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									Basic Education and Gender Equality
                Mali
            2010 – 2012




   Natcom Donor Toolkit
           DECEMBER 2009

 Accelerated Child Survival and
  Development in Mozambique

                                      1
Acronyms
AE             Académie d‘Enseignement
AME            Association des Mères d‘Elèves
CADDE Centre d‘Appui a la Décentralisation et a la Déconcentration de l‘Education
CAP            Centre d‘Animation Pédagogique
CFS            Child-Friendly Schools
C4D            Communication for Development
CGS            Comité de Gestion Scolaire
CNE            Centre National de l‘Education
CNR-ENF        Centre National des Ressources pour l‘Education Non-Formelle
DEN            Division de l‘Enseignement Normale
DNEB           Direction National de l‘Education de Base
EBE            Education de Base et Equité
ECD            Early Childhood Development
EFA            Education for All
ESARO Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Office (UNICEF)
ILO            International Labor Organisation
MDG            Millennium Development Goals
NGO            Non Government Organization
OFL            Organisation Féminine Locale
OMAES          Œuvre Malienne d‘Aide a l‘Enfance au Sahel
OVC            Orphaned and other Vulnerable Children
PISE           Education Sector Investment Program
PRODEC         Ten Year National Education Programme
SFA            Schools for Africa
UNDAF United Nations Development Assistance Framework
UNESCO         United Nations‘ Education Science and Culture Organization
WB             World Bank
WCARO          Western and Central Africa Regional Office (UNICEF)
WFP            World Food Programme




                                                                                    2
Contents

Acronyms ................................................................................................................................................. 2
Contents ................................................................................................................................................... 3
1. Programme Summary........................................................................................................................... 4
2. Situation Overview............................................................................................................................... 6
3. Investment Case ................................................................................................................................. 10
4. Country Programme Plan ................................................................................................................... 11
5. Partnerships ........................................................................................................................................ 14
6. Results Matrix .................................................................................................................................... 16
7. Constraints, Actions & Way Forward ................................................................................................ 22
8. Budget ................................................................................................................................................ 23
9. Price Example .................................................................................................................................... 25
10.Human Interest Materials .................................................................................................................. 26
11.Additional Materials & Resources .................................................................................................... 30
Appendix A: The Schools for Africa Partnership with the Nelson Mandela Institute........................... 31
Appendix B: Natcom Feedback Form.................................................................................................... 33




                                                                                                                                                            3
    1. Programme Summary
Country                       MALI
MTSP Focus Area               □ Young Child Survival and Development
                               Basic Education and Gender Equality
                              □ HIV / AIDS and Children
                              □ Child Protection from Violence, Exploitation and Abuse
                              □ Policy Advocacy and Partnerships for Children‘s Rights
Other Programme Areas         N/A
Programme Title               BASIC EDUCATION AND EQUITY
Type of Document               Proposal {November. 09}
                              □ Progress Report 1 {Date}
                              □ Progress Report 2 {Date}
                              □ Progress Report 3 {Date}
                              □ Progress Report 4 {Date}
                              □ Final Report {Date}
Country Programme Cycle       2008- 2012
Toolkit Cycle                 2010-2012
Budget                        Total Budget for Toolkit Cycle:
                               Planned (total): USD 35,571,069
                               Funded (prog): USD 17,394,983
                               Unfunded (prog): USD 14,364,900
                               Expenditure (prog): USD 0
                               Expenditure Rate (%): 0
Overall Programme Result      National standards for increased access to quality basic education with
                              an emphasis on gender equity are developed through the promotion of
                              girls and vulnerable children‘s education.
Programme Component Results         1. By 2012, 50,000 children aged 3-5 have access to ECD
                                       services in targeted regions
                                    2. By 2012, 500,000 children mostly girls have access to quality
                                       primary education in the targeted regions
                                    3. By 2012, 100,000 adolescents and 50,000 women have access
                                       to quality non formal education in the targeted regions
Geographic Focus              The program activities will be implemented at the central and regional
                              levels. Advocacy, strategic planning and policy development activities
                              will be conducted in BAMAKO, the capital city. Midstream activities will
                              be implemented in 4 regions KAYES, KOULIKORO, SEGOU and
                              MOPTI through 8 local education academies and 17 pedagogical units.
                              Grass root activities will take place in 1000 villages hosting schools.
Focus Population              Direct beneficiaries
                              50,000 children, in the regions of intervention have access to pre-
                              primary education;
                              500,000 students in 1,000 primary schools have access to quality
                              education ;
                              100,000 adolescents aged 9 to 18 have access to quality non-formal
                              education.
                              Indirect beneficiaries
                              Approximately 90,000 community members will indirectly benefit from
                              the program interventions: 40,000 parents will participate in parental
                              education and 50,000 women will be involved in income generating
                              activities. More than 1,000,000 primary school students will benefit from
                              improved school curriculum and child centred teaching methodology.
Partners                      Government Institutions: Ministry of Education, Central and Provincial
                                                                                                          4
                           Departments    of Education and Municipalities.       UN agencies;
                           Development      Agencies; Community   Based           Organizations,
                           Communities
                           Civil Society Organizations: World Education and 5 local NGO.
UNICEF Contact             Marcel Rudasingwa, Resident Representative
                           Email: mrudasingwa@unicef.org,
                           Tel. +223- 20 79 44 01
                           Deborah McWhinney, Deputy Representative
                           Email: dmcwhinney@unicef.org,
                           Tel. +223-20 79 44 01
                           Assane Amadou, Chief Education
                           Email: aamadou@unicef.org
                           Tel. +223-20 79 44 01


PBA Reference Number
Toolkit Reference Number




                                                                                               5
2. Situation Overview
a)         Situation Analysis:
Mali is the seventh largest country in Africa, bordering Algeria on the north, Niger on the east, Burkina Faso and
the Côte d'Ivoire on the south, Guinea on the south-west, and Senegal and Mauritania on the west. Its size is
just over 1,240,000 km² with an estimated population of approximately 12 million people, 46 per cent being
under the age of 15. Consisting of eight regions, Mali's borders on the north reach deep into the middle of the
Sahara, while the country's southern region, where the majority of inhabitants live, features the Niger and
Senegal rivers.

Mali is considered to be one of the poorest nations in the world. According to the Human Development Index
2009, Mali ranks 178th out of 182 countries much the same as in recent years. Over the last 15 years, income,
school enrolment rates and access to basic social services have increased. Still Mali‘s development indicators-
especially those related to literacy- are among the lowest in the world. Mali lags behind other countries in the
region, and the prospects for achieving most of the MDGs by 2015 are low, particularly those on infant and child
mortality, maternal health and gender equality.

KEY FACTS & FIGURES

           Primary Education Indicators                                 Year         Source
                                       Boys      Girls       Total
           Gross primary school        89.5%     70.7%       80%        2008         Statistical yearbook
           enrolment rate
           Net primary school          68.1%     53.9%       60.9%      2008         Statistical yearbook
           enrolment rate
           Gross intake rate           86.8%     72.3%       79.4%      2008         Statistical yearbook
           Net intake rate             28.1%     22.9%       25.5%      2008         Statistical yearbook
           Repetition rate             10%       18%         14%        2008         Aide mémoire WB
            th
           6 grade survival rate       63.5%     44.8%       54%        2008         Statistical yearbook
           Student/Teacher ratio       -         -           64         2008         Statistical yearbook
           Student classroom ratio     -         -           60         2008         Statistical yearbook
           School life expectancy      7.5       _           6.4        2005         UNESCO Statistics



b)         Situation of Children/Women in the Country:
In Mali, child poverty is a pervasive and deep rooted problem; a vast majority of children live below the poverty
line. According to a study carried out in 2008 on child poverty and inequalities in Mali, the scope of poverty
among children is very large in Mali, with 85% of children affected by severe deprivation and 50% by absolute
deprivation of rights. One of Mali‘s biggest challenges is to translate its economic gains into improved access to
quality basic social services for children and women.
Disparities in income, education, health and nutritional status as well as access to safe water and sanitation
exist between those living in rural areas and urban areas; between men and women, boys and girls and
between those that are educated and those that are not.
Significant progress has been made in increasing children‘s access to primary education in Mali. Gross
enrolment ratio (GER) has risen from 64.3% in 2002 to 80% in 2008. The net enrolment ratio (NER) for basic
                                                          1
primary education is currently at 60.9%, 53.9% being girls .


1
    Source: Annuaire National des Statistiques Scolaires de l’Enseignement Fondamental
                                                                                                                6
A large number of children are still not accessing primary education due to extreme poverty and vulnerability.
There are persistent gender and geographical disparities. Only 13 per cent of newly enrolled children in primary
school (grade 1) have attended preschool which are vital for their cognitive development as well as
socialization. Some 40 per cent of children of school age have not had the chance to learn.
A significant number of children, particularly girls, never go to school (net access rate is as low as 25.5%, 22.9
for girls). The quality of education is compromised by high teacher-student ratios and overcrowding in poorly
constructed classrooms. Primary school repetition and dropout rates are high especially among girls in rural
communities. Girls are also more prone to drop out of school early to marry, to help out with heavy household
chores or to migrate to cities or neighbouring countries, often in futile attempts to escape abject poverty back
home (drop-out ratio is close to ). They are particularly vulnerable to traffickers and other forms of exploitation.
In a study conducted in Mali in 2008 with UNICEF support, 8.8 per cent of the children interviewed said they
had been victims of trafficking. Many other children are subjected to other forms of exploitative labour. About 2
children out of 3 between 5 and 17 years are working, representing three million girls and boys. Girls are
particularly vulnerable as the majority are employed as domestic workers in households.


(c)_       Situation of Children and Women with Regard to Education
The government of Mali is committed to reaching universal primary education and providing all children with
quality education. Significant progress has been made in increasing children‘s access to primary education in
Mali. Gross enrolment ratio (GER) has risen from 64.3% in 2002 to 80% in 2008. The net enrolment ratio (NER)
                                                                          2
for basic primary education is currently at 60.9%, 53.9% of whom are girls .
However, there are several issues:


           Insufficient school coverage due to the lack of educational opportunities: Pupil / class ratio = 60 and
            student / teacher ratio = 64 average in 2008

          Poor quality of education resulting from the shortage of adequate educational facilities,
           teaching/learning materials, equipment and low teacher qualifications; (average repetition rate is 14%,
           18% for girls; average dropout rate stands at 4%, 9.7% for girls and the completion rate is 54% with
           44.8% for girls.

       
                                                      3
           According to a study carried out in 2008 on child poverty and inequalities in Mali, the scope of poverty
           among children is very large; 85% of children affected by severe deprivation and 50% by absolute
           deprivation of rights. Poverty is a major obstacle to schooling. A large number of children are still not
           accessing primary education due to extreme poverty and vulnerability. There are persistent gender and
           geographical disparities. Only 13 per cent of newly enrolled children in primary school (grade 1) have
           attended preschool which are vital for their cognitive development as well as socialization. Some 40 per
           cent of children of school age have not had the chance to learn.

          Social, gender and geographic disparities due to several factors including poverty, socio cultural
           obstacles, and illiteracy: (gender parity index stand at 0.8, an example of geographical disparity is:
           gross enrolment rate is 50.8% in Kidal while it stands at 96% in Gao;

          Average illiteracy rate is 60% mainly women;

A significant number of children, particularly girls, will never go to school, or will prematurely drop out owing to
the above mentioned issues.
(d)        Addressing the Issues of Children and Women


2
    Source: Annuaire National des Statistiques Scolaires de l’Enseignement Fondamental
3
    Pauvreté des enfants et inégalités au Mali, Novembre 2008, Unicef Mali
                                                                                                                      7
UNICEF in Mali and other partners support the efforts of the Ministry of Education to increase access and
improve the quality of primary education by helping alleviate the cost of primary education for poor rural families
and enhancing the quality of education by availing teaching and learning materials in primary schools in rural
areas as well as training teachers in interactive teaching methodologies. The reduction of school-related costs
helps increase access to primary education and presents new opportunities for disadvantaged children (girls,
street children, orphans, unpaired children etc.) to attend and remain in school, thus contributing to poverty
reduction.
The quality of education is unsatisfactory as the achievement rate is as low as 54% for the total school
population and 44.8% for girls. Strengthening teachers‘ capacities is key for better participation in the classroom
is key for improved quality of education. Observations from the field suggest that Child Friendly Schools tend to
have better levels of school attendance and achievement. Furthermore, coranic students, children in remote
nomadic areas, handicapped children and street children are excluded. Providing an adapted response to the
educational needs of these marginalized groups will help realise the right to quality education for all in Mali.


The Basic Education and Equity component covers the regions of KAYES, KOULIKORO, SEGOU and MOPTI.




                                                                                                                 8
COUNTRY FACTS & FIGURES
(Basic Indicators)

    Under-five              191 / 1,000
    mortality
    GNI / Capita                      $500
    Population              12.6 million
    Median age               15.8 years
    Birth rate            births / 1,000
    Urban                   32% of total
    population                     pop.
    Gender ratio           0.98 males /
                                female


Source: Bulletin Statistique, 2007,




PROGRAMME FACTS & FIGURE

(Programme Indicators)

  Estimated adult HIV                 1.5%
  prevalence rate (aged 15–
  49)
  Mother-to-child                    56000
  transmission, Estimated
  number of women (aged
  15+) living with HIV,


Source: Bulletin Statistique, 2007




                                             9
    3. Investment Case
The Government of Mali has since 1997 made the fight against poverty as its top priority. In order to
put this clearly stated political will into action, a National Strategic Plan was issued and translated into
a Poverty Reduction strategy (CSRP in French). The PRS was approved by the Ministers‘ Board in
May 2002.

Through the PRS, the Government intends to increase access to basic services for all which include
education, health, potable water etc. In order to respond to the education goals, a ten year
programme on ―Access to Quality Education‖ has been developed (PRODEC). The PRODEC failed to
meet the Education for All (EFA) goals in 2005. Also Mali is far behind towards the achievement of the
2015 goals- the gap shows that in order for Mali to achieve its MDG on Education, the country has to
progress: 4 per cent each year on the primary school net enrolment rate; approximately 7 per cent on
the completion rate and at least 0, 3 per cent with regards to gender parity index which currently
stands at 0.8. However, the current progress rates remain between 2 and 2, 5 per cent for the first
indicators and 0, 1 for the latter. An accelerated strategy is needed for implementation in line with the
Fast Track initiative.

Despite sustained increase in enrolment rates in primary, the right of children to quality basic
education is not being met, particularly girls and vulnerable groups due to socio-cultural practices and
beliefs as well as the insufficient number and low quality of available primary schools. Schools lack
water and sanitation facilities, most teachers are not trained to teach, and classrooms lack minimum
infrastructure such as desks, books and other teaching-learning materials. Vulnerable children are
excluded from education due to poverty.

UNICEF is a unique partner of the Ministry of Education. The Basic Education and Equity Country
Programme Component started in 2008 as an extension to the former Education For Life Component
in three regions outreaches to 400 child friendly primary schools, 80 Early Childhood Development
Centres and 80 Non-Formal Education Centres covering approximately 250, 000 children.

The Child Friendly School approach has helped significantly improve the learning environment in the
targeted schools. Water and sanitation has been promoted in all schools through school councils, the
training of teachers and school management committees.

There is tangible evidence of the success of the Child Friendly School Approach. The momentum is in
place and UNICEF, with its partners, is expanding the programme to reach a far greater number of
children. UNICEF is the preferred partner for the Ministry of Education in the country. It has
supported Mali for decades throughout numerous programs including human rights, child survival,
children protection, basic education and the protection of HIV and AIDS.
UNICEF has regular consultations with the Ministry of Education and is a source of technical support
to the Government and other partners. The organisation uses these contacts to ensure that
education, and particularly girl‘s education, remains at the forefront of the national agenda. UNICEF
is also uniquely positioned to leverage resources for other agencies, which it does through joint
initiatives with other UN agencies and by taking an active stand with donor partners to invest
resources in the development processes underway in Mali.




                                                                                                         10
4. Country Programme Plan
a.   Programme Component Results
     Overall programme results are as follows:
            National standards for increased access to quality basic education with an emphasis
             on gender equity are developed through the promotion of girls and vulnerable
             children‘s education.

     There are three programme component results which contribute to the achievement of these
     overall programme results:

     1. By 2012, 50,000 children aged 3-5 have access to ECD services in targeted regions;
     2. By 2012, 500,000 of children aged 6-11 have access to quality primary education
     3. By 2012, 100,000 adolescents and 50,000 women have access to quality non formal
        education.


b.   Focus Population / Beneficiaries
     Beneficiaries

     Pursuant to the Cooperation Agreement signed by the Ministry of Education and UNICEF,
     four regions were selected for the implementation of the Basic Education and Equity program
     component (Kayes, Koulikoro, Segou and Mopti). These regions were selected on the basis
     of criteria including low education indicators (enrolment and completion rates, and high
     gender gap), the size of the district and student population.

         a. 50 000 children and 40 000 parents, in the regions of intervention participate in
            children‘s developmental readiness activities to start primary school;
         b. 500 000 students have access to quality education in 1 000 child friendly schools in
            the regions of intervention;
         c. 100 000 adolescents aged 9 to 18 and 50 000 women have access to quality non
            formal education adapted to their specific needs in the regions of intervention.

     By 2012 the interventions will benefit approximately:
        1,000 education staff including central and provincial agents have acquired skills in
         planning, managing education in emergency situation and use monitoring and evaluation
         tools;
        15,000 new pupils realise their right to education in 300 new or rehabilitated classrooms;
        8,000 teachers have acquired knowledge in gender equality, practice active teaching,
         using availed teaching/learning materials in favour of 500,000 primary school pupils who
         participate in improving school environment through Child Friendly Schools;
        50,000 children aged 3 to 5 participate in the Early Childhood Development (ECD)
         activities and 40,000 parents, mainly women participate in the parental education
         program.
        500,000 children aged 6 to 12 have access to quality education in 1,000 child friendly
         schools.
        100,000 adolescents mainly girls and 50,000 women organised into female associations
         participate in non formal education programs including life skills and the prevention of
         HIV/AIDS.
        100% primary schools nationwide have adopted the Child Friendly School approach.



                                                                                                  11
c.       Strategies
Challenges identified by the Ministry of Education during its recent forum on education are many.
Some immediate actions are required: (i) increase access through the construction or rehabilitation of
classrooms (ii) improve quality education through the training of teachers and the provision of
materials to primary school pupils and (iii) ensure the right to education for all children by adapting a
policy of inclusive education.

The UNICEF Mali Basic Education and Equity Component will continue to:

    Work with the Ministry of Education and other line ministries, and within the context of Sector-
     Wide Approach to programming, to ensure that aspects of the Child-Friendly Schools approach
     are reflected in national and district plans and budgets to promote school quality improvement;
    Advocate for the integration of policies regarding girls‘ education, low cost school construction,
     school fee abolition into national priorities in view to increase access to education and
    Support provinces and districts to include the CFS approach in provincial and district plans so that
     it is implemented and monitored as part of their annual programmes for ensuring sustainability.

The goal of the program is that all children and the women, particularly most vulnerable, realise their
human rights. The program contributes mainly to MDG 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 (and incidentally of the other
goals of the Millennium) and three out of five UNDAF‘s objectives.

The program covers 4 out of 9 regions: KAYES, KOULIKORO, SEGOU and MOPTI.


The Basic Education Component will:
    Strengthen the capacities of government counterparts in strategic planning, Results Driven
     Management, Communication for Development, Monitoring and Evaluation, education in
     emergency situation;

    Advocate for the adoption and implementation of policies regarding girls‘ education, low cost
     school construction, abolishing school fees to increase access to education; a joint UN agencies
     effort;

    Prepare 50,000 young children for school enrolment and help sustain their performance well into
     the primary cycle;

    Increase access to education and reduce inequalities for 15,000 new pupils by
     rehabilitating/constructing and equipping 300 classrooms with the participation of communities
     organised by local NGOs, the municipalities and the provincial departments of education;

    Provide quality non formal education including life skills and HIV/AIDS prevention to 100,000
     adolescents and 50,000 women;

    Enhance the quality of education through in-service training sessions for 8,000 teachers in gender
     equality, active teaching, availing teaching/learning materials for 8,000 teachers and 500,000
     pupils in primary schools;

    As part of inter-agencies collaboration, WFP will provide support to the school canteens.

    Promote pupils participation in improving school environment through Child Friendly Schools in
     1,000 schools;


                                                                                                          12
    Avail potable water, hygiene and sanitation kits in 1,000 schools,

    Rehabilitate 6,000 space-separated latrines (boys and girls);

    Reinforce protection of the school domain in 1,000 schools;

    Rehabilitate play grounds for both girls and boys in 1000 schools;
    Develop peer support to improve performance, peer information on HIV/AIDS‘ prevention in 1,000
     schools;
    Consolidate the Child Friendly School approach by bringing on board partners such as the World
     Bank (WB), USAID, CARE through Government organised forums, annual reviews etc. for
     mainstreaming and scaling up.


d.       Assumptions and risks

The full success of the program will largely depend on the political and social stability of the country.
The national commitment and MOE and communities ‗engagement to participate in the program is a
critical factor to the success of the program. The availability of sufficient funds to scale up is also
paramount. Global financial crisis has shown how vulnerable our economies are; a prolonged crisis
could severely affect our fragile economy.

    1. e.        Monitoring and Evaluation
The monitoring and evaluation will be conducted by a steering committee composed of government
counterparts (focal points) UNICEF and other UN agency staff. Monthly field visits are conducted by
local government counterparts and quarterly joint Ministry, UNICEF and UN Agencies missions will
conduct spot checks. Each visit will be followed by a detailed report. At Mid-year update and annual
reviews all stakeholders will be informed about achievements, challenges, lessons learned and future
plans. Progress reports will be produced using recommended templates and shared with donors.

    2. f.     Sustainability
To ensure ownership of the results by children and families, the component works with national
counterparts at all levels in the planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of programme
activities. The component also promotes sustainability through communities, families and children‘s
participation and contribution in all interventions, through social mobilization.




                                                                                                      13
5. Partnerships
Under the leadership of the Ministry of Education, the main partnerships and alliances under the programme are:

Partners         Partner Type        Nature of partnership           Partner role                                 UNICEF’s role
DNEB             Govnt National      Policies strategies, norms      Decide on priorities                         Provide technical and financial support
                                     and standards
CNE              Govnt National      Policies strategies             Decide on priorities                         Provide technical and financial support
CADDE            Govnt National      Policies strategies             Decide on priorities                         Provide technical and financial support
CNR-ENF          Govnt National      Policies strategies             Decide on priorities                         Provide technical and financial support
DEN              Govnt National      Policies strategies             Decide on priorities                         Provide technical and financial support
AE               Govnt Provincial    Educational services provider   Dissemination of policies and priorities     Provide technical and financial support
CAP              Govnt Local         Educational services provider   Identify most needy schools                  Provide technical and financial support
WFP              UN Agency           School canteens services        Provide foods and build canteens             Provide technical and financial support
                                     provider
UNESCO           UN Agency           Advocacy for vulnerable         Advocacy services                            Provide technical and financial support
                                     groups
ILO              UN Agency           Advocacy for vulnerable         Advocacy services                            Provide technical and financial support
                                     groups

World            International       Implementing partner            Social mobilisation and implementation of    Provide technical and financial support
Education        NGO                                                 activities with community participation



OMAES            National NGO        Implementing partner            Social mobilisation and implementation of    Provide technical and financial support
                                                                     activities with community participation




                                                                                                                                                        14
FANDEEMA     National NGO   Implementing partner            Social mobilisation and implementation of   Provide technical and financial support
                                                            activities with community participation



STOP SAHEL   National NGO   Implementing partner            Social mobilisation and implementation of   Provide technical and financial support
                                                            activities with community participation



GUAMINA      National NGO   Implementing partner            Social mobilisation and implementation of   Provide technical and financial support
                                                            activities with community participation
PROMAVI      National NGO   Implementing partner            Social mobilisation and implementation of   Provide technical and financial support
                                                            activities with community participation



CGS          CBO            School management               Community mobilisation                      Provide technical and financial support


AME          CBO            Supporting/Encouraging          Community mobilisation and                  Provide technical and financial support
                            school attendance               implementation of income generating
                                                            activities to support schools



OFL          CBO            Supporting/Encouraging          Community mobilisation around education     Provide technical and financial support
                            school attendance               activities

CFS          Schools        Participation in school based   Agents of change in communities             Provide technical and financial support
                            activities




                                                                                                                                              15
6. Results Matrix
Overall Progress

Overall Programme Result                 Verifiable Indicators               Progress Reports           Progress to Date   Constraints
                                         (Baseline / Target)                 (Number, Type, Date)


National standards for increased         Pre-primary Net Attendance Ratio    Proposal Stage                                .
access to quality basic education with   Baseline: 4.5%
an emphasis on gender equity are
                                         Target: 10%
developed through the promotion of
girls and vulnerable children‘s          Primary Net Attendance Ratio
education.                               Baseline: 56%
                                         Target: 80%
        .                                Non formal gross Attendance Ratio
                                         Baseline: NA
                                         Target: 90%




                                                                             Progress Report 1


                                                                             Progress Report 2 (etc.)




                                                                                                                                         16
Progress Against Programme Component Results (PCRs) and Intermediate Results (IRs)


Programme Component Result 1
By 2012, 50 000 children aged 3-5 have access to ECD services.
PCR 1 Indicators                                        Progress Reports           Progress to Date   Constraints
(Baseline / Target)                                     (Number, Type, Date)
Proportion of children enrolled in primary school in    Proposal Stage                                Readiness for school is a key result of ECD
targeted regions who attended pre-primary schools (NA- Progress Report 1 (Date)
80%)
                                                        Progress Report 2 (Date)

                                                        Final Report (Date)

Intermediate Results         IR Indicators              Progress Reports           Progress to Date   Constraints
(Workplan Targets)           (Baseline / Target)        (Number, Type, Date)
1.1. Decentralised           Number of units whose                                                    The units will receive computer equipment and the
government units have the    capacities have been                                                     agents will be trained in planning, monitoring and
capacities to manage good    strengthened;                                                            evaluation and management.
quality ECD program          (Baseline:0 Target:12)


1.2. At least 50 ECD         Number of ECD centers                                                    The standard program has been developed with the
centers apply the standard   applying the standard                                                    ministry of education and aims at preparing children
program                      program. (Baseline:0                                                     aged 3-5 for school. The implementation of this
                             Target:50)                                                               standard requires the availability and the use of
                                                                                                      teaching/learning materials such as teachers‘ guides
                                                                                                      and colouring notepads and textbooks.




                                                                                                                                                17
1.3. Access to pre-primary   Number of new ECD              Rehabilitation includes equipment, playground and
education is increased       centers created                teaching/learning materials.
                             (Baseline:0 Target:100)
                             Number of rehabilitated
                             ECD centers. (Baseline:0
                             Target:120)




1.4. Strengthened teaching   Number of trained ECD          Teacher training is key to improve the quality of ECD
capacities of at least 300   teachers practicing ECD        activities.
ECD teachers in the          standard methods.
targeted regions.            (Baseline:0 Target:2)




1.5. All the partner         Number of parents who          Major activities include parental education, community
communities are engaged      participated in the parental   participation in ECD activities
in ECD activities.           education sessions;
                             (Baseline:8000 Target:40
                             000)

                             Student population in ECD
                             centers. (Baseline:2500
                             Target:50 000)




                                                                                                       18
Progress Against Programme Component Results (PCRs) and Intermediate Results (IRs)


Programme Component Result 2
By 2012, 500 000 children aged 6-11 have access to quality primary education
PCR 2 Indicators                                      Progress Reports           Progress to Date   Constraints
(Baseline / Target)                                   (Number, Type, Date)
Student population in targeted regions.               Proposal Stage                                The sub component contribute in achieving MDG 2
(Baseline 200 000 Target 500 000)                     Progress Report 1 (Date)
National
Primary Gross attendance ratio                        Progress Report 2 (Date)
(Baseline: 75% - Target: 95%)
Net attendance ratio                                  Final Report (Date)
(Baseline: 56% - target: 80%)
        th
Grade 6 survival rate
(Baseline: 54% – Target: 80%)

Intermediate Results        IR Indicators             Progress Reports           Progress to Date   Constraints
(Workplan Targets)          (Baseline / Target)       (Number, Type, Date)
2.1. Central and            Number of units whose                                                   The units will receive computer equipment and the
decentralised government    capacities have been                                                    agents will be trained in planning, monitoring and
units have the capacities   strengthened;                                                           evaluation preparedness and response to
to manage good quality      (Baseline:8 Target:17)                                                  emergency situation.
primary education
program and have
                            Number of agents
improved capacity to
                            trained. (Baseline: 0
respond to emergency
                            Target:30)
situations.
2.2. At least 25 primary    Proportion of schools                                                   The standards include access to potable water,
schools in the targeted     which comply.                                                           separate latrines, playground and hygiene and
regions comply with the     (Baseline:0 Target:25)                                                  sanitation kits. Teacher training package include:
CFS standards.                                                                                      active teaching, gender, hygiene and sanitation,
                            Number of teachers
                                                                                                    HIV/AIDS, school health and CFS standards.
                            trained
                            (Baseline:1 200
                            Target:8 000)
2.3. Access to primary      Number of new                                                           School construction is implemented with community
education is increased      classrooms built                                                        participation in kind and manpower.
                            (Baseline: 30

                                                                                                                                                    19
                           Target:122)


2.4. Partnership around    Number of partnerships                                                   Scaling up will be achieved with the support of other
primary education is       established and                                                          partners under the leadership of the government.
strengthened and all the   implemented.                                                             Major activities also include community participation
partner communities are    (Baseline:2 Target:4)                                                    in education activities to ensure sustainability.
engaged in primary
education activities
following communication
for development
activities..

Progress Against Programme Component Results (PCRs) and Intermediate Results (IRs)


Programme Component Result 3
By 2012, 100,000 adolescents and 50,000 women have access to quality non formal education

PCR 3 Indicators                                     Progress Reports            Progress to Date   Constraints
(Baseline / Target)                                  (Number, Type, Date)


Number of children/adolescents aged 9-18 attending   Proposal Stage                                 The sub component contribute in achieving MDG 3
non formal education centers. (Baseline: 2400
Target: 100,000)


                                                     Progress Report 1 (Date)


                                                     Progress Report 2 (Date)



                                                     Final Report (Date)

Intermediate Results       IR Indicators             Progress Reports            Progress to Date   Constraints
(Workplan Targets)         (Baseline / Target)       (Number, Type, Date)
                                                                                                                                                    20
3.1. National policies and   Number of policies in       Documents of policies and strategies will be
strategies adapted to the    place; (Baseline:1          translated into 11 local languages for nationwide
needs of most vulnerable     Target:2)                   access to its content.
groups are in place to
ensure quality non formal
                             Number of strategies
education.
                             adopted. (Baseline: 0
                             Target:1)
3.2. All non-formal          Number of trained           Life skills include the prevention of HIV/AIDS.
education centers in the     teachers who teach life
targeted regions utilize     skills. (Baseline:0
the revised program          Target:120)
integrating life skills.     Number of adolescents
                             enrolled in non-formal
                             education centers.
                             (Baseline:2400
                             Target:100 000)
3.3. Government              Number of non formal        The non-formal education units will be trained in the
education services have      education centers using     CFS approach and they will introduce the approach
improved capacity to         the CFS approach.           and standards in non-formal education centers.
provide quality non-formal   (Baseline:17
education.                   Target:300)

3.4 Access to non formal     Number of rehabilitated     School construction is implemented with community
education is increased       centers                     participation in kind and the provision of manpower.
                             (Baseline: 180
                              Target:300)
3.5. Partnership around      Number of partnerships      Major activities include communication for
non-formal education         established and             development, community participation in education
centers is strengthened      implemented.                activities to ensure sustainability.
and all the partner          (Baseline:0 Target:2)       Female associations conduct income generating
communities are engaged      Number of female            activities subsidized by the component to support
in education activities.     organisations which         education activities..
                             support education
                             activities. (Baseline: 40
                             Target:80)



                                                                                                           21
7. Constraints, Actions & Way Forward




                                        22
8. Budget

                                                                                                     2010-12
                                                                           Planned      Funded       Unfunded       Expenditure   Expenditure
                          Planned Results
                                                                            (US$)        (US$)         (US$)           (US$)       Rate (%)
PCR 1: Increased aaccess to ECD services for 50 000 children
                                                                            6,757,500    3,903,000     2,854,500            n/a           n/a
aged 3 to 5
1.1 Decentralised government units have the capacities to manage
                                                                             387,000      232,500       154,500             n/a           n/a
good quality ECD program
1.2 At least 50 ECD centers apply the standard program                       142,500      142,500               0           n/a           n/a
1.3 Access to pre-primary education is increased.                           6,000,000    3,450,000     2,550,000            n/a           n/a
1.4 Strengthened teaching capacities of at least 300 ECD teachers in
                                                                             225,000       75,000       150,000             n/a           n/a
the targeted regions
1.5 All the partner communities are engaged in ECD activities                   3,000       3,000               0           n/a           n/a
PCR 2: Increased access to quality primary education for 500
                                                                           19,601,799    9,950,466     9,651,333            n/a           n/a
000 children aged 6 to 11
2.1 Central and decentralised government units have the capacities
to manage good quality primary education program and have                     36,000       21,000        15,000             n/a           n/a
improved capacity to respond to emergency situations.
2.2 At least 25 primary schools in the targeted regions comply with
                                                                             589,500      214,500       375,000             n/a           n/a
the CFS standards
2.3 Access to primary education is increased                               18,971,799    9,710,466     9,261,333            n/a           n/a
2.4 Partnership around primary education is strengthened and all the
partner communities are engaged in primary education activities                 4,500       4,500               0           n/a           n/a
following communication for development activities
PCR 3: Increased access to quality non formal education for 100
                                                                            3,048,000    2,253,000      795,000             n/a           n/a
000 adolescents and 50 000 women
3.1 National policies and strategies adapted to the needs of most
                                                                             600,000             0      600,000             n/a           n/a
vulnerable groups are in place to ensure quality non formal education
3.2 All non-formal education centers in the targeted regions utilize the
                                                                             300,000      300,000               0           n/a           n/a
revised program integrating life skills
3.3 Government education services have improved capacity to
                                                                             195,000             0      195,000             n/a           n/a
provide quality non-formal education

                                                                                                                                                23
3.4 Access to non formal education is increased                        1,950,000    1,950,000           0    n/a   n/a
3.5 Partnership around non-formal education centers is strengthened
                                                                           3,000        3,000           0    n/a   n/a
and all the partner communities are engaged in education activities
Sub-total (programme)                                                 29,407,299   16,106,466   13,300,833
Country-level programme support                                        2,352,584    1,288,517    1,064,067
Sub-total at CO level                                                 31,759,883   17,394,983   14,364,900
UNICEF Programme Support (7%)                                          2,223,192
Nelson Mandela Foundation Education Programme Component (5%)           1,587,994
Grand Total                                                           35,571,069




                                                                                                                         24
9. Price Example

No.                             Item                                   Unit             Estimated                                              Note / Comments
                                                                                                 4
                                                                                        Cost USD                                        (i.e. No. of beneficiaries, etc.)
    1.   Construction of 90 classrooms and 20                             1                                This is a single classroom unit.
         ECD centers                                                                        9,631

    2.   Rehabilitation of 280 ECD centers and                            1                                This includes the equipment of the center with tables, chairs and playground for children
         280 non formal education centers                                                  10,503          as well as toys.

    3.   Construction of 20 Non-Formal                                    1                                This is a single classroom unit.
         Education Centres                                                                  9,266

    4.   Construction of 200 water points                                 1                                This is the cost of a borehole equipped with a manual pump.
                                                                                           17,800

    5.   Construction of 200 latrine boxes                                1                                This is a single latrine box. Six boxes are usually required for an average sized school.
                                                                                            3,500          Three for girls three for boys.

    6.   In-service training of 8 000 teachers                            1                                This is the cost of a 5 day training course for one teacher. Sessions usually gather 50
                                                                                             500           teachers.

    7.   Purchase of Teaching materials                                   1                                Average cost of a text book.
         (guides/textbooks) for 400 schools,                                                  12
         300 ECD centers and 300 Non-formal
         education centers
    8.
         4 Communication for development
                                                                          1                 1,000          Campaigns are run at the community level and gather about 100 people.
         campaigns in 400 communities.




4
  Please note that specific targets and unit costs are indicative only. They are prepared by the country office upon submission of the Natcom Donor Toolkit, and changed upon subsequent Toolkit updates to reflect any changes in
programming or changes in costs due to market or currency fluctuations. Please use these figures with discretion in your fundraising appeals.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                               25
10. Human Interest Materials

SCHOOLS BECOME MORE “FRIENDLY”
October 2009
“If a girl drops out, I go to the house and find out why and try to get her back into school.”

Adama Bamba not only is the ―Prime Minister‖, but he also has the aura of a leader. He listens with interest,
makes close eye contact and expresses himself eloquently, gently moving his hands to stress a point.

He and his ―government‖ are explaining their ―Action Plan‖ to a group of visitors as they sit in their classroom
in a primary school in Mougna, in the district of Djenné.

                                                     Adama is only 12 years old and is in sixth grade at a
                                                     school, which has been designated ―child friendly‖ with the
                                                     support of UNICEF. The school has a government,
                                                     comprising of five boys and four girls. It aims to ensure that
                                                     pupils participate in how their school is run. They work
                                                     closely with a school council – which is composed of the
                                                     school director as well as community leaders.

                                                     While more children now access school in Mali than ever
                                                     before – -primary school gross enrolment rate is 70.7 per
                                                     cent for girls and 89.5 per cent for boys --- narrowing the
                                                     gender gap and improving the quality of education are the
                                                     main challenges.

The school environment needs to be conducive to every aspect of child development and to ensure that the
school actively encourages all children, especially those that tend to drop out first, notably girls, the very
poor and children with disabilities.

The Director of the school, Salif Koné, says the school government has made a difference. ―There are some
problems that the school government is better able to solve than the council; for example before the pupils
had to pay for consultations at the health centre, but they were able to negotiate not to pay.‖

There has also been progress in keeping girls in school. Nana Plea, a farmer and also a member of the
school council, says, ―If a girl drops out, I go to the house and find out why and try to get her back into
school.‖ The school now has 196 boys and 208 girls.

Also simple improvements, like separate latrines can make huge differences to girls. ―Before the latrines
were together, but now they are separate,‖ says Adama. ―The girls‘ latrines are a little further away from the
school building as they need more privacy.‖

He points out that each class has its own soap and a water carrier so they can wash their hands. Keeping
the school clean is also a priority. ―Every Friday at 5pm, all the pupils clean our school, including the toilets.‖

The minister of discrimination, 10-year-old Safoura Sao, adds that she has been particularly concerned
about how boys treat girls. ―If a boy beats a girl, the girl will tell me and I will report him to the school council
and his parents will then be informed. I have been beaten, but it was before this system was put in place, so
he was not reported.‖

Poverty is also a huge obstacle to learning. UNICEF has provided each pupil with smart blue backpacks with
school materials inside, such as pens, pencils and rulers. ―The bags help motivate the children,‖ says Koné.
―They all keep them in good condition.‖



                                                                                                                   26
Particularly important for some of the poorer children are free school meals; this is high on the school
government‘s agenda. The parents built a canteen with UNICEF support, and the lunches were initially
provided by the World Food Programme, with the aim that the community would contribute in the future.
However, the lunches stopped because the community groups were unable to carry the costs. ―If we had
meals provided at school, our numbers would go up to 500 students,‖ says Koné.

                                                  Adama, who is the son of a local medical doctor, agrees. ―I
                                                  live near so I can go home to eat, but there are a lot of
                                                  children who cannot, and they do not eat for the whole
                                                  day.‖

                                                  Special efforts are also made to ensure that children with
                                                  disabilities come to school. Members of the school council
                                                  have taken part in a training supported by UNICEF on how
                                                  to integrate children with disabilities into school.

                                                 Souleymane Traore, from the local education authority in
                                                 Mougna who ran a ―training of trainers‖ course, says that it
has made a major difference in the region. In the primary school in Mougna, three children -- one with poor
vision, another with a limp and a boy with mental disabilities-- have been successfully integrated into the
school. ―The teachers have been taught to assess them differently if necessary, not always using exams,
and they make home visits, especially if they miss school.‖

Twelve year -old Diakaridia has a mental disability following a bout of cerebral malaria four years ago. The
school works closely with his father, Daouda Konda, who has always wanted him to have an education
despite his disability. ―Although he is not the same as the others, he can understand things,‖ says his father.

Diakaridia needs some encouragement to talk from the head master, but he does with a shy smile. ―I like
learning at school, as I would like to do                                               what my father
does, charging batteries for cars,‖ he                                                  says.

Adama adds that the school government                                                         makes sure that
children with disabilities are not                                                            discriminated
against. ―They must be made to feel part                                                      of our school.‖

And what about Adama, what are his                                                            dreams for
himself? He answers without a second                                                          thought. ―This
experience as ―Prime Minister‖ has                                                            convinced me
that I want to be a teacher.‖




                                                                                                               27
SCHOOLS TO ENTICE CHILDREN OF ALL AGES
October 2009
“Early childhood centres open children’s minds. They help them relate to groups and give them a feeling of
solidarity.”

Fourteen-year-old Sanata Bouaré does not conceal her despondency while her mother explains why she
never let her go to school.

―I wanted her to stay here, not to leave our village,‖ says her mother, Tenin Bouaré, in the local language
Bambara. ―She could then carry on with the activities in the village. I have taught her crocheting and how to
buy and sell goods.‖

She continues as Sanata just stares, ―there is no joy going out of the village, just dangers. Our daughters
leave to work abroad. The boss will not pay you, and some daughters never come back.‖

UNICEF Mali supports the local education authorities and community organizations for 400 schools to
ensure that all children have access to primary school. In 40 of these sites the focus is on the link between
Early Childhood Development Centres (ECD), primary school and Non Formal Education (NFE) centres, for
children who have missed out on an education. All children aged 3 to 18 years living in these sites have a
chance to start and continue some form of education. Each institution will be closely linked and refer children
when necessary.

Today, Sanata has another chance. Her village, Yebe, in the eastern district of Djenné, is situated in one of
these 40 sites

It is a major step towards reaching the Millennium Development Goals of ―education for all‖ in Mali. Progress
has been made; during the 2007-2008 academic year, 68.1 per cent of school aged boys and 53.9 per cent
of school age girls (7 to 12 years) were in education However, some 40 per cent have not had the chance to
learn.

At first Yebe only had a primary school and that was in poor condition. Today UNICEF has supported not
only the new school building, and the construction of separate latrines for girls and boys, but has also
assisted the community to set up an ECD centre and the local authority to establish a non formal education
centre for children, like Sanata, who have never been to school.

The village has welcomed the initiative. The first advisor to the chief of the village, Da Bouaré, comes along
to see the ECD centre, which he had been involved in establishing. It is packed full of excited pre-school
children, blowing hard into recorders and beating traditional drums, or just playing around with each other in
the courtyard adjoined to a one-room building which was built by the community.

―I had seen ECD centres in the towns, and I know it is useful for children,‖ says Da Bouaré, the adviser to
the village chief. ―ECD centres open children‘s minds. They help them relate to groups and give them a
feeling of solidarity.‖

Aminata Kampo is also thrilled about the centre. She has just dropped off her niece, Moudo, and daughter,
Nana; both of them five years old. ―I want my children to be independent in life. Life is difficult,‖ she says.
―They are at an advantage starting to learn at an early age. They will learn useful skills, like how to
pronounce words and reading, as well as how to wash their hands. I never went to school because I was the
eldest and my mother had a lot of household chores that I had to help her with. I am not literate, but I
understand the advantages of knowing how to read and write.‖

Kampo, a mother of three children, is a member of one of the four income generating groups in the village,
which plans to use some of its income to support the running costs of the ECD centre. She says she is
determined that it will work.

There are now 130 children between three and six years, 50 girls and 80 boys, at the ECD centre which
opens from 8a.m.-11a.m. every day except Sunday and Thursday; the latter is market day. The centre has
                                                                                                              28
only been running for three months, and so far income generating groups have not yet organized their
regular contributions.

The three members of staff have had to work without any salaries, explains one of the animators, Fatoumata
Koné. However, she believes that the ECD centre will be sustainable because of the enthusiasm in the
village. ―The community has been easy to motivate. They wanted to build the centre and to send their
children,‖ she says. UNICEF provided materials on health and hygiene education, cooking pots as well as
toys for the children.

The ECD centre will refer the children once they are seven years old to the local primary school, as was the
case with Aminata Kampo‘s son. Aminato Kampo at first thought her seven-year-old son could enrol with her
niece and daughter at the ECD centre. ―They explained my son was too old, and he was referred to the
primary school.‖

The third link is the NFE centre. It has yet to open but Sanata is on the waiting list. ―Before, the people in the
village did not want to send their children to school. They would even try to pay money not to have their
children registered for school,‖ explains Da Bouaré. ―Now they understand that you can‘t get by in life
without education. Most of the older boys and girls, who are out of school, want to learn something.

The Non Formal Education centre will give basic literacy classes to children between 9 and 18 years as well
as skills, such as carpentry or sewing. Those children who want to and are not too old will be reintegrated
into the primary education system. This is Sonata‘s dream. ―I would like to start primary school as soon as
possible because I want to study to be a doctor. There is no doctor in our village,‖ she says with a quiet
determination.

Aminata Kampo is also thrilled about the centre. She has just dropped off her niece, Moudo, and daughter,
                                               Nana; both of them five years old. ―I want my children to be
                                               independent in life. Life is difficult,‖ she says. ―They are at an
                                               advantage starting to learn at an early age. They will learn
                                               useful skills, like how to pronounce words and reading, as
                                               well as how to wash their hands. I never went to school
                                               because I was the eldest and my mother had a lot of
                                               household chores that I had to help her with. I am not literate,
                                               but I understand the advantages of knowing how to read and
                                               write.‖

                                              Kampo, a mother of three children, is a member of one of the
                                              four income generating groups in the village, which plans to
use some of its income to support the running costs of the ECD centre. She says she is determined that it
will work.

There are now 130 children between three and six years, 50 girls and 80 boys, at the ECD centre which
opens from 8a.m.-11a.m. every day except Sunday and Thursday; the latter is market day. The centre has
only been running for three months, and so far income generating groups have not yet organized their
regular contributions.

                                               The three members of staff have had to work without any
                                               salaries, explains one of the animators, Fatoumata Koné.
                                               However, she believes that the ECD centre will be sustainable
                                               because of the enthusiasm in the village. ―The community has
                                               been easy to motivate. They wanted to build the centre and to
                                               send their children,‖ she says. UNICEF provided materials on
                                               health and hygiene education, cooking pots as well as toys for
                                               the children.

                                               The ECD centre will refer the children once they are seven
                                               years old to the local primary school, as was the case with
                                               Aminata Kampo‘s son. Aminato Kampo at first thought her


                                                                                                               29
seven-year-old son could enrol with her niece and daughter at the ECD centre. ―They explained my son was
too old, and he was referred to the primary school.‖

The third link is the NFE centre. It has yet to                                                   open but
Sanata is on the waiting list. ―Before, the people                                                in the
village did not want to send their children to                                                    school.
They would even try to pay money not to have                                                      their
children registered for school,‖ explains Da                                                      Bouaré.
―Now they understand that you can‘t get by in                                                     life without
education. Most of the older boys and girls, who                                                  are out of
school, want to learn something.

The Non Formal Education centre will give basic                                                    literacy
classes to children between 9 and 18 years as                                                      well as
skills, such as carpentry or sewing. Those                                                         children
who want to and are not too old will be reintegrated into the primary education system. This is Sonata‘s
dream. ―I would like to start primary school as soon as possible because I want to study to be a doctor.
There is no doctor in our village,‖ she says with a quiet determination.




11. Additional Materials & Resources

Map of Mali




                                                                                                              30
Appendix A: The Schools for Africa Partnership with the
Nelson Mandela Institute
The Nelson Mandela Institute for Education and Rural Development (―Nelson Mandela Institute‖ or ―NMI‖) is
a regular implementing partner of our UNICEF South Africa Country Office. As anywhere in the field,
both Schools for Africa (SFA) and non-SFA countries, UNICEF gives funds to its implementing partners to
carry out agreed programming work. These implementing partners can be local or international NGOs, civil
society organizations, universities, etc. Because of the centrality of our partnership with the Nelson Mandela
Institute, it is important that our donors understand how Schools for Africa funds are supporting the
education work of NMI and how the results of our partnership support the overall SFA Campaign.

We recommend that in discussions with donors, NatComs first present the Schools for Africa—Nelson
Mandela Institute partnership; talk about what has been achieved to date; and then focus on the donor's
support and the opportunities for supporting the education sector in the recipient country. In that way, the
5% "NMI Programme Support" is put into its proper context from the start.

Background
The Nelson Mandela Institute has a very important role in the Eastern Cape region of South Africa because
of its expertise and strong community ties around the issues of education and rural development. NMI is
also in the unique position of influencing the development of teacher curricula through its long-standing
relationship with the University of Fort Hare.

The UNICEF South Africa Country Office works closely with the Nelson Mandela Institute on issues related
to rural education. Through this collaboration, they are working towards creating sustainable, vibrant rural
communities united by a spirit of learning and collective action through which communities are empowered
to take responsibility for encouraging all their children and youth to become educated.

The four aims of this work are:
       Leadership Development: To support school and community leaders to live up to the legacy of Mr.
        Mandela.
       Human Centered Development: To build sustainable, human-centered methodologies for rural
        education and community development.
       Research and Public Dialogue: To create a space for scholarships linked to development action;
        to facilitate research and public dialogue to address some of the most intractable challenges facing
        our nation and world.
       Pilot Sites: To create a series of pilot sites to harness social hope and demonstrate through
        practice the possibilities for rural education and development.

The Institute views community development and education issues as interlinked. UNICEF South Africa is
collaborating with NMI to implement a Child Friendly Schools model in rural Eastern Cape, South
Africa. The model includes a strong research component and aims to provide evidence of its successes to
other schools in the Schools for Africa campaign. One hundred (100) schools are part of the NMI pilot.
These schools are open for study tours and inputs from the other countries participating in SFA, offering a
learning opportunity for all.

The main objectives of the Nelson Mandela Institute‘s partnership with UNICEF South Africa is to work with
100 rural schools to improve access and completion rates in grade 10 by 100%; to reduce teacher attrition;
and to improve pass rates to over 70%. An estimated 7,000 students, 1,000 teachers, and 100 school
management teams and school governing bodies will benefit from this initiative.


Administrative and Programmatic Arrangements with the Nelson
Mandela Institute for Education and Rural Development


                                                                                                           31
The relationship between the Nelson Mandela Institute and UNICEF South Africa is governed through a
Project Cooperation Agreement, which provides (a) that SFA funds will be used to increase the quality of
basic education in rural areas in South Africa; and (b) that the learnings from these interventions will be
shared through UNICEF South Africa with UNICEF Regional and Country Offices.

NMI Programme Support

UNICEF shall provide a share of Schools for Africa contributions to the Nelson Mandela Institute according
to the following sliding scale:
       5% (five per cent) up to US$50 million of the total SFA contribution
       3% (three per cent) above US$50 million and up to US$100 million
       1% (one percent) above US$100 million up to US$200 million

Release of Funds to NMI
UNICEF will release agreed amounts of Natcom contributions to NMI through the UNICEF South Africa
Country Office, subject to satisfactory review of programme implementation.

UNICEF Support Costs
All contributions to the Nelson Mandela Foundation will be subject to UNICEF‘s standard 7% programme
support cost for OR Non-thematic contributions and 5% for OR Thematic contributions.

Financial Accountability
NMI will account for the use of UNICEF funds by reporting to UNICEF South Africa in accordance with
UNICEF rules and procedures.

Monitoring and Evaluation
The UNICEF South Africa Country Office will be responsible for monitoring and evaluating NMI programmes
that receive UNICEF funds.

Donor Reporting
The UNICEF South Africa Country Office will produce an annual report on the use of funds by the Nelson
Mandela Institute, which shall be annexed to the annual updates of the Education Natcom Donor Toolkits
(due 28 February of each year).

Natcom Remittance Advice Notations
Each transfer of funds in support of Schools for Africa should include the following information in the Natcom
Remittance Advice:
       Name of recipient country
       Schools for Africa (95%)
       SFA South Africa Country Office and Nelson Mandela Institute (5%)




                          Partnerships allow us to achieve
                            greater results for children




                                                                                                           32
Appendix B: Natcom Feedback Form
Country:
MTSP Focus Area:
Reporting Date:
Toolkit Reference Number:

1. Programme Summary table: Is this completely and correctly filled in?
       Yes
       No
       Comments

2. Situation Overview: Is the ‗Programme Facts and Figures‘ table updated?
        Yes
        No
        Comments

3. Investment Case: Does the reported progress reflect the justification given in this section (so that you
   can use it for further fundraising purposes)?
        Yes
        No
        Comments

4. Country Programme Plan:
   a) Do the reported results match the planned outcomes (e.g., have the Programme Component
      Results and Intermediate Results been achieved as planned?
       Yes
       No
       Comments

    b) Is there evidence in the report that the progress was closely monitored?
        Yes
        No
        Comments

5. Results Matrix: Does the report clearly state the impact and results at the Milestone, Intermediate
   Results, and Programme Component Results level?
       Yes
       No
       Comments

6. Future Plan: Are constraints clearly explained and was a future plan to address them included?
       Yes
       No
       Comments

7. Budget: Is the budget table completely and correctly updated in the progress report?
      Yes
      No
      Comments
                                                                                                         33
8. Price Examples: Does the report reflect any changes in unit costs due to fluctuations in currency or
   market prices?
        Yes
        No
        Comments

9. Financial Reports:
   a) Where appropriate, was a Funds Utilisation Report included and did it meet your expectations?
       Yes
       No
       Comments

   b) Is the financial report sufficiently aligned with the budget?
       Yes
       No
       Comments

10. Human interest materials: Were human interest stories, photos and other materials included as part
    of the annual update?
          Yes
          No
          Comments (e.g., quantity and quality of material)

11. Additional Material &Resources: Check if any of the following were provided.
        Fact sheets
        Key indicators
        Maps
        Any programme presentations (e.g., PowerPoint and PDF)
        Any programme documents (e.g., surveys, evaluations, and assessments)
        Country Programme Action Plans and Country Programme Documents
        Situation Analyses
        Annual Work Plans
        MDG reports
        CRC reports and concluding recommendations
        Other: (specify)

12. Glossary/Acronyms: Does the report include any country-specific acronyms or technical definitions?
        Yes
        No
        Comments

13. How would you rate the Natcom Donor Toolkit in terms of content and its usefulness as a
    fundraising aid?

   Scoring:       5 indicates “highest level of satisfaction’’
                  0 indicates “complete dissatisfaction’’

   Comments:

14. Other suggestions to improve the Natcom Donor Toolkits:


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