with second language
learners.

Required for the ESL Program Specialist certificate (15 credits)

GESL     508      Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners                 3

GESL     510      Theories and Practice of Second Language Learning              3

GESL     512      ESL Curriculum and Assessment                                  3

GESL     515      Sociolinguistics and the ESL Classroom                         3

GESL     518      Integrated Literacy in the Content Area                        3

                  15 Total

Requirements for the M.S.Ed. program (15 credits)

A. Educational Foundations (3 credits)

GFDE     570      Educational Language, Politics and Policies                    3



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GFDE     502      Action Research in Education                                     3

B. Methods, Reading and Curriculum (6 credits)

GECE     646      Multicultural and International Literature                       3

GECE     523      Teaching the Language Arts                                       3

GECE     549      Elementary School Literature                                     3

GRLA     521      Reading Programs and Instruction                                 3

GRLA     524      Psychology of Reading                                            3

GRLA     625      Reading Disabilities                                             3

C. Subject Area Specialty Courses (3 – 6 credits)

Coursework in English or Modern Languages

ENGL     562      Introduction to Linguistics                                      3

ENGL     560      History of the English Language                                  3

D. Practicum (3 credits)

GESL     690      Practicum Experience                                             3

                  30 Total

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


508. CULTURALLY AND LINGUISTICALLY DIVERSE LEARNERS. 3 CR.

This course provides the knowledge, skills and dispositions that enable K-12 teachers to facilitate learning among
students from various linguistic and cultural backgrounds. It integrates theory and research with practical
classroom applications to address the needs of teachers who work with limited English proficient students of all
language background. Intended to focus on access to literacy and educational opportunity for ESL learners, the
course will engage class members in discussions around a variety of topics in educational practice, research, and
policy. Specifically, the course will (1) explore variations in personality, educational background, social class,
ethnicity, national origin, language, and culture; (2) analyze the issues of race, racism, and culture in historical and
contemporary perspective, (3) explore strategies for teaching multicultural and multilingual ESL learners in K-12
settings, and (4) identify obstacles to participation in the educational process by diverse cultural and ethnic groups.
Students will be required to complete field experiences and classroom activities that enable them to reflect on
their own belief systems, practices, and educational experiences. Field experience is articulated with course
outcomes and assignments.




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510. THEORIES AND PRACTICE OF SECOND LANGUAGE LEARNING. 3 CR.

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to theories and research of second language acquisition (SLA),
explores factors that influence L2 learning process, compares the similarities and differences between first and
second language acquisition, and discusses the implications of these theories for second language teaching. Topics
will cover SLA theoretical models, (e.g. UG, processing models, the input hypothesis, the socio-educational model,
multi-competence model, and socio-cultural model), individual differences (e.g. motivation, attitude, age,
cognitive styles, memory, learning strategies), second language teaching styles (e.g. the academic style, the audio-
lingual style, the communicative style, the mainstream EFL style), and teaching of a particular aspect of second
language (e.g. grammar, pronunciation, listening, reading, writing) based on SLA research.


512. ESL CURRICULUM AND ASSESSMENT. 3 CR.

This course provides a general overview of curriculum and assessment for ESL education. It exposes participants to
a wide variety of strategies used to assess ESL students at K-12 levels language proficiency as well as presents
abundant approaches to plan ESL curriculum. ESL curriculum involves (a) the study of learners' needs, (b) the
setting of objectives, (c) the development of a syllabus, teaching methods and materials, and (d) the evaluation of
the effects of these procedures on the learners' language abilities. Assessment involves measurement and
evaluation of the ability of a student, the quality or success of a teaching course, and the implementation of an ESL
program. The major focus of this course, thus, includes aligning curriculum with ESL and PDE standards, integrating
teaching methodology with curriculum design, considering the syllabus and lesson planning, examining the
authentic and innovative assessment practices, investigating various types of language assessment, evaluating the
appropriateness of assessment measures, and assessing cultural appropriate testing situations. Students will be
evaluated on the basis of class attendance/discussion.


515. SOCIOLINGUISTICS AND THE ESL CLASSROOM. 3 CR.

 This course addresses the relationship between language use and the social world. It provides an overview of the
main topics of sociolinguistics and an introduction to the most important methods used in sociolinguistic research
and analysis. The lectures will be built around a discussion of topics and notions, such as the speech community,
dialect, code-switching, language variation, pidgins and Creoles, bilingualism, multilingualism, diglossia, address
systems, language and gender, language planning, language maintenance, and language shift. The course also
covers an introduction to the basic levels of language (phonetics and phonology, morphology and semantics,
syntax, pragmatics) with special emphasis on the relevance of linguistic concepts to education. Students will
explore the relationships between language and society as well as between sociolinguistics and education by
assigned readings, classroom discussions, written assignments, oral presentation, and final examination.


518. INTEGRATED LITERACY IN THE CONTENT AREAS. 3 CR.

Classroom success depends upon the ability of ESL students to master academic language. This course is designed
to incorporate ESL strategies in the content area classrooms for English language learners. The emphasis of this
course will be focused on the techniques and strategies for improving second language learners' listening,
speaking, reading, and writing in the content area classrooms. Content area language instruction will cover ESL



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teaching in courses such as Reading, Writing, Science, Mathematics, Social studies, Music, Arts, Physical Education,
Health Education, and Business Education.


690. PRACTICUM EXPERIENCES. 3 CR.

Supervised teaching experience designed for persons who hold an Instructional I or Instructional II teaching
certificate and are extending certification to ESL Program Specialist. Prerequisite: approval of faculty advisor.


502. ACTION RESEARCH IN EDUCATION. (GFDE 502) 3 CR.

This course is designed for classroom teachers. Action research is scholarly investigation conducted by
practitioners for the purpose of informing their own practice. For education, this means research conducted by
teachers with the intent of taking some action that will enhance instruction and consequently, student learning.


570. EDUCATIONAL LANGUAGE, POLITICS AND POLICIES. (GFDE 570) 3 CR.

An overview of educational policy and practice for multilingual populations worldwide, with special attention to
bilingual education. Content includes features of language, historical patterns of language politics, and roles of
schools in creating democratic language policies.


523. TEACHING THE LANGUAGE ARTS. (GECE 523) 3 CR.

Explores the development and acquisition of language; contemporary approaches to the teaching of language arts
with emphasis on richness in content and activities to meet the needs of a broad range of linguistically different
children.


549. ELEMENTARY SCHOOL LITERATURE. (GECE 549) 3 CR.

A survey of children's literature including its historical development and current trends; evaluating writers and
illustrators of children's books; and studying the various phases of literature which should be presented to
elementary school children for instruction and enjoyment.


646. MULTICULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL LITERATURE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG
ADULTS. (GECE 646) 3 CR.

Interdisciplinary thematic concepts, books and strategies for the K-12 literature-based curriculum. Emphasis is on
the cultural diversity within the United States and global education imperatives addressed in literature of various
genres published here and around the world. Includes materials useful for the teaching of English as a second
language.


521. READING PROGRAMS AND INSTRUCTION. (GRLA 521) 3 CR.

Provides an overview of reading programs. Topics include the reading-learning process; emergent literacy;
individual differences; developmental reading program, material and procedures; classroom management;

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children with special needs; grouping; adult readers; reading in the content areas; role of parents; and the
administration of the reading program.


524. PSYCHOLOGY OF READING. (GRLA 524) 3 CR.

Emphasis is on the physiological, psychological and sociological aspects of children's behavior and their
relationship to learning to read. Also examined will be learning theory and teacher and their relationship to
learning to read. Also examined will be learning theory and teacher variables; dialects and non-standard language
patterns; oral and written language development, and an understanding of the affective variables that promote
reading competence.


625. READING DISABILITIES. (GRLA 625) 3 CR.

Provides in-depth study of the nature of reading problems; causes of reading disabilities; evaluation and
remediation of reading problems; understanding exceptional children and the planning of appropriate instruction.
Students examine and practice with evaluative instruments and case study procedures.


560. HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. (ENGL 560) 3 CR.

English, like its nearest relatives, the Germanic languages, is a member of the Indo-European family of languages.
This course will identify many of the features that English shares with other Indo-European languages and trace
the development of English from the earliest written records to recent times. We will study the ways in which
geography, conquest, cultural interaction, and the passage of time have changed the pronunciation, grammar, and
vocabulary of English. We will do some introductory study of Old and Middle English, but no prior knowledge of
these earlier stages of the language is necessary.


562. INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS. (ENGL 562) 3 CR.

This course is an introduction to basic principles and methods of modern linguistics, with special emphasis placed
on modern grammatical theory and practice, most notably emphasizing phrase-structured grammar. Also explored
in the course are phonological and morphological concerns relating specifically to the English Language.

INTERDISCIPLINARY DOCTORAL PROGRAM FOR EDUCATIONAL LEADERS (IDPEL)

In January, 1993, the Pennsylvania Department of Education afforded the School of Education its first doctoral
program – the Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program for Educational Leaders (IDPEL). This Program prepares
participants for the Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degree. Eligible cohort participants may also apply for the
Superintendent’s / Assistant Superintendent’s Letter of Eligibility issued by the Pennsylvania Department of
Education.

PROGRAM BELIEFS AND MISSION STATEMENT

 The Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program for Educational Leaders (IDPEL) has been designed in accordance with the
results of a needs assessment conducted among practicing school leaders in the Western Pennsylvania region, and

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has been continuously improved through the advice of IDPEL’s scholarly community of participants, faculty
members, and expert practitioners. IDPEL is rooted in Duquesne University’s Mission and Goals stressing values
and a commitment to service, and in the following strongly-held assumptions and undergirding beliefs:

  1.    Leadership skills can be developed;

  2.    A competency-based instructional approach is most appropriate in an adult learning environment;

  3.    A partnership among University faculty, school practitioners, community leaders, and the learners
        promotes a more dynamic and relevant learning environment and network of participants (also known as
        the Community of Scholars);

  4.    The network established among Community of Scholars members may take the form of large group
        meetings, small task force and colloquium groups, and small and large group dialogue and meetings via
        electronic technology;

  5.    Educational leadership must be grounded upon ethics and moral values;

  6.    A direct relationship exists between demonstrated competency and future behavior;

  7.    Cohort grouping provides for cooperative learning and ongoing support systems;

  8.    The combination of action and reflection best facilitates the integration of theory and practice;

  9.    An interdisciplinary approach provides the basis for a more comprehensive educational perspective;

  10.   Analytical skills form the basis for managing change in education;

  11.   Action research and problem solving are critical skills for effective educational leaders;

  12.   Instruction is best delivered in a variety of formats;

  13.   A mentor-apprentice relationship is significant in the development of educational and leadership skills;

  14.   The nature of adult learners requires the development of innovative scheduling patterns;

  15.   The need exists for a periodic updating of practicum skills.

MISSION STATEMENT

These beliefs are succinctly translated into IDPEL’s reason for being—the program mission statement:

        The Mission of the Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program for Educational Leaders (IDPEL) is to develop
        educators who have the vision, the commitment to research and achievement, and the skills to move the
        American educational system to prominence in tomorrow’s world. This will be accomplished through an
        innovative partnership program linking competence and the learner, university faculty, practicing
        educational administrators, and community leaders.




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PROGRAM DESIGN

IDPEL requires sixty semester hours of study over a four-year period. Daytime classes are held two full days each
month during the school year. Summer sessions of eight full days are conducted during the first three years of
cohort study.

Professional problem-solving teams, study groups, continuous networking, benchmarking, and feedback on each
participant’s progress are featured in the Program. Instructional delivery modes include Duquesne faculty
lectures, expert practitioner seminars, nationally renowned resource persons, study guides, simulations, case
studies, position papers, video analyses, online activities, and field studies, including opportunities for
international connections.

Faculty members occupy non-traditional roles and relate to participants in a collegial fashion. Each cohort
member has a faculty advisor and selects a field mentor-practitioner. Participants are actively involved in Program
advisement and governance.

Each cohort becomes part of a scholarly community of practitioners and University faculty. During the three years
of core studies and practica and the fourth year dedicated to writing the dissertation, this Community of Scholars
gains prowess in both theoretical and applied studies. The Community of Scholars offers a lifetime professional
consultation and problem-solving network for cohort members.

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS

The following procedures and requirements for admission are designed to provide for the selection of cohort
members who stand the best chance of successfully completing the program and of subsequently serving as
educational leader-practitioners.

Admissions requirements are: Master’s degree from an accredited institution; minimum graduate GPA of 3.5;
current employment in administration or supervision or strong desire for leadership development; letter of
endorsement from the employer authorizing the applicant to participate eight days per semester during the fall
and spring semesters and during the summer sessions; computer competence and possession of, or access to, a
computer, modem, and printer; possession and use of a Duquesne University e-mail account; successful
completion of the Professional Seminar during the program’s first summer; a commitment to participate in the
entire program of study with the cohort group; and participation in interview with the program director and
faculty.

Requirements for application packet are: a letter of application, completed application form, and non-refundable
application fee; official undergraduate and graduate transcripts; three letters of recommendation by professionals
familiar with the applicant’s academic or work experience; resume or vita to include all professional experience,
education, certification, and other relevant information; two personal essays that a) document one’s own
commitment to the education and growth of students and educators, b) identify one’s professional goals and how
this program will help attain these goals, recent scores on the Graduate Record Exam.




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PROGRAM SEQUENCE FOR THE COHORT OF 2012

(Professional Strands are noted in RED, and Research Strands are in BLUE) 1

SEMESTER                   STRAND                                                  CREDITS

Summer, 2008               Professional Seminar (GFDE 701)                              3

Fall, 2008                 Leadership & Ethics (GFDE 702)                               2/1

                           Research Design (GREV 701)                                   3

Spring, 2009               Society & the Individual (GFDE 703)                          2/1

                           Qualitative Research Methods I (GREV 721)                    3

Summer, 2009               Human Resource Leadership (GFDE 708)                         2

                           Research Question Seminar (GFDE 713)                         1

Fall, 2009                 Planning, Quality & Finance ((GFDE 704)                      2/1

                           Statistics I (GREV 711)                                      3

Spring, 2010               Creating an Environ. for a Dynamic Instit. (GFDE 705)        2/1

                           Statistics II (GREV 712)                                     3

Summer, 2010               Measurement Theory & Practice (GREV 715)                     2

                           Research Question Seminar II (GFDE 714)                      1

Fall, 2010                 Dissertation Seminar (GREV 750)                              3

                           Educational Statistics III (GREV 611)                        3

                                      -OR-

                           Qualitative Research Methods II (GREV614/722)                3

Spring, 2011               Leading the Dynamic Institution (GFDE 707)                   2/1

                           Program Design & Evaluation (GFDE 706)                       2/1

Summer, 2011               Program Synthesis & Comp. Assessment (GFDE 718)              3




1
    Revised Program Sequence endorsed by the IDPEL Quality Council on 1/24/07.


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Fall, 2011                 Dissertation Study (GFDE 719)                                6

Spring, 2012               Dissertation Study (GFDE 719)                                6

IDPEL COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


GFDE-701: PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR

Introduces the Cohort members to one another, to the faculty, to the program format and expectations, and to an
overview of the body of knowledge to be studied in the professional strand sequence and the applied research
strand sequence, paying particular attention to leadership theory.


GFDE-702: LEADERSHIP & ETHICS

Provides the Cohort members with a broad-based, interdisciplinary knowledge of leadership and ethics theory.
Cohort members will be expected to analyze and critique the leadership styles observed in their own experiences
in the context of those theoretical perspectives.


GREV-701: RESEARCH DESIGN

Provides Cohort members with a basic knowledge of the language of research that is essential to reading
professional journals in the field and in communicating in a valuable international language. That knowledge and
understanding underlies educational decision-making and is required for doing professional research and
dissertations.


GFDE-703: SOCIETY & THE INDIVIDUAL

Enables Cohort members to develop the knowledge of the cultural, sociological, political, legal, scientific, economic
contexts, and education trends in which school districts will operate in the 21st Century, and the ability to analyze,
synthesize, and assess those cultural, sociological, political, legal, scientific, and economic conditions that will
impact current and future education decisions.


GREV-721: QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS I

Cohort members will be introduced to the knowledge base, tradition, and theory of qualitative research and will
be offered a real opportunity to practice qualitative research. Students will explore theoretical underpinnings as
well as consider methodological strategies in preparation for designing a research project and writing it up for
presentation to colleagues in the field.


GFDE-708: HUMAN RESOURCE LEADERSHIP

Enables Cohort members to learn and practice human resource management theory and practical skills, the ability
to coordinate and improve the quality of human resources in the educational setting, and the qualities of empathy,
commitment, and respect in making decisions and working with others in the educational community.

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GFDE-713: RESEARCH QUESTION SEMINAR

Provides Cohort members with a working understanding of how research questions are developed and with
opportunities to define their own research interests through the generation of research questions. Students write
a “First Talking Paper" that analyzes and critiques a research study in a field related to the student's potential
dissertation intent.


GFDE-704: PLANNING, QUALITY, & FINANCE

Develops the Cohort members’ knowledge of educational planning, ability to identify problems and use available
financial and other data in the planning process, and a commitment to wed research tools and methods to the
solutions of actual problems in service of the educational enterprise and stakeholders.


GREV-711: STATISTICS I

Provides students with essential statistics skills (basic descriptive statistics, t tests, and correlation) to assist in
solving research and practice problems.


GFDE-705: CREATING AN ENVIRONMENT FOR A DYNAMIC INSTITUTION

Enables Cohort members to develop the knowledge of the effects of the school environment on the educational
enterprise, and to develop the ability to use technology in operation of the physical plant to facilitate a positive
teaching and learning environment.


GREV-712: STATISTICS II

Provides students with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to delineate research hypotheses and to test them using
basic analysis of variance (ANOVA) and linear regression techniques.


GREV-715: MEASUREMENT THEORY & PRACTICE

Provides Cohort members with an understanding of mental measurements practice in the application of those
measurements, and skill in the analysis and interpretation of their results.


GFDE-714: RESEARCH QUESTION SEMINAR II

Students complete the “Second Talking Paper” in which they formulate a research question in an area of potential
dissertation interest, construct a literature review, and discuss possible quantitative or qualitative methodological
approaches.




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GREV-750: DISSERTATION SEMINAR

Provides Cohort members with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to synthesize research findings in the context of
relevant research literature and to report same in the form of a dissertation. The expected outcome of this course
is the production of the “Third Talking Paper,” which will form the basis of each student’s dissertation proposal.


GREV-611: EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS III

Content includes multivariate techniques (MANOVA, factor analysis) and topics in nonparametric statistics, with
computer applications.

                    -OR-


GREV-614/722: QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS II

Course is designed for individual or seminar students seeking advanced understanding of and practice in
qualitative inquiry.


GFDE-707: LEADING THE DYNAMIC INSTITUTION

Enables Cohort members to develop knowledge of the changing society and its effects on the administration of the
educational institution, to develop the ability to recognize societal changes and to be able to foster institutional
change, and to develop the skills, techniques, and commitment to promote change in order to foster excellence.


GFDE-706: PROGRAM DESIGN & EVALUATION

Enables Cohort members to develop the knowledge of curriculum, design, delivery, and evaluation of instruction
and learning outcomes, the ability to conceptualize and communicate the total education program to all
constituents, and the commitment to meet the needs of all constituents.


GFDE-718: PROGRAM SYNTHESIS & COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT

Provides the Cohort members with an opportunity to reflect on, analyze, and synthesize the salient knowledge
acquired over the previous three years, and the Comprehensive Examinations requires Cohort members to
demonstrate, through discussion and presentation of their professional portfolios and practica checklist materials,
their readiness to assume increasingly responsible positions of school leadership. Cohort members must maintain
a minimum grade point average of 3.5 to be eligible to participate in the Comprehensive Examinations. The
Comprehensives will include theoretical knowledge, original research, an oral examination relating each member’s
practica experience to the body of knowledge explored in the Strand coursework, and a review of each Cohort
member’s professional portfolio. Each segment of the Comprehensive Examinations will be graded on a “Pass-Fail”
basis.




                                                                                                                  88
GFDE-719: DISSERTATION STUDY

Dissertation Study provides Cohort members with an opportunity to independently pursue research in an area of
the Cohort member’s interest, while supported by faculty and practitioner dissertation committee members while
enrolled in 6 dissertation credits in both the Fall and Spring semesters of the Cohort member’s fourth year in
IDPEL. Cohort members maintain the responsibility for assembling a Dissertation Committee. The Committee will
comprise not less than three members and not more than five members. It is expected that the Committee chair
will be a full-time Duquesne faculty member, unless written approval to the contrary in secured from the Program
Director. Committees will comprise at least one additional faculty member and one practitioner. Complete
guidelines are available on the School of Education web site.


GFDE-720: DISSERTATION STUDY

While it is hoped that Cohort members will complete dissertations by the end of the Spring Dissertation Study
(GFDE-719) Semester and within the four-year Program timeline, individual Cohort members who do not complete
all dissertation requirements must continue enrollment in 3 credits of Dissertation Study in each Fall and Spring
semester until all dissertation requirements have been met. This Dissertation Study provides Cohort members
with an opportunity to independently pursue research in an area of the Cohort member’s interest, while
supported by dissertation committee members, beyond the first four years of IDPEL study. Please note: all
students are expected to complete all requirements: coursework, practica/internships/field experiences,
mentoring, talking papers, proposals, all required forms, the dissertation, IRB approvals, the dissertation defense,
formatting and other changes, payment of all financial obligations, and any other relevant requirements, within
eight (8) calendar years from the first date of course work. First date of course work is defined as the last day of
the semester in which the student was first enrolled. Students may petition for one or more one (1) year
extensions (years 9 and 10) with written support from their chair and approval of the IDPEL program quality
council.

COUNSELOR EDUCATION

MISSION

The mission of Duquesne University’s Counselor Education Program is to prepare ethical and professional
counselors, educators and supervisors, and promote the well-being of individuals, families, and communities
through teaching, scholarship and service.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

The Counselor Education Program currently offers a 60 credit master’s degree with majors in Community
Counseling, Marriage and Family Therapy, and School Counseling. All three majors are accredited by the Council
for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). The School Counseling
Certificates are also approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE). The Counselor Education
Program is part of the Leading Teacher Program in the School of Education.

ADMISSION TO DEGREE CANDIDACY PROGRAM



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Admission to degree candidacy is granted to qualified students who have been admitted to graduate study in the
School of Education, successfully completed the screening series courses, and received recommendation by the
Counselor Education faculty. Students should consult the handbook, any Counselor Education faculty member or
visit the website, www.education.duq.edu/counselored, regarding the procedures for admission to candidacy.

COUNSELOR EDUCATION - SCHOOL COUNSELING MAJOR

This major requires a minimum of 60 semester hours. Completion of the program will provide the student with
the academic credentials to become PA certified as an elementary and secondary school counselor. Completion of
the program will also provide the student with the academic credentials to take the National Counselor
Examination. This program is nationally accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related
Educational Programs (CACREP).

GCNE    549      Multicultural Issues and Strategies in Counseling                                       3

GCNE    550      Orientation to Counselor Education                                                      0

GCNE    551      Professional and Ethical Practices in Counseling                                        3

GCNE    556      Counseling and Consulting Theory                                                        3

GCNE    557      Group Counseling – Theory and Techniques                                                3

GCNE    700      Group Counseling Lab                                                                    0

GCNE    558      Field Interviews in School Counseling (3 visits)                                        0

GCNE    562      Lifespan Development and Counseling                                                     3

GCNE    565      Therapeutic Techniques in Counseling                                                    3

GCNE    650      Social Systems in Counseling                                                            3

GCNE    652      Career Development and Vocational Counseling                                            3

GCNE    654      Introduction to Marriage and Family Therapy                                             3

GCNE    655      Seminar in Student Assistance                                                           3

GCNE    656      Psychotherapeutic Aspects of Human Sexuality                                            3

GCNE    658      Counseling and Consulting in the Elementary School                                      3

GCNE    660      Counseling Pre-practicum Seminar                                                        0

GCNE    664      School Counseling Practicum                                                             3

GCNE    667      Counseling and Consulting in the Secondary School                                       3

GCNE    701      Counseling Pre-internship Seminar                                                       0

                                                                                                               90
GCNE    705      Counseling Internship: Elementary School                                              3

GCNE    706      Counseling Internship: Secondary School                                               3

GCNE    709      Oral Comprehensive Examination                                                        0

GFDE    504      Statistics in Behavioral Research                                                     3

GPSY    512      Psychological Testing                                                                 3

                 Electives to be approved by Advisor                                                   6

TOTAL CREDITS                                                                                        60

Additional Requirements

    Written Comprehensives

    Passing Praxis Specialty Exams

    Application for Graduation

COUNSELOR EDUCATION - COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING SERVICES MAJOR

This major requires a minimum of 60 semester hours. Completion of the program will provide the student with
the academic credentials to take the National Counselor Examination and meet the academic requirements for
Pennsylvania State Licensure. This program is nationally accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of
Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).

GCNE    549      Multicultural Issues and Strategies in Counseling                                     3

GCNE    550      Orientation to Counselor Education                                                    0

GCNE    551      Professional and Ethical Practices in Counseling                                      3

GCNE    556      Counseling and Consulting Theory                                                      3

GCNE    557      Group Counseling – Theory and Techniques                                              3

GCNE    700      Group Counseling Lab                                                                  0

GCNE    562      Lifespan Development and Counseling                                                   3

GCNE    559      Field Interviews in Community Agencies (3 visits)                                     0

GCNE    565      Therapeutic Techniques in Counseling                                                  3

GCNE    650      Social Systems in Counseling                                                          3

GCNE    651      Introduction to Addictions Counseling                                                 3


                                                                                                              91
GCNE     652      Career Development and Vocational Counseling                                               3

GCNE     654      Introduction to Marriage and Family Therapy                                                3

GCNE     656      Psychotherapeutic Aspects of Human Sexuality                                               3

GCNE     660      Counseling Pre-practicum Seminar                                                           0

GCNE     661      Community Counseling Services Practicum                                                    3

GCNE     670      Play Therapy and Child Psychotherapy                                                       3

GCNE     673      Diagnosis and Treatment Planning                                                           3

GCNE     701      Counseling Pre-internship Seminar                                                          0

GCNE    703       Community Counseling Internship                                                            6

GCNE    709       Oral Comprehensive Examination                                                             0

GFDE    504       Statistics in Behavioral Research                                                          3

GPSY    512       Psychological Testing                                                                      3

                  Electives to be Approved by Advisor                                                        6

TOTAL CREDITS                                                                                              60

Additional Requirements

    Written Comprehensives

    Application for Graduation

COUNSELOR EDUCATION - MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY MAJOR

This major requires a minimum of 60 semester hours for the degree. Completion of the program will provide the
student with the academic credentials to take the National Counselor Examination. This major emphasizes the
development of academic, practical and professional skills required for successful entry into the field of marriage
and family therapy. This program is nationally accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and
Related Educational Programs (CACREP).

GCNE     549      Multicultural Issues and Strategies in Counseling                                          3

GCNE     550      Orientation to Counselor Education                                                         0

GCNE     551      Professional and Ethical Practices in Counseling                                           3

GCNE     555      Field Interviews in Marriage and Family Therapy (3 visits)                                 0



                                                                                                                  92
GCNE    556     Counseling and Consulting Theory                                                   3

GCNE    557     Group Counseling – Theory and Techniques                                           3

GCNE    700     Group Counseling Lab                                                               0

GCNE    562     Lifespan Development and Counseling                                                3

GCNE    570     Family Therapy: Theory and Techniques                                              3

GCNE    571     Marital & Couples Therapy: Theory and Techniques                                   3

GCNE    650     Social Systems in Counseling                                                       3

GCNE    652     Career Development and Vocational                                                  3

GCNE    654     Introduction to Marriage and Family Therapy                                        3

GCNE    656     Psychotherapeutic Aspects of Human Sexuality                                       3

GCNE    660     Counseling Pre-practicum Seminar                                                   0

GCNE    665     Marriage and Family Therapy Practicum                                              3

GCNE    670     Play Therapy and Child Psychotherapy                                               3

GCNE    673     Diagnosis and Treatment Planning                                                   3

GCNE    701     Counseling and Pre-internship Seminar                                              0

GCNE    708     Marriage and Family Therapy Internship                                             6

GCNE    709     Oral Comprehensive Examination                                                     0

GFDE    504     Statistics in Behavioral Research                                                  3

GPSY    512     Psychological Testing                                                              3

                Electives to be Approved by Advisor                                                 6

TOTAL CREDITS                                                                                      60

Additional Requirements

    Written Comprehensives

    Application for Graduation

COUNSELOR EDUCATION POST-MASTER’S DEGREE – for earning credits toward certification or licensure




                                                                                                        93
There are three academic tracks in which an individual may obtain Post Master's degree credits. They are the
following: School Counseling Certification, Additional Majors and Licensure credit. Applicants for Post Master's
Candidacy must already possess a Master's degree and are required to complete the equivalent of the curriculum
for the academic track of their choosing.

COUNSELOR EDUCATION - CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE STUDY (C.A.G.S.)

A certificate of advanced graduate study may be awarded to any post-master's program candidate who completes
the equivalent of the curriculum for any of the three post-master's academic tracks (60 credits), and adds an
additional 18 credits. The specific required courses to be taken are determined by the Program Director or a
faculty member designated by the Director.

COUNSELOR EDUCATION AT ST. VINCENT COLLEGE

All three counselor education majors are offered as an off campus program at St. Vincent College, Latrobe, PA.

GRADUATE COUNSELOR EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS




549. MULTICULTURAL ISSUES AND STRATEGIES IN COUNSELING. 3 CR.

This course offers a theoretical knowledge base aimed at better understanding cultural differences, as well as the
various diversity-related issues facing professional counselors today. Building upon this, the course is designed to
raise the awareness of counselor trainees' own perspectives on diversity and to explore strategies for working with
a variety of potential future clients based on race, ethnicity, culture, gender, social class, able bodiedness and
sexual preference.


550. ORIENTATION TO COUNSELOR EDUCATION. 0 CR.

Designed to familiarize the student with the curriculum, philosophy and requirements of the Counselor Education
Program. (Must be completed prior to initial enrollment in Counselor Education courses)


551. PROFESSIONAL AND ETHICAL PRACTICES IN COUNSELING. 3 CR.

This course will provide the students with an orientation to the professional aspects of the counseling profession.
Emphasis will be on ethical and legal issues, interpersonal relationships and skill development.


555. FIELD INTERVIEWS IN MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY. 0 CR.

Provides students with required early observation and interviews of at least three counselors who work with
couples, families, parents and children in agencies and private practice. Completed observation forms are required
from each visit.




                                                                                                                  94
556. COUNSELING AND CONSULTING THEORY. 3 CR.

Important theoretical approaches in the counseling and consulting process are presented, evaluated and
discussed. Theoretical aspects of the counseling/consulting relationships, interviewing techniques and treatment
modalities are presented for each theory.


557. GROUP COUNSELING: THEORY AND TECHNIQUES. 3 CR.

This course is designed to provide counselors in training with opportunities to explore basic theoretical and
practical concepts regarding the group counseling process; the behavioral dynamics that occur in groups; and the
role, essential skills, and techniques of group leadership.


558. FIELD INTERVIEWS IN SCHOOL COUNSELING. 0 CR.

Provides students with required early observation and interviews of counselors working in elementary,
middle/junior high, and secondary schools. Completed observation forms required from each visit.


559. FIELD INTERVIEWS IN COMMUNITY AGENCIES. 0 CR.

Provides students with required early observation of counselors working in a community counseling agency.
Completed observation forms required from each visit.


562. LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENT AND COUNSELING. 3 CR.

This counseling course provides a survey of developmental theories, concepts and research from a life span
perspective.


565. THERAPEUTIC TECHNIQUES IN COUNSELING. 3 CR.

This skill development course is intended to be present and review the helping process, skills, conditions, and
attitudes that facilitate the counseling process. This experience is intended to serve as an introduction to the skills
and methods for initiating, maintaining, and terminating the therapeutic relationship. Emphasis will be given to the
skills associated with structuring, attending, listening, interviewing, challenging, and problem management.
Prerequisites: 556, 557.


570. FAMILY THERAPY: THEORY AND TECHNIQUE. 3 CR.

This course is an overview of various theoretical models of family therapy. Additional emphasis will be the practice
and initial development of the techniques, which will be incorporated by the students in their practice of family
therapy. Prerequisites: 556, 654.




                                                                                                                    95
571. MARITAL AND COUPLES THERAPY: THEORY AND TECHNIQUES. 3 CR.

This course is an overview of various theoretical models of marital and couples therapy. Additional emphasis will
be the practice and initial development of the techniques, which will be incorporated by the students in their
practice of marital and couples therapy. Prerequisites: 556, 557, 654.


650. SOCIAL SYSTEMS IN COUNSELING. 3 CR.

This course is designed to increase counselors' awareness of the variety and complexity of systems, organizations
and groups. An interdisciplinary, social systems and organizational development approach will be utilized to
explore and understand system composition, interactions, elements and processes.


651. INTRODUCTION TO ADDICTION COUNSELING. 3 CR.

Provides a basic understanding of the complex interrelationships of medical, legal, social, and psychological
factors, which comprise the major addictive disorders in the United States. An overview of major treatment
approaches to the addictive disorders will also be discussed.


652. CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND VOCATIONAL COUNSELING. 3 CR.

Theories of vocational choice, psychology and sociology of work and use of information in decision-making are
presented. Particular attention is given to identification, evaluation, and utilization of resource information in
guidance and orientation to occupational and educational information, and community resources.


654. INTRODUCTION TO MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY. 3 CR.

Designed to introduce information and counseling skills in marriage and family counseling. Emphasis on theoretical
approaches, traditional and alternative marriage styles, family life, and the handling of marital and family discord.


655. SEMINAR IN STUDENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS. 3 CR.

Introduction to the role of the school counselor on the student assistance and instructional support program team.
Study of "at-risk" youth involvement with chemical dependency, depression, suicide, teen pregnancy, drop out
prevention, and students with disabilities will be the focus. SAP certification may be available.


656. PSYCHOTHERAPEUTIC ASPECTS OF HUMAN SEXUALITY. 3 CR.

An interdisciplinary course dealing with basic concepts of human sexual development and the bio-psycho-sexual
dynamics influencing sexual behavior throughout the life cycle, designed to provide information and attitudinal
training for counseling clients with sexual problems.




                                                                                                                     96
658. COUNSELING AND CONSULTING IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 3 CR.

Provides students with an opportunity to study the role of the counselor in elementary schools. Emphasis is on the
adaptation of counseling-consulting theories with children, teachers, and parents. Students will develop a plan for
services in the elementary school.


660. COUNSELING PRE-PRACTICUM SEMINAR. 0 CR.

The Counseling Pre-Practicum Seminar is a non-credit required prerequisite experience of all students anticipating
registration for the Counseling Practicum. The purpose of the experience is to provide students with the materials
and information that are essential for successful initiation into the Counseling Practicum.


661. COMMUNITY COUNSELING SERVICES PRACTICUM. 3 CR.

Counseling experience with clients from community agencies under direction of on-site counselors and University
supervisors. Direct counseling, supervisory conferences, weekly seminars, preparation of case reports, and
analyses of tape recordings are essential elements. Registration by permission. Prerequisite: 565, 660.


664. SCHOOL COUNSELING PRACTICUM. 3 CR.

Counseling experience with students from elementary, middle, and secondary schools under direction of certified
school counselors and University supervisors. Direct counseling, supervisory conferences, weekly seminars,
preparation of case reports, and analyses of tape recordings are essential elements. Prerequisite: 565, 660, must
pass Praxis Three Basic Skills Tests prior to acceptance.


665. MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY PRACTICUM. 3 CR.

Counseling experience with clients from agencies and private practices under direction of on-site counselors and
University supervisors. Direct counseling, supervisory conferences, weekly seminars, preparation of case reports,
and analyses of tape recordings are essential elements. Prerequisites: 570, 571, 660.


667. COUNSELING AND CONSULTING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. 3 CR.

Provides students with an opportunity to study the role of the counselor in secondary schools. Emphasis is on the
adaptation of counseling-consulting theories with adolescents, teachers, and parents. Students will develop a plan
for services in the secondary school.


670. PLAY THERAPY AND CHILD PSYCHOTHERAPY. 3 CR.

History of theories and development phases of play; theoretical frameworks for utilization of play as therapy;
overview of concepts important in diagnosis and treatment. Videotapes and films will supplement lectures, group
discussion, and laboratory experiences.




                                                                                                                 97
673. DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT PLANNING FOR PROFESSIONAL COUNSELORS. 3 CR.

Familiarizes the student with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders as well as case
management and treatment planning strategies.


700. GROUP COUNSELING LAB. 0 CR.

This lab affords students with the opportunity to experience group process as a member in a personal growth
group with other counselors in training.


701. COUNSELING PRE-INTERNSHIP SEMINAR. 0 CR.

The Counseling Pre-Internship Seminar is a non-credit required prerequisite experience of all students anticipating
their first Counseling Internship. The purpose of the experience is to provide students with the materials and
information that are essential for successful initiation into the Counseling Internship. Prerequisite: 661, 664 or 665.


703. COMMUNITY COUNSELING INTERNSHIP. 6 CR.

Internship experience as a counselor in a community counseling agency under the direction of a certified counselor
and University supervisors. A total of 600 clock hours is required. Prerequisites: 661, 701.


705. COUNSELING INTERNSHIP: ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 3 CR.

Internship experience as a counselor in an elementary school under the direction of a certified elementary school
counselor and University supervisors. A total of 300 clock hours is required. Prerequisites: 664, 701.


706. COUNSELING INTERNSHIP: SECONDARY SCHOOL. 3 CR.

Internship experience as a counselor in a junior or senior high school under the direction of a certified secondary
school counselor and University supervisors. A total of 300 clock hours is required. Prerequisites: 664, 701


708. MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY INTERNSHIP. 3CR.

Internship experience as a counselor/therapist in an agency under the direction of a certified counselor and
University supervisors. A total of 600 clock hours is required. Prerequisites: 665, 701


709. MASTER'S ORAL COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION. 0 CR.

The Oral Comprehensive Examination of candidates for the M.S. Ed. Degree is a structured experience in which the
degree candidate is asked to demonstrate his or her understanding of required counseling competencies. This
experience also serves as an exit interview for the student.




                                                                                                                      98
MASTER OF SCIENCE (M.S.ED.) IN EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION

MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of the program of Educational Administration and Supervision at Duquesne University, as a
program that values the ability to access, conduct, interpret and apply research, is to prepare
educational leaders who are scholar-practitioners and exhibit the knowledge, skills, dispositions and
ethics that promote equity and excellence for all students for a culturally diverse, technologically
complex, global community.

PENNSYLVANIA COMPREHENSIVE PRINCIPAL CERTIFICATION

This program is designed for students seeking a Master of Science (M.S. Ed.) in Educational Administration degree
and/or a Pennsylvania’s Comprehensive Principal Certification. Coursework involves 36 semester hours, including
30 for the degree and an additional 6 semester hours that are needed to meet Pennsylvania requirements for the
Principal Certificate. The Principal's Certificate will not be issued until a candidate has completed five years of
professional school experience and earned a passing score on the Educational Leadership: Administration and
Supervision Assessment. The following are the specific course areas and courses that are required in the program.

Required Courses - 36 credits

GFDE 504         Statistics in Behavioral Research

GADS 532         Curriculum Development

GADS 547         Advanced Curriculum

GADS 557         Supervision

GADS 573         School Administration and Supervision: Orientation

        (This course must be taken in the first semester of registration.)

GADS 574         Pupil Personnel

GADS 575         Middle Level School Practices and Organization

GADS 671         Elementary School Administration and Management

GADS 675         Secondary School Administration and Management

GADS 681         School Law

GADS 682         School Finance

GADS 686         K-12 School Administration Practicum




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PENNSYLVANIA SUPERVISOR’S CERTIFICATION

This program enables a student to develop competencies needed to meet the criteria for a Pennsylvania
Supervisor's Certificate. Requirements for completion of the program will vary depending on the specific program
of specialization and the candidate’s background.

Eligibility for certification requires graduate study, five years of certified experience in a cognate or specialization
field and earning a passing score on the Educational Leadership: Administration and Supervision Assessment.
Students may specialize in any of the following cognate areas:

Elementary Education

Reading

School Counseling

Special Education Services

Music Education

Secondary Education:

          Communication

          English

          Foreign Languages

          Mathematics

          Science

          Social Studies

Curriculum Component

GADS 532            Curriculum Development

GADS 547            Advanced Curriculum

Supervision Component

GADS 573            School Administration and Supervision: Orientation

GADS 557            Supervision

GADS 559            Supervision Practicum

GADS 671            Elementary School Administration and Management



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         or

GADS 675          Secondary School Administration and Management

GADS 681          School Law

Special Requirements

Other requirements vary according to the specific program. Requirements to be satisfied are determined by
Program Coordinator and cognate advisor after transcript evaluation.

SUPERVISOR OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION CERTIFICATION

This 21-credit program meets the requirements for Supervisor of Curriculum and Instruction certificate. A
Master’s Degree in School Administration is a prerequisite to enrolling in this program. Certification will not be
issued until the candidate has completed five years of professional school experience, logged 360 hours of field
experience, and passed the Educational Leadership: Administration and Supervision Assessment.

Required Courses

GADS 501          Collaborative Planning and Implementation of Programs

GADS 532          Curriculum Development

GADS 547          Advanced Curriculum

GADS 557          Supervision

GADS 559          Supervision Practicum

GADS 573          School Administration and Supervision: Orientation

GITE 511          Technology and Education or

GITE 512          Instructional Design

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


GADS 501 COLLABORATIVE PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTATION OF PROGRAMS - 3 CREDITS

This course concentrates on collaboration in the planning, implementation and evaluation of school programs.
Special emphasis is placed on developing skills for interdisciplinary team building, collaborative analysis of
schedules and facilities to facilitate program implementation, construction and use of alternative assessments and
evaluations across subject areas.




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GADS 532 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT - 3 CREDITS

This course deals with the nature of curriculum, including philosophical conflicts and historical perspective;
curriculum construction, implementation and change; developing goals and objectives; instructional modes and
the learner; criticism directed against the existing curriculum and proposals for reform.


GADS 547 ADVANCED CURRICULUM - 3 CREDITS

Advanced curriculum covers critical issues in curriculum research such as needs assessment, curriculum
implementation and change, curriculum management, mapping and audit, instructional models, and curriculum
evaluation.


GADS 557 SUPERVISION - 3 CREDITS

Coursework covers the principles of supervision, supervision theory, models, techniques of supervision,
philosophical conflicts, teacher evaluation schemes and supervisory research.


GADS 559 SUPERVISION PRACTICUM - 3 CREDITS

Field experience or field research in a specialist or subject area.


GADS 573 SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION: ORIENTATION - 3 CREDITS

This course provides an orientation to the structure and processes of administration and supervision programs,
including assessments of personal characteristics required in the PDE Standard, writing samples, problem solving
and a review of internal and external resources available to students.


GADS 574 PUPIL PERSONNEL - 3 CREDITS

Coursework examines recent Pennsylvania State Board of Education regulations that involve children in
school, including such issues as child abuse, student rights, educating persons with disabilities and the study of
mandated and proposed personnel services in Pennsylvania Schools.


GADS 575 MIDDLE LEVEL SCHOOL PRACTICES AND ORGANIZATION - 3 CREDITS

Designed for the novice in middle school education as well as the practitioner who seeks explanations and
alternatives for schools in the middle level, this course covers organization, curriculum, instruction, leadership
roles, staff development and evaluation.


GADS 671 ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT - 3 CREDITS

Coursework covers organizational management as it applies to educational leadership, including principles,
research and operational development that affects the work of administrative personnel in the elementary
school.

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GADS 675 SECONDARY SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT - 3 CREDITS

This course covers administrative theories and practical techniques for secondary administrators. Coursework
is problem-oriented with an emphasis on community relations, curriculum planning, decision-making, staff
development, student relations, scheduling practices and activities programs.


GADS 681 SCHOOL LAW - 3 CREDITS

Coursework covers the principal provisions in school law that affect teachers, building-level administrators and
superintendents, including constitutional, statutory, ruling case and common law bases for public education
interpretations and legal procedures with an emphasis on Pennsylvania school law.


GADS 682 SCHOOL FINANCE - 3 CREDITS

This course covers the economics of school finance related to theories and principles of taxation,
reimbursement, financial planning and budgeting as well as the effects of governmental and court
intervention on public and non-public schools. Practical applications to local school district situations will be
considered when possible.


GADS 686 K – 12 SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION PRACTICUM - 3 CREDITS

This course should be the final course in sequence before applying for certification. It requires field
experiences that are developed in consultation with an advisor as well as field site personnel at all three levels
(elementary, middle and secondary). Group seminars are concurrently scheduled during the practicum
semester.

ADMISSIONS

To be considered for admission to any graduate program in Administration and Supervision, applicants must
submit the following to the School of Education Graduate Office:

    1.   A complete application for graduate admission to the School of Education.

    2.   Official transcripts from the accredited college, university or seminary where the applicant obtained a
         bachelor’s degree.

    3.   Documentation of scores from the Miller Analogies Test or the Graduate Record Examination. The test
         scores should be no more that two years old.

VENUE

A choice of venue is available to candidates enrolled in this program.

    1.   Taking courses on campus in traditional format.

    2.   Taking Saturday morning courses at an off-site campus location as part of a cohort group.


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    3.   Taking courses as part of a cohort group following a format combining on-campus and on-line study
         through the Center for Advancing Teaching and Learning (CASTL). A resume and three letters of reference
         required.

For information, contact:
Robert L. Furman, ED.D.
Program Director
Educational Administration and Supervision
412.396.5274
furman@duq.edu

SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY

The School Psychology Program offers a 113 credit hour Ph.D. program in School Psychology that prepares
students for Pennsylvania Department of Education Certification as a School Psychologist and eligibility for the
Nationally Certified School Psychologist credential from NASP, as well as licensure for independent practice; a 60-
hour Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study that leads to Pennsylvania Department of Education Certification as a
School Psychologist and eligibility for the Nationally Certified School Psychologist credential from NASP; and a 30-
hour Master's Degree in Child Psychology (M.S.Ed.) that prepares students to provide paraprofessional mental
health services to children in community and school settings. For more in-depth information about these
programs, please refer to the School Psychology website at www.schoolpsych.duq.edu.

MISSION STATEMENT

The Duquesne University School Psychology Program, guided by the belief that all children can learn, is dedicated
to providing both breadth and depth of professional training in a theoretically-integrated, research-based learning
environment. The Program prepares ethical practitioners, scientists and scholars who are life-long learners
committed to enhancing the well-being of youth, their families, and the systems that serve them. The Program
achieves this by engaging in scholarly activities that advance the field of school psychology, maintaining a modern
curriculum that employs aspects of multiculturalism and diversity, examining emerging trends in the profession,
conducting continuous outcomes assessment for program improvement, and providing support to our graduates.

DOCTORATE (PH.D.) IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY

This 113 credit hour training program includes coursework, practica, dissertation and internship. The Ph.D.
program consists of 4 years of coursework and practica (an exception may be made for those applying who have
previously obtained a Master's Degree in a related field of study and whose courses are approved by the School
Psychology faculty), a one-year internship, and completion of a doctoral dissertation. The Ph.D. program is offered
only on a full-time basis, and students are expected to complete the degree in an uninterrupted sequence.
Completion of this program leads to an M.S.Ed. in Child Psychology (after 30 hours), and a Ph.D. in School
Psychology, Pennsylvania Department of Education Certification in School Psychology, eligibility for the Nationally
Certified School Psychology credential from NASP, and prepares graduates to apply for licensure by the
Pennsylvania State Board of Psychology.

Required Courses – Doctorate (Ph.D.) in School Psychology



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Year 1
Fall Semester:
GPSY 505 Role & Function of the School Psychologist
GPSY 512 Psychological Testing
GPSY 619 Child & Adolescent Development
GPSY 511 Psychology of Learning

Spring Semester:
GPSY 623 Behavioral Interventions
GCNE 565 Therapeutic Techniques in Counseling
GREV 610 Statistics II
GPSY 692 Individual Testing
GPSY 692L Individual Testing Practicum

Summer Semester:
GPSY 625 Academic Interventions
GSPE 570 Curriculum Perspectives, Adaptations, & Issues K-12

Year 2
Fall Semester:
GPSY 680 Consultation & Program Evaluation in School Psychology
GPSY 618 Personality Assessment for Intervention
GPSY 691 Psychotherapy with Children & Adolescents
GPSY 691L Psychotherapy & Consultation Practicum
GPSY 810 Directed Research

Spring Semester:
GPSY 695 Child Neuropsychology
GPSY 690 Child & Adolescent Psychopathology
GREV 701 Research Methods & Design
GREV 701P Research Methods & Design Practicum
GPSY 693L Integrated Practicum
GPSY 810 Directed Research

Year 3
Fall Semester:
GPSY 801 Social Systems & Developmental Psychopathology
GPSY 614 Organizational Consultation for School Psychologists
GPSY 812L Doctoral Practicum*
GREV 611 Statistics III
GPSY 810 Directed Research

Spring Semester:
GPSY 804 Child Violence in Schools*


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GCNE 814 Counselor Ed. & Supervision in a Multicultural Society
Research Elective (3 credit)
GPSY 813 Professional Seminar: Dissertation Research
GPSY 810 Directed Research

Year 4
Fall Semester:
GPSY 808 Early Childhood & Low Incidence Conditions
GPSY 814 Professional Seminar: Professional Development
Elective (3 credit)
GPSY 810 Directed Research

Spring Semester:
GPSY 811 Biological Basis of Behavior
PSYC 535 History of Psychology
GPSY 815 Professional Seminar: Professional Standards & Ethics
GPSY 810 Directed Research

Year 5 - Internship
Fall Semester:
GPSY 901 School Psychology Doctoral Internship I
GPSY 903 School Psychology Internship Seminar I
GPSY 906 School Psychology Dissertation*

Spring Semester:
GPSY 902 School Psychology Doctoral Internship II
GPSY 904 School Psychology Internship Seminar II
GPSY 906 School Psychology Dissertation*

Please note that GPSY 509 (Independent Study), GPSY 812L (Doctoral Practicum), GPSY 901 (School Psychology
Doctoral Internship I), GPSY 902 (School Psychology Doctoral Internship II) and GPSY 906 ((Doctoral Dissertation)
have separate sections for individual faculty members. Be sure to register for the proper faculty member.

Note: Students must register for a total of 12 dissertation credits (GPSY 906) to be eligible for graduation.

*Electives, Doctoral Practicum and Dissertation do not necessarily need to be taken in the semester indicated.

CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE STUDY (CAGS) IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY

This 60 credit hour training program approved by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) includes
coursework, practica, and internship. This program consists of three years of full-time graduate study (an
exception may be made for those applying who have previously obtained a Master's Degree in a related field of
study and whose courses are approved by the School Psychology faculty). Completion of this program leads to
Certification in School Psychology by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and eligibility for the Nationally



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Certified School Psychology credential from NASP. Students are awarded an M.S.Ed. in Child Psychology after the
completion of 30 graduate credits.

Required Courses – Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) in School Psychology

Year 1: Fall Semester
GPSY 505 Role & Function of the School Psychologist
GPSY 512 Psychological Testing
GPSY 619 Child & Adolescent Development
GPSY 511 Psychology of Learning

Year 1: Spring Semester
GPSY 623 Behavioral Interventions
GCNE 565 Therapeutic Techniques in Counseling
GREV 510 Statistics I
GPSY 692 Individual Testing
GPSY 692L Individual Testing Practicum

Year 1: Summer Semester
GPSY 625 Academic Interventions
GSPE 570 Curriculum Perspectives, Adaptations, & Issues K-12
GCNE 554 Multicultural Issues in Counseling

Year 2: Fall Semester
GPSY 680 Consultation & Program Evaluation in School Psychology
GPSY 618 Personality Assessment for Intervention
GPSY 691 Psychotherapy with Children & Adolescents
GPSY 691L Psychotherapy & Consultation Practicum

Year 2: Spring Semester
GPSY 695 Child Neuropsychology
GPSY 690 Child & Adolescent Psychopathology
GREV 701 Research Methods & Design
GREV 701P Research Methods & Design Practicum
GPSY 693L Integrated Practicum

Year 3 Internship: Fall Semester
GPSY 701 School Psychology Internship I
GPSY 703 School Psychology Internship Seminar I

Year 3 Internship: Spring Semester
GPSY 702 School Psychology Internship II
GPSY 704 School Psychology Internship Seminar II

ADMISSIONS (CAGS OR PH.D.)


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Applications for admission to the Certification Program in School Psychology (CAGS) or the Ph.D. in School
Psychology can be obtained from the School Psychology website (www.schoolpsych.duq.edu) or the Program
Office (102C Canevin Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15282, (412) 396-1058) by the annual deadline of February 1st. Students
who are still enrolled in a Bachelor's or Master's Degree Program who intend to receive the degree before the
beginning of the Fall semester are eligible to apply to the School Psychology Program before the degree is actually
awarded. Students may only start the program during the fall semester of each academic year. All applications
should include:

    •   A School Psychology Program Application. An application fee of $50.00 must accompany the application
        form. Online applications do not require an application fee. (Current Duquesne University students do not
        need to submit the application fee.)
    •   A letter of intent addressed to Dr. Kara McGoey (Program Director). Clearly indicate the program (CAGS
        and/or Ph.D.) for which you are applying for in your letter of intent. You may apply for the Certificate of
        Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) only, the Ph.D. only, or both CAGS and Ph.D. programs. If you apply to
        both, you will be considered first for the Ph.D. program and then for the CAGS program.
    •   Official Transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate work. Transcripts must show a quality point average
        equivalent to 3.0 or better on a four-point scale overall or for the last 48 credits earned, including post-
        graduate, graduate and/or undergraduate courses.
    •   Three letters of recommendation that focus on personal, professional and academic qualifications.
    •   Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores. All applicants must take the Verbal and Quantitative sections
        of the GRE. Exams must be taken in time to have scores submitted to Duquesne University (GRE code
        R2196) by the application deadline of February 1st.
    •   Applicants may be required to come to Duquesne University for an interview with the School Psychology
        Program faculty.
    •   Letters of acceptance, provisional acceptance, wait list or rejection will be forwarded to all applicants
        toward the end of the spring semester.

RESIDENCY REQUIREMENT (CAGS OR PH.D.)

Once admitted to either the Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) or the Ph.D. program, it is expected
that all students be enrolled continuously. Students admitted to the Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study
(CAGS) or the Ph.D. program must be enrolled full-time (6 credits per semester or 1 credit of dissertation) and
complete their internship following the last semester of class work. The internship must be completed in a full-
time, uninterrupted two-semester sequence. This residence requirement allows students the opportunity to
interact with faculty and other graduate students and to become familiar with University resources.

CAGS COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION AND PH.D. PRELIMINARY EXAMINATIONS

All students in the Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) must successfully complete a written
comprehensive examination. The purpose of this examination is to allow the student to demonstrate their mastery
of knowledge across each of the 10 areas of proficiency characterized by the School Psychology Program. The
comprehensive examinations are administered in a written format, typically during May of the second year of
program study. All second year Ph.D. students must successfully complete their written doctoral preliminary exams
and complete an oral comprehensive examination prior to dissertation proposal.



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FIELD EXPERIENCES AND PRACTICA (CAGS OR PH.D.)

As a competency based program, the coursework and field experiences are carefully sequenced so that theoretical
knowledge, skill acquisition, and the opportunity to enhance these skills are fully integrated. In addition to
coursework, it is expected that Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) students be engaged in school-
based experiences during each semester of their residence. It is expected that Ph.D. students complete a minimum
of 600 practicum hours.

INTERNSHIP REQUIREMENTS (CAGS AND PH.D.)

A 1200 credit hour, supervised internship is required of all CAGS students. Doctoral students complete a 1500
credit hour internship. The internship experience reflects the final stage of training and is designed to allow
students to receive a comprehensive, supervised period of practice to help meet specific training objectives. A
minimum of 600 hours must be completed in a school setting.

The internship experience is completed during the student's final year in the program. The internship experience is
completed on a full-time basis over a period of one academic year. Most internships are completed in a school
setting. All settings agree to provide experiences specific to the training objectives of the program as evidenced in
the internship contract. Internship credit is not given for past work experiences. Internship experiences shall be
conducted in a manner consistent with the current legal-ethical standards of the profession.

MASTER'S DEGREE (M.S.ED.) IN CHILD PSYCHOLOGY

The M.S.Ed. in Child Psychology is a 30 credit hour training program that includes course work that enhances the
student's ability to provide paraprofessional mental health services to children in community and school settings.
The M.S.Ed. in Child Psychology does not lead to the professional practice of school psychology.

Required Courses – Master's Degree in Child Psychology

GCNE 556            Counseling & Consulting Theory

GPSY 827            Classroom Discipline & Behavior Management

GPSY 619            Child & Adolescent Development

GREV 510            Statistics I or GFDE 505 Basic Educational Statistics

GPSY 512            Psychological Testing

GSPE 570            Curriculum Perspectives, Adaptations, &d Issues K-12

GPSY 511            Psychology of Learning

GRLA                Elective 3 Credits

                    Elective 3 Credits

                    Elective 3 Credits


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ADMISSIONS (MASTER’S IN CHILD PSYCHOLOGY)

Graduates with a Bachelor's Degree from an accredited college or university will be considered for admission to
graduate study in the School of Education. Each student applying for admission must file an application with the
School Psychology Program Office (102C Canevin Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15282, (412) 396-1058). General admission is
based on an applicant's previous academic record as shown by official transcripts of all previous study. Transcripts
must show a quality point average equivalent to a 3.0 or better on a four-point scale overall or for the last 48
credits earned including post-graduate, graduate and/or undergraduate courses OR transcripts show a quality
point average equivalent of a minimum 2.8 on a four-point scale overall or for the last 48 credits earned including
post-graduate, graduate and/or undergraduate courses AND a FRK score of at least 4.8 (FRK = GPA + (GRE Verbal +
GRE Quantitative)/ 400).

Please note that admission to the Master's Degree program does not include acceptance into the Certificate of
Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) or the Ph.D. Program. Those interested in practicing the profession of school
psychology should apply to either the Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) or the Ph.D. program.
Master's level classes may be taken in any order and on a part-time basis.

SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY (GPSY) COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


505. ROLE AND FUNCTION OF THE SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST 3 CR

This course is designed to introduce prospective school psychologists to the field of school psychology. Subjects
and experiences include role and function of the school psychologist; legal, ethical, and professional issues in
school psychology; field work experiences; research methods in school psychology; and emerging technologies in
school psychology.


506. CONSULTATION AND PROGRAM EVALUATION IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY 3 CR

Students will explore theories of consultation, pre-referral processes, behavioral approaches to assessment and
intervention, direct and indirect intervention alternatives, program development, and system-level consultation
and intervention. This course provides an emphasis on working with families, culturally and linguistically diverse
populations as well as regular and special education populations.


511. PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING 3 CR

Several theoretical mechanisms of learning and cognitive processing are examined. The goal of the course is to
establish the practical utility of operant conditioning, social learning theory and information processing theory.


512. PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING 3 CR

Introduction to the basic principles of test theory, construction and measurements. Topics include reliability,
validity, item analysis as well as other test construction considerations. Test interpretation focuses on standardized
test scores and factor analysis. Survey of general ability tests, achievement tests, personality tests and interest
inventories.


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514. HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 3 CR

Survey of growth, adaptation, and developmental patterns in infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood.
Implications for academic, emotional, and social learning will be explored.


614. ORGANIZATIONAL CONSULTATION FOR SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS 3 CR

An in-depth study of change processes for schools and organizations serving youth and their families. Topics will
include organizational assessment, program evaluation, strategic planning, change management, problem-solving,
and process improvement. Specific examples covered will include the development of organization level crisis
plans and techniques in organizational recovery.


618. PERSONALITY ASSESSMENT FOR INTERVENTION 3 CR

Develop major strategies and techniques for individual personality assessment of children and adults. Integrate
projective assessment with objective and behavioral measurements, with emphasis upon assessment techniques
that inform treatment approaches and treatment progress monitoring.


619. CHILD AND ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT 3 CR

This course will explore child development from conception through adolescence and include a survey of growth,
adaptation, and developmental patterns in infancy, childhood, and adolescence with implications for academic,
emotional, and social learning. The course will be organized in a topical manner and include basic concepts and
theories of child development, applied directions of child development, research strategies, biological foundations
of development, prenatal development, physical growth, cognitive and language development, personality and
social development, and how social context affects development. An additional focus will be the application of
students' knowledge of child development in solving problems they may encounter in schools.


623. BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTIONS 3 CR

The purpose of this course is to teach students to design, implement, and evaluate interventions through progress
monitoring for common behavioral problems. The course will also cover single subject design and applied
functional and experimental behavioral assessment.


625. ACADEMIC INTERVENTIONS 3 CR

The purpose of this course is to teach students to design, implement, and evaluate interventions through progress
monitoring for common academic problems. The course will also cover curriculum based measurement and
progress monitoring of academic interventions.


690. CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOPATHOLOGY 3 CR

This course will provide an intensive, theoretically integrated study of emotional and behavioral disorders of
children and adolescents. Specifically, this course will address: (1) the development of psychopathology in children,

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including biological, cognitive, social-emotional, interpersonal, and contextual influences; (2) the characteristics of
psychopathology specific to children and adolescents; (3) the interpretation and integration of multiple
assessment strategies to make formal diagnoses; and (4) how to use historical and assessment data to develop
comprehensive interventions.


691. PSYCHOTHERAPY WITH CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS 3 CR

The prospective school psychologist will explore methods and techniques of therapy with school-aged children.
Students will learn the professional procedures for initiating a counseling relationship; will learn legal and ethical
responsibilities regarding the counseling relationship; will learn a variety of counseling techniques and the typical
problems they are used to treat; and be able to review the current status of outcome and process research about
psychotherapy with children.


691L. COUNSELING PRACTICUM WITH CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS 1 CR

A supervised counseling practicum designed to accompany 691 Psychotherapy with Children and Adolescents.


692. INDIVIDUAL TESTING 3 CR

Instruction and practice in the administration and interpretation of major individual tests of intelligence. The goal
of the course is to provide students with knowledge in the administration, scoring and interpretation of the
Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, and the Stanford-Binet.


692L. SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PRACTICUM I 1 CR

A supervised practicum designed to accompany 692 Individual Testing.


693L. INTEGRATED SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PRACTICUM 1 CR

A supervised practicum designed to accompany 690 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology and 695 Child
Neuropsychology.


695. CHILD NEUROPSYCHOLOGY 3 CR

An in-depth study of the brain-behavior relationships in children and adolescents. Course content includes
functional, developmental neuroanatomy, neuropsychological assessment methods and tests, descriptions of
specific brain-behavior disorders, and linking assessment with intervention and rehabilitation.


701/702. SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY INTERNSHIP I AND II 2 CR EA

Supervised practice of clinical procedures in an educational setting.




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703/704. SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY INTERNSHIP SEMINAR I AND II 3 CR EA

This seminar is designed to accompany the school psychology internship. It is designed to provide intern students
with information on a wide range of topics and issues. The class will provide students with a forum for sharing their
internship experiences and will also include discussions and case reviews of assessments and consultative cases on
which the interns are professionally involved.


801. SOCIAL SYSTEMS AND DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOPATHOLOGY 3 CR

This course will focus on the study of the origins and course of individual patterns of behavior in order to predict
the development of maladaptive behaviors and disorders in childhood and adolescence. An emphasis will be
placed on the impact of developmental influences on clinical problems of children and adolescents, including risk
and resiliency factors and strategies for developmental assessment. A second emphasis of the course is on
prevention and early intervention of childhood and adolescent psychopathologies.


804. CHILD VIOLENCE IN SCHOOLS 3 CR

Examines the development of aggression in children. This course emphasizes multimodal prevention and
intervention models appropriate for the school setting, as well as examining the role of interagency collaboration
on the impact of violent offenders.


808. EARLY CHILDHOOD AND LOW INCIDENCE CONDITIONS 3 CR

Provides an overview of the current models of assessment and intervention for low incidence disorders and
developmental delays, which are typically identified before age five. Course content will explore current definitions
and diagnostic criteria, assessment techniques, behavioral, therapeutic, and educational strategies, effective
support services, and family, school, and community systems issues.


810. DIRECTED RESEARCH 1-3 CR

Students engage in research projects directed by faculty members. Provides students with ongoing research
experience and the opportunity to publish and present self-generated or collaborative research projects.


811. BIOLOGICAL BASES OF BEHAVIOR 3 CR

This course examines our knowledge as to how behavior is controlled by physiological processes. The content of
the course falls into four general areas: (1) an examination of neurons and neurotransmitters; (2) a description of
sensory and motor systems; (3) a survey of various behaviors and how these are controlled by the nervous system;
and (4) psychopharmacology.


812L. DOCTORAL PRACTICUM 3 CR

Students will choose an area of specialization in which they will complete a supervised practicum.


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813. PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR: DISSERTATION RESEARCH 1 CR

Provides students with support on the development of specific dissertation research questions, development of a
research design, and preparation of the dissertation proposal.


814. PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR: PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 1 CR

Provides students with support in preparation for internship, coverage of school-based professional practices, and
coverage of private professional practice.


815. PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR: PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS AND ETHICS 1 CR

Provides students with an exposure to NASP and APA ethical guidelines through lectures, class discussions, and
role-playing activities. Ethical codes, ethical conduct and professional standards of practice will also be included.


827. CLASSROOM DISCIPLINE AND BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT 3 CR

Students will explore basic principles of classroom discipline and behavior management. Students will survey
prevention techniques, environmental, multidimensional and systemic approaches to assessment and
intervention. This course provides an emphasis on working with families, culturally and linguistically diverse
populations, and children with and without disabilities.


895. ADVANCED CHILD NEUROPSYCHOLOGY 3 CR

The course covers advanced topics in child neuropsychology including applied cognitive neuroscience, assessment,
disorders and treatment. This is the second course in the sequence of preparation for the professional practice of
child neuropsychology and is a qualified elective for the Ph.D. School Psychology Program. A problem-based
learning (PBL) approach is used and there are opportunities for service-learning experiences.


901/902. SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY DOCTORAL INTERNSHIP I AND II 2 CR EA

Supervised practice of school psychology in a school or educational setting. Requires 1500-clock hours experience.


903/904. SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY INTERNSHIP SEMINAR I AND II 3 CR EA

This seminar is designed to accompany the school psychology internship. It is designed to provide intern students
with information on a wide range of topics and issues. The class will provide students with a forum for sharing their
internship experiences and will also include discussions and case reviews of assessments and consultative cases on
which the interns are professionally involved.


906. SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY DISSERTATION 1-6 CR

Successful completion, written and oral presentation of the student's doctoral research are required. Completion
of the experience requires also meeting all graduation requirements.

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SPECIAL EDUCATION

SPECIAL EDUCATION - COGNITIVE, BEHAVIOR, PHYSICAL AND HEALTH DISABILITIES
(CBP/HD)

Candidates who successfully complete one of these programs will meet the requirements for the degree and / or
certification to teach Special Education including students with cognitive, behavior, physical and health disabilities
in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. It is designed for educators who desire to teach in kindergarten through
twelfth grade in a variety of different learning environments or to work with individuals with disabilities in
community agencies.

1. Master's Degree and Additional Certification in Special Education (CBP/HD): Minimum 36 credits

This program requires a minimum of 36 semester hours, meets the requirements for the degree and certification
to teach in special education programs for students with Cognitive, Behavior, Physical/Health Disabilities (CBP/HD)
in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in kindergarten to twelfth grades. A baccalaureate degree that satisfies the
School of Education requirements as approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education is prerequisite. This
program requires GSPED 595 Field Experience and GSPED 689/690 Practicum in Special Education. Candidates
must successfully complete the special education specialty Praxis exam as required by the Pennsylvania
Department of Education.

2. Master's Degree and Initial Certification in Special Education (CBP/HD): 42-45 credits

 Candidates who have a baccalaureate degree may, depending on previous preparation, complete the
requirements for the degree and certification with a minimum of 42-45 semester hours. This program includes
GSPED 595 Field Experience and GSPED 590 Internship in Special Education as well as courses in the general
education and special education curriculum. Candidates completing the initial certification program must
successfully pass the required Praxis teacher certification exams required by the Pennsylvania Department of
Education. Candidates may be required to complete courses identified as deficiencies according to PDE Act 354.

3. Extended Certification: Minimum of 24 credits

This program is designed for candidates who want to add the Special Education certification (CBP/HD) to their
current teaching certificate but are not interested in a degree. This program requires a minimum of 24 semester
hours of required special education courses and other courses deemed necessary by the Special Education faculty
advisor based on a review of the candidate’s previous transcripts. Demonstration of competence in field
experiences is required including GSPED 595 Field Observation and GSPED 689/690 Practicum in Special Education.
These credits may be counted toward Instructional II Permanent certification. Candidates in this program must
complete the special education specialty Praxis exam as required by the Pennsylvania Department of Education.

4. Master’s of Education Degree only: Minimum of 30 credits

This program is designed for candidates who seek a master’s degree only and are not interested in initial or
extended certification. Candidates must have a baccalaureate degree that satisfies the School of Education
requirements as approved by PDE. The advisor will design a program of study and students must apply for



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candidacy for the master’s degree. Candidates in this program do not have to take the Praxis exams nor must they
complete a practicum experience.

SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAM COURSES

 1. *Special Education Foundation Core: GSPE


500** Orientation to Special Education Program                                      0


563 Physical and Multiple Disabilities (Register                                    3
simultaneously with GSPED 595)


580 Transition and Career Issues                                                    3


611** Persons with Disabilities                                                     3


660 Mental Retardation                                                              3


662 Learning Disabilities                                                           3


663** Educational Assessment: Special Education                                     3


664 Behavior Disorders                                                              3


699 Final Candidate Staffing                                                        0


2. Special Education Electives (3-6 crs.): GSPE


552 Counseling and Consulting with Parents of Persons                               3
with Disabilities


561 Assistive Technology                                                            3


565 Early Childhood Special Education                                               3


570 Curriculum, Perspectives, Adaptations, and Issues                               3
K-12



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661 Gifted and Talented                                          3


667 Autism                                                       3


625 Inclusive Education: Rationale and Strategies                3


3. Educational Research (3 crs.) Required for the M.S.ED: GFDE


502 Action Research in Education                                 3


504 Statistics in Behavioral Research                            3


514 Intro. To Qualitative Methods                                3


525 ** Education Research Literacy                               3


4. Field Experience (3-6 crs.)


590 Internship: Special Education (Initial Certification)        6


595 Field Observation – Special Education (Register              0
concurrently with GSPED 563)


689 Orientation to Special Education Practicum                   0


690 Practicum: Special Education (Additional                     3
Certification


5. Suggested Education Electives (0 – 9 crs.) ***


503 Multicultural Education                                      3


619 Child & Adolescent Development                               3


510 Theories of Teaching – Learning Process                      3



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520 Introduction to Teaching                                                       3


521 Reading Programs and Instruction                                               3


553 Teaching the Language Arts                                                     3


552 Teaching Social Studies                                                        3


554 Teaching Elementary School Mathematics                                         3


555 Teaching Elementary Science                                                    3


625 Reading Disabilities                                                           3


631 Instructional Techniques (Secondary)                                           3


694 Psychology of Deviant Behavior                                                 3


* Required courses

** Screening Courses to be taken in first 6-9 credits of program

*** Consult with your advisor for additional elective courses

SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAM: COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH / SPECIAL EDUCATION
SUPPORT

This program requires a minimum of 30-36 semester hours. The candidate will develop advanced training for
employment and advancement within various community agencies. Candidates will develop skills and
competencies appropriate to positions of direct care, health maintenance, advocacy, intensive case management
or independent support coordination. This program does not meet the requirements for CBP/HD teaching
certification in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

1.      Special Education:


500* Orientation to the Special Education Program                                  0


552 Counseling and Consulting with Parents of                                      3



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Exceptional Persons


563 Physical and Multiple Disabilities (Register               3
simultaneously with 595)


580 Transition and Career Issues                               3


611* Persons with Disabilities OR                              3

625 Inclusive Education: Rationale and Strategies



664 Behavior Disorders                                         3


660 Mental Retardation                                         3


                                                               Section 1 Total 15-18 credits

*Required screening courses to be taken in first 6-9 credits

2.       Electives to be approved by the student’s advisor:


553 Sexuality of Persons with Disabilities OR                  1

670 Play Therapy



556** Counseling and Consulting Theory                         3


557 Group Counseling: Theory and Techniques (Register          3
simultaneously with 700)


700 Group Counseling Lab                                       0


650** Social Systems in Counseling                             3


671 Seminar in Community Counseling Services                   2


557 Supervision                                                3



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574 Pupil Personnel                                                                      3


675 Secondary School Administration & Management                                         3


512 Psychological Testing                                                                3


694 Psychology of Deviant Behavior                                                       3


                                                                                         Section 2 Total 15-18 credits

**556 or 650 required screening course to be taken in first 6-9 credits

3.       Field Practice – Required (3 CRS.)


689 Orientation to Special Education Practicum                                           0


690 Practicum                                                                            3


559 Field Observation in Community Agencies AND/OR                                       0

595 Field Observation in Special Education



                                                                                         Program Total 30-36 credits

ADMISSIONS AND CANDIDACY: Applicants are admitted with provisional status for graduate study in Special
Education upon acceptance by the School of Education Graduate Office. Students must meet the current GPA
requirement as established by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. An individual program of study will be
designed for the student by the advisor. After completing the required screening courses in the first 6-9 credits in
the master’s degree/ certification program, students must apply for candidacy. Candidacy is granted to qualified
applicants who have successfully met the published benchmarks and gateways in the Handbook for Graduate
Programs in Special Education. If an applicant does not have all of the necessary prerequisites, or if the applicant's
record is unsatisfactory, conditional acceptance or dismissal from the program may be recommended. Students
should consult with their advisor and the Handbook (see
http://www.education.duq.edu/sped/Graduate/Graduate.htm for details).

INITIAL CERTIFICATION PROGRAM:

All applicants for graduate study in an initial certification in special education program must submit the following:

             1.   Official Transcripts of Bachelor’s Degree from an accredited college, university or seminary.



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             2.   Applicants may be accepted into graduate study with the following:

                         • A minimum overall 3.00 grade point average – or –

                         • A minimum 3.00 GPA on the most recent 48 credits – or –

                         • A minimum of 2.80 overall GPA with qualifying scores on the Praxis PPST examinations
                           (PPST Reading, PPST Writing, PPST Mathematics and the Fundamental Subjects:
                           Content Knowledge).

ADDITIONAL CERTIFICATION and COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH/SPECIAL EDUCATION SUPPORT PROGRAMS:

All applicants for graduate study in the additional certification special education program OR CMH/SES must
submit the following:

    1.   Official transcript of Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college, university or seminary.
    2.   Applicants may be accepted into graduate study with the following:
         • A minimum overall 3.0 grade point average –or-
         • A minimum 3.00 GPA on the most recent 48 credits –or-
         • A minimum 2.60 overall GPA and a FRK score of at least 4.5 (FRK = GPA + (GRE verbal + GRE
              quantitative)/400). Applicants must send GRE scores with the application for admission.
    3.   Copy of applicant’s valid Instructional I Teaching Certificate for additional certification in special education
         program.

SPECIAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


500. ORIENTATION TO SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 0 CR.

 Orientation meeting designed to introduce new students to the Graduate Special Education Program. It is held
each semester prior to the student’s first term of enrollment. Admissions requirements and procedures including
screening, program of studies, field work and Praxis exams are discussed.


552. COUNSELING AND CONSULTING WITH PARENTS OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES 3 CR.

Designed to prepare special and regular educators, counselors, and other professionals to work with parents of
persons with disabilities in order to achieve an effective parent-professional partnership.


553. SEXUALITY OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES 1 CR.

This course will provide an overview for the professional to develop skills regarding sexual attitudes, providing
assistance, counseling and sex education for persons with disabilities.




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561. ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY 3 CR.

Reviews the technology used to assist students with disabilities in accessing the general education curriculum and
activities as well as technology to assist people with disabilities in everyday activities. Provides candidates with the
knowledge and application of technology to support students in computer access, augmentative and alternative
communication systems, reading and writing, and everyday activities. Assessment and implementation issues will
be presented in the context of developing individualized plans for students with disabilities using assistive
technology.


563. PHYSICAL AND MULTIPLE DISABILITIES 3 CR.

Intensive study of the psychological, educational and medical aspects of working with persons with neurological
impairments, physical disabilities and multiple disabilities. Instructional techniques, prosthetic devices and
specialized adaptive equipment are examined. Exploration of ethical and legal rights and responsibilities, advocacy
groups, agencies, public and private resources are stressed. Prerequisite: 611 or permission of instructor.


565. EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION 3 CR.

Overview of current models of assessment and intervention for children with developmental delays from birth to
five years of age. Explores philosophical and legal foundations, educational programs, intervention strategies, and
family system issues.


570. CURRICULUM, PERSPECTIVES, ADAPTATIONS, AND ISSUES K-12 3 CR.

Emphasis is on exploration of alternative instructional strategies and current trends and practices in curriculum
decision-making and planning to make curriculum more relevant for students with diverse learning needs including
methods for adaptations and modifications. Candidates will examine the field of curriculum and evaluate
outcomes for learners with diverse needs in a variety of general education and community settings across a range
of ages. Candidates will participate in collaborative experiences and will research the empirical bases for what is
effective at state and local levels where learning needs, academic abilities, language and cultural backgrounds
differ. Prerequisite: 611 or permission of instructor.


 580. TRANSITION AND CAREER ISSUES 3 CR.

Provides an overview of secondary curricular practices, issues in planning and implementing a transition plan,
interagency collaboration, as well as support issues regarding all aspects of adult life for persons with disabilities,
including the impact of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Prerequisite: 611 or permission of instructor.


 585. FIELD OBSERVATION AND EXPERIENCE 3 CR.

Designed to give short-term experience with persons with varying degrees of disabilities at different
developmental levels, and in a variety of service settings. A pass/fail grade will be given, and involvement in more
than one area may be required of students with limited previous experience. A minimum of 20 contact hours is
required for each credit. Permission of Advisor required for this experience.

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590. INTERNSHIP: SPECIAL EDUCATION 6 CR.

Full-time student teaching for a fifteen-week experience under the supervision of university and school personnel.
Required for initial teacher certification and conducted Fall and Spring semesters only. Admission with approval of
advisor.


595. FIELD OBSERVATION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 0 CR.

All initial certification candidates must satisfactorily complete a series of field-based observations across the range
of exceptionalities included in the Cognitive, Behavior, Physical and Health Disabilities certificate. Specific special
education courses are designed to incorporate field experiences to satisfy the 595 requirements. This course is a
prerequisite for student teaching.


 611. PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES 3 CR.

 Overview of critical issues and strategies in the education of students with disabilities. Focuses on historical and
legal foundations of special education, inclusive education, diverse developmental characteristics and strategies
for accommodating students with challenges in general education environments.


625. INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: RATIONALE AND STRATEGIES 3 CR.

Provides an overview of the philosophy and rationale for inclusive education and an overview of components that
are critical to successful programs. Topics include: goal selection, teaming, co-teaching, planning and scheduling
issues, grading, and support needs.


660. MENTAL RETARDATION 3 CR.

Designed to provide special and general educators, parents and agency personnel with an understanding of the
impact of mental retardation upon individuals at different ages in various settings. Explores the historical,
psychological, educational aspects of cognitive disabilities. Emphasis is on research and literature based
systematic instructional strategies to meet the needs of students with mental retardation. Prerequisite: 611 or
permission of instructor.


 661. GIFTED AND TALENTED 3 CR.

Acquaints candidates with the identification and characteristics of persons who are gifted and talented: the
educational goals, objectives and the curriculum content. Specialists and community resources for the gifted will
be utilized.


 662. LEARNING DISABILITIES 3 CR.

Explores the historical, psychological and educational aspects of learning disabilities. Emphasis is on diagnosis and
identification, and intervention strategies based on the learning, behavior, social and emotional characteristics of
students with learning disabilities. Prerequisites: 611 or permission of instructor.

                                                                                                                    123
 663. EDUCATIONAL ASSESSMENT: SPECIAL EDUCATION 3 CR.

Provides an overview of theoretical and legal issues in assessment of students with disabilities. Emphasis is on
theoretical and legal foundations of assessment, use of formal and informal assessment procedures, developing
Individualized Educational Programs, and parent conferences. Prerequisite: 611 or permission of instructor


 664. BEHAVIOR DISORDERS 3 CR.

Provides a current overview of the field of education for persons with behavior disorders. Topics addressed are
diagnosis and screening procedures, the incidence of emotional disturbances, factors influencing these
disturbances, treatment alternatives, intervention and prevention strategies. Prerequisite: 611 or permission of
instructor.


667. AUTISM 3 CR.

Designed to assist teachers, families, school administrators, guidance counselors, school psychologists, physical
education teachers, music, speech, occupational and physical therapists, school nurses, college professors and
teaching assistants in understanding the characteristics of autism. The information includes: current definition and
diagnosis criteria; state-of-the-art behavioral and educational strategies; effective supportive service/therapy,
techniques; nutritional information and planning for community placement.


689. ORIENTATION TO SPECIAL EDUCATION PRACTICUM 0 CR.

Orientation meeting that is required for candidates registered for GSPED 690. It is held each semester prior to the
candidate’s placement in the field. Provides information regarding requirements and procedures for the practicum
and is a prerequisite for 690.


690. PRACTICUM: ADDITIONAL CERTIFICATE/ SPECIAL EDUCATION 3-6 CR.

The practicum is required for candidate’s who are extending certification to add the CBP/HD certificate to their
current teaching certificate. Candidates will demonstrate competence in all areas of the CBP/HD certificate under
the guidance of a certified special education cooperating teacher and a university supervisor. The Program
Coordinator is responsible for accepting applications for the experience and the University Clinical Supervisor
arranges for supervision of the practicum. Prerequisite course is 689.


690. PRACTICUM: COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH / SPECIAL EDUCATION SUPPORT 3-6 CR.

The practicum is required for candidate’s who are pursuing the master’s degree in CMH/SES. Candidates will
demonstrate competence in all areas of program knowledge and skills under the guidance of an appropriately
credentialed site supervisor and a university supervisor. The Program Coordinator is responsible for accepting
applications for the experience and the University Clinical Supervisor arranges for supervision of the practicum.
Prerequisite course is 689.




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699. SPECIAL EDUCATION: FINAL CANDIDATE STAFFING

Final performance assessment for all graduate candidates pursuing certification / master’s degree in special
education. Candidates who have completed their program of study and all field requirements with at least a 3.0
QPA, and passed required Praxis exams will prepare a final portfolio based on the Special Education Candidate Self-
Assessment Profile (SECSAP). Candidates will present their SECSAP at a simulated panel interview including faculty
and key stakeholders from the Special Education Advisory Council and school administrators.

M.S.ED. LEADING TEACHER IN SPECIAL EDUCATION DEGREE AND ADDITIONAL
CERTIFICATION (MAJOR CODE 2285)

This program is designed for graduates of the Duquesne University Undergraduate Leading Teacher Program and is
a one-year, full-time cohort model (summer, fall, spring). The program requires 30 semester hours and meets the
requirements for the M.S.Ed. degree and certification to teach in special education programs (kindergarten to
twelfth grades) for students with Cognitive, Behavior, Physical/Health Disabilities (CBP/HD) in the Commonwealth
of Pennsylvania. This program requires two semesters of field-based practicum in Special Education. A
baccalaureate degree from the Duquesne University Undergraduate Leading Teacher Program with at least a 3.0
GPA and a PA Instructional I Certificate in Elementary, Early Childhood or Secondary Education are prerequisites.
Successful applicants will also be required to provide letters of reference from Duquesne University faculty
members, from their Student Teaching Cooperating Teacher, and University Supervisor. Additional courses or field
experiences may be required to address identified deficiencies.

M.S. Leading Teacher in Special Education Program Courses (GLTSE):                                         Credits

Summer Session:


500 Orientation: M.S. Leading Teacher in Special                               0
Education


501 Designing Effective Individualized Instruction                             3


525 Educational Research Literacy (GREV 525)                                   3


Fall Semester:


502 Collaboration and Consultation in Special                                  3
Education


502L Clinical Practicum I                                                      1


503 Functional Independent Living Curriculum                                   3


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503L Clinical Practicum I                                                   1


504 Supportive Environments for Social &                                    3
Emotional Learning


504L Clinical Practicum I                                                   1




Spring Semester:


505 Transition Across Support Systems                                       3


505L Clinical Practicum II                                                  1


506 Supporting Students with Severe Physical &                              3
Multiple Disabilities


506L Clinical Practicum II                                                  1


507, 508 Special Interest Courses:                                          2


507, 508L Clinical Practicum II                                             1


599 M. S. LT in Special Education Seminar                                   1


                                                                 Program Total:      30 credits

ADMISSIONS AND CANDIDACY: Applicants are admitted with provisional status for graduate study in Special
Education upon acceptance by the School of Education Graduate Office. Students must meet the current GPA
requirement as established by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and all admissions requirements of the
program. After completing the required screening courses in the summer session (6 credits and GLTSE 500),
students must apply for candidacy. Candidacy is granted to qualified applicants who have successfully met the
published benchmarks and gateways in the M.S. Leading Teacher in Special Education Handbook. If an applicant
does not have all of the necessary prerequisites, or if the applicant's record is unsatisfactory, conditional
acceptance or dismissal from the program may be recommended. Students should access the website (see

                                                                                                           126
http://www.education.duq.edu/sped/Graduate/Graduate.htm) for details of program admissions procedures and
candidacy.

M.S. LEADING TEACHER IN SPECIAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS:


GLST 500       ORIENTATION; M.S. LEADING TEACHER IN SPECIAL EDUCATION

This course is designed to inform students of the professional and ethical standards and responsibilities of special
educators as required by relevant accrediting and certification requirements. Students will examine the impact of
the requisite dispositions to function effectively and appropriately as an advocate for individuals with disabilities.
All relevant policies and procedures of the Candidate Assessment System will be addressed.


GREV 525         EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH LITERACY 3 CR.

This course is designed to give students the skills and knowledge base necessary for the conceptual understanding
of research presented in the literature. In doing so, it will provide the students with the foundation to become
critical readers of research.


GLST 501       DESIGNING EFFECTIVE INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTION 3 CR.

This course is designed to prepare graduate-level special education professionals to administer a variety of
technically adequate, nonbiased formal and informal assessments to students who require supports and specially
designed instruction. The course provides an overview of the terminology used in assessment, and theoretical,
legal, and ethical issues related to assessment, classification, and educational planning in special education.
Candidates will develop skills in interpreting a range of standardized and curriculum-based assessment data for
making eligibility, program, and placement decisions. Candidates will also plan individualized education programs
for students with disabilities with diverse backgrounds and participate in parent conferences in related field
experiences.


GLST 502       COLLABORATION & CONSULTATION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 3 CR.

This course is designed to prepare special education professionals to assume leadership roles in collaboration and
consultation to build partnerships with professionals, families and paraeducators. Topics will focus on knowledge,
skills and dispositions for effective interpersonal communication and problem-solving, and approaches to
consulting and co-teaching. Strategies for building family-professional partnerships with regard to the nature and
needs of parents and siblings of persons with disabilities will be developed. Research will focus on the empirical
bases for effective collaboration and consultation including language and cultural differences in the home and
school environments, and the theoretical and legal foundations of parents’ rights and responsibilities in special
education. Candidates will participate in collaborative experiences in class and in GLTSE 502L Clinical Practicum I:
General Curriculum.




                                                                                                                    127
GLST 503       SUPPORTIVE ENVIRONMENTS FOR SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL LEARNING 3 CR.

This course explores differences in the development of social and emotional learning and skills in children and
young adults with behavior challenges through theory, practice and research. The course focuses on foundational
issues including social and emotional learning theory, the historical and philosophical underpinnings of behavior
disorders, principles of Applied Behavior Analysis, as well as the current research on emotional intelligence and
brain-based research as it applies to students with disabilities in the area of behavior challenges. Candidates will
demonstrate competencies in the principles of Applied Behavior Analysis, assessment-based intervention/support
strategies, and data-driven decision-making. GLTSE 503L Clinical Practicum I will be taken concurrently with this
course.


GLST 504       FUNCTIONAL INDEPENDENT LIVING CURRICULUM 3 CR.

This course is designed to prepare candidates in the design of educational programs for students who require a
functional independent living curriculum addressing the skills needed to succeed in inclusive schools and
communities. The course focuses on the theoretical foundations, legal and ethical considerations, specific
assessment and instructional methods, utilization of assistive technology, inclusion of the education team to
support students with moderate and severe disabilities in inclusive settings. Candidates will be prepared to
administer alternative assessments and utilize the results to make data-based decisions about the design of
curriculum and instruction. Candidates will develop skills in the design of systematic instruction utilizing the
principles of Applied Behavioral Analysis for the acquisition, generalization and maintenance of skills for students
with moderate to severe disabilities. GLTSE 504L Clinical Practicum I will be taken concurrently with this course.


GLST 502L, 503L, 504L            CLINICAL PRACTICUM I: GENERAL CURRICULUM 1 CR. EACH

This practicum is required for candidates who are extending certification to add the CBP/HD certificate to their
current teaching certificate in the M. S. Leading Teacher Program in Special Education. Candidates will
demonstrate competence in all areas of the CBP/HD certificate related to serving students with disabilities within
the general education curriculum. Requirements for this field experience will be articulated with content of the fall
semester courses and must be taken concurrently with GLTSE 502, 503, and 504.


GLST 505       TRANSITION ACROSS SUPPORT SYSTEMS 3 CR.

This course focuses on major transitions within support systems for individuals with disabilities from birth to
adulthood. Candidates will be prepared to assess, plan and implement successful transitions using the criterion of
the next environment. Topics that will be addressed include self-advocacy, secondary curriculum and instruction,
post-secondary quality of life outcomes including employment, living options, recreation and leisure opportunities,
adult support structures and the process of entitlement vs. eligibility. GLTSE 505L Clinical Practicum II will be taken
concurrently with this course.




                                                                                                                   128
GLST 506 SUPPORTING STUDENTS WITH SEVERE PHYSICAL AND MULTIPLE DISABILITIES 3
CR.

This course is designed to prepare teachers to include students with physical and multiple disabilities in general
education classrooms through collaboration with families, other educators, related service providers, and
community agencies. The course focuses on psychological, educational, and medical aspects of persons with
physical and multiples disabilities. Topics include assessment, and long-range individualized educational programs,
instructional methods, specialized augmentative and alternative communication, and appropriate use of prosthetic
devices and adaptive equipments. Research will focus on ethical and legal rights of students with physical and
multiples disabilities, professional responsibilities of teachers to design appropriate instructional strategies, and
promotion of positive learning results in both general and special curricula. GLTSE 506L Clinical Practicum II will be
taken concurrently with this course.


GLST 507 SPECIAL INTEREST: AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS 1 CR.

Overview of the characteristics of autism spectrum disorders. Course topics include current definition and
diagnosis criteria; state-of-the-art behavioral and educational strategies and considerations for effective support
programs and services to facilitate inclusion (Not offered every year).


GLST 508 SPECIAL INTEREST – ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY 1 CR.

This one credit course is designed to prepare special education professionals in the assessment, design,
implementation and evaluation of assistive technologies. Topics will focus on knowledge, skills and dispositions for
effective implementation of technologies to assist students with disabilities in accessing the general education
curriculum and activities as well as individually designed curriculum content.


GLST 505L, 506L & 507L CLINICAL PRACTICUM II: INDEPENDENCE CURRICULUM 1 CR.
EACH

This practicum is required for candidates who are extending certification to add the CBP/HD certificate to their
current teaching certificate in the M. S. Leading Teacher Program in Special Education. Candidates will
demonstrate competence in all areas of the CBP/HD certificate related to serving students with disabilities within
the independence curriculum. Requirements for this field experience will be articulated with content of the spring
semester courses and must be taken concurrently with GLTSE 505, 506 ,507, and 508.


GLST 599 M. S. LEADING TEACHER IN SPECIAL EDUCATION SEMINAR 1 CR.

This seminar is the final performance assessment for all graduate candidates pursuing certification / master’s
degree in special education. Candidates who have completed their program of study with at least a 3.0 QPA and all
field requirements, and passed required Praxis exams will prepare a final portfolio based on the Special Education
Candidate Self-Assessment Profile (SECSAP). Candidates will present their SECSAP at a simulated panel interview
including faculty and key stakeholders from the Special Education Advisory Council and school administrators.




                                                                                                                  129
APPENDICES




             130
STUDENT STANDING PETITION

                                STUDENT STANDING PETITION

You may add the information regarding your petition to the form below, or you may use this
form as a guide in writing your petition (Make sure you include all the requested information).



Name: ____________________________________ Date: ______________________________

Mailing Address: ________________________________________________________________

Email Address:______________________________ Telephone: _________________________

Major Area of Study: _____________________________________________________________

Name of Academic Advisor: _______________________________________________________



Specific Statement of Request / Reason for Petition:




                                                                                             131
                               STUDENT STANDING PETITION

Description of Rationale for Request / Any extenuating circumstances:




Requested Outcome:




Please attach any relevant background documentation. Non-digital documents may be
mailed to the following address or faxed to 412.396.6017:

Committee on Student Standing
Attention: Gail Freynik
Duquesne University School of Education
107 Canevin Hall
Pittsburgh, PA 15282



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IN THE WAKE OF TRAUMA: TIPS FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS

Whether or not you were directly affected by a traumatic event, it is normal to feel anxious about your own safety,
to picture the event in your own mind, and to wonder how you would react in an emergency. People react in
different ways to trauma. Some may become irritable or depressed, others lose sleep or have nightmares, and
others may deny their feelings or simply “blank out” the troubling event. There is no right or wrong way to feel
after experiencing trauma.

While it may feel better to pretend the event did not happen, in the long run, it is best to be honest about your
feelings and to allow yourself to acknowledge the sense of loss and uncertainty. It is important to realize that while
things may seem off balance for a while, your life will return to normal. It is important to talk with someone about
your sorrow, anger, and other emotions, even though it may be difficult to get started.

You may feel most comfortable talking about your feelings with a professor, counselor, or religious or spiritual
leader. The important thing is to share your feelings with someone you trust. If you don’t have someone in whom
to confide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) for someone who will listen.

It is common to be angry at people who have caused great pain. This desire comes from your outrage for the
innocent victims. One must understand, though, that it is futile to respond with more violence. Nothing good is
accomplished by hateful language or actions.

While you will always remember the event, the painful feelings will decrease over time, and you will come to
understand that in learning to cope with tragedy, you have become stronger, more adaptable, and more self-
reliant.


Tips for Coping

•   Talk about it. Talking with friends, classmates, professors, and family members will help you realize that you
    are not alone in your feelings.
•   Limit media viewing. Take breaks from watching news coverage of the event.
•   Take care of yourself. Taking good physical care of yourself with rest, exercise, and healthy eating will help
    your body to deal with stress. Do activities that you enjoy and find relaxing.
•   Avoid excess. Avoid using alcohol, drugs, and tobacco products as a way of dealing with stress.
•   Resume routines. Getting back to your daily routines in life can be a good method for regaining a sense of
    control.
•   Get involved. Engaging in positive activities like group discussions and candlelight vigils can help promote
    comfort and healing.


Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Mental Health Services. (n.d.). In
the wake of trauma: Tips for college students (Pub. No. KEN-01-0092). Retrieved January 14, 2008, from
http://www.samhsa.gov

Disclaimer: This document is intended for general information only. It does not provide the reader with specific
direction, advice, or recommendations. You may wish to contact an appropriate professional for questions
concerning your particular situation.

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MANAGING YOUR STRESS: TIPS FOR SURVIVORS OF A TRAUMATIC EVENT


What You Should Know

When you are exposed to traumatic events—such as natural disaster, mass violence, or terrorism—be aware of
how these events can affect you personally. Most people show signs of stress after such an event. These signs are
normal. Over time, as your life gets back to normal, these signs should decrease.

After a stressful event, monitor your own physical and mental health. Know the signs of stress in yourself and your
loved ones. Know how to relieve stress and know when to get help.


Know the signs of stress.

Your Behavior

•   An increase or decrease in your energy and activity levels
•   An increase in your alcohol, tobacco use, or use of illegal drugs
•   An increase in irritability, with outbursts of anger and frequent arguing
•   Having trouble relaxing or sleeping
•   Crying frequently
•   Worrying excessively
•   Wanting to be alone most of the time
•   Blaming other people for everything
•   Having difficulty communicating or listening
•   Having difficulty giving or accepting help
•   An inability to feel pleasure or have fun

Your Body

•   Having stomachaches or diarrhea
•   Having headaches and other pains
•   Losing your appetite or eating too much
•   Sweating or having chills
•   Getting tremors or muscle twitches
•   Being easily startled

Your Emotions

•   Being anxious or fearful
•   Feeling depressed

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•   Feeling guilty
•   Feeling angry
•   Feeling heroic, euphoric, or invulnerable
•   Not caring about anything
•   Feeling overwhelmed by sadness

Your Thinking

•   Having trouble remembering things
•   Feeling confused
•   Having trouble thinking clearly and concentrating
•   Having difficulty making decisions


Know how to relieve stress.

You can manage and alleviate your stress by taking time to take care of yourself.

Keep yourself healthy:

•   Eat healthy foods and drink water.
•   Avoid excessive amounts of caffeine and alcohol.
•   Do not use tobacco or illegal drugs.
•   Get enough sleep and rest.
•   Get physical exercise.

Use practical ways to relax:

•   Relax your body often by doing things that work for you—take deep breaths, stretch, meditate, wash your
    face and hands, or engage in pleasurable hobbies.
•   Pace yourself between stressful activities. Do a fun thing after a hard task.
•   Use time off to relax—eat a good meal, read, listen to music, take a bath, or talk to family.
•   Talk about your feelings to loved ones and friends often.

Pay attention to your body, feelings, and spirit:

•   Recognize and heed early warning signs of stress.
•   Recognize how your own past experiences affect your way of handling this event and think of how you
    handled past events.
•   Know that feeling stressed, depressed, guilty, or angry is common after a traumatic event.
•   Connect with other survivors of traumatic events or violent crime, many of whom may experience similar
    difficulties.


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•   Take time to renew your spirit through meditation, prayer, or helping others in need.

Have a plan to manage your tasks.

Do the important things first. If necessary, find a safe place to stay. Tell family where you are and how they can
contact you. Get water and food. If needed, get papers for your property, insurance, bank, medical records, and
job qualifications from agencies if you lost them in the traumatic event. It may take time to feel like you’ve
regained control over your life. Be patient with yourself and others.


Know when to get help.

Sometimes things become so overwhelming that you need help from a mental health or substance abuse
professional. If you or someone you know threatens to hurt or kill him or herself or another person; looks for ways
to kill him or herself; talks or writes about death, dying, or suicide; feels rage or uncontrolled anger; desires
revenge; or shows signs of stress for several days or weeks; get help by calling a hotline such as the National
Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), or someone else you trust.

Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Mental Health Services. (Revised
2007, April). Managing your stress: Tips for survivors of a traumatic event (Pub. No. NMH05-0209). Retrieved
January 14, 2008, from http://www.samhsa.gov

Disclaimer: This document is intended for general information only. It does not provide the reader with specific
direction, advice, or recommendations. You may wish to contact an appropriate professional for questions
concerning your particular situation.

                                                                                                  Content ID: 9077




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MIND AND BODY HEALTH: THE EFFECTS OF TRAUMATIC STRESS


What is a traumatic stress reaction?

People who experience or witness horrible events such as school shootings, combat, rape, torture, natural
disasters, accidents or other things in which their physical safety and life—or the safety and life of others—was in
danger have experienced a traumatic stress. People who are repeatedly exposed to life or death situations, such as
Emergency Medical Team (EMT) and rescue squad workers, police officers, fire fighters and medical personnel on
burn wards or trauma units where stress levels and mortality rates are high also witness trauma. Anyone who has
experienced these things has experienced a shock and, even if all ultimately escape danger, the people who lived
through the event may feel like life “just isn’t the same anymore.” People may experience a variety of reactions,
many of which are understandable in the context of experiencing or witnessing traumatic events such as the
hurricanes. Experiencing physical or emotional symptoms in response to a traumatic event is normal and is called a
traumatic stress reaction.


Physical Symptoms of Traumatic Stress

Anyone affected by the hurricanes or other traumatic stress may experience:

•   Fatigue
•   Being easily startled
•   Headaches
•   Sweating
•   Gastrointestinal problems


Emotional Symptoms of Traumatic Stress

Those affected by traumatic stress may feel:

•   Fear
•   Anger
•   Guilt
•   Anxiety
•   Reduced awareness
•   Feeling like you are numb or not part of the world
•   Helplessness
•   Hopelessness


What is PTSD?



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PTSD stands for post-traumatic stress disorder. This is similar to a stress reaction and, in fact, many people who
have experienced a traumatic event do develop PTSD. Those with PTSD may experience many of the same
emotional and physical symptoms as those with a traumatic stress reaction. Those with PTSD, however, experience
trauma along with intense fear, helplessness or horror and then develop intrusive symptoms (such as flashbacks or
nightmares). Their symptoms will last more than a month and get in the way of normal life.

Traumatic stress is not uncommon. In fact:

•   About 70 % of U.S. adults have experienced a severe traumatic event at least once in their life and one out of
    five go on to develop symptoms of PTSD.
•   Approximately 8% of all adults have suffered from PTSD at any one time.
•   If you include children and teens, an estimated 5% of all Americans will develop PTSD during their lifetime or
    more than 13 million people.
•   About one in 10 women will develop PTSD symptoms during their lifetime or double the rate for men because
    they are much more likely to be victims of domestic violence, rape or abuse.
•   Almost 17% of men and 13% of women have experienced more than three traumatic events during their life.


The Mind/Body Connection

Suffering traumatic stress can affect your emotions as well as your body and the two are so connected that it can
be hard to tell the difference. For instance, traumatic stress can cause you to lose concentration, forget things, or
have trouble sleeping. It may be difficult to determine on your own whether these symptoms are because you do
not feel well physically or because you are still upset. Traumatic stress also can lead you to eat in unhealthy ways
or to eat foods that are not healthy, and those eating patterns can affect how you sleep or how your stomach
feels. Stress can cause headaches, but the pain from the headaches can also make your stress worsen.

Because the body and the mind work in concert, traumatic stress can cause a cycle that makes it seem like the
body and mind are working against one another, worsening symptoms like pain and fatigue.


Coping with Traumatic Stress

There are things you can do to help yourself if you have suffered traumatic stress as a result of an event such as a
school shooting.

•   Give yourself time to heal. Anticipate that this will be a difficult time in your life. Allow yourself to mourn the
    losses you have experienced. Try to be patient with changes in your emotional state.
•   Ask for support from people who care about you and who will listen and empathize with your situation. But
    keep in mind that your typical support system may be weakened if those who are close to you also have
    experienced or witnessed the trauma.
•   Communicate your experience in whatever ways feel comfortable to you—such as by talking with family or
    close friends, or keeping a diary.
•   Find out about local support groups that often are available such as for those who have suffered from natural
    disasters. These can be especially helpful for people with limited personal support systems.



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•   Try to find groups led by appropriately trained and experienced professionals such as psychologists. Group
    discussion can help people realize that other individuals in the same circumstances often have similar
    reactions and emotions.
•   Engage in healthy behaviors to enhance your ability to cope with excessive stress. Eat well-balanced meals and
    get plenty of rest. If you experience ongoing difficulties with sleep, you may be able to find some relief
    through relaxation techniques. Avoid alcohol and drugs.
•   Establish or reestablish routines such as eating meals at regular times and following an exercise program. This
    can be especially important when the normal routines of daily life are disrupted. Even if you are in a shelter
    and unable to return home, establish routines that can bring comfort. Take some time off from the demands
    of daily life by pursuing hobbies or other enjoyable activities.
•   Help those you can. Helping others, even during your own time of distress, can give you a sense of control and
    can make you feel better about yourself.
•   Avoid major life decisions such as switching careers or jobs if possible because these activities tend to be
    highly stressful.


When should I seek professional help?

Many people are able to cope effectively with the emotional and physical demands brought about by a natural
disaster by using their own support systems. It is not unusual, however, to find that serious problems persist and
continue to interfere with daily living. For example, some may feel overwhelming nervousness or lingering sadness
that adversely affects job performance and interpersonal relationships.

Individuals with prolonged reactions that disrupt their daily functioning should consult with a trained and
experienced mental health professional. Psychologists and other appropriate mental health providers help educate
people about common responses to extreme stress. These professionals work with individuals affected by trauma
to help them find constructive ways of dealing with the emotional impact.

With children, continual and aggressive emotional outbursts, serious problems at school, preoccupation with the
traumatic event, continued and extreme withdrawal, and other signs of intense anxiety or emotional difficulties all
point to the need for professional assistance. A qualified mental health professional such as a psychologist can
help such children and their parents understand and deal with thoughts, feelings and behaviors that result from
trauma.



APA is grateful to Paul J. Rosch, M.D.. President, The American Institute of Stress, for his help in developing this fact
sheet.

The American Psychological Association (APA). (April 2007). Mind/body health: The effects of traumatic stress.
Retrieved April 18, 2007, from http://www.apahelpcenter.org

Disclaimer: This document is intended for general information only. It does not provide the reader with specific
direction, advice or recommendations. You may wish to contact an appropriate professional for questions
concerning your particular situation.

                                                                                            Content ID: 7880 PF 35023

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