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					Saturday, July 09, 2011

From the Coeur d’Alene Press
 No new education news stories today.
From the Spokesman-Review
 Sandpoint levy back on ballot
From the Moscow pullman daily news (password required)
 Mother says frat members saved her son's life
 OUR VIEW: Revamped I-STARS will need broad support (Editorial)
 Idaho's jobless see classroom as key to career change
From the Lewiston Tribune (password required)
 Quick action saves UI student from bacterial meningitis death
 No new education news stories today.
From the Idaho Statesman
 Information nights for international school program
From the Twin Falls Times-News
 Idaho's jobless see classroom as key to career change
 T.F. School District unveils rezoning plan
From the Idaho State Journal(password Required)
 Higher ed: Who pays?
 ISU student wins Fulbright Scholarship
From the Idaho Falls Post Register (password required)
 The cleanup crew
 SCHOOL BOARD BUSINESS
 Rebuilding Idaho history
 SCHOLARLY STARS
 Unemployed in Idaho are going back to school
 Emerson seeking books for school library
FROM THE COEUR D’ALENE PRESS

No new education news stories today.



FROM THE SPOKESMAN-REVIEW

Sandpoint levy back on ballot

Proponents say schools require funds to update aging buildings

Kootenai Elementary fifth-graders Matt Knott, front, and Tyler Brown play basketball during
recess Tuesday. Bonner County voters will be asked to approve a $14 million levy that would
include money to complete construction of the school. The school is overcrowded and uses
portable classrooms near the playground. The Spokesman-Review (KATHY PLONKA The
Spokesman-Review)

SANDPOINT – If at first you don't succeed, try again.

That is just what proponents of a plant facilities levy in Lake Pend Oreille School District in
Sandpoint are doing. Two years ago they brought the $14 million proposal before the voters, but
it failed.

"When it was first brought up in September of 2006 we were coming off the tails of the
Legislature moving funding for schools from property taxes to sales tax," said Doug Olin,
assistant administrator for Lake Pend Oreille School District. "There was a lot of confusion
then."

Lake Pend Oreille School Superintendent Dick Cvitanich agrees, and said that this time around
voters will be more aware of the financial impact the levy will have on their taxes.

For the owner of a home with a net taxable value of $100,000, for example, the increase would
be $129 in the first year and $123 the second year. Net taxable value is the value after deducting
the homeowner's exemption of $100,938 for 2008.

"There is not all the uncertainty as to what the tax structure will look like (like there was in
2006)," said Cvitanich.

Cvitanich began his tenure as superintendent almost three years ago. He said has encountered a
great deal of opposition to not only the district, but also to the citizens who are trying to educate
the community on the needs that the levy will address. Cvitanich said he is not sure from where
the animosity comes, and finds the feeling of mistrust to be unsettling.

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"We're proposing something that is good for kids and is for their health and safety," said
Cvitanich. He noted that the 10-year average for construction levy rates for Idaho is $159. "For
Lake Pend Oreille School District it is zero."

Approximately $6.7 million of the proposed levy would be used to complete construction of
Kootenai Elementary School, alleviating overcrowding at Farmin Stidwell and Washington
elementary schools. Because of population growth south of the Long Bridge, there also is $1.2
million earmarked for expansion of Sagle Elementary School. Another $2.6 million will be used
to address health and safety issues, as well as deferred maintenance at all the schools in the
district, with almost $2.5 million earmarked for districtwide improvements.

With the cost of building materials on the rise, the levy has a $1 million construction inflation
contingency built in.

Between now and May 20, the day the voters go to the polls, levy supporters are determined to
do what they can to educate the community on the needs of the district and just how much of an
economic impact it will have.

Sandpoint resident Wendy Dunn, chairman of the Citizens for Better Schools, said the extensive
wear and tear on the schools must be dealt with immediately.

"What would happen if you did nothing to your house for 25 years," said Dunn, referring to the
fact the last time there was a plant facilities levy was in the 1980s. "There is a big difference
between mopping a floor and replacing it."




FROM THE MOSCOW PULLMAN DAILY NEWS (PASSWORD REQUIRED)

Mother says frat members saved her son's life

Nick Biggs released from hospital, recovering from meningitis at home in Nampa

By Hadley Rush, Daily News staff writer

Monday, April 14, 2008 - Page Updated at 12:00:00 AM

The mother of a University of Idaho freshman diagnosed with meningitis said her son wouldn't
be alive today if not for his fraternity brothers.

Audean Biggs said Kappa Sigma members went upstairs to check on her son, Nick Biggs, in his
room when he failed to come down for breakfast Wednesday morning.

"If they would have just left him laying there all day, (doctors) said he would be dead," Audean
said. "I'm just so thankful that they went up there to check."
Audean said she spoke to her son Tuesday morning and he seemed fine. By that evening, Nick
had told his fraternity brothers he wasn't feeling well.

They took him to Gritman Medical Center in Moscow after finding him incoherent in bed at
10:30 a.m. Wednesday.

Her son was airlifted to St. Luke's Hospital in Boise after doctors in Moscow determined from a
spinal tap that he may have contracted meningitis.

On Friday, lab results confirmed the case to be bacterial meningitis.

Audean, who lives in Nampa, said she was terrified when she received the call from the Moscow
hospital because of Nick's history of illness.

"Nick almost died when he was 18 months old," Audean said. Meningitis "was the first thing
they tested him for at St. Luke's when he was (a baby), so I've always feared that. It was just an
empty feeling inside."

Audean said she began praying for her son's life after his diagnosis.

"I thought, 'OK, God, I can't play games with you,' " she said. "I was looking at all of his pictures
on the wall and his life was flashing before me. I had a lot of fear of him dying."

Audean said her son was incoherent when he awoke in the hospital, and he ended up spending
four nights there. At one point, Audean said her son's white blood cell count was near 22,000.

"There are only supposed to be 11,000," she said. "Thank God for the hospital in Moscow. They
put him on antibiotics" right away.

Audean said her son, who's still on heavy antibiotics, was released from the Boise hospital on
Sunday and is back home with her in Nampa.

"He's doing OK now," she said, adding that she's still unsure whether Nick, who's majoring in
civil engineering, will return to UI to finish the semester.

"I'm going to call and talk to the dean to see if he can make up the work," Audean said. "We're
just going day-by-day and (seeing) how he feels. He has his whole heart in it."

Audean said she wants people to know that she thinks it's unlikely her son contracted meningitis
from living in a fraternity.

"I don't want the fraternity to get the blame for it," she said. "It's very clean there. Nick could
have picked it up somewhere else. It just one of those things. We don't know where he got it or
why."
Kappa Sigma President Don Benz has said the house has been sanitized and no other students
living in the fraternity have shown any symptoms of the illness.

"I'm so thankful that they went and checked on Nick and that they keep an eye on each other,"
Audean said of the fraternity. "It's a wonder they even thought to go find him."

Hadley Rush can be reached at (208) 882-5561, ext. 239, or by e-mail at hrush@dnews.com.



OUR VIEW: Revamped I-STARS will need broad support (Editorial)

Monday, April 14, 2008 - Page Updated at 12:00:00 AM

Tom Luna seems to be pondering a second round of political hay with teachers' salaries in Idaho.

Before the Republican superintendent of public instruction wades too deep into those waters
again, we suggest he take a cue from some of the state's public school students and do a little
homework.

There are innumerable lessons to be learned from his first venture into the salary realm.

Luna roared out of the gate with his high-gloss packaging of I-STARS - the Idaho State Teacher
Advancement and Recognition System. It was a fancy way of saying pay-for-performance and it
went after the longstanding pattern of paying teachers for seniority and education.

Outside of the marketing, which the new superintendent did quite well, the package was a flop.

Teachers didn't like it because they were asked to give up job security for pay raises. Legislators
didn't like it because it cost too much money. No amount of tinkering with the price tag or the
language related to job security could save it. In effect, it was doomed before it even arrived in
Boise for the legislative session - though no one apparently told Luna that.

Last week, Department of Education officials said they were considering whether to pitch a
similar plan next year. "The issue of pay for performance isn't going to go away," department
spokeswoman Melissa McGrath said. "That's clear."

What's also clear is that Luna needs to hit the road and talk to teachers and legislators about his
plans.

Repackaging what was presented last session isn't going to have much of a chance. Instead, the
next plan put forth by Luna needs to have some buy in by teachers and lawmakers.

Another piece of legislation that has a catchy title but unworkable details won't do anything to
resolve the pay-for-performance issue that Luna folks say "isn't going to go away."
It will, however, deal a serious blow to Luna's credibility as head of the state's education system.
- Steve McClure, for the editorial board



Idaho's jobless see classroom as key to career change

By JESSIE BONNER
Associated Press Writer

BOISE, Idaho (AP) -- Alyn Stanton apparently never got the memo about the casual dress code
for the statewide job fair.

Instead, Stanton came to make a lasting impression. Sporting a gray suit, Stanton came with a
thick stack of resumes - each 10 pages complete with charts and graphs - and an introduction he's
given way too many times.

"Hi, I'm Alyn, I live with my cousin, and I'm unemployed," Stanton joked.

In January, the 52-year-old former hotel manager from Cannon Beach, Ore., moved to the Boise
suburb of Meridian, hoping to find work in a state that last year boasted one of the nation's
healthiest economies. But like so many other states, Idaho finds itself in the middle of an
economic downturn.

With job losses reported in construction, manufacturing, insurance, finance and real estate, the
unemployment rate in Idaho grew from 2.8 percent in February to 3 percent in March, the largest
one-month increase in Idaho's unemployment rate since a severe national recession in the 1980s,
according to the Idaho Department of Labor.

The state now has about 22,400 people out of work, a figure that prompted the state Labor
Department to host a statewide job fair earlier this month. Stanton was among the dozens of
unemployed who wandered past booths set up by 24 different companies with vacancies to fill.

But like a growing number of the state's out-of-work population, Stanton is also weighing a
return to the classroom to launch a career change.

"People are just expecting way more experience," he said. "I've thought about getting my
teaching certification."

Construction, real estate, insurance and finance are just some of the areas people are leaving
behind in order to go back to school and seek more highly skilled or specialized occupations,
said John Russ, a supervisor at the state Labor Department.

The trend back to the classroom is not based on hard data because the state Labor Department
does not specifically track how many unemployed workers enroll in universities or technical
colleges. Instead, officials say the trend is supported by information gathered by state work force
experts who consult with job seekers and companies looking to hire.
The agency scheduled its first statewide job fair last year, when 1,100 workers were laid off by
Micron Technology Inc., the Boise-based memory chip maker. Many of those workers opted to
go back to school as part of their job search, Russ said. This month's job fair followed and state
labor officials say employers are pushing for another this fall.

The decision by many of Idaho's unemployed to enroll in classes is hardly unique to the current
economic slump.

Idaho colleges and universities have historically reported higher enrollments when the economy
is suffering, said Scott Christie, fiscal officer for the state Board of Education.

While getting a better education is the primary appeal of going back to school, Christie said
students suffering economic hardship can also find some relief by securing student loans.

"They can use that money to make ends meet," Christie said. "They're killing two birds with one
stone."

Last year, according to the state Labor Department, unemployment in the state dipped as low as
2.3 percent.

The state seemed immune to the homebuilding crashes and construction lags dragging down the
economy in other parts of the country, said Boise economist Don Reading.

But Reading added, "It was unrealistic to think that would be sustained."

Reading is vice president at Ben Johnson Associates, an economic research firm with offices in
Boise and Tallahassee, Fla.

Migration of the unemployed to universities and technical colleges is a mixed blessing, Reading
said. On one hand, he said, the state gets a better educated work force. But the trend can also put
pressure on the education system's ability to handle unexpected surges in enrollment.

"The best thing the state of Idaho could do is beef up its education system," Reading said.

Employers also report struggles finding workers who are highly skilled or have specialized
training, such as nurses or skilled technology workers.




FROM THE LEWISTON TRIBUNE (PASSWORD REQUIRED)

Quick action saves UI student from bacterial meningitis death

Fraternity members follow hunch, take him to hospital
By Joel Mills

Tuesday, April 15, 2008

A rash on his arms was the last thing Nick Biggs remembers before he nearly died last week.

Biggs, a 19-year-old civil engineering student at the University of Idaho, had contracted bacterial
meningitis from an unknown source. According to his doctors, if it wasn't for some quick action
by the men at Kappa Sigma, the worst outcome was entirely possible.

"They said if my fraternity brothers hadn't taken me to the hospital, I probably would have died,"
a tired Biggs said Monday from his home in Nampa. His mother, Audean Biggs, was able to take
him to more familiar surroundings after he was released Sunday morning from St. Luke's
hospital in Boise.

Audean Biggs said that even though her son also came down with a case of shingles due to his
bout with meningitis, he is expected to make a full recovery. She credited the Kappa Sigma
members and doctors at Gritman Medical Center in Moscow for saving Biggs' life.

Before her son was hospitalized Wednesday, Audean Biggs said she had just read him the riot
act for letting his academic work slip.

"I talked to him Tuesday night, and I jumped him about getting his grades up," she said,
laughing. "I just really chewed him out. I said, 'You've only got a month left. You've got to get a
handle on things.' "

Grades would soon be the least of the Biggs family's worries. Biggs told his mother he wasn't
feeling well Tuesday night, and later she found out he was starting to show significant
disorientation, one of the signs of the deadly disease.

"He was fumbling for his doorknob," she said. "He couldn't hardly find it."

"I guess I took a shower Wednesday," Biggs added. "I don't remember taking a shower. I guess I
was running into the wall."

At 10:30 Wednesday morning, some fraternity members had a hunch that they should check on
Biggs. "When they got him up, he was incoherent," Audean Biggs said. "He wasn't focusing on
anything."

They quickly stuffed him into a car and raced to the Gritman emergency room where he was
quarantined and placed on a heavy dose of antibiotics.

But Biggs needed specialized care, his mother said. By a stroke of luck, hospitals in Spokane and
Coeur d'Alene were full, so Biggs was airlifted to Boise, only 20 miles from his mother.
In another bit of luck, both of Biggs' fathers were close to Moscow last Wednesday and were
able to rush to the hospital. Adoptive father Kim Biggs is an engineer for Qwest
Communications in Lewiston, and biological father Tom Legerski was in the area working for
the state liquor dispensary.

Ironically, Audean Biggs said the men bonded at the hospital as they fretted over their gravely ill
son.

Biggs said he vaguely remembers bits and pieces of his early hospital stay. "I was trying to get
up, and four people were trying to put me back down."

"They had to tie him down for a good 30 hours because he would not lay still," his mom added.

Audean Biggs said her son's feisty struggles actually gave her hope after he was wheeled into St.
Luke's, face and neck swollen beyond recognition.

"I thought, 'Is that Nick?' " she said, noting that he also looked different because he'd shaved off
his curls for a fundraiser for the Kappa Sigma cook, who has cancer.

"That's the kind of kid he is," she said.

The antibiotics started to show an effect early Thursday morning when he was able to answer his
first questions in two days, albeit not very well.

"They woke him up to ask him what his name was," Audean Biggs said. "He said 'Nick'. They
asked him what his last name was, and he said 'Nick.' They asked him when his birthday was, he
said 'Nick.' They asked him who his friend was, he said 'Nick.' That's all he could say was 'Nick.'
"

The Kappa Sigma house has been sterilized, and the university worked with the North Central
District Health Department to identify and give antibiotics and vaccinations to those who had
close contact with Biggs. So far, no additional meningitis cases have been reported.

Biggs said he will be in contact with the school this week to figure out how he can finish the
semester. But his mother said she's just relieved that her boy is still with her, and making a rapid
recovery.

Mills may be contacted at jmills@lmtribune.com or (208) 883-0564.




From the Idaho-Press Tribune, Nampa
No new education news stories today.



FROM THE IDAHO STATESMAN

Information nights for international school program

By Anne Wallace Allen - Idaho Statesman
Edition Date: 04/15/08

The Boise School District is holding an information meeting on its new international program
Wednesday evening.
The district is planning international programs at Longfellow Elementary School in Boise’s
North End, and at Pierce Park Elementary School in northwest Boise.

The program will include some Spanish language instruction and an international curriculum,
said Stacie Curry, the district’s administrator of professional development. Curry is in charge of
the committee organizing the program.

The information meeting Wednesday is at Longfellow at 7 p.m. Another is scheduled for April
29 at Pierce Park at the same time.

The program will offer Spanish in grades kindergarten through second in the first year, and the
international studies in kindergarten through sixth grade.

It’s one of many new programs district officials are offering to attract families to Boise schools.
Because the district uses open enrollment, anyone can attend the programs if there is room.




FROM THE TWIN FALLS TIMES-NEWS

Idaho's jobless see classroom as key to career change

By JESSIE BONNER
BOISE, Idaho - Alyn Stanton apparently never got the memo about the casual dress code for the
statewide job fair.

Instead, Stanton came to make a lasting impression. Sporting a gray suit, Stanton came with a
thick stack of resumes _ each 10 pages complete with charts and graphs _ and an introduction
he's given way too many times.

"Hi, I'm Alyn, I live with my cousin, and I'm unemployed," Stanton joked.
In January, the 52-year-old former hotel manager from Cannon Beach, Ore., moved to the Boise
suburb of Meridian, hoping to find work in a state that last year boasted one of the nation's
healthiest economies. But like so many other states, Idaho finds itself in the middle of an
economic downturn.

With job losses reported in construction, manufacturing, insurance, finance and real estate, the
unemployment rate in Idaho grew from 2.8 percent in February to 3 percent in March, the largest
one-month increase in Idaho's unemployment rate since a severe national recession in the 1980s,
according to the Idaho Department of Labor.

The state now has about 22,400 people out of work, a figure that prompted the state Labor
Department to host a statewide job fair earlier this month. Stanton was among the dozens of
unemployed who wandered past booths set up by 24 different companies with vacancies to fill.

But like a growing number of the state's out-of-work population, Stanton is also weighing a
return to the classroom to launch a career change.

"People are just expecting way more experience," he said. "I've thought about getting my
teaching certification."

Construction, real estate, insurance and finance are just some of the areas people are leaving
behind in order to go back to school and seek more highly skilled or specialized occupations,
said John Russ, a supervisor at the state Labor Department.

The trend back to the classroom is not based on hard data because the state Labor Department
does not specifically track how many unemployed workers enroll in universities or technical
colleges. Instead, officials say the trend is supported by information gathered by state work force
experts who consult with job seekers and companies looking to hire.

The agency scheduled its first statewide job fair last year, when 1,100 workers were laid off by
Micron Technology Inc., the Boise-based memory chip maker. Many of those workers opted to
go back to school as part of their job search, Russ said. This month's job fair followed and state
labor officials say employers are pushing for another this fall.

The decision by many of Idaho's unemployed to enroll in classes is hardly unique to the current
economic slump.

Idaho colleges and universities have historically reported higher enrollments when the economy
is suffering, said Scott Christie, fiscal officer for the state Board of Education.

While getting a better education is the primary appeal of going back to school, Christie said
students suffering economic hardship can also find some relief by securing student loans.

"They can use that money to make ends meet," Christie said. "They're killing two birds with one
stone."
Last year, according to the state Labor Department, unemployment in the state dipped as low as
2.3 percent.

The state seemed immune to the homebuilding crashes and construction lags dragging down the
economy in other parts of the country, said Boise economist Don Reading.

But Reading added, "It was unrealistic to think that would be sustained."

Reading is vice president at Ben Johnson Associates, an economic research firm with offices in
Boise and Tallahassee, Fla.

Migration of the unemployed to universities and technical colleges is a mixed blessing, Reading
said. On one hand, he said, the state gets a better educated work force. But the trend can also put
pressure on the education system's ability to handle unexpected surges in enrollment.

"The best thing the state of Idaho could do is beef up its education system," Reading said.

Employers also report struggles finding workers who are highly skilled or have specialized
training, such as nurses or skilled technology workers.

A service of the Associated Press(AP)



T.F. School District unveils rezoning plan

New principal named for new high school
By Andrea Jackson
Staff writer
The Twin Falls School District Board heard recommendations Monday night for zone and grade
changes likely to unfold after a new high school opens in 2009.

Boundaries at the new 219,716-square foot high school, Canyon Ridge, and the existing Twin
Falls High School could end up being the same as existing boundaries for the school district's
two junior high schools.

Under the recommendations, crafted by three committees, students would go to high school in
their junior high school zone.

For example, if a student lives in the Vera C. O'Leary Junior High School School zone that
student would be assigned to Twin Falls High School - students living in the Robert Stuart Junior
High School zone would be assigned to Canyon Ridge.

The recommendations stemmed from about six months of committee meetings.
An Activities/Athletic Advisory group is a standing school district committee made up of
coaches and advisors, said Wiley Dobbs, school district superintendent. It recommends that each
school offer the same activity programs, with certified athletic trainers, full-time athletic
directors, and assistant coaches.

The activities committee is also proposing that middle school activities mirror high school
activities, and a junior varsity Canyon Ridge schedule be developed for competitive cut sports in
2008-2009. Coaches would be hired after the 2008-2009 season for each sport, according to the
recommendations.

In related news, the school board approved a recommendation for the school's first principal by
agreeing upon Brady Dickinson ��" currently the vice principal of Robert Stuart Junior
High School.

A reconfiguration committee and a rezoning committee also came up with recommendations for
the school board. Each of those committees were made up of about 20 to 25 people -including
parents, teachers, school building and district administrators, and some realtors, which also made
presentations to the committees.

Seniors from the 2010 graduating class would be allowed to choose whether or not to go to Twin
Falls High School or Canyon Ridge High School, according to the recommendations.

Those seniors wanting to attend high school outside of their junior high school zone would need
to fill out a form by Oct. 15 of this year. Then, the school district would make determinations by
Nov. 7, according to the recommendations.

Subsequent graduating classes could also apply for transfer under the district's existing policy,
said Dobbs. "If there's room, then transfers would be considered and approved."

Students who transfer need to re-apply every year for continued transfer.

A school district survey of 460, 10th grade students from Twin Falls High School found that
most - 66 percent or 155 - would like to go to Twin Falls High School after Canyon Ridge opens.

That's encouraging, said Dobbs, because at least 125 students at the new high school would be
needed for scheduling.

The school district also plans to make the junior high schools into middle schools once Canyon
Ridge opens. The middle schools would serve grades sixth through eight, instead of seventh
through ninth.

The school district is projecting that the number of students at Canyon Ridge will burgeon from
about 922 its first year, to 1,280 by the 2016-2017 school year. Meanwhile, it projects student
populations at Twin Falls High School will dwindle in eight years from 1,250 in the 2009-2010
school year to 1,184 in 2016-2017.
The recommendations will be brought to the school board May 12 for a vote, and may be
changed based on feedback received, Dobbs said.

Andrea Jackson can be reached at 735-3380 or Andrea.Jackson@lee.net.




FROM THE IDAHO STATE JOURNAL(PASSWORD REQUIRED)

Higher ed: Who pays?

State Board of Education member Blake Hall has put the blame for inadequate funding for
higher education right where it belongs — in the lap of legislators.
  You can’t expect students to pay ever-higher tuition and fees to fill financial holes created by
state lawmakers, Hall says. That is why the board trimmed the requests from presidents of the
state’s public universities and colleges for tuition and fee increases.
  The board approved increases of 5 percent at University of Idaho, down from a 7.9 percent
request; 5 percent for Boise State University, down from 6.1 percent requested; and 6 percent for
Idaho State University, down from 7 percent requested.
  Cognizant, perhaps, of slumping enrollment at several campuses, the board came down on the
side of students rather than administrators claiming their requests were essential to maintain
academic programs and keep pace with rising operating costs.
  State money accounts for only about 50 percent of university budgets, and lawmakers
earmarked $285 million for higher education next year. That’s a 7.9 percent increase, but the
administrators sought to make a case for higher fees and tuition to meet needs.
  ―We’re headed into difficult economic times,‖ Hall said in announcing the cuts. ―I think access
is critical to our students.‖
  ISU President Arthur Vailas did not complain about the board’s decision, but he also warned
that skimping on tuition and fees could have a major impact on the future of higher education in
the state.
  And piling annual tuition and fee increases on the backs of students also can have a major
impact. Every kid who wants an education should have that opportunity, and we all would be
better for it.



ISU student wins Fulbright Scholarship

Gomez plans to teach English in Andorra this fall

  POCATELLO — An Idaho State University Spanish major has won a Fulbright Scholarship to
teach English in Andorra, the principality squeezed between France and Spain.
  Autumn Gomez, a senior, is one of the select few ISU students to ever win the prestigious
grant.
  She leaves for Andorra in September.
  According to Gomez’ Spanish Professor Sharon Sieber, who is also ISU’s Fulbright program
coordinator, there have only been four other Fulbright winners in the past eight years. Sieber said
the recent feat is not only an honor for Gomez, but also for ISU.
  Qualifying for the Fulbright grant was a rigorous process, Gomez recalls. Part of the process
included submitting a written statement showing interest in the program and writing up a
biography about herself.
  Gomez said it took her seven rewrites before she finally finished her biography.
  The Spanish major said she also applied for the grant at a much later stage than most Fulbright
candidates. Gomez completed the entire Fulbright application process all in October of last fall.
  The application process also required Gomez to interview with four professors in October.
  ―They highly recommended me for the Fulbright,‖ Gomez said. ―But I would give it at least
three months as the least amount of time to prepare for it.‖
  Beginning Sept. 1, she will be teaching English to high school-level students in Andorra as part
of the 10-month Fulbright program.
  Although Gomez does not speak Andorra’s Catalan dialect, she is confident she will do well.
Catalan is a mix of French and Spanish.
  ―The students there speak both Spanish and French,‖ Gomez said.
  Nevertheless, Gomez believes her Spanish should be up to par. Aside from being a Spanish
major, she spent the fall of 2005 in Mexico and stayed in Argentina from January 2000 to June
2001.
  Gomez has taught English to foreign students before. While she was in Argentina, she taught
English to some of the local youths.




FROM THE IDAHO FALLS POST REGISTER (PASSWORD REQUIRED)

The cleanup crew

Teens take to the streets to wipe out graffiti
By NICK DRAPER ndraper@postregister.com

With kids from Idaho Falls and Skyline high schools off Monday for parent-teacher conferences,
many probably took the opportunity to sleep in and lounge around.

Not this troop of teenagers.

Twenty kids from the Bonneville County Youth Council spent 31/2 hours removing graffiti from
bridges, businesses and residences across Idaho Falls.

"It's just ruining everything," Skyline High School junior Kayla Ferguson said of the graffiti.

Armed with paint rollers, paint trays and buckets, the teenagers, along with four adult
chaperones, launched their cleanup effort at the bridge on Ninth Street and Southwest Bonneville
Drive.
After making quick work of that bridge, the group hiked up the empty canal, hitting four more
overpasses before reaching First Street.

In all, 19 spots throughout the city received a fresh coat of paint.

Melissa Smith, the volunteer coordinator for the Idaho Falls Police Department, said tagging is a
big problem in Idaho Falls, especially since winter has passed and temperatures have started to
rise.

As soon as it reaches 40 degrees, teenagers grab spray paint cans and look for a plain canvas,
Smith said, but hopefully the work done Monday by their peers will help curb the shenanigans.

"It's kids that's marking it, so kids cleaning it up makes a bigger impact," Smith said. "I'm hoping
for a domino effect."

Skyline junior Jaxson Odell felt the same way but acknowledged it may take some time for
others his age to stop tagging altogether.

"We know it's going to happen, but at least (Monday's sites) will look nice for a little while," he
said. "If people see us (removing) it, it might inspire them to do it, too."

Monday's work won't be the last graffiti-cleaning project.

Cherise Frei, the city's zoning enforcement officer, said her department will be doing
neighborhood cleanups this year.

Idaho Falls' Parks and Recreation Department is taking a more aggressive approach, too.
Director Dave Christiansen said his department is in the process of hiring two seasonal
employees whose sole job will be to remove graffiti in the city's parks. Its garbage crews will
also do removal from time to time.

The Idaho Falls Citizens Watch Patrol routinely tries to paint over graffiti, too.

Yet its members are often busy assisting IFPD officers with other duties, such as directing traffic
around accidents.

That's why the Citizens Watch Patrol was especially grateful that the teenagers devoted a day for
community service, commander Dick Ingle said.

"It saves us a lot of time," he said. "Maybe it'll get the message to (the vandals)."

Get it removed

If your business has been tagged, it's your responsibility to remove the graffiti. But if you
purchase the paint, volunteers from the Idaho Falls Citizens Watch Patrol will remove it for you.
SCHOOL BOARD BUSINESS

This listing is published Tuesdays. For information, call Sonja DeCato at 542-6743 or e-mail
sdecato@postregister.com.

Idaho Falls School District 91

MEETING SCHEDULE

The school board meets at noon April 22 in the district office boardroom, 690 John Adams
Parkway.

at last week's meeting

Agenda item: Trustee Mary Ann Smith presented a report of what she learned at the National
School Board Conference in Orlando, Fla.

Agenda item: Eagle Rock Junior High School Vice Principal Robin Busch and teacher Shelly
Thiel presented a proposal to keep the new ERA academy going next year. The academy helps
struggling students achieve better grades and increase their self esteem while preparing them for
high school. Trustees did not take any action.

Bonneville Joint School District 93

MEETING SCHEDULE

The school board meets at 7:30 p.m. May 20 in the district office boardroom, 3497 N. Ammon
Road. The regular meeting was moved to accommodate the school board election.

at last week's meeting

Agenda item: Board chairman Craig Lords presented Carole Ellingfor, Rimrock Elementary
School's head cook, with the district's classified employee of the year award.

Agenda item: Business manger Mike Sorenson announced the district's surplus sale.

Agenda item: Brian Armes and Ken Marlowe, principals for two elementaries under
construction, recommended names for the new schools. The top names were Calico Sky
Elementary School and Bridgewater Elementary School, but trustees tabled the discussion
because they don't like naming schools after subdivisions.

Agenda item: Assistant Superintendent Bruce Roberts presented proposed district policies.

Agenda item: The following principals presented administrative reports for their schools: Lanie
Keller, Ammon Elementary School; Ken Marlowe, Tiebreaker Elementary School; John Pymm,
Bonneville High School; Scott Miller, Hillcrest High School.
Other school boards

The White Pine Charter School Board meets at 7:15 p.m. May 8 at the school, 2959 John Adams
Parkway.

The Taylor's Crossing Public Charter School Board meets at 7:30 p.m. May 7 at the school, 1445
N. Wood River Drive.



Rebuilding Idaho history

Cloverdale 4th-graders create elaborate dioramas
By CLARK CORBIN ccorbin@postregister.com

Cloverdale Elementary School fourth-grader Gage Bottles helped re-create a little Idaho history
using Popsicle sticks, paint and sand.

Gage is one of more than 60 Cloverdale fourth-graders who have spent the past three months
creating Idaho history projects that were displayed at the school last week.

He created an elaborate Idaho ghost town diorama, complete with abandoned buildings, a river
and railroad tracks.

"I just like history all the way around," Gage said. "It's fun to learn about because it happened
where I live."

A host of ghost towns, American Indian reservations, mines, wildlife areas and historic sites
were displayed near the school's entry all week.

Teacher Katie Johnston said she was impressed with her students' dedication during what she
called the biggest project of the year.

Many of the students said they really got involved with the hands-on research project. They
visited libraries, searched the Internet, read reports and tracked down old photos for the
assignment.

"It's been interesting learning about what happened before we were born," said student Maegan
Grover, who made a wildlife quilt with her grandmother.

Fourth-grader Christian Ames said learning about the past with a project about transportation,
pioneers and ghost towns helped build an appreciation for the present.

"It's important to know about history so we can be thankful for transportation and what we have
today," Christian said.
Student Dillon Struhs said he learned a lot about eastern Idaho researching his project on the
1976 Teton Dam disaster. During spring break, he visited the dam site with his family, took
pictures and built a model of the failed dam.

"I really wanted to pick something for a project that they had built that didn't work," Dillon said.
"The most interesting part was when we got to go see it. It was really tall and really neat to see
when all of the snow was on the ground."

Features writer Clark Corbin can be reached at 542-6761.

It's been interesting learning about what

happened before we were born.

-- Maegan Grover

Cloverdale Elementary School fourth-grader

I just like history all the way around.

-- Gage Bottles

Cloverdale Elementary School fourth-grader



SCHOLARLY STARS

SONJA DECATO

Tell us about your scholarly stars -- students who have earned significant academic
achievements. E-mail Sonja DeCato at sdecato@postregister .com or send a fax to to 529-9683.

Speed readers earn prestige -- and money

Jacob Harmon is no dummy.

He knew winning the Edgemont Gardens Elementary School Read-a-thon would take a lot of
work, so the sixth-grader spent his spring break reading.

Every day, he'd read from

5 a.m. to noon and from 6 p.m.

to midnight.
The results: victory, by reading for 7,304 minutes.

Last year, Jacob lost by 200 minutes to a neighbor across the street, said Jacob's mom, Michelle
Harmon.

She said she was surprised by her son's effort, especially since their house was full of visitors
most of spring break. Jacob's favorite books were from "The Redwall Fantasy" series by Brian
Jacques.

Though Jacob read the most, classmate Brooke Franco raised the most money -- $238. For
Jacob's efforts, he got $48 to spend at the school's book fair.

In all, Edgemont students raised more than $4,100 to purchase new books and Accelerated
Reading tests for the library. Its students also read 133,775 minutes, which equals about 93 days
of reading. Individually, here's how the students fared:

Most minutes read:

First place: Jacob Harmon, 7,304 minutes (about five days)

Second place: Veronica Nield, 7,127 minutes (just less than five days)

Third place: Ashley Schumacher, 5,297 minutes (about 31/2 days)

Most money raised:

First place: Brooke Franco, $238

Second place: Parker Erikson, $210

Third place: London Hall, $195

In the class competition, the winners were:

Most minutes read:

First place: Christina Carroll's class

Second place: Carol Larsen's class

Third place: Val Montano's class

Most money raised:

First place: Christina Carroll's class
Second place: Joyce Rogers' class

Third place: Caryen Johnson's class



Unemployed in Idaho are going back to school

BOISE (AP) -- Alyn Stanton apparently never got the memo about the casual dress code for the
statewide job fair.

Instead, Stanton came to make a lasting impression. Sporting a gray suit, Stanton came with a
thick stack of rsums -- each 10 pages complete with charts and graphs -- and an introduction he's
given way too many times.

"Hi, I'm Alyn, I live with my cousin, and I'm unemployed," Stanton joked.

In January, the 52-year-old former hotel manager from Cannon Beach, Ore., moved to the Boise
suburb of Meridian, hoping to find work in a state that last year boasted one of the nation's
healthiest economies.

But like so many other states, Idaho finds itself in the middle of an economic downturn.

With job losses reported in construction, manufacturing, insurance, finance and real estate, the
unemployment rate in Idaho grew from 2.8 percent in February to 3 percent in March, the largest
one-month increase in Idaho's unemployment rate since a severe national recession in the 1980s,
according to the Idaho Department of Labor.

The state now has about 22,400 people out of work, a figure that prompted the state Labor
Department to host a statewide job fair earlier this month. Stanton was among the dozens of
unemployed who wandered past booths set up by 24 different companies with vacancies to fill.

But like a growing number of the state's out-of-work population, Stanton is also weighing a
return to the classroom to launch a career change.

"People are just expecting way more experience," he said. "I've thought about getting my
teaching certification."

Construction, real estate, insurance and finance are just some of the areas people are leaving
behind in order to go back to school and seek more highly skilled or specialized occupations,
said John Russ, a supervisor at the state Labor Department.

The trend back to the classroom is not based on hard data because the state Labor Department
does not specifically track how many unemployed workers enroll in universities or technical
colleges. Instead, officials say the trend is supported by information gathered by state work force
experts who consult with job seekers and companies looking to hire.

The agency scheduled its first statewide job fair last year, when 1,100 workers were laid off by
Micron Technology Inc., the Boise-based memory chip maker. Many of those workers opted to
go back to school as part of their job search, Russ said. This month's job fair followed, and state
labor officials say employers are pushing for another this fall.

The decision by many of Idaho's unemployed to enroll in classes is hardly unique to the current
economic slump.

Idaho colleges and universities have historically reported higher enrollments when the economy
is suffering, said Scott Christie, fiscal officer for the State Board of Education.

While getting a better education is the primary appeal of going back to school, Christie said
students suffering economic hardship can also find some relief by securing student loans.

"They can use that money to make ends meet," Christie said. "They're killing two birds with one
stone."



Emerson seeking books for school library

Emerson High School in Idaho Falls is hosting a book drive to build up its library.

"Our goal is to collect new or gently used books from everywhere in the community, which will
then be used to renovate our library," said Kristin Gazaway, who works at the school. "All over
the nation, school districts are being forced to cut funding for school libraries and media centers.
Yet educators know there is a direct correlation between better reading and higher test scores."

An alternative high school, Emerson provides learning opportunities typically not found in
regular schools.

The class schedules are more flexible, but the rules

are more rigid. There's no parent-teacher organization, either, and the resources of the students'
parents tend

to be limited, Gazaway said, which means funding for the library is scarce.

Hence the book drive, which will last from today through May 15.

All sorts of books will help -- fiction, nonfiction, resource, career exploration, parenting books,
etc.
The only request is that they are in good shape.

"'Gently used' means they can stand up to multiple readings by sometimes careless teenagers,"
Gazaway said. "We don't want books that are falling apart."

Unused books around the house?

If you'd like to take part in Emerson High School's book drive, books can be dropped off at the
school,

335 Fifth St., or at these locations in Idaho Falls:

n St. Luke's Episcopal Church, 270 N. Placer Ave.

n Book City, 2299 E. 17th St.

n The Bookworm, 637 First St.

				
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