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Printable Job Application Form for Malaysia - DOC

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									                                           12/8/2008




WEBER
STATE
UNIVERSITY
COMPUTER
             OPERATION PLANNING SYSTEM (OPS)
SCIENCE
DEPARTMENT




                Design Document | CS3750
Operation Planning System
Design Document
Department of Computer Science
Weber State University, Ogden, Utah
7/8/2011 Version 1.5




                                  2 |Page
Table of Contents
1 Introduction ................................................................................................. 7
  1.1 Introduction ........................................................................................... 7

     1.1.1      Product Vision / Vision Statement ................................................. 7

     1.1.2      Sponsor ......................................................................................... 7

     1.1.3      Stakeholders .................................................................................. 8

     1.1.4      Design Team .................................................................................. 8

     1.1.5      Proposed Implementation Team ..................................................... 8

  1.2 Purposes ................................................................................................ 9

     1.2.1      Project Purpose .............................................................................. 9

     1.2.2      Document Purpose ........................................................................ 9

  1.3 Assumptions and Dependencies ........................................................... 10

     1.3.1      Presentation Assumptions ........................................................... 10

     1.3.2      Business Logic Assumptions ........................................................ 10

  1.4 Project Objectives ................................................................................. 11

     1.4.1      Design a Scenario Editor .............................................................. 11

     1.4.2      Design a Scenario Simulator ........................................................ 11

2 Terms and Definitions ................................................................................ 13
  2.1 General Terms and Definitions ............................................................. 13

  2.2 Presentation Terms and Definitions ...................................................... 14

  2.3 Business Tier Terms and Definitions .................................................... 15


                                                                                                    3 |Page
  2.4 Data Tier Terms and Definitions ........................................................... 15

3 Architecture Design.................................................................................... 17
  3.1 Hardware Architecture ......................................................................... 17

  3.2 Software Architecture N-Tier Design ..................................................... 20

     3.2.1 Presentation layer ........................................................................... 20

     3.2.2 Logic layer ...................................................................................... 21

     3.2.3 Data layer ...................................................................................... 21

4 Presentation ............................................................................................... 23
  4.1 Presentation Flow ................................................................................. 23

  4.2 Main Screen / Menu ............................................................................ 24

  4.3 Scenario Editor .................................................................................... 25

  4.4 Scenario Playback ................................................................................ 27

  4.5 FEMA Form Reports ............................................................................. 28

  4.6 Help File / Tutorial............................................................................... 29

5 Business Rules Design ............................................................................... 30
  5.1 Business Rules..................................................................................... 30

     5.1.1 Main Program ................................................................................. 30

     5.1.2 Select Map...................................................................................... 32

     5.1.3 Select Scenario Main ...................................................................... 33

     5.1.4 Action Enablers .............................................................................. 35

     5.1.5 Business Rules Continued .............................................................. 36

  5.2 Use Cases ............................................................................................ 38

     5.2.1 Add Slide System ............................................................................ 38

     5.2.2 Run Scenario.................................................................................. 39

     5.2.3 Operation Planning System Overview .............................................. 40


                                                                                                  4 |Page
     5.2.4 Build Scenario System .................................................................... 41

     5.2.5 Select Scenario System ................................................................... 43

     5.2.6 Reports System .............................................................................. 44

  5.3 Program Flow ....................................................................................... 45

  5.4 Activity Diagrams ................................................................................. 46

     5.4.1 Create New Scenario ....................................................................... 46

     5.4.2 Create Slide .................................................................................... 47

     5.4.3 Print Report .................................................................................... 48

     5.4.4 Add Event ...................................................................................... 49

     5.4.5 Select Map...................................................................................... 50

  5.5 Class Diagrams .................................................................................... 51

6 Data Management ...................................................................................... 52
  6.1 File Imports .......................................................................................... 52

  6.2 File Exports .......................................................................................... 54

  6.3 File Structures ..................................................................................... 56

  6.4 Database Structure .............................................................................. 58

7 Risk Assessment ........................................................................................ 59
  7.1 Risk Assessment for Data Link Layer.................................................... 59

     7.1.1 Binary Flat Files ............................................................................. 59

     7.1.2 Database System ............................................................................ 60

  7.2 Risk Assessment for Business Layer ..................................................... 61

     7.2.1 Process ........................................................................................... 61

     7.2.2 Scope/Feature Creep ...................................................................... 61

     7.2.3 Students Failing to Complete Their Responsibilities ........................ 62

     7.2.4 Program ......................................................................................... 62


                                                                                                  5 |Page
     7.2.5 Program Won't Save Scenario ......................................................... 62

     7.2.6 Program Won't Run Scenario .......................................................... 63

     7.2.7 Program Can't Print Reports ........................................................... 63

     7.2.8 File/Database Integrity is compromised .......................................... 64

8 Alternative Solutions and Programs ................................................................ 65
  8.1 FEMA Incident Command Training Requirements................................. 65

  8.2 Simulation Effectiveness ...................................................................... 75

  8.3 Emergency Response Software ............................................................. 81

9 Meeting History .......................................................................................... 88
10 Project Approval ....................................................................................... 92




                                                                                                6 |Page
1 Introduction

1.1 Introduction
      This is the software design document specification for the Weber State
      University Emergency Response Simulation/Training System sponsored
      by Curt Roberts, the Vice Provost for Innovation & Economic
      Development at Weber State University.


      The project was designed and will be implemented by teams of
      undergraduate students at Weber State University with the guidance of
      university professors. Dane LeBlanc, the university's chief of police, has
      provided the overall description of the system that would be of benefit to
      the campus police department.

1.1.1 Product Vision / Vision Statement
      For resource managers who train others in resource management, the
      OPS (Operation Planning System) is an incident control training system
      that allows presentations based on scripted emergencies. It also allows
      for visual event planning for other types of scenarios. It allows for
      dynamic training unlike static presentation software. This product will
      be user friendly and will help with the learning curve of those
      professionals being trained.

1.1.2 Sponsor
      Curt Roberts
      Vice Provost for Innovation & Economic Development
      Weber State University


                                                                        7 |Page
     (801) 626-8940
     curtroberts@weber.edu

1.1.3 Stakeholders
      Provost
      Vice Provost
      Chief of Police
      Faculty
      Students
      Legal Counsel



1.1.4 Design Team
     Students
            Adam Hellewell ....................................... adamhellewell@gmail.com
            Doug Alves ................................................. douglas@alvescorp.com
            Ethan Jensen ............................................ sr.agent.riot@gmail.com
            Ken Romney ....................................................... kaiged@gmail.com
     Professors
            Brian Rague ...................................................... brague@weber.edu
            Greg Anderson ............................................. ganderson@weber.edu
            Rob Hilton ......................................................... rhilton@weber.edu

1.1.5 Proposed Implementation Team
      Managers
            Adam Hellewell ...................................................... Project Manager
            Ken Romney .......................................................Manager Assistant
            Erik Johnson .................................................. Data Layer Manager
            Corey Dabb ......................................... Presentation Layer Manager
            Ken Cottrell .............................................. Business Layer Manager
      Presentation Layer Team Members:
            Mariela Tinajero

                                                                                     8 |Page
              Jeff Nelson
              Cody Hodson
              Brett Eames




        Business Layer Team Members:
              George Takamine
              Douglas Alves
              Hyrum Taft
              Stanley Harvey
              Benjamin Burnett
              Daniel Hillstead
        Data Layer Team Members:
              Bruce Jarvis
              Bryant Dearden



1.2 Purposes
1.2.1 Project Purpose
        The purpose of this software project is to give presenters a tool to easily
        script and train personnel to manage resources in simulated situations.
        The first phase will focus on emergency response exercises.

1.2.2 Document Purpose
        The purpose of this document is to provide a living blueprint for the
        implementation team. By living, this document is meant to be changed
        and redefined to meet the requirements of the user.


1.2.3    Background
        In communication with Dane LeBlanc and under his request, we are
        creating this tool to assist in the presentation process of emergency


                                                                          9 |Page
        response training. Through researching alternative solutions, it is
        concluded that in resource training there are very few interactive tools
        available with the attributes described within this document that
        presenters have at their disposal.

1.2.4   Business Opportunities
        A business can be created out of the successful implementation of this
        project as this project aligns with Weber State's research initiative
        meeting the following goals:

        (1) Meet the needs of the market.
        (2) Create a product that will continue to grow and develop.
        (3) Become known as a research institution (CS department).

1.2.5    Business Objectives and Success Criteria
        The following are criteria that determine the possibility of success of this
        project:

           Break Even / Make profit
           Gain recognition
           Meets needs

1.3 Assumptions and Dependencies
1.3.1 Presentation Assumptions
   The user will be competent in using a computer.

1.3.2 Business Logic Assumptions
   The end-user has one of the following operating systems:
      Microsoft® Windows (32bit/64bit)
      Microsoft® Windows 2000
      Microsoft® Windows Vista
      Microsoft® Windows XP
   The end-user has a combination of the following hardware:
           Pentium® 4 2.0ghz or above

                                                                         10 | P a g e
      Mouse
      Keyboard
      LCD/CRT/Projection device
   The end-user supplies own image file to be used as a map:
      File is supported by C# API
      Image is not corrupted
      User assumes full responsibility for any copyrighted material use
   The end-user will use icons included with the product.
   The end-user may supply / import own icon:
        Producer is not responsible for how the icon is displayed ( size, colors,
         etc )
      Icon file is not corrupt
      User assumes full responsibility for any copyrighted material use
   The end-user has a basic knowledge of how to operate windows
   applications.
   The end-user will learn how to use this product via help file and or tooltips.
   No technical training will necessarily be provided.
   The end-user understands and can read the English language.
   The end-user creates most content through user-definable resources; i.e.
   locations of buildings, hospitals, police headquarters, etc.
   This system will be used to create a scripted simulation.

1.4 Project Objectives
1.4.1 Design a Scenario Editor
         Load and import new maps
         Edit building information and locations
         Edit user-defined resources and events

1.4.2 Design a Scenario Simulator
         Simulate definable events such as:
             o   Fire
             o   Shooter on campus
             o   Mudslides/Flooding

                                                                        11 | P a g e
      o   Earthquake
      o   Severe windstorms
      o   Whiteout snow conditions w/ wind
      o   Communications breakdown
      o   Etc.


   Simulate resource management:
      o   Known resources such as:
                Vehicles
                University officials
                University police
                County first responders (medical, fire, police, etc.)
                Hazmat
                Food, water, clothing, supplies, shelter, etc.


      o   Unknown resources such as:
                Volunteers
                Donated food, water, clothing, supplies, shelter, etc.
                Media


      o   User-definable resources


   Design a Report/Log System




                                                                  12 | P a g e
2 Terms and Definitions
2.1 General Terms and Definitions
Data Management Layer - This layer stores and makes the raw data available
to the Business Logic Layer

Business Logic Layer - This layer is where the program actually executes and
is acted upon by the user's input in the Presentation Layer.

Presentation Layer - This layer is where the user interacts with the graphical
user interface of the application

C# - An object-oriented programming language used for writing software in a
Windows PC environment

OPS – Operation Planning System (or Software)

GIS - Geographic Information System

Baseline – Basic information about the scenario before anything has
been scripted (location, time window, available resources, and events).

Dynamic – event, resource, or obstacle that can be moved around throughout
the map. i.e. Fire truck, Police Officer, news reporters, etc.

Event – Situation that has to be managed. i.e. Fire, Earthquake, Campus
Shooter, Chemical Leak, etc.

Background Image – Area with an image background where resources, events,
and obstacles are placed.

Obstacles – Things that have to be dealt with that aren't necessarily a
resource or part of the situation (innocent bystanders, news
reporters, rubble, fallen telephone pole or other blockage etc).



                                                                     13 | P a g e
Resource – Tools used to manage the event (fire trucks, Police
Officers, Paramedics, Ambulance, etc).

Scenario – Big picture, the complete script of everything that happens.
Collection of all the slides

Script – Chronological list of when and where events happen, when and
where resources become available, when and where obstacles are
created, and when and where dynamic things are moved

Slide – Defines where the resources and events are on the map at a
specific time

Static – event, resource, or obstacle that CANNOT be moved throughout
the map(Fire, Earth Quake, Lake (natural water supply), etc).

2.2 Presentation Terms and Definitions
Report – a printable document of the created events and resources

Form – Provides methods for returning forms that are used in the user
interface when working with the contents of a list.

Button – an icon which is pressed to trigger an action

TextBox – an area to enter text for descriptions of events, scenarios, etc

NumericUpDownBox – able to select the amount of events or resources to be
used

ListView – display a collection of items

Picture Box – A picture box is a holder for a picture within the program

Tool Strip – A menu-like bar within the program, used to create and add tool
options.




                                                                      14 | P a g e
2.3 Business Tier Terms and Definitions
Crop – Choose a smaller area of the map and zoom in on it.

Dynamic – Event, resource, or obstacle that can be moved around throughout
the map. i.e. Fire truck, Police Officer, news reporters, etc.

Icon Package – A list of icons usually associated with a single scenario that
can be imported into the program.

Report – A text file containing a list of all the events in chronological order that
can be exported or printed.

Slide – One slice of the scenario. Defines where the resources and events are
on the map at a specific time.

2.4 Data Tier Terms and Definitions
Scenario – This table contains the list of scenario projects installed in the OPS
application. This is also the main parent of all entity relationships in the
database.

Iconset – This table contains the available icon packages that the user can use
within a scenario project. Upon initial database installation the system will
install the default “User” icon package and the Database Layer will protect this
entry from removal by the user; whereas all other icon packages that are
imported (including the default sets we install) will have the option to remove.

Icon – This table contains the information about physical icon files that are
installed in the OPS application. They share a one-to-one relationship with
their iconset (icon package) parent.

Slide – This table contains all the slides associated with a particular scenario
project. It provides information for the type of slide (text, normal), the
font/background colors and text [only used in text slide], and background
sizing coordinates [only used in normal slide].

                                                                        15 | P a g e
Object – This table contains all the objects that are assigned to a particular
slide, including type (resource, event), a description, the assigned icon, and the
available count [only used for resource type].

Object_coord – This table contains the list of coordinates for a particular
object (resource/event) on a slide. Its structure allows for numerous objects of
the same type positioned in different locations on a particular slide.




                                                                         16 | P a g e
3 Architecture Design
3.1 Hardware Architecture
Typical GIS systems were originally considered for this project. These systems
used a configuration similar to that displayed in Figure 1. Throughout our
research and design process, we discovered that such a system will not be best
suited to our needs.




                                                                   17 | P a g e
                                                       Figure 1 – Chameleon GIS System


          Typical Open-Source “Chameleon”                                                                                      Kenneth Romney
               Application Configuration                                                                                           5/24/08
        http://www.directionsmag.com/article.php?article_id=914




              Components to be                                                                    End-user Access
                                                                                                      (via web-browser
                 developed                                                                          or web-based viewer)




                                                     Our Web-based                                                              Development and
                                                       Application                                                               Administrative
                                                        (Chameleon API)                                                             Access




                     MapServer
                http://maptools.org/ms4w/




                                                                          Chameleon Server
                                                                  http://chameleon.maptools.org/index.phtml
                                                                                                                 Pre-written Content
                                                                                                                   (the wheel we don’t re-invent)




                                            Map Data
                                   http://opensourcegis.org/




As a GIS system was thrown out as an idea due to major differences in the
purposes of a GIS system and our project, we decided on a stand-alone type
system such as that shown in Figure 2. The basic program would load local
resources for use and the user could access the system. Any administrative
access for updates, fixes, troubleshooting, or implementing end-user created
content would be at that machine level.


                                                     Figure 2 – OPS hardware architecture

                                                                                                                                                    18 | P a g e
                                                                        Kenneth Romney
                                                                            8/20/08




   Components to be                                   End-user Access
      developed




                                                                          Development and
                                                                           Administrative
                                                                              Access

                         Our standalone application
                            with all components
                          available in one location




Other possibilities that may be implemented are shown in Figure 3 (following
page). These include user-created content such as resources specific to the
region, updated maps, and local conditions. Updates such as software
updates, requested content, and other online content would be made available
on a separate server.




                                                                                19 | P a g e
                           Figure 3 – Other possible OPS hardware architecture




    Components to be
       developed                                                End-user Access


                                                                           User-created content



                                                                                     Development and
                                                                                      Administrative
                                                                                         Access




   Future content to be
        developed
       (Updated Content)



                                                         Software update server




3.2 Software Architecture N-Tier Design
This system will be built on an n-tier, or more specifically a 3-tier design. An
n-tier design consists of multiple “layers” of code that are interdependent. In
the 3-tier design there are 3 layers: presentation layer, logic layer, and data
layer. Each layer is an encapsulated module with its own functionality and
works with the next tiered layer.

3.2.1 Presentation layer
The job of this layer is to make the work easy for the end-user so they do not
have to worry about logic or data storage, the other two layers complete that
work. Information here is passed and/or accessed to/by the logic layer.




                                                                                            20 | P a g e
3.2.2 Logic layer
This layer processes all commands in the application, is the inside “program”
and “code” and moves data between the presentation and data layers.

3.2.3 Data layer
Information is stored as a file on the hardware. The information is accessed by
the logic layer and passed up to the presentation layer. Information here
includes account information, saved data, local resources, etc.

                                             Figure 4: 3-tier Design




                                                                                   Application


    Presentation Layer
     This layer is the interface of the end user.


                                                                                 Status bar        Status divider                 Status divider




                                                                                   Vin1           Vout1
                                                                                                                              0
                                                                                                           1                             5
                                                                                                                a1        Vcc1      b1
                                                             B1           Vout                    Vout1    2
                                                                                                                a2                  b2
                                                                                                                                         6


     Logic Layer                                             B4                                   Vout2
                                                                                                           3

                                                                                                           4
                                                                                                                a3                  b3
                                                                                                                                         7

                                                                                                                                         8
                                                                                                                a4                  b4


      This layer is the interpreter of the                                         Vin2           Vout2

      presentation and data layers.
                                                             Vref
                                                                                              1                           5
                                                                                                   a1                b1
                                                                                              2                           6
                                                                                                   a2                b2
                                                             GND    ENB                       3                           7
                                                                                                   a3                b3
                                                                                              4                           8
                                                                                                   a4     GND        b4
                                                                                                            0




      Data Layer
       This layer stores information.


                                                                    Database                  Computer Hardware




                                                                                                                                  21 | P a g e
22 | P a g e
4 Presentation
4.1 Presentation Flow

                    GUI Flow Chart


                         Introduction
                             Menu




    Open Scenario
                        Create Scenario   Play Scenario
     for Editing




                         Choose Map




                           Crop Map




     Create/Edit
                         Choose Icons
        Scene



                                               23 | P a g e
4.2 Main Screen / Menu




This screen is the main window of the application. All other windows appear in
or on top of this window. This window contains a menu that contains options
for the application as well as a tool bar that contains icons that allow the user
to interact with the application.




                                                                      24 | P a g e
4.3 Scenario Editor




This screen allows the users to select a background map and a set of icons to
use in a scenario as well as choose a name for the scenario and specify the
scenario author. This screen also allows users to import new maps and icon
sets.




This screen allows the user to crop the background map to preview the cropped
result and either accept or reject it.


                                                                    25 | P a g e
This screen is the window that allows a user to build text slides to present the
data or statistic to the audience. The user may adjust the background color,
the font color, the font type and size.




This screen is the window that allows a user to build slides and set the
resources available for discussion with that slide during presentation. As well
as set the log event for that slide as well as opening comments when that slide
is first displayed.

                                                                     26 | P a g e
4.4 Scenario Playback




This screen allows the user to view a scaled down view of the entire
background map including all icons that have been placed.




This screen is the window that allows a user to play a scenario for presentation
or training purposes. This screen displays a series of slides containing maps
and icons or text.


                                                                       27 | P a g e
4.5 FEMA Form Reports




This screen shows a mock up of the event and situation status report.




This screen shows a mock up of the resource and equipment status report.

                                                                   28 | P a g e
4.6 Help File / Tutorial
OPS will include a help file that will aid any user in creating and editing
scenarios. It will include how-to's, product information, definitions, liability
disclaimer, and system requirements. It will be created using HelpNDoc.




                                                                       29 | P a g e
5 Business Rules Design
5.1 Business Rules
5.1.1 Main Program
File Menu:
               Create New Scenario
               Load Scenario
               Save Scenario
               Print Scenario
               Exit


Import/Export Menu
               Import Scenario
               Export Scenario
               Import Map File
               Import Icon Package
               Import Single Icon


Options Menu
               Load/Unload Icon Packages
               Load/Unload Background Image


(1)      On program load, user shall have a dialog box presented that will start
      the “Scenario Creation Wizard,” or the option to quit the wizard.




                                                                          30 | P a g e
(2)      Scenario Creation Wizard will guide the user through creating a new
      scenario through the following series of dialog boxes (one dialog box where
      the content changes for each screen)
(3)      Scenario Creation Wizard screens:

(4)      “Select Background”

         a. User is presented dialog box to select background file.

         b. User is restricted to selecting only supported file types
            (Jpeg/Gif/Png/Tif/Raw/Bmp) for map file

(5)      Import Icon Packages

         a. User is asked if they want to import a new icon package

                i. If yes, bring up a Browse dialog box and allow them to search
                   and select the icon package to load, or cancel

                       1. If icon package selected, run business rules associated
                          with Import Icon

               ii. If no, continue to next screen

(6)      Select Icon Package

(7)      Title Slide

         a. User is presented with dialog box to create first slide – this will be a
            normal create slide dialog box

(8)      After Scenario Creation Wizard is completed, the program will be in “Edit
      Scenario” mode and the user can then add/edit slides.
(9)      Once a user has selected a background file, they are currently restricted
      to using that background for all slides within that map. Future versions
      should include ability to change background on a per-slide basis – that would
      actually be great to add in to this version if time allows.

                                                                           31 | P a g e
(10)   User can exit the program at any time.
(11)   If user chooses to exit and the program is in edit mode and changes have
   not been saved, a confirmation box is displayed saying there is unsaved
   information and user is asked if they really want to quit without saving.
(12)   If user chooses to exit and the program is in presentation mode (scenario
   is running), confirmation box is displayed saying that a presentation is
   running and user is asked if they really want to quit.
(13)   Only one scenario can be open at a time.
(14)   At any one time, program is either in presentation mode or edit mode,
   but not both.
(15)   If user chooses Create New Scenario or Load Scenario while in edit mode
   and changes have not been saved, a confirmation box is displayed saying
   there is unsaved information and user is asked if they really want to quit
   out of current scenario.
(16)   While in presentation mode, the user cannot change slide
   text/background image, change number/types of resources, or re-order
   slides.
(17)   While in presentation mode, the Import menu and Options menu should
   be grayed out.

5.1.2 Select Map
   (1) At any time the user may cancel out of loading an image.
   (2) The user may select an image from the file browser.
   (3) The image must be compatible with the software (list file types here).
   (4) If the image is corrupted or damaged and cannot be opened the user will
       be notified to select a new image.
   (5) When the image has been loaded the user will be prompted if they would
       like to use the image. The user may select image or return and select a
       new image




                                                                      32 | P a g e
   (6) The user will be prompted if they would like to crop and or scale the
      image. Upon crop or scaling of image the user will be able to confirm or
      cancel the selection.
   (7) The user must confirm image to continue.

5.1.3 Select Scenario Main
List of Business Rules

   (1) The user will start the program by clicking on the OPS Icon.
          a. Start Program
   (2) When the software first starts, the user will have a couple options.
          a. Create Scenario
          b. Load Scenario (for editing)
          c. Load Scenario (for Presentation)
          d. Exit
   (3) If the user decides to click on Create Scenario, the following options are
      going to appear.
          a. Select the desired map to be imported (A dialog box will come up,
             and the user will be able to chose the file from a directory)
          b. If the file is corrupted, the user will be able to choose other file.
          c. If the specified map is not in the right format, the software will
             convert the file to a JPEG image.
          d. If the file cannot be located, the user will be able to exit or try
             another folder.
          e. Import Icons ( A dialog box will come up, and the user will be able
             to chose the file from a directory)
          f. Add/Edit Slide (A box will come up asking if the user wants to add
             more slides of just add an existing slide)
          g. Determine part of map to display (A box will come up asking the
             user which parts of the map he would like to work on)




                                                                          33 | P a g e
      h. Select which resources are available (An option box will come up
         asking what kind of resources the end user wants to add to the
         presentation)
      i. Add/Edit Events and resources (The user will be able to add or edit
         events at this point, or continue)
      j. Edit Ordering of Slides (At this point, the user will be able to decide
         the order of the presentation slides)
      k. Save Scenario (At this point, the user will be able to save the
         scenario created and import the saved scenario to the
         presentation).
      l. Exit
(4) If the user decides to click on Load Scenario (for editing), the following
   options are going to appear.
      a. Can change scenario settings if wanted: Icons, Maps, and Part of
         the map, Resources available, edit events and resources. (If the
         user decides to change something in an existing scenario, he will
         load scenario for editing and modify the scenario).
             i. If the scenario is not correctly imported, a dialog box will
                come up asking for other file.
      b. If the user cannot find the desired map, he will have the ability to
         exit or try another directory.




(5) If the user decides to click on Load Scenario (for presentation), the
   following options are going to appear.
      a. Select Scenario
      b. If the scenario is not correctly imported, a dialog box will come up
         asking for other file.
      c. If the user cannot find the desired map, he will have the ability to
         exit or try another directory.
      d. Scenario Runs
                                                                     34 | P a g e
            e. Print Report
            f. Print full Report
            g. Print slide

5.1.4 Action Enablers
Rules

   (1)   If the user clicks on the Add Slide button, then the system will display a
         dialog box with the radio button options for adding a blank presentation
         slide and a map slide.

   (2)   If the user selects a map slide in the Add Slide dialog box, then the
         system will prompt the user to choose whether to copy the same map,
         events, and resources from the previous map slide or to select a new
         map.

   (3)   If the user chooses to select a new map, then the system will display a
         dialog box with browsing for available maps or to find a new map on the
         local machine.

   (4)   If the user adds an event or resource to a previous map slide that is used
         in latter map slides, then the system will copy those new changes to the
         latter map slides.

   (5)   If the user changes any of the properties to an event or resource in a
         previous map slide that is used in latter map slides, then the system will
         update those new changes to the latter map slides.

   (6)   If the user deletes an event or resource in a previous map slide that is
         used in latter map slides, then the system will delete all other
         occurrences of that event or resource in latter map slides.

   (7)   If the user deletes an entire map slide from the scenario, then the
         system will delete all other events and resources copied from that slide in
         all other latter map slides. (I.e. The user creates map slides 1,2,3,4. User

                                                                            35 | P a g e
         creates a fire event on map slide 2 and it is copied in slides 3 and 4. The
         user then decides to delete slide 2. The system will then delete the fire
         event and other resources that were copied from slide 2 in slides 3 and
         4.)

   (8)   If the user attempts to name two or more same resources/events the
         same name, then the system will notify the user through a dialog box
         that the name has already been used by a same resource and will force
         the user to type in a different name. (I.e. The user creates 2 fire events,
         and attempts to name them “Fire”, the system will display a dialog
         message stating that name has already been used, and to type in a
         different name for the second fire event. The system will display the
         event properties box to allow the user to change the name.)

Constraints

   (1)   While editing an open scenario, the user can select to add new icons to
         use.

   (2)   The user created icons will be saved in a icon package file (IPF) format.

   (3)   The resource and event icons will be displayed in category format by
         their different icon packages.

5.1.5 Business Rules Continued
   (1)   Before the scenario can be saved, all slides must be saved first. Prompt.
   (2)   Current slide must be saved or discarded before a new slide can be
         created.
   (3)   Current slide must be saved before it can be rearranged in the slide order
         window.
   (4)   User must have the map image they want to use on their system.
   (5)   User must have any additional Icon Packages they wish to use on their
         system.


                                                                          36 | P a g e
(6)   When background map area is changed, user will be prompted whether
      or not to clear off all resources and events.




                                                               37 | P a g e
5.2 Use Cases
5.2.1 Add Slide System

                                                 Add Slide System


                                                            Presentation Slide




                                                «extends»



                         Add Slide                                                               Copy Previous
            *    *                                                                           Background Image Slide
                                                                                       *


   Actor1                                                                  *

                                    «extends»
                                                      Background Image
                                                            Slide


                                                                     *
                                                                                                   New Background
                                                                                                     Image Slide
                                                                                       *



                         Element                   Description

                         Use Case Name             Add Slide System
                         Assumptions               The actor is running or has run a scenario.

                         Preconditions             The actor has opened a scenario for editing.

                         Use Case Initiation       The actor has selected the Add Slide button..

                         Actor(s)                  User

                         Use Case Dialog           The actor is presented with two radio button options when
                                                   adding a slide. The actor can choose to add a blank
                                                   presentation slide. The actor can choose to add a slide with a
                                                   loaded background image.

                         Post Conditions           None for choosing a blank presentation slide. The actor can
                                                   choose to copy event and resources from previous background
                                                   image slide when adding a slide with a loaded background
                                                   image.

                         Unresolved Issues         None




                                                                                                            38 | P a g e
5.2.2 Run Scenario

                                                    Run Scenario




                     Go to Next Slide

                     *                         Return to Previous
                                                     Slide
                                           *
                                                                                    Jump to Slide

                                                                            *




          *
                                                                            Add/Remove Resource
           **                                                       *
           *
          **
            *                        Load Scenario
                               *

 Actor1

                                                       Print Report
                                                *




                                                                                      Exit
                                                                        *




                         Element                      Description
                         Use Case Name                Run Scenario

                         Assumptions                  User has created a scenario
                                                      Has access to program

                         Preconditions                Previous scenario has been made

                         Actor(s)                     User

                         Use Case Dialogue            Actor may:
                                                      Demonstrate (move resources dynamically on map.
                                                      Can go to next previously created slide
                                                      Can return to previous slide
                                                      Can jump to any slide
                                                      Add Icon
                                                      Print current report in text form
                                                      Load other scenario
                                                      Save scenario
                                                      Exit

                         Post Conditions              None

                         Unresolved Issues            None




                                                                                                        39 | P a g e
5.2.3 Operation Planning System Overview

                       Operation Planning System Overview

                 Create New Scenario
                                                   Modify Existing
                                                     Scenario




                                       Import/Export
                                         Scenario




                                                                          Import Icon
                                                                           Packages
 User


                                                                             Import
                                                                       User-created Icons




                                       Run a Scenario
                                                              «uses»


                                                                          Logging System
                                                              «uses»

                                       Generate/Print
                                         Reports




           Element                 Description

           Use Case Name:          Operation Planning System Overview
           Assumptions:            User has program installed
           Preconditions:          User has program installed
           Actor(s):               User
           Use Case Dialogue:      Actor may:

                                   Create New Scenario
                                   Modify Existing Scenario
                                   Import/Export Scenarios
                                   Import Icon Packages
                                   Import User-Created Icons
                                   Run a Scenario
                                   Generate/Print Reports

           Post Conditions         None
           Unresolved Issues       None




                                                                                            40 | P a g e
5.2.4 Build Scenario System

                                                   Build Scenario System


                                            Select or Import
                                           Background Image
                                      *


                                                                    Select or Import
                                                                    Icon Package(s)
                                                          *




                                                                                     Create New Slide(s)
            *
             *                                                             *
          * **




  Actor                                                            Edit or Rearrange
                                                                         slide(s)
                                                         *




                                             Save Scenario
                                  *




                    Use Case Name         Build Scenario System

                    Assumptions           The actor has the authority to access this system.

                    Preconditions         The actor must have chosen to build a scenario from the scenario
                                          select system.

                    Use Case Initiation The actor selected the [OK] button in the select scenario system.

                    Use Case Dialog       The actor is presented with the scenario editor
                                          The actor will be prompted to select or import a background image.
                                          The actor will be prompted to select or import new Icon Packages.
                                          The actor will have the ability to create new slides.
                                          The actor can edit or rearrange existing slides.
                                          The actor can save a scenario at any time.

                    Post Conditions       The scenario must be saved in order to be able to run the scenario
                                          in the run scenario system

                    Unresolved Issues None.




                                                                                                               41 | P a g e
42 | P a g e
5.2.5 Select Scenario System




                                                 Select Scenario System



                                              Create Scenario

                                  *




                     *
                     *
                 *                             Load Scenario (For
                                                    Editing)
                                      *




          User

                                                   Load Scenario (For
                                          *          Presentation)




                               Element                          Description
                               Use Case Name                    Select Scenario System

                               Assumptions                      The actor has authority to access the system

                               Preconditions                    The actor must have started the program.

                               Use Case Initiation              The actor started up the program.

                               Actor(s)                         User

                               Use Case Dialog                  The actor is presented with a scenario selection
                                                     menu.
                                                                Actor may delete scenario.
                                                                Actor may modify scenario.
                                                                Actor can view presentation slide scenario.
                                                                Actor can view load scenario for editing

                               Post Conditions                  None for building a scenario.
                                                                To modify a scenario, a scenario must have
                                                                already been built.
                                                                To run a scenario, a scenario must have already
                                                                been built.

                               Unresolved Issues                None.




                                                                                                                   43 | P a g e
5.2.6 Reports System




                                       Reports System

                                                         Print Complete
                                                            Scenario
                                                *




                                                         Print Individual
          *
        **
        *
                                                              Slide
                                            *




 User                                                   Generate FEMA
                                                    formatted Situation Report
                                            *




                                                        Generate Events
                                            *               Report




               Element               Description

               Use Case Name         Reports System
               Assumptions           There are created scenarios on which to generate and print
                                     reports.

               Preconditions         The user must have created a scenario.

               Use Case Initiation   The actor can select the Reports System once a scenario has
                                     been created.

               Actor(s)              User

               Use Case Dialog       The user can choose to access the Reports System when a
                                     scenario has been completed, to view changes made to the
                                     scenario and be able to create a situation report in a FEMA
                                     format that can be submitted. There will also be the option to
                                     generate a complete print out of the whole scenario. The
                                     user will also be able to print out individual slides.

               Post Conditions       None

               Unresolved Issues     None




                                                                                      44 | P a g e
5.3 Program Flow


                                       Start Program / Main Menu               Terminate




                       Create
                      Scenario

                                                Load Scenario
                                                 (for editing)
                                                                                Load Scenario (for
                                                                                  presentation)


                    Select Map to
                       import
                                                Can change
                                                  scenario
                                                                    Select
                                                 settings if
                                                                   Scenario
                                                wanted (map/
                                                 icons/etc)
    Import Icons



                                                                   Scenario
                                                                    Runs




                                                                                Print
   Add/Edit Slide                                                                                       Print Report
                                                                              Summary




   Determine part
                                                                                           Print Full
     of map to                                                                                                         Print Slide
                                                                                            Report
      display




    Select which
   resources are
     available




     Add/Edit
    Events and
    Resources




    Edit Ordering
      of slides




       Save
                                    Terminate
      Scenario




                                                                                                              45 | P a g e
5.4 Activity Diagrams
5.4.1 Create New Scenario


                      *


               Select New Scenario


                     *                *
                     *


                 Fill in Title Page

                                              *
                     *

                                          *
                  Add/Load Map
                                                      **

                      *                               *      Errors Display
                                                                              *   *
                                                       **
             Select Map From Directory                   *
                                                  *

                      *
                      *


                    Add Slides            *

                      *
                      *

                  Save Scenario               *


                      *
                      *




                                                                                      46 | P a g e
5.4.2 Create Slide




                                                                 Choose Slide Type




              Choose Background Color




                                                            Choose Background Image




                                     Keep Previous Background                             Crop New Background




                   Add & Edit Text           Clear Previous Resources           Inherit Resource Positions




                                                                Define Slide Properties




                                                          Drag'n Drop Resources & Events




                                                                      Save Slide




                                                                                                                47 | P a g e
5.4.3 Print Report




                                                        User Selects Print Report




                        Print Slide                           Print Scenario
                                                                                               Print Summary                   Print FEMA Report




 Print Screenshot of Slide with Event/Resource Descriptions                      Print Text of Slide Event/Resource Descriptions




                                                              Print All Slides




                                                                                                                               48 | P a g e
5.4.4 Add Event

                  User selects add event




                       Add Event




                     Add Resource




                   Choose Resource




                  Add Another Resource




                     Go to next slide




                                           49 | P a g e
5.4.5 Select Map




                                                    Select Background Image


                                                    Cancel



                                                       Browse for Image




                                           Cancel
                                                         Open / Cancel


                                                                  Open        No

                                           Bad File
                   Image Load Failed                    Image Loading


                                                                   Loaded


                                                             Use Image?


                                  Cancel                          Yes


                                                    Crop / Zoom Scale Image


                                                                    OK




                                                                                   50 | P a g e
5.5 Class Diagrams

                                                                                        Background
                                                                                  -File path
                                                                                  -Width
                                                                                  -Height
                                                           1                      -
                                                                                  +Import()
                            Scenario                                         1    +Export()
              -Starting Slide
              -Number slides
              -Icon Packages                               1                               Slide
              -Background File                                                    -Title
              +Save()                                                     1..*    -Icon Setup
              +Run()                                                              -Coordinates
              +Load()                                                             -Slide Order
                                                            1
              +Stop()                                                             +Save Slide()
                                                                                  +Reorder Slide()
                                                Can Print

                                                                                       Icon Package
       Print will inherit                          Print
       from a base C#                                                             -Title
                                       -Title                             1..*    -Number Icons
       printing class.
                                       +Print()                                   +Import()
                                                                                  +Export()




                   Print FEMA Report                      Print Slide        Print Summary
                  -Scenario                      -Slide                   -Scenario
                  +Format for Printing()         +Format for Printing()   +Format for Printing()




                                                                                                      51 | P a g e
6 Data Management
6.1 File Imports
                                   Import Scenario Save File

                                                        Start




                                                     Read File
              Correct Header         Yes
                Identifier?



                      No
                                                                                         Get Data
                                                 Get Total File Size
                   Print                                                                 Checksum
               “Invalid File”




                Print “File           No          Matches Header           Yes         Matches Header        Yes
               Corruption”                        File Size Value?                    Checksum Value?



                                                                                        No


                                                      Check For
                                                 Installed Scenarios
                                                   With Same Title
                                                     and Author




                                                                                          Create Unique
         No        Overwrite?              Yes        Already                 No         Folder in Program
                                                     Installed?
                                                                                             Directory



                          Yes

                     Delete                                 Extract Icon Files and
                  Existing Files                             Background Image




                                                                Save Title, Author,
                 Clear Existing                                    and Unique                 Save Slide Data
                    Records                                         Directory




                                                        End




                                                                                                             52 | P a g e
                          Import Icon Package File

                                              Start




     Correct Header        Yes             Read File
       Identifier?



             No

                                                                       Get Data
                                       Get Total File Size
          Print                                                       Checksum
      “Invalid File”




       Print “File           No         Matches Header       Yes    Matches Header        Yes
      Corruption”                       File Size Value?           Checksum Value?



                                                                       No


                                            Check For
                                       Installed Packages
                                         With Same Title
                                           and Author




                                                                     Create Unique
No         Overwrite?            Yes        Already          No     Folder in Program
                                           Installed?
                                                                        Directory



                  Yes


            Delete
                                       Extract Icon Files
         Existing Files




                                       Save Title, Author,
                                          and Unique
                                           Directory




                                              End




                                                                                        53 | P a g e
6.2 File Exports

             Export As Scenario Save File

                         Start




                     Get Scenario
                      Information




                      Write File
                     Header Block




                   Write Background
                         Image




                   Scan Associated      Create Icon
                    Icon Directory      Package File




                                         Write Icon
                                        Package File




                   Write Slide Count,
                    Total File Size,
                                        Write Slides
                   and Checksum to
                     Header Block




                          End




                                                       54 | P a g e
Export As Icon Package File

          Start




   Get Icon Package
      Information




       Write File
       Header
        Block




       Scan Icon
       Directory




                                Append
       Finished?         No   Icon To End
                                  File




             Yes



   Get Total File Size




       Get Data
       Checksum




   Write Icon Count
    Total File Size,
    and Checksum
   to Header Block




          End




                                            55 | P a g e
6.3 File Structures

                             Scenario Save File (SSF)

                       Header Identifier
                            (0x4653)


                             Title                               Background Image




                                                     Resources
           Header




                            Author


                        File Size (bytes)
                                                                 Icon Package File
                       Data Checksum

                         Slide Count


                                            Slides




        Type                                                                         Icon #

                                                                                Description
        Slide #
                                                                                Coordinates
        Text
   Background Sizing
     Coordinates
        Events

     Resources                                Resources                           Icon #
                                                                                Description
                                                                              Available Count

                                                                               Coordinates




                                                                             56 | P a g e
         Icon Package File (IPF)

                Header Identifier
                     (0x5049)


Header                Title


                     Author

                 Data Checksum


                 File Size (bytes)

                   Icon Count




              Icon Attachments




           File Size (bytes)

             Description


            Icon File Data




                                     57 | P a g e
6.4 Database Structure

                               Database ERD


                                     scenario
                               PK   id
                slide               title                   scenario_icon
    PK      id                      author
                                    background_path   PK,FK1      scenario_id
            slide_no                                  PK,FK2      icon_id
            text
            bg_coord_x1
            bg_coord_y1
            bg_coord_x2
            bg_coord_y2
    FK1     scenario_id
            type                                             icon
                                                      PK     id

                                                      FK1    iconset_id
                                                             filename
            objects
   PK      id

           type
                                                            iconset
           description
           icon_path                                  PK     id
   FK1     slide_id
           available_count                                   title
                                                             author
                                                             base_path
                                                             type

          object_coords
    PK,FK1         object_id
    PK             x
    PK             Y




                                                                      58 | P a g e
7 Risk Assessment

7.1 Risk Assessment for Data Link Layer
Data Link Team:

Erik Johnson, Bruce Jarvis, Bryant Dearden

7.1.1 Binary Flat Files
       Files have their obvious benefits and disadvantages over their distributed
data source counterparts; however, the choice is clear when needing to transfer
data to an external system, such as a new computer that has installed the
application and needs to view a scenario created elsewhere. The application
will incorporate two file types – the icon package file and scenario save file.
Each will encounter roughly the same risks in their use, namely a potential
loss of data integrity after the files have been generated. Files are more
susceptible to this corruption as they are inherently more portable than other
segments of the application’s data storage (i.e. light-weight database); they can
be transferred or otherwise delivered to remote machines via email, USB flash
drives, Internet networks, etc. Since files are really just a stream of binary bits,
usually any distortion, even slight, can completely degrade the original file
source. To counter this, the system will provide both checksum and file size
attributes in the header section of each binary file as a means of detection
when a file’s data integrity has been compromised. While methods exist to
regenerate or fix corrupted data, the system will not provide this solution. If a
file is detected as corrupted, this will be flagged as an erroneous state by the
system and the user will be informed of such conditions. The latter solution,
for all general purposes of the project, is the most time and cost effective



                                                                        59 | P a g e
solution when taken in tandem with the low likelihood of data integrity loss in
modern systems.




7.1.2 Database System
      Physical limitations are the primary risk when choosing a system from a
list of light-weight database management systems, such as our final choice:
Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Express. There is a 4GB total database size
limitation. While we don’t feel this will be an issue, it is something that we
need to be aware of when we design the system. We need to be aware of the
size of everything that goes into our database. We have chosen to save map
paths instead of the maps themselves for this reason. SQL Server 2005
Express was not designed to take advantage of multi-core system architecture.
While it will run on such systems it will not take advantage of the multiple
cores, and there may be a bit of a performance lag on such system relative to
other applications that do take advantage of this architecture. However, this
lag shouldn’t be substantially significant in the context by which we’ll be
utilizing the system, especially since we shall assume that only one instance of
an application can be open at any given time.

      We investigated other “Light” or “Express” DBMS’s (Database
Management Systems) but felt compelled to choose SQL Server Express.
Benchmarks are similar to others that we looked at, but because of its ease of
use with Visual Studio it was given the final nod. These “Lite” DBMS’s do have
performance bottle-necks compared to their full-fledged siblings, though we felt
that through smart design of our system the previously mentioned issues may
overcome. Additionally, like any database system, best practice dictates that
regular updates be maintained in case of catastrophic failure in any component
which deems its data inaccessible. The application system should keep
automatic backups over an average amount of time should a worst-case
scenario occur. This will allow the user to recover the system to a previous

                                                                       60 | P a g e
backup point. On average, significant failures are very infrequent with this
class of desktop application, especially since the database is accessible by only
one user on a single computer at a time.

7.2 Risk Assessment for Business Layer
This is separated into two areas: risks associated with our process and risks
associated with program operation.

Each risk has a brief description of it, or the situation that might lead to it.
Each risk has a probability and a severity rating associated with it. "Above
Average," "Average," and "Below Average," are the possible values for the
probability. Severity is listed as either “Very Serious,” “Average,” “Not Serious,”
or as a range between two of those values.

Following those measures is an explanation of what we will do to mitigate that
particular risk.

7.2.1 Process
These risks are things that we have to watch out for while we're creating the
program.

7.2.2 Scope/Feature Creep
Scope/feature creep occurs when additional features are added to the project
that were not originally planned for.

Probability: Above Average

Severity: Average – Very Serious

Some measure of scope creep occurs in any reasonably-sized program, as
features that weren't thought of initially come up in further planning sessions.
Scope creep can irrecoverably damage a project if allowed to go unchecked. We
can mitigate this risk by being aware that scope creep can happen and limit it
once we've gone beyond the planning stages. Changes to the program at the


                                                                        61 | P a g e
design stage are approximately 150 times less expensive to make than a
change during testing, the final phase of the project.

7.2.3 Students Failing to Complete Their Responsibilities
With any project, and particularly a student-run one, there is always a risk
that some participants will fall behind in their responsibilities and fail to make
reasonable progress. If this occurs in critical areas of the program, the entire
project can fall behind schedule due to lack of effort on the part of a relatively
small number of people.

Probability: Average

Severity: Average – Very Serious

This could potentially be the most damaging risk we have defined. If the
students in control of the project fail to do their responsibilities, there's a very
high likelihood that the project will not be completed in the specified
timeframe.

To control this, the students that are most likely to be responsible need to be
put in charge of the most important parts of the project. Those who have a
track record of irresponsibility should not be entrusted with critical parts of the
program. If any students do start to fall behind, the team leader should report
it immediately to the program manager and the instructor.

7.2.4 Program
These are risks that can occur while the program is actually running.
Probability listed assumes that we follow appropriate Quality Assurance
measures to limit the probability of those risks occurring.

7.2.5 Program Won't Save Scenario
Before a scenario can run, it must be saved.

Probability: Below Average



                                                                         62 | P a g e
Severity: Very Serious

Should this occur, the program is essentially useless. This risk must be
mitigated by ensuring that the data layer has a well-defined structure for
saving, that the business layer can effectively transfer data from the GUI to the
data layer, and that all aspects of the system are working.

7.2.6 Program Won't Run Scenario
Once a scenario is created, the user will want to run the scenario.

Probability: Below Average

Severity: Very Serious

Like the above risk of not saving a scenario, this could have devastating
results, particularly if it occurs during a large presentation. To mitigate this
risk, controls must be in place to ensure that the database is tamper-resistant
and that key files in the application folders are not deleted.

7.2.7 Program Can't Print Reports
Once a scenario is created, the user may want to print out reports.

Probability: Below Average

Severity: Average

The ability to print reports is one that is desired by our client, but not the main
ability. It would be inconvenient if this was to happen, and this could be
potentially very annoying to the client, but it is also one that might be due
solely to user error. This risk can be mitigated by ensuring that the business
layer is able to take data from the data layer, send it to the presentation layer
for formatting, and then send it to the printer. Our documentation should also
note that




                                                                        63 | P a g e
7.2.8 File/Database Integrity is compromised
The program stores data in the database and in an application folder. There is
a possibility that data could be damaged.

Probability: Below Average

Severity: Very Serious

If data (icons, maps, scenario scripts, etc.) are damaged, then the program will
not run as expected. To mitigate this risk, measures must be in place to allow
the user to backup data (both those in normal file formats and those in the
database) and restore them. Basic error detection (checksums, mostly) will be
built into the data storage, but in the event of a detected error, the user needs
a way to restore data. This could be done with automatic backups, user-
generated backups, or with re-installing parts of the program, depending on
where the error occurs.




                                                                      64 | P a g e
8 Alternative Solutions and Programs
The following sections contain small research notes of existing programs that
provide training in disaster or emergency response situations. The techniques
and programs described may be effective in implementing in this Emergency
Response Simulation System.




8.1 FEMA Incident Command Training Requirements
       – Adam Hellewell

All information contained in this document was taken from the FEMA individual
studies website. More specific information can be found on the FEMA website.
This is meant to be a broad general overview. If more specific training is needed
please consult the website.
http://www.training.fema.gov/EMILMS/IS100A/ICS01summary.htm


The Incident Command System (ICS) is the command system that must be
employed by all agencies in an emergency. Some examples of incidents that
might occur where ICS would be used are:

      Fire, both structural and wild land.
      Natural disasters, such as tornadoes, floods, ice storms or earthquakes.
      Human and animal disease outbreaks.
      Search and rescue missions.
      Hazardous materials incidents.
      Criminal acts and crime scene investigations.

                                                                      65 | P a g e
      Terrorist incidents, including the use of weapons of mass destruction.
      National Special Security Events, such as Presidential visits or the Super
       Bowl.
      Other planned events, such as parades or demonstrations.

In many cases the incident management is not possible for one agency to cover
it alone. Even in these cases ICS is fully functional.

The Incident Command System, or ICS, is a standardized, on-scene, all-hazard
incident management concept. ICS allows its users to adopt an integrated
organizational structure to match the complexities and demands of single or
multiple incidents without being hindered by jurisdictional boundaries.
ICS has considerable internal flexibility. It can grow or shrink to meet different
needs. This flexibility makes it a very cost effective and efficient management
approach for both small and large situations.
Communication is probably the most critical part of an emergency. Without
clear communication an emergency can quickly become a disaster. A critical
part of working in a multi-agency response effort is to use clear common text to
communicate. It is very important that no radio codes, agency specific lingo or
codes, or jargon are used.
An incident is managed by objectives. There are clear steps that must be
followed when functioning within ICS.


Step 1: Understand agency policy and direction.
Step 2: Assess incident situation.
Step 3: Establish incident objectives.
Step 4: Select appropriate strategy or strategies to achieve objectives.
Step 5: Perform tactical direction (applying tactics appropriate to the strategy,
assigning the right resources, and monitoring their performance).
Step 6: Provide necessary follow-up (changing strategy or tactics, adding or
subtracting resources, etc.).

                                                                       66 | P a g e
Incident Facilities include:
The Incident Command Post (ICP): Where the incident commander oversees all
operations associated with the incident. Usually an ICP is located out of the
immediate hazard zone. The ICP will be designated by the name of the incident.
I.e. Trail Creek ICP
Staging Areas: Area where incident personnel and equipment are kept while
waiting for assignment. Those in the staging area are in the available status.
There may be more than one staging area.
Base: Area where primary logistics and administrative functions are
coordinated. Only one base per incident and those in the base are considered
out-of-service.
Camps: Area where resources may be kept to support incident operations.
Every incident does not have to have camps. Usually located in the general
incident areas they are usually staffed with water, food, sleeping areas, and
other necessities.
Helibases and Helispots: Places where a helicopter could land. Helibases are
generally more long term then are Helispots.
Map symbols for these are:




http://www.training.fema.gov/EMILMS/IS100A/ICS01summary.htm
Resources are designated as either Tactical or Support services. Tactical are
equipment and personnel to help with the incident where everything else is a
                                                                      67 | P a g e
support service such as food, water, etc. Resources are also designated as
Assigned, Available, or Out of Service.
Resource Management includes:

      Categorizing resources.
      Ordering resources.
      Dispatching resources.
      Tracking resources.
      Recovering resources.

Keeping track of resources is essential. We must keep track of all resources
that come to the incident. So they must check in and check out from the
incident in order to have accurate recordkeeping.
There are five major management functions that are the foundation upon
which the ICS organization develops. These functions apply whether you are
handling a routine emergency, organizing for a major non-emergency event, or
managing a response to a major disaster. The five major management functions
are:




      Incident Command: Sets the incident objectives, strategies, and
       priorities and has overall responsibility at the incident or event.
      Operations: Conducts tactical operations to carry out the plan. Develops
       the tactical objectives and organization, and directs all tactical resources.
      Planning: Prepares and documents the Incident Action Plan to
       accomplish the objectives, collects and evaluates information, maintains
       resource status, and maintains documentation for incident records.
      Logistics: Provides support, resources, and all other services needed to
       meet the operational objectives.
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      Finance/Administration: Monitors costs related to the incident.
       Provides accounting, procurement, time recording, and cost analyses.

http://www.training.fema.gov/EMILMS/IS100A/ICS01summary.htm


As incidents grow, the Incident Commander may delegate authority for
performance of certain activities to the Command Staff and the General Staff.
The Incident Commander will add positions only as needed.




      Public Information Officer, who serves as the conduit for information to
       internal and external stakeholders, including the media or other
       organizations seeking information directly from the incident or event.
      Safety Officer, who monitors safety conditions and develops measures
       for assuring the safety of all assigned personnel.
      Liaison Officer, who serves as the primary contact for supporting
       agencies assisting at an incident.

http://www.training.fema.gov/EMILMS/IS100A/ICS01summary.htm




The Operations Section is primarily in charge of managing the operation. It can
be broken down into groups or divisions. It can be broken down as small as
needed to accommodate the emergency. An example of this is:

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Expanding to




Expanding to

Operations can include also




http://www.training.fema.gov/EMILMS/IS100A/ICS01summary.htm



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Operations can get as complex or as simple as a single resource, or a single
strike team or a task force. Single Resources may be individuals, a piece of
equipment and its personnel complement, or a crew or team of individuals with
an identified supervisor that can be used at an incident. Strike Teams are a set
number of resources of the same kind and type with common communications
operating under the direct supervision of a Strike Team Leader. Strike Teams
are highly effective management units. The foreknowledge that all elements
have the same capability and the knowledge of how many will be applied allows
for better planning, ordering, utilization and management. Task Forces are a
combination of mixed resources with common communications operating
under the direct supervision of a Leader. Task Forces can be versatile
combinations of resources and their use is encouraged. The combining of
resources into Task Forces allows for several resource elements to be managed
under one individual's supervision, thus lessening the span of control of the
Supervisor.




The major activities of the Planning Section may include:

      Collecting, evaluating, and displaying incident intelligence and
       information.
      Preparing and documenting Incident Action Plans.
      Conducting long-range and/or contingency planning.
      Developing plans for demobilization.
      Maintaining incident documentation.
      Tracking resources assigned to the incident.




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      Resources Unit: Conducts all check-in activities and maintains the
       status of all incident resources. The Resources Unit plays a significant
       role in preparing the written Incident Action Plan.
      Situation Unit: Collects and analyzes information on the current
       situation, prepares situation displays and situation summaries, and
       develops maps and projections.
      Documentation Unit: Provides duplication services, including the
       written Incident Action Plan. Maintains and archives all incident-related
       documentation.
      Demobilization Unit: Assists in ensuring that resources are released
       from the incident in an orderly, safe, and cost-effective manner.

http://www.training.fema.gov/EMILMS/IS100A/ICS01summary.htm
The Logistics Section is responsible for all of the services and support needs,
including:

      Ordering, obtaining, maintaining, and accounting for essential
       personnel, equipment, and supplies.
      Providing communication planning and resources.
      Setting up food services.
      Setting up and maintaining incident facilities.
      Providing support transportation.
      Providing medical services to incident personnel.




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The Logistics Service Branch can be staffed to include a:

      Communication Unit: Prepares and implements the Incident
       Communication Plan (ICS-205), distributes and maintains
       communications equipment, supervises the Incident Communications
       Center, and establishes adequate communications over the incident.
      Medical Unit: Develops the Medical Plan (ICS-206), provides first aid and
       light medical treatment for personnel assigned to the incident, and
       prepares procedures for a major medical emergency.
      Food Unit: Supplies the food and potable water for all incident facilities
       and personnel, and obtains the necessary equipment and supplies to
       operate food service facilities at Bases and Camps.
      Supply Unit: Determines the type and amount of supplies needed to
       support the incident. The Unit orders, receives, stores, and distributes
       supplies, and services nonexpendable equipment. All resource orders are
       placed through the Supply Unit. The Unit maintains inventory and
       accountability of supplies and equipment.
      Facilities Unit: Sets up and maintains required facilities to support the
       incident. Provides managers for the Incident Base and Camps. Also
       responsible for facility security and facility maintenance services:
       sanitation, lighting, cleanup.

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      Ground Support Unit: Prepares the Transportation Plan. Arranges for,
       activates, and documents the fueling, maintenance, and repair of ground
       resources. Arranges for the transportation of personnel, supplies, food,
       and equipment.

http://www.training.fema.gov/EMILMS/IS100A/ICS01summary.htm


The Finance/Administration Section is set up for any incident that requires
incident-specific financial management. The Finance/Administration Section is
responsible for:

      Contract negotiation and monitoring.
      Timekeeping.
      Cost analysis.
      Compensation for injury or damage to property




      Procurement Unit: Responsible for administering all financial matters
       pertaining to vendor contracts, leases, and fiscal agreements.
      Time Unit: Responsible for incident personnel time recording.
      Cost Unit: Collects all cost data, performs cost effectiveness analyses,
       provides cost estimates, and makes cost savings recommendations.
      Compensation/Claims Unit: Responsible for the overall management
       and direction of all administrative matters pertaining to compensation for
       injury and claims related activities kept for the incident.

http://www.training.fema.gov/EMILMS/IS100A/ICS01summary.htm



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All information contained in this document was taken from the FEMA individual
studies website. More specific information can be found on the FEMA website.
This is meant to be a broad general overview. If more specific training is needed
please consult the website.
http://www.training.fema.gov/EMILMS/IS100A/ICS01summary.htm



8.2 Simulation Effectiveness
       – Kenneth Romney

Simulations are effective. This short section is not meant to be a complete
paper or research report, but a list of notes and findings I have found regarding
the effectiveness of simulations. The notes here touch on the use of
simulators, the effectiveness, the principles that govern that effectiveness,
studies that show differences in different teaching methods, and my overall
idea of why I recommend a simulations system as a project for Weber State
University.

Kenneth Romney
Undergraduate student,
Weber State University 2008

I began reading a document called “Supply chain simulator: A scenario-based
educational tool to enhance student learning” (Siddiqui, Khan, & Akhtar,
2008). This document goes over the concepts of simulation training on
students that were learning how a supply chain works. These are the following
points I found useful to our project:

      Simulations are in widespread use as stated in this article:


              Simulation-based educational products in academics are becoming
              wide spread and ample literature is available on this area. These
              products are categorized as scenario-, simulation-, and game-based


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         e-learning (Randall, 2002).


         The realization of the efficacy of these products is growing (Albrecht,
         1995; Carlson, 2003; Curland & Fawcett, 2001; Gilad & Sheizaf,
         2000; Holweg & Bicheno, 2002; Shifrony & Ginat, 1997; Sparling,
         2002; Walter, Coalter, & Rasheed, 1997) (Siddiqui, Khan, & Akhtar,
         2008)



   Simulations have a need for development standards and Weber State
    University should try to adopt or understand these standards before
    proceeding to market this product:



         Due to ever-increasing scope and scale of work in this area,
         formulating development standards are becoming important.
         Shareable content object reference model (SCORM) is „„a collection of
         standards and specifications for web-based e-learning. It delineates
         communications between client side content and a host (generally
         part of a learning management system)‟‟ (ADL, 2007; Wikipedia-
         SCORM, 2007).



         SCORM is an e-learning standard in which the goal is to have
         learning objects reusable, accessible, interoperable and durable,
         abbreviated as „RAID‟ (Li & Lin, 2005). Li and Lin (2005) proposed a
         hybrid scheme, for SCORM compliant courses, composed of an XML
         binding model and a WAP based directory service in which complex
         metadata could be dealt efficiently. Content object repository
         discovery and registration architecture (CORDRA) are another
         standard which is „„open, standards-based model on how to design
         and implement software systems for the purposes of discovery,

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          sharing and reuse of learning content through the establishment of
          interoperable federations of learning content repositories‟‟ (ADL2,
          2007; Cordra.net, 2007). (Siddiqui, Khan, & Akhtar, 2008)



   There are important principles to follow in order to actually teach
    someone by using a simulation. In the supply chain document I found
    that a 3 step process is important to developing a skill through
    simulations. One, a person is introduced into a simulation that does not
    mimic reality. Instead, the person is shown only a partial “piece of the
    puzzle.” Two, pieces of this “puzzle” are interconnected and the person
    is taught to multitask and incorporate the basic elements taught and can
    start to see a bigger picture. Three, the bigger picture is completely
    connected and the “puzzle” is complete. The user now experiences
    something close to reality; how the real world works. These are the steps
    that were taken by the supply chain simulator to implement the process:


          1st Scenario – „„The traditional chain‟‟ begins with the start of the
          task and lasts for initial few days. During this period a player must
          act alone and independently without any knowledge of the other
          components (no information from distributor or retailer is shared).
          This is the case where a company waits for an order to arrive and to
          react accordingly. (Siddiqui, Khan, & Akhtar, 2008)


          2nd Scenario – „„The value of information‟‟ is the next phase. In this
          scenario, a player is exposed to all the information flowing in the
          supply chain – flow of material downstream and flow of order
          upstream. In this scenario, a player understands the value of
          information and the reduction of time delays in the information flow
          and can see the effects on his performance. The outside demand
          pattern remains either fixed or follows a „step change‟ to keep the

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              dynamics of the supply chain simple. Using the information seen at
              retailer and distributor the manufacturer can foresee and plan his
              production. (Siddiqui, Khan, & Akhtar, 2008)


              3rd Scenario – Finally, uncovers the „„the true market‟‟ scenario
              where a player is exposed to the more realistic situation. The
              demand in this case becomes stochastic (random) so that a player
              has to manage his/her supply chain with more realistic and
              complicated circumstances. The information sharing remains same
              as in the „„the value of information‟‟ scenario. (Siddiqui, Khan, &
              Akhtar, 2008)



      A fourth principle is also extremely important, feedback. For the OPS
       system, the system administrator, assumed to be the chief of police, will
       provide discussion and feedback would be incorporated with the police
       and response team. The supply chain simulator implemented it in this
       way:


              …the course is compulsory. Accordingly, it is one of the highly
              populated courses. As a result, the number of instructors who have
              taught this course is sizable. These instructors were asked by the
              authors to evaluate this game… …A questionnaire is given to these
              instructors to give their feedback. The prime objective of this survey
              was to evaluate, in their opinion, the effectiveness of this game in
              the course. (Siddiqui, Khan, & Akhtar, 2008)



In another article, titled The simulated delivery-room environment as the future
modality for acquiring and maintaining skills in fetal and neonatal resuscitation,
simulation based learning is shown to be more effective in improving skills
than simply pushing a student straight into the real delivery room.
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Behavioral skills are so important that it is now a recommendation of the Joint
Commission for the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) that all
health care organizations responsible for delivering newborns „conduct team
training in prenatal areas to teach staff to work together and communicate more
effectively‟ and „for high-risk events, such as shoulder dystocia, emergency
cesarean delivery, maternal hemorrhage and neonatal resuscitation, conduct
clinical drills to help staff prepare for when such events actually occur, and
conduct debriefings to evaluate team performance and identify areas for
improvement. (Halamek, 2008)

While learning in a real environment is seemingly better than only learning out
of a text book, problems arise in an actual delivery room. The care of living
people is more important than the learning of the student, and if critical
problems arise only the doctor will be able to make the time-critical decision
making. The student, being the one trying to be taught, will be unable to
participate well enough to learn these critical factors. The actual delivery room
itself is not the best place to begin learning. But learning is still needed.

The traditional learning venue is the classroom. This, however, is not the best
way to learn everything about the delivery room because of the lack of “cues,
distracters, and pressures of the real environment.” (Halamek, 2008) This
environment is still important in learning the principles before proceeding, but
does not provide the needed experience-based training.

The following summery shows the limitations on traditional simulation-less
learning:

Traditional limitations summary:

      Classroom environment
           Characterized primarily by passive, not active,
           learning opportunities
           May be primarily focused on teaching rather than learning

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          Lacks realistic cues, distracters and pressures
          Unable to adequately prepare for practice in the real environment



      Clinical environment
          Places patients at some degree of risk
          Learning opportunities (cases) present randomly
          Learning limited by fast pace, production pressure, inherent high cost
           and other competing priorities
(Halamek, 2008)

Simulation based training holds an advantage to the tradition learning
environments of the classroom and actual clinic, but the advantage does not
necessarily come with the complexity and cost, but the methodology and
proper design implementing correct principles. Halamek explains in the article
that “Feedback elicited from NeoSim trainees in the past decade indicates that it
is their perception that most of their learning occurs not during the training
scenarios themselves but rather during the facilitated debriefings that follow
each scenario.” (Halamek, 2008) The proper training, simulated experience, and
debriefing, or critique, are critical in the simulation learning process. The
principles undermining advantages of simulation learning carry over to any
type of simulation, especially our emergency response simulation system. The
following summary explains the advantages to simulation learning.

Simulation advantage summery

      Creates no risk to human patients
      Provides structured learning opportunities with
      Defined learning objectives
      Allows practice without interruption/interference
      Can be scheduled at times convenient to trainees and instructors
      Easily tailored to the needs of individual trainees
      Can be scaled in intensity to meet the needs of learners at all levels of
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       experience
      Allows practice of routine and rare situations
      Fosters integration of cognitive, technical and behavioral skills
      Facilitates multidisciplinary team training
(Halamek, 2008)

In summary simulations are effective, if they are created properly. The
Emergency Response Simulation System will be a successful project if it is
built on principles similar to those discussed briefly in this short section.
Simulations have advantages to real-life experience in teaching and the rate at
which one can be immersed in a subject. These principles should be
implemented.

Bibliography

Halamek, L. P. (2008). The simulated delivery-room environment as the future modality for
acquiring and maintaining skills in fetal and neonatal resuscitation. Seminars in Fetal &
Neonatal Medicine , 1-6.

Siddiqui, A., Khan, M., & Akhtar, S. (2008). Supply chain simulator: A scenario-based
educational tool to enhance student learning. ScienceDirect , 252-261.



8.3 Emergency Response Software
       -Ethan Jensen

Response Information Folder System (RIFS) – (Alion First Responder
Products)

http://www.alionscience.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=Products.viewpage&produ
ctid=21&pageid=43 (product page)

http://www.firstresponderproducts.com/homeland_security_news_media.php?
articleid=29 (product brief)


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Alion partnered with Hampton University to develop Response Information
Folder System (RIFS). It was developed initially for use at Hampton University
as part of the “Safe School” program, but would later deploy to help secure
other educational infrastructure throughout the local area. Currently, there is
national interest in the product to expand beyond a local scale. Indeed,
government agencies have expressed interest in developing it further for use by
federal agencies.

The software can be used in a collaborative fashion by incident commanders
during an emergency situation to better coordinate ground units and
understand ahead of time what to expect when first responders arrive on-
scene. This software is a tool that can rapidly model the infrastructure where
an emergency situation is taking place and grants the ability to navigate
through the model.

Key Components:

 - View infrastructure as an event is unfolding
 - All first responders can log on to a secure site and view events in real-time
 - View a model with panoramic images of the infrastructure
 - Models can be produced quickly; for example, a high school - in a matter of
days
 - Display proximity to resources (hospital, fire, water, etc)
On-Scene Xplorer

http://www.onscenexplorer.com/

On-Scene Xplorer provides critical information to emergency responders. They
are able to view pre-plans and the layout of the dispatch location as they en
route to an emergency. The software has an easy to use interface that helps
crews find addresses, intersections, and other places quickly. On-Scene
Xplorer contains “Spell-Right” technology to ensure that a street name is
entered correctly.

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On-Scene Xplorer uses concise mapping that will display streets, building floor
plans, fire hydrants, etc. Zooming in and out will intelligently display certain
map features. It also includes GPS (Global Position System) capabilities to
make it easier to locate things such as the closest fire hydrant - even at night
or during inclement weather.

Emergency crews will now know better what to expect upon arriving on scene
with a few simple clicks on the map. The software can store comprehensive
pre-incident planning data regarding all aspects of a facility for speedy access.
First responders can now “see” inside a building ahead of time with easy to
read floor plans, documents, and pictures.

Key Components:

 - Search using street names, intersections or business names
 - “Spell-Right” technology
 - Intelligent map display
 - Map zoom capability
 - Global Positioning System (GPS) capabilities
 - Precise map coordinates displayed (for contacting others, such as MedEvac
Helicopters)
 - Pre-incident planning to store and retrieve important details such as utility
shut-off locations, hazardous materials storage, occupancy, fire suppression
systems, etc
 - Pre-incident plans can be shared with mutual-aid departments
 - Create hazardous zone buffers by clicking on the map to see what’s nearby
 - Bundled with a ruggedized Windows Tablet PC installed in emergency
vehicles



Required Hardware:
 - Panasonic Toughbooks
 - GPS receivers
                                                                      83 | P a g e
 - Vehicle computer mounting hardware



PEAC-WMD (AristaTek)

http://www.aristatek.com/PEAC2007.aspx

      PEAC-WMD 2007 supports first responders when dealing with both
Hazmat and chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high yield explosive
(CBRNE) events. The latest release now includes standoff distances for
hazardous fragmentation threats due to shrapnel or other projectiles that are
thrown from a blast.

Key Components:

 - Database containing more than 100,000 entries on chemical warfare agents
 - Explosion calculator that computes the standoff distances for the hazardous
fragmentation
 - Provides direct access to the EPA Acute Exposure Guideline Levels
 - Improvised explosive device (IED) Guide
- NFPA 704 Hazard Classification System
   - NFPA 704 Hazmat Diamond
- Gamma Dose Calculation
- Fireball Calculator for Unconfined Vapor Cloud Explosions
- Fallout Radiation Dose Calculator
- Nuclear Detonation Calculator
- Integrated Mapping Tool




Black Coral SoftRisk

Black Coral SoftRisk was designed specifically to coordinate response efforts
during major events, emergencies, and other disasters. It can be used to

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manage all phases of an incident. This includes the preparedness phase
(during which operators develop plans and procedures to approach various
scenarios) to the response phase (during which application users track and
record information about assets and personnel).

SoftRisk has an incident-centric design. This enables users to relate contact,
resource, and site information for tasking and information management
purposes. SoftRisk also has a fully integrated web mapping capability that
comes loaded with rich geospatial data and imagery. Visualization of mission
critical information can then be viewed.

SoftRisk is designed to be used on its own as a fully functional web-based
incident management tool. It can also be used with Black Coral LIVE and/or
Black Coral AXIS. Black Coral LIVE allows for participants to display incidents
on a map and to manage related information in a team oriented environment.
This is used for situational awareness purposes. Black Coral AXIS allows
users to publish and subscribe to geo-referenced alerts and data feeds.




CoBRA (Chemical/Biological Response Aid)

CoBRA provides critical resources and capabilities needed during any
emergency response. This software package includes several tools, databases,
checklists, and incident reporting capabilities to help facilitate the coordination
of response to a WMD or other large-scale incident. Any first responder
including fire, hazmat, law enforcement, emergency medical, bomb response or
other public safety personnel can adeptly make use of this software at any
point of an incident. It is scalable to accommodate the needs of small or large
organizations and supports the full spectrum of response including planning,
training, exercising, and response.

Key Components:


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 - Updated Databases include the latest CBRNE data and provide instant
searching and filtering as you type
 - PPE database expanded to include Trelleborg data
 - Updated SOPS, Checklists, and Guides including a completely linked
Emergency Response to Terrorism Job Aid and expanded medical response
protocols
 - US Coast Guard CHRIS database added in searchable format
 - Nuclear Bomb / Improvised Nuclear Device Effects Tool
 - Customizable Database for your local Response data ready for loading
 - Unit Converter Tool for converting between units of area, force, energy,
length, pressure, absorbed radiation, radiation activity, radiation exposure,
time, velocity, volume, weight, and temperature
 - GPS Integration provides current location, speed, heading, and more, as well
as adding a location stamp to all incident report entries
 - Integrated real-time weather display
 - Updated radiological exposure tool provides time and exposure limits for
general public, first responders, and military operations in a hot zone,
including calculation of dose from activity, adjustments for distance, user-
adjustable dose limits, and much more
 - Upgraded Master Search tool allows for partial searches across all databases
 - Enhanced NFPA 704 tool provides search interface to chemical databases
 - MSDS database now supports facility information, enabling users to look up
MSDS by storage location within facility
 - Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) standards implementation
 - Integration with DHS FEMA OPEN system for standards-compliant
communication across emergency management systems
 - Improved Software Development Kit for enhanced 3rd party integration
support
 - Integration with CoBRA Server for central incident logging, reporting, and
query


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 - Support for CoBRA add-ons including GIS / Plume Plotting, HICS, Exercise
Aide, Forensics Toolset, and Crisis Negotiator Toolset.
 - Expanded glossaries form WMD and radiological terms




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9 Meeting History
This section contains a brief report on team meetings held during the summer
of 2008 from the months of May to August and meetings of the CS2750 Fall
2008 class:

     5/12/08 – First team meeting. Discussed basic purpose of the summer
     internship, and the scope of our possible projects(s). Ethan and Douglas
     were to research existing GIS systems, mapping programs, and anything
     useful for a deployment program for emergency response services/police
     department. Ken and Adam were to research existing API systems,
     implementation possibilities, licensing, etc.


     5/15/08 – Team collaboration discussion. Decided on Ourspace, Google
     Docs, Google Calendar, and Gmail as collaboration tools.


     5/20/08 – Basic Flowcharting overview.


     5/27/08 – Basic UML overview.


     5/29/08 – Meeting with Chief LeBlanc. We found out some great ideas
     from the Chief of Police on the idea of developing a training system
     dealing with simulation. He expressed the need of resource management
     which led to a brainstorm of ideas dealing with real-time strategy games
     (RTS games) to simulation system games such as SimCity. Instead of
     dealing with a GIS system, we decided that the best direction would be a
     resource management training tool with a disaster simulation scenario.



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6/3/08 – More in-depth UML diagramming training.


6/5/08 – Doug, Ken, Ethan, and Adam all worked on a system use case
that would fit our project idea. The consensus was that rather than
having a simulation of individual disasters, providing detailed
information of building plans, routing schemes and a GIS-type system,
we would, instead, develop a simulation system similar to Maxis' SimCity
and a mixture of Microsoft's Age of Mythology. Although the games
mentioned were designed for an audience to have “fun,” a resource
management simulation would be more of a training tool.


6/10/08 – Collaboration meeting with an emphasis on the development
of a design document. It was suggested that we have an introduction
finished for the design document for our next meeting.


6/12/08 – Doug, Ken, and Ethan worked on the introduction. We
created the best 2 paragraphs in English known to man (in our humble
opinion).


6/16/08 – Starting on the 16th, the team had meetings with an
emphasis on the Use Case Diagrams. We also had meetings with Greg
and Brian regarding to Unified Modeling Language.


6/24/08 – The week of June 22nd, we created Use Case Diagrams. On
June 25th, we had a meeting with Chief LeBlanc regarding some
important clarifications on scenarios.


6/30/08 – The week of June 29th, the group did research about
prototypes and also started to create the Activity Diagrams. That week
Doug also contacted Michael Davis about the Emergency Response
Power-Point Presentation.
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7/14/08 – The week of July 14th, the group had meetings regarding to
Visual Studio and starting the Prototype, also the team contacted
Michael Davis for more information on scenarios.


7/21/08 – The week of July 21st, the group had meetings regarding to
Prototypes and also had a meeting with Michael Davis regarding to some
clarifications on the Prototype.


7/27/08 – The week of July 27th, the group had meetings regarding to
the Design Document, prototype and also started a Power-Point
Presentation.


8/4/08 – The week of August 8th, the group had meetings about
deadlines of Design Document, prototypes and presentation.


CLASSWORK BEGINS


9/8/08 - Today we talked about assumptions. We assume that the
project will not be a network-type. We also talked about the database
and decided on SQL Server Express.


9/10/08 - Today we talked about the product vision. We talked a lot
about what makes a name in the product.


9/10/08 - Today we talked about the product vision. We talked a lot
about what makes a name in the product.


9/17/08 - We discussed business rules, what sorts of things might
cause constraints in this software title.


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10/8/08 - Split into teams and worked on the 3 tiers. Decided that
FRAMES are the way to go.


10/13/08 - Reviewed a presentation prototype GUI mock-up.

10/15/08 – Decided on a database layout and how images would be
stored.

10/20/08 – Assigned the 3 tiers different objectives to complete before
the end of the semester.

11/5/08 – Met with Mike from the police department and discussed what
needed to implemented, what looked nice, etc. We came up with a
bunch more rules to be finished for the end of the semester.




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10 Project Approval
This document is a living document, meaning that it will change. By signing
below, I agree that the document meets my approval in its current form and I
understand it may be reformed or changed for improvement. By signing below,
I agree that I understand and agree with what is proposed in this document
and that any future changes may prolong an estimated completion date.

Printed Name                      Signature                  Date




We, the undersigned, agree that this is our work and that it may need
improvements and changes to better suit the needs of the ultimate end-user.
We state that this is our work.

Printed Name                      Signature                  Date
Adam Hellewell
Ken Romney
Erik Johnson
Corey Dabb
Ken Cottrell
Mariela Tinajero
Jeff Nelson



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Cody Hodson
George Takamine
Douglas Alves
Hyrum Taft
Stanley Harvey
Benjamin Burnett
Daniel Hillstead
Bruce Jarvis
Bryant Dearden




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