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Principles of Research Design

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									Theorem 1. If something can go wrong in conducting an
experiment, it will.
Theorem 2. The probability of successfully completing an
experiment is inversely proportional to the number of runs.
Theorem 3. Never let one person design and conduct an
experiment alone, particularly if that person is a subject-
matter expert in the field of study.
Theorem 4. All experiments are designed experiments;
some of them are designed well, and some of them are
designed really badly. The badly designed ones often tell
you nothing.
Theorem 5. About 80 percent of your success in
conducting a designed experiment results directly from
how well you do the pre-experimental planning.

Theorems by Dr. Douglas Montgomery
  Basic principles of experimental design
Statistical design of the experiment
             Process of planning experiment so that the appropriate
data can be analyzed by statistical methods….experiment answers
the question it was proposed to answer

Statistics Consulting Lab is located in BR 211

METHOD OF ANALYSIS DEPENDS DIRECTLY ON THE
DESIGN EMPLOYED!!!
Statistics Consulting Lab is located in BR 211
             Principles of experimental design
                   1. Randomization
                          Randomization is one of the most important ideas
in designing an experiment; without it, there can be no conclusive evidence!!

Statistics Consulting Lab is located in BR 211
                    2. Replication
                          Important question…how many replicates do I
need? (replicate versus repeated)
                          Without replication, there can be no test for
interaction

Statistics Consulting Lab is located in BR 211
                  3. Blocking
                        Block or control variables that will influence the
outcome, but which you are not interested in. But be careful as to what your
blocking will do.


Statistics Consulting Lab is located in BR 211
The Statistics faculty
Dr. James
               Varying Coefficient Models, Non-parametric
Blum
               Regression, Categorical Data Analysis, Statistics
               Education
BR 211B
Dr. Edward     Bayesian Modeling and Inference, Missing Data,
Boone          Spatial Statistics, Time Series, Model Selection,
               Statistical Simulation and Computation, Biological,
BR 225         Ecological and Environmental Applications
Dr. Dargan
               Mathematical Statistics (Sequential Analysis,
Frierson
               Nonparametric Statistics), Data Analysis, Statistics
               Education
BR 211A
Dr.
Subramanyam
Kasala      Multivariate Analysis, Time Series, Inference

BR 251
Dr. Shiva K.
Saksena        Bayesian Methods, Inference, Simulation,
               Biostatistics
BR 244
Dr. Susan
Simmons        Hierarchical Models, Bayesian Inference, Decision
               Theory, Statistical Computing, Statistics Education
BR 230
       Preparing for the First
             Meeting
The primary purpose of the first meeting is to familiarize the
statistical consultant with your project and objectives so that
appropriate advice may be given. Depending on the current
state of your project, this may involve many different issues.
You should be prepared to discuss any of the following as
appropriate to your progress to date:

     Objectives of your research and/or hypotheses you wish
      to test.
     Methods of data collection and recording.
     Experimental and/or survey designs.
     Analysis methods--including those that are considered
      "traditional" in your field of study.
     Statistical software packages.
     Your timetable for completion of the project and its
      various stages.

With the above in mind, we offer answers to some general
questions you may have:

WHEN SHOULD THE FIRST CONSULTING MEETING TAKE PLACE?
    The easiest answer is: As soon as possible. Ideally, data
    collection and management methods, experimental
    design(s), summary procedures and analysis techniques
    would all be in place from the outset. Early assistance on
    design and data collection issues can often result in less
    work for the experimenter, a smoother transition from
    the experimental phase to the analysis phase and,
    possibly, better results. Of course, this does not mean
    that someone who has already conducted and
     experiment and gather data would not be able to receive
     help. We can offer assistance at any stage of your project,
     but our motto is: "The earlier, the better."
WHAT MATERIALS SHOULD I PLAN TO BRING TO THE FIRST MEETING?
    Any formal or informal documents related to your project
    (plans for experiment/research, prospectus,
    articles/references to similar work in the field) will be
    helpful of course. Any data you have gathered and
    analyses/summaries you have done--tables, graphs and
    the like. Also, any collaborators who are available to aid
    in the description of efforts undertaken so far and
    questions of interest. In fact, we require that the advisor
    or another committee member be present at the first
    meeting for any projects being undertaken by a graduate
    student.
WHAT HAPPENS AFTER THE FIRST MEETING?
    For people looking for confirmation of or suggestions on a
    completed analysis, the first meeting may well be the
    last. However, for most people, further consulting services
    will be necessary. It is one of the goals of the first
    meeting to determine what level of involvement is
    required on the part of the consultant and to outline a
    plan of future collaboration.

								
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