Principles of Management Honda Pakistan - DOC by lxc20899

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                     Emergency Manager’s Weekly Report
                                 10-3-08
(The articles, reports and additional information contained in this edition were collected from 9-26
                                               to 10-3)

       “Leadership does not always wear the harness of compromise.”
                                         Woodrow Wilson




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      (http://cesa.net/aoi.cfm?color=st)
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   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 1
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                                  Table of Contents
Contributions                                                                          3

U.S. News Reports                                                                      4

Hurricane Ike                                                                          4
Emergency Management                                                                   6
Homeland Security, Defense and National Security                                       8
Campus Safety and Security                                                             18
Special Needs                                                                          19
Hazard Research and News                                                               21
Public Safety Communications, Interoperability, 3-1-1 and 9-1-1 News                   23
Other                                                                                  24

International News Stories                                                             30

Civil Preparedness, Security and Humanitarian Affairs                                  30
Hazard Research and News                                                               37
International Affairs                                                                  39

Global Warming/Climate Change News Articles (U.S. and International)                   48

Alternate Energy Research and Development News                                         49

Reports                                                                                50

Additional Information                                                                 51




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 2
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                                     Contributions
The following individuals or groups contribute to the Emergency Management and Homeland
Security Articles of Interest.

Editor
     Steve Detwiler

Regular Contributors
    International Association of                         National Congress for Secure
       Emergency Managers                                  Communities
    National Emergency Management                        Fire Chief‟s Command Post
       Association                                        American City and County
    Florida Emergency Preparedness                       Corporate Crisis Response Officers
       Association                                         Association
    Emergency Management Institute,                      APCO International
       Higher Education Program                           The Institute of the North
    Montgomery County, PA                                Nena Wiley
       Department of Public Safety                        Dave Freeman
    Natural Hazards Center                               Gregory Banner
    U.S. Department of Homeland                          Arthur Rabjohn
       Security                                           Martha Braddock
    Interagency Coordinating Council on                  Bill Firestone
       Emergency Preparedness and                         Ed Kostiuk
       Individuals with Disabilities                      Eric Holdeman
    National Organization on                             Kenny Shaw
       Disabilities, Emergency                            Robin Storm
       Preparedness Initiative
                                                          Hal Newman
    EAD & Associates, LLC
                                                          Dave Bujak
    Emergency Information
                                                          Brendan McCluskey
       Infrastructure Project
                                                          Dean Larson
    ProtectingAmerica.org
    U.S. Access Board
    Florida Division of Emergency
       Management

Guest Contributors
    National Emergency Management Resource Center
    Steve Charvat
    Stephen Krill
    Victor Healey
    Betty Omerod
    Jerry Mcateer
    Scott Lewis
    Jim Roberts




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 3
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                                 U.S. News Reports
Hurricane Ike
Supply held up despite a few snags (Texas)
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/front/6026124.html

Power repair goal is a miss
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/morenews/6028851.html

Ike limits bread supply for Rosh Hashana celebrations
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/front/6028853.html

Perdue Delayed Asking For Gas Shortage Help (Georgia)
http://www.wsbtv.com/automotive/17578885/detail.html

So what‟s the real story behind the slow beginning to getting supplies?
http://www.hcnonline.com/articles/2008/09/29/dayton_news/news/023771_sowhat.txt

Why Hurricane Ike's "Certain Death" Warning Failed
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/09/080926-hurricane-ike-
evacuation.html?source=rss

Overlooked: The Littlest Evacuees
http://www.newsweek.com/id/161223/output/print

Disaster Medical Teams Wrap Up Response to Hurricane Ike
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=45985

How Ike scarred the terrain
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/morenews/6033223.html

Feds say woman filed fraudulent claim for Galveston home
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/headline/metro/6032095.html

FEMA takes new role in post-storm repairs from Hurricanes Gustav and Ike
http://www.nola.com/news/index.ssf/2008/09/fema_takes_new_role_in_poststo.html

USS Nassau Concludes Hurricane Ike Disaster Response Efforts
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=45896

Ahead of the Bell: Hurricane Ike hurts restaurants (Texas)
http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/080929/restaurants_ahead_of_the_bell.html?.v=1

3 more Hurricane Ike victims raises toll to 67 (Texas)
http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2008/sep/29/3-more-hurricane-ike-victims-raises-toll-to-67/

MMS updates damage assessments from Hurricane Ike (Texas)
http://www.oilonline.com/news/headlines/internet/20080929.MMS_upda.23757.asp

Hurricane Ike HUD Vouchers Explained (Texas)
http://www.myfoxhouston.com/myfox/pages/News/Detail?contentId=7536037&version=2&locale=
EN-US&layoutCode=VSTY&pageId=3.2.1



   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 4
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Hurricane Ike Destroyed, Created Job Opportunities (Texas)
http://www.myfoxhouston.com/myfox/pages/News/Detail?contentId=7536260&version=2&locale=
EN-US&layoutCode=VSTY&pageId=3.2.1

Ike evacuees complain of violence at shelter
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081001/ap_on_re_us/ike_troubled_shelter

Man killed saving three dogs may be buried as pauper
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/morenews/6035391.html

No homes at homecoming
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/headline/metro/6035394.html

Compared with Rita, Ike evacuation considered a breeze
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/headline/metro/6035160.html

Blue Roofs Help Texans Remain In Homes Damaged By Hurricane Ike
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=45972

300 people still missing since Ike hit Texas
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/10/02/ike.missing/index.html

American Medical Response Provides Largest EMS Deployment in U.S. History
http://www.centredaily.com/business/story/879214.html

Assisted living homes make it happen after the storm
http://www.hcnonline.com/articles/2008/10/02/east_montgomery/news/40emcassisted.txt

Hundreds of thousands may stay without water for a while (Texas)
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/metropolitan/6019127.html




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 5
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Emergency Management
Leggett Announces New Emergency Management/Homeland Security Director (Montgomery
County, Maryland)
http://www.montgomerycountymd.gov/Apps/News/press/PR_details.asp?PrID=4869

FEMA Awards $17.6 Million In Equipment And Training To Smaller Emergency Response
Agencies Nationwide
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=45918

Volunteers Make A Difference (Florida)
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=45919

Memories of Katrina
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/front/6028805.html

Missouri Department of Natural Resources Receives New Emergency Response Fleet
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/418544

NOAA Biological Opinion Alters NFIP Implementation In Washington State
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=45974

Snyder County hires new EMA director (Pennsylvania)
http://www.dailyitem.com/0100_news/local_story_270162148.html

Probe targets EMA deals (Pennsylvania)
http://www.dailyitem.com/0100_news/local_story_269075143.html

Ex-official: DA‟s probe is „politics‟ (Pennsylvania)
http://www.dailyitem.com/0100_news/local_story_270073513.html

Flooding in Interior Alaska declared a major disaster
http://newsminer.com/news/2008/sep/26/flooding-interior-alaska-declared-major-disaster/

Forecasters: Preparedness key to surviving wildfires (California)
http://www.dailynews.com/news/ci_10546711?source=rss

Law combines emergency response agencies (California)
http://www.dailynews.com/news/ci_10577012?source=rss

Senate Bill Would Move FEMA Trailers
http://www.4029tv.com/news/17573160/detail.html?rss=fts&psp=news

What if disaster struck? Counties, schools update responses (Michigan)
http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080928/NEWS06/809280442

Gov. vetoes NYC Hurricane evacuation bill (New York)
http://www.legislativegazette.com/day_item.php?item=484

Funds to aid flu preparedness (Illinois)
http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080930/LOCAL18/809300361

Speaker stresses being prepared (Louisiana)
http://www.montgomeryadvertiser.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080930/NEWS01/80930033
4
    Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 6
  opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                 organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


Natural and Man-Made Disasters: Be Prepared with a Recovery Plan That Works
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/418939

President Declares Major Disaster for Puerto Rico
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=45994

Delays, huge costs threaten ground zero rebuild
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26988662/

„Preparedness Fair‟ preps Army for disasters
http://www.belvoireagle.com/index.php/news-
articles/preparedness_fair_preps_army_for_disasters/

Indian Point to create emergency center outside evacuation zone (New York)
http://www.lohud.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20081001/NEWS02/810010371

Delta Emergency Response Bill Becomes Law (California)
http://www.news10.net/news/local/story.aspx?storyid=48441

Retired Gen. Russel Honoré enlists with CNN
http://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/stories/2008/09/29/daily35.html?ana=from_rss

Rethinking Who Should Be Considered “Essential” During a Pandemic Flu Outbreak
http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/544856/?sc=rsmn

A Road Map to Help Navigate Disaster Assistance
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=46021

Fire chiefs say they have been left out of the loop (Louisiana)
http://www.dailycomet.com/article/20080830/articles/808309916




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 7
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Homeland Security, Defense and National Security
Making Mr. Secretary: Experts Weigh In on Skills Needed by the Next DHS Chief
http://www.cqpolitics.com/wmspage.cfm?docID=hsnews-000002967506

Security Officials Need to "Adapt" to a New Security Environment, Argue Two Academics
http://www.securitymanagement.com/news/security-officials-need-adapt-new-security-
environment-arguetwo-academics-004620

Border Patrol expands transportation checks
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2008-09-30-border-patrol-
checks_N.htm?loc=interstitialskip

FBI creates knowledge wiki
http://www.fcw.com/online/news/153926-1.html?topic=homeland_security

$20M Northern Border tech project kept alive
http://www.fcw.com/online/news/153878-1.html?topic=homeland_security

HomelandSecuritystudyoutdateduponitsrelease
http://www.bostonherald.com/news/national/politics/general/view.bg?articleid=1121769&srvc=rss

U.S. fights fired Muslim scientist's lawsuit
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26916917/

Trial to examine alleged plot to kill soldiers (New Jersey)
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26931175/

COASTAL WATERWAYS: AN UNTAPPED SECURITY RESOURCE
http://hstoday.us/content/view/5341/149/

Kevlar containers could protect jets
http://www.usatoday.com/travel/flights/2008-09-25-baggage_N.htm

Post-terror illness often just in mind
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2008/sep/24/post-terror-illness-often-just-in-mind/

Coast Guard awards patrol boat contract to fill critical void
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=41096&sid=60

Homeland Security preparations underway pre-election
http://wbz.com/pages/3051123.php?contentType=4&contentId=2821514

Airport Check-in: Houston airports face $14M clean-up bill
http://www.usatoday.com/travel/flights/2008-09-28-airport-check-in_N.htm?csp=34

1,100 arrested in California immigration sweep
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2008-09-29-california-illegal-immigrants-arrests_N.htm

Stopping a cyber attack before it begins
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26860127/

DHS has IT oversight problems, IG finds
http://www.fcw.com/online/news/153933-1.html?topic=homeland_security

   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 8
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

An oral history of Iraq and Afghanistan
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=41106&sid=60

U.S. cracking down on leaks to China
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26962823/

Could you pass the new citizenship test?
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/10/01/citizenship.test/index.html

Rethink spending on anti-terrorism, report says
http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2008-10-01-terrormoney_N.htm?loc=interstitialskip

GPS 'spoofing' could threaten national security
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26992456/


Top Officials Knew in 2002 of Harsh Interrogations

By Joby Warrick
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, September 25, 2008; A07

Top White House officials were told in early 2002 about harsh measures used by the CIA to
extract information from suspected al-Qaeda terrorists in the agency's secret prisons, according
to an account given to congressional investigators by the office of Secretary of State
Condoleezza Rice.

The details of the controversial program were discussed in multiple meetings inside the White
House over a two-year period, triggering concerns among several officials who worried that the
agency's methods might be illegal or violate anti-torture treaties, according to separate
statements signed by Rice and her top legal adviser.

"I expressed concern that the proposed CIA interrogation techniques comply with applicable U.S.
law, including our international obligations," John B. Bellinger III, legal adviser to Rice at the State
Department and formerly her top legal aide at the National Security Council, said in written
answers to questions from the Senate Armed Services Committee.

While media reports have described internal White House debates over the CIA's program, the
accounts by Rice and Bellinger are believed to be the first such acknowledgment of such
discussions by a member of the Bush Cabinet.

The written accounts specifically name former attorney general John D. Ashcroft and former
defense secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld as participants in the discussions, according to copies of
the statements released by committee officials in advance of a hearing scheduled for today. The
committee's questionnaire did not specifically ask whether President Bush or Vice President
Cheney attended the meetings.

In her responses, compiled in a seven-page memo, Rice indicated that she asked Ashcroft to
"personally review the legal guidance" of Bush administration lawyers who had declared the CIA's
program to be legal.

Rice and Bellinger both said they recalled related discussions inside the White House of an
obscure Army survival training program that subjected military trainees to waterboarding -- a
   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 9
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

technique that simulates drowning -- and other harsh tactics to prepare them for conditions they
might face if captured. The survival program, known as Survival, Evasion, Resistance and
Escape, or SERE, was the inspiration for several of the interrogation methods later used at both
CIA and Defense Department detention camps.

Rice said she remembered meetings at which the SERE methods were discussed but said she
was assured that the tactics "had been deemed not to cause significant physical or psychological
harm."

Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Carl M. Levin (D-Mich.) has been investigating the
origins of the decision to use harsh interrogation tactics on high-level detainees held by the
Pentagon and CIA. Many congressional Democrats and some Republicans have equated some
of the techniques to torture. Levin has linked the decision to use SERE methods to the abuse that
occurred at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison.

"These discussions took place at the highest levels of the White House," Levin said in an
interview. The documents belie administration claims that abuse of detainees was "the work of a
few bad apples," he said.

Levin noted that the SERE methods themselves -- which included not only waterboarding but also
exposure to temperature extremes, forced nudity and sensory deprivation -- were designed by
Chinese communists to extract confessions from captured U.S. servicemen.

"The validity of the confessions they didn't care about; they just wanted the confessions so they
could put them on TV," Levin said.

In their accounts, Rice and Bellinger indicate that several senior officials were uneasy with the
program, even though top legal experts at both the CIA and the Justice Department's Office of
Legal Counsel had officially sanctioned the techniques as legal. Bellinger remembered repeated
calls from Bruce Swartz, deputy assistant attorney general in the Justice Department's criminal
division, about alleged abuses of detainees at the Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, military prison.
Bellinger said he forwarded the complaints to the Defense Department and was told that an
investigation was already underway.

The main concern was not the legality of the interrogation methods but whether they were
"effective and professional and being resourced in the most effective way," Bellinger said.

Levin said today's hearing will focus on the early decisions to use SERE techniques. He is
expected to call as witnesses two military officers who worked in Defense survival schools and
later observed the application of similar techniques on suspected terrorists.

In June, Levin's committee released Defense Department documents suggesting that Pentagon
officials became interested in SERE tactics after learning of their successful application in secret
CIA prisons.




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 10
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Two Portraits of a Bioterror Suspect
As FBI Paints Ivins as Killer, Friends Recall Him as Good, if Flawed

By Anne Hull, Marilyn W. Thompson and Lyndsey Layton
Washington Post Staff Writers
Sunday, September 28, 2008; A01

Two days before he was found unconscious at home, felled by a lethal dose of Tylenol and
valium, microbiologist Bruce E. Ivins logged on to one of the "express computers" on the second
floor of the library in downtown Frederick.

He typed in the name of a Web site devoted to the anthrax-mailings investigation, a perplexing,
unsolved case that had dragged on for seven years. At 7:13 p.m., the computer connected to a
page that included comments from FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III, who was confident that the
case soon would be solved. "I tell you, we've made great progress in the investigation," he said.

Earlier that day, Ivins had been released from a psychiatric hospital, where the FBI had used the
opportunity to obtain a DNA sample from him. Agents assigned to 24-hour surveillance followed
him as he returned to his modest Cape Cod house outside the gates of Fort Detrick. Then Ivins
"wasn't seen again," FBI documents say, until paramedics carried him out of his home
unconscious.

The scientist who had spent his career studying lethal bacteria chose one of the simplest but
most painful ways to die: acetaminophen poisoning, which causes liver damage and internal
bleeding.

Some details of Ivins's final days emerged last week in a new release of FBI documents. The
bureau found no suicide note, as it had hoped, and only sketchy evidence to bolster its case that
Ivins was a diabolical and plotting criminal.

The new material emphasized the two irreconcilable versions of the man the FBI blames for the
nation's most deadly act of biological terrorism.

The fatal spores used in the 2001 mailings came from a single flask in his custody, the FBI said,
and for years Ivins displayed secretive behavior that fit the profile of a murderer who stuffed
poison-laced letters into a Princeton, N.J., mailbox. He stalked members of a sorority, sent
packages anonymously from out-of-town mailboxes, used false names in bizarre letters and e-
mails, and took mysterious nocturnal car trips, sometimes rolling back his odometer.

But Ivins's defenders have cast enough doubt on the FBI's case that key members of Congress
are demanding hearings. One recipient of an anthrax-laced letter, Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.),
for the first time has publicly questioned the FBI, especially its conclusion that Ivins acted alone.

Friends say Ivins's psychiatric troubles intensified as the FBI hounded him, showing his children
photos of victims and saying, "Your father did this." They knew Ivins as a father who cheered on
his son's ball games and as a volunteer who cleaned out the muddied rescue vehicle used when
two boys were swept away in a creek. Even in the face of the FBI's revelations -- the guns, the
obsessions, the aliases -- Ivins's friends rationalized the details.

"For everything they want to pin on him . . . there is a counter to it, an alternate explanation," said
Katie Carr, the former deputy commander at USAMRIID, the U.S. Army Medical Research


   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 11
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Institute for Infectious Diseases, where Ivins worked for 27 years. "There are an awful lot of us in
the community that surrounded Bruce who are not satisfied. Please prove it."

Ivins's attorney, Thomas M. DeGonia, likens his client to a diamond held up to the light. Turn it
just so, and it could fit the FBI's idea of a sociopath. Turn it another way and see a flawed 62-
year-old man. "The obsession with a sorority and the anthrax killings, these are two completely
unrelated things," DeGonia said.

Brainy but Quirky

Growing up in Lebanon, Ohio, Ivins was a brainy kid with a quirky personality. A neighbor
remembers Ivins inviting him into his garage one day to show off a stick of dynamite he was
cutting in half with a surgical instrument. "He kind of grinned, with the scalpel in his hand, with his
[other] hand on the dynamite," Robert Surface said.

Bruce's pharmacist father, Princeton graduate T. Randall Ivins, ran the local drugstore, and his
mother, Mary Ivins, had a keen intellect and belonged to the Hill History Club. Ivins's parents
attended the Presbyterian church and played bridge, but Ivins's older brother, Tom, said there
was physical abuse in the house. Their father sometimes slept at the drugstore.

Ivins later said he felt "desolation" in high school, though most remember him as academically
gifted if slightly awkward. The 1964 Lebanon High yearbook shows a skinny kid posing with the
track team, all elbows and heavy black glasses.

A science standout, Ivins entered the University of Cincinnati in 1964 and earned his bachelor's
and advanced degrees in microbiology. At 29, he married Diane Betsch, 20. They headed to the
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where Ivins had postdoctoral work.

"He was a very bright scientist and an awfully nice guy," said Priscilla B. Wyrick, then Ivins's
professor at UNC and now the chair of the microbiology department at Quillen College of
Medicine at East Tennessee State University. Wyrick had belonged to the sorority Chi Omega
and remembers Ivins asking her about its rituals. "After about the second time he did it, I told him
to buzz off," she said.

But Ivins's interest in another sorority, Kappa Kappa Gamma, frightened microbiologist Nancy L.
Haigwood, a member who knew Ivins at UNC. Both ended up living in Gaithersburg, and one
morning, Haigwood came out of the apartment she shared with her boyfriend and found "KKG"
spray-painted on their Honda.

"Bruce figured out where I lived and what my fiance's car looked like," said Haigwood, now the
director of the Oregon National Primate Research Center in Beaverton. She filed a police report
and later confronted Ivins, who denied it.

By then Ivins was working at USAMRIID at Fort Detrick, in Frederick. He and his wife adopted
twins, and Diane Ivins opened a day care at their home. She later led Frederick County Right To
Life, participating in antiabortion rallies. The couple attended St. John the Evangelist Roman
Catholic Church. They scrimped to buy a $140,000 house across the street from the Army
installation. The slender Ivins often rode his bike to work, reminding one colleague of a scarecrow
on wheels as he pedaled across the base.

A Respected Scientist


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Within USAMRIID's high-security laboratories, Ivins was the go-to man for researchers probing
anthrax disease. Ivins specialized in spore preparation, taking wet bacteria samples and culturing
them in glass flasks. Ivins experimented on mice, rats, golden guinea pigs and monkeys, first
injecting the animals with test vaccines and then blasting them with anthrax. After a few days, he
counted bodies.

His research earned scientific notice, and the Pentagon awarded him its highest civilian honor in
2002 for helping solve a problem that had delayed production of the anthrax vaccine used to
inoculate U.S. troops. The FBI suggested that Ivins's determination to promote the importance of
the vaccine may have been a motive in sending the letters.

Ivins also worked to help develop vaccines offering broader protections. Partly through his efforts,
the Army secured two patents that could aid in the production of a vaccine then under
development. Ivins stood to gain some money from the patent rights, but hardly a financial
bonanza.

"This was a guy who drove an older car with bare tires, who wore threadbare clothes. He was not
in this for money," said another former supervisor, Jeffrey J. Adamovicz.

Although his work was going well, by 2000 Ivins was seeing a psychiatrist who prescribed for him
the anti-depressant Celexa. The drug brought little relief. "I get incredible paranoid delusional
thoughts at times, and there's nothing I can do until they go away, either by themselves or with
drugs," he wrote in an e-mail.

That summer, Ivins attended weekly therapy sessions at Comprehensive Counseling Associates
in Frederick, telling a counselor of his plans to travel out of town to watch a young woman play
soccer. If she lost, Ivins said, he would poison her, according to the counselor, who spoke to The
Washington Post on the condition of anonymity. "It was not a crime of impulse," the counselor
said. "It was planned with cunning." The counselor notified authorities, who said nothing could be
done without the intended victim's last name or address.

By mutual agreement, Ivins stopped seeing the counselor, whom he felt he could no longer trust.
He cryptically wrote a friend, saying that his counselor "wanted to get me put in jail."

He also was using out-of-town mailboxes to anonymously send gifts and cards to someone in
another city. He apparently made an 11-hour round-trip one night to leave a package for that
person. When the FBI later questioned him, he explained that he liked taking mindless drives.

Ivins used a variety of names and e-mail addresses -- "jimmyflathead" was one -- and he rented a
postal box under the name Carl Scandella. That was the name of Nancy Haigwood's husband --
her boyfriend at the time of the car vandalism.

Clues, and Holes, in the Case

The anthrax letters mailed in the fall of 2001 were distinguished by childlike block handwriting that
warned: "We have this anthrax. You die now. . . . Death to America. Death to Israel." Though the
FBI did not match Ivins's handwriting to that in the letters, agents were struck by phrasing in an e-
mail he sent Sept. 26, after the first letters were mailed: "Bin Laden terrorists for sure have
anthrax and saran gas" and have "just decreed death to all Jews and all Americans."

Ivins spent several late nights in the lab alone before the mailings. The FBI called the nighttime
hours unusual, although his friends said they were not. Ivins later told agents he was merely

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escaping problems at home. He seemed fine that fall when he enrolled in an American Red Cross
disaster-relief course with Peggy Magnanelli, a fellow volunteer who remembered how Ivins later
stepped up to help Hurricane Katrina evacuees.

Ivins's professional skills were such that the FBI took him into its confidence as it analyzed the
powder contained in a letter to Sen. Thomas A. Daschle (D-S.D.). He was kept informed as the
bureau began a global quest to identify the distinctive genetic fingerprint of the bacteria packed
into the mailings.

Eventually, it all came down to a single flask kept in Ivins's custody. In 1997, he had received
anthrax spores prepared at Dugway Proving Ground, an Army test facility in Utah. Ivins cultured
the Dugway spores, mixed them with his own and stored the unique concoction in a flask about
the size of a half-pint of milk.

He labeled it "Dugway 97," then at some point added the name RMR 1029, which stands for
"Reference Material Request." A prosecutor later called it the "murder weapon" in the anthrax
case.

The FBI concluded that Ivins was the sole culprit in the mailings, growing the distinctive material
in his lab, packing it into pre-stamped envelopes bought in Frederick and secretly driving six
hours round-trip to Princeton, N.J., to mail them. Of special note, the bureau said, was the fact
that the Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority had an office on the same street as the Princeton mailbox.

But the case had holes. No one had spotted Ivins in Princeton, and hair samples taken from the
Nassau Street mailbox did not match his DNA. Moreover, Ivins was not the only person with
access to RMR 1029. The FBI at first said about 100 people had access, but that number
multiplied with the finding that Ivins had kept the flask in two different USAMRIID buildings, each
with its own lab technicians and cleaning crews.

The FBI also made the case that Ivins, once so trusted, had tried to deceive investigators. When
scientists were asked to give the FBI bacterial samples from their labs, he did not follow protocol.
His second sample, the FBI later said, had been doctored.

By then, it was 2007. Ivins had worked without incident among pathogens for five years after the
anthrax mailings.

Late last year, the circle was closing around Ivins. In November, the FBI searched his property,
with his family sequestered at a hotel. Agents seized a Glock 34, a Glock 27 and a Beretta pistol,
as well as directions to the home of a female former co-worker.

The lab revoked his access to pathogens. He kept office hours but was mixing anti-anxiety drugs
with sleeping pills and alcohol. Someone alerted a fellow scientist who was in a 12-step recovery
program that Ivins needed help. This spring, Ivins did two stints in rehab. His wife visited often.

This year, the FBI met with Ivins three times, documents say, including once in early June as
prosecutors prepared to indict him. Out of the blue, Ivins contacted his counselor from 2000 to
ask if he could obtain his patient records. The counselor no longer worked at Comprehensive
Counseling Associates but said if the records still existed, they would be at the office.

Ivins, who tried to implicate several of his colleagues, e-mailed himself at an oddly named
address to say that he was doing his own investigation and "should have been a private eye!"


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A Pledge of Violence

On July 9, Ivins announced in group therapy that he was a suspect in the anthrax case. He
vowed to kill co-workers who had wronged him. The account of this session came from Jean C.
Duley, then a clinic addiction specialist. The next morning, Duley called Frederick police and later
went to court to get a restraining order.

Ivins was taken into custody and sent to a Sheppard Pratt psychiatric hospital for evaluation. His
house was again searched; seized were hundreds of rounds of ammunition, homemade body
armor, a bulletproof vest and a handwritten note about Duley. Also found was a copy of "A
Madman Dreams of Turing Machines," a novel based on the lives of Alan Turing and Kurt Godel,
two towering figures of modern logic. Both men died in bizarre suicides, Godel in Princeton in
1978 from starvation and Turing, a Princeton alumnus, of cyanide poisoning in 1954 after
applying the poison to an apple.

The trove of documents released since Ivins's suicide has added to the image seen by his
counselors: a madman, driven by obsessions. He tracked members of Kappa Kappa Gamma and
showed his command of the sorority's secrets in entries on Wikipedia. He became obsessed with
Kathryn Price, a winner of "The Mole" television reality show, and wrote strange e-mails to her
under a phony name, Cindy Wood.

"Family and friends deserve to know he had two sides," one of his counselors said. "In all my
years of counseling, I never felt scared, except by this person."

But even after his death, the FBI acknowledged that the central forensic evidence in its case
against Ivins left room for doubt. "There's always going to be a spore on the grassy knoll," said
Vahid Majidi of the bureau's weapons of mass destruction directorate.

Days after his death, Ivins's family and friends prepared for a memorial service that drew so many
people to the small Fort Detrick chapel that overflow chairs were hustled in by Army personnel.
One weeping colonel after another praised Ivins's devotion to work and family, while co-workers
recalled his endearing habits -- such as Tupperware lunches of lima beans and Jell-O.

At Ivins's house nearby, dead leaves covered the small yard where agents had come again to
rummage through trash. They found notes Ivins wrote in the psychiatric hospital detailing his
anxieties, including his fear of incarceration. They carted away the scraps of paper to log as
evidence, passing a wooden shed with peeling paint where they had also searched for clues. The
scientist's blue Saturn sat in the driveway, empty.




September 24, 2008
An Exercise in Security at 150 Railroad Stations
By MATTHEW L. WALD


Amtrak and the Transportation Security Administration deployed officers from about 100 local
police departments to 150 train stations in 13 states and the District of Columbia during the
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morning rush on Tuesday in a drill to familiarize law enforcement personnel with the rail system
and to practice working together. An Amtrak spokesman said some travelers were asked for
identification and some were told to open their bags for inspection.


In many cases, the exercise meant mostly that more police officers were present in Amtrak and
commuter rail stations, although some commuters may not have noticed. In some stations, police
dogs were present.


Officials said the drill, along the Northeast corridor from Virginia to Vermont, was not in response
to any threat, but was meant to demonstrate how the authorities could respond to one, or to an
actual attack. Participating agencies included police departments from small jurisdictions, like
Kingston, R.I., and Old Saybrook, Conn., Linden and Metuchen, N.J., Lower Merion, Pa., and
Harpers Ferry, W.Va., as well as from big cities, including Boston, New York, Philadelphia and
Washington.


At Union Station in Washington, a few blocks from the Capitol, there was a noticeable increase in
the security presence. Transportation Security Administration officers who said they were
ordinarily assigned to Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport stood near a busy Starbucks,
watching passengers who had just arrived on an Acela from New York. “It‟s national rail security
day,” one officer said cheerily, as if it were a new holiday. He said he was not authorized to give
his name to the press.


But the security arrangements were low-key. An Amtrak police officer surprised passengers in a
waiting area by quietly asking them to show her their tickets. Several passengers arriving on a
southbound train said they had noticed nothing unusual at either end of their journeys.


A spokesman for the Transportation Security Administration, Christopher White, said some of the
law enforcement personnel were in plain clothes, and some of the deployments were a few
minutes in one station, a few minutes on a train and a few minutes in another station.


Participants drilled on a variety of tasks, he said, including looking for bombs near the periphery
of train stations, where crowds might flee after an explosion within the station. Attacks on mass
transit in Madrid and London involved bombs that exploded more or less simultaneously, not
sequentially, but, Mr. White said, “We need to prepare for scenarios we haven‟t seen in the past.”




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“Having the local police get involved intimately with Amtrak and T.S.A. is a great force multiplier,”
he said.


At Amtrak‟s security office, Edward S. Phillips, the deputy for operations, said that 121 law
enforcement agencies had promised to participate but that it was possible that some did not. “If
you‟ve got four duty cops in your town and there‟s a fire, then you‟ve got to go to that and you
don‟t show up,” he said.


But he said that as a result of this drill, “If we were to receive information of a credible threat, we
could mount something like this within 12 hours, maybe even faster.”


Future drills, he said, would include undercover agents acting in ways that should arouse the
suspicion of the police.


The Amtrak police chief, John O‟Connor, said in a statement that “without question, this operation
provided the longest wall of security ever mobilized along the East Coast.”


Darnell Donahue, who was boarding a train to Boston at Pennsylvania Station in Manhattan on
Tuesday morning, said, “It doesn‟t necessarily make me feel any safer, but it doesn‟t hinder my
feeling one way or the other about taking the train.” He added that the effort was good for the
“peace of mind” of tourists or visitors as much as anything.


But at the American Civil Liberties Union, Barry Steinhardt, director of the group‟s technology and
liberty program, said sending police officers to ask for identification “may be interfering with the
right to travel, which is constitutionally protected.”


“What do you do if someone refuses to present identification?” he said. “Prevent them from
getting on a train?”


He added, “You have to ask yourself if this isn‟t just security theater.” A would-be bomb planter
who saw the police stopping travelers could simply walk to a different station or a different
entrance to the same station, he said. “The train system is just too wide open for this to be
effective.”




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Campus Safety and Security
Colleges to Get a Reprieve from Additional Campus-Safety Requirements
http://chronicle.com/news/index.php?id=5239

William and Mary alerts students about anonymous threat (Virginia)
http://hamptonroads.com/node/481854

Campus gains in safety, health and sustainability are saluted by CU administrators (New York)
http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/Sept08/sherm.html

Study: Campus alerts unreliable
http://www.onlineathens.com/stories/092508/uga_336494829.shtml

BCC Explosion Leads to Cancelled Classes (Florida)
http://www.cfnews13.com/News/Local/2008/10/2/brevard_community_college_on_lockdown.html

Sirens Tested at UVa
http://www.charlottesvillenewsplex.tv/home/headlines/29968169.html




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Special Needs
For additional articles on this topic feel free to visit:
http://www.eadassociates.com/news.html or
http://www.nod.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=Page.viewPage&pageId=1564

FEMA Grant of $3.2 Million Funds Construction of Special-Needs Safe Room in Baldwin County,
Ala.
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=45937

4 special-needs students die in Ind. bus crash
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26906266/

Worst fears come true with Neb. safe haven law
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26902738/

Senior centers prep for baby boomer boom
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2008-09-27-senior-centers_N.htm




FCC Fines Station Over Wildfire Coverage (California)

By John Eggerton, Broadcasting and Cable, 9/18/08

FCC upholds $25,000 fine against KUSI-TV San Diego for failing to provide adequate visual
warnings to hearing-impaired viewers during coverage of California wildfires occurred in October
2003.

The Federal Communications Commission upheld a $25,000 fine against KUSI-TV San Diego for
failing to provide adequate visual warnings to hearing-impaired viewers during its coverage of
California wildfires.

It was running up against a five-year statute of limitations since the incident occurred in October
2003.

In response to a complaint and subsequent investigation, the FCC initially proposed the fines in
2005, but the station challenged it.

"I think the FCC has gone crazy with fines thinking this is their sole purpose in life," station owner
Michael McKinnon told B&C at the time, arguing that the station had been understaffed as it was,
with one-half of the employees at home trying to save their property, including the general
manager, who was on his roof with a hose. "This was a disaster, not an inconvenience. "

"People with hearing disabilities have a right to the same timely emergency information as
stations provide to their hearing audiences," then-FCC chairman Michael Powell said at the time.
"The commission remains committed to strong enforcement in this critical area." The Kevin Martin
commission agreed.

In releasing the final order for the fine Thursday, the FCC said it was not persuaded by various
arguments, including that the station was exercising editorial judgment about what of the
emergency information was sufficiently crucial and credible to make visually available given that
visuals had more impact and authority than words.

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The fine could have been much more. The FCC pointed out that it found 22 separate violations,
each potentially warranting an $8,000 base fine, which would have added up to $176,000.

"We determined, however, that a strict application of $8,000 for each of the 22 apparent violations
would result in a total proposed forfeiture that is excessive in light of the circumstances
presented," the commission's Enforcement Bureau said in the order. "Furthermore, in
determining the total number of apparent violations, we took into consideration the circumstances
facing KUSI in providing emergency coverage during the wildfires."




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Hazard Research and News
Hurricane watch for Maine as Kyle heads north
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080927/ap_on_re_us/tropical_weather

Biggest fear: 'The perfectly hidden WMD'
http://www.wtop.com/?nid=251&sid=1487257

American Terrorism, 1910-Style
http://www.time.com/time/arts/article/0,8599,1845282,00.html

Hurricane experts predict a stormy October
http://blogs.usatoday.com/weather/2008/10/hurricane-exper.html

Nuclear waste piles up at hospitals
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080925/ap_on_re_us/nuclear_trash

Storm causes power outages, coastal flooding (North Carolina)
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/09/25/coastal.storm.ap/index.html

Stalagmites may predict next Big One along the New Madrid Seismic Zone
http://www.physorg.com/news141569379.html

Scientists seek volunteers to monitor for quakes
http://www.physorg.com/news141578393.html

PSA crash victims remembered at morning service (California)
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/metro/20080925-0942-bn25psa.html

Unwelcome Visitors at the Ole Miss Debate: The Ku Klux Klan
http://www.time.com/time/politics/article/0,8599,1844872,00.html?cnn=yes

New balloons aim for better hurricane data
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26907427/

Kyle headed our way (Maine)
http://www.sunjournal.com/story/284839-3/LewistonAuburn/Kyle_headed_our_way/

The CDC goes viral to stop the spread of influenza
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2008-09-28-flu-shots-children-campaign_N.htm

Updated maps show 3 areas at most risk of burning in giant blazes (California)
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/metro/20080928-9999-1n28nextfire.html

DHS To Test Technology To Rapidly Repair Levee Breaches
http://hstoday.us/content/view/5337/187/

Locals Unimpressed By Hurricane Kyle (Maine)
http://www.wpbf.com/weather/17575215/detail.html?rss=wpb&psp=news

Hawaiian Vog: Where There's Smoke--There is Something Brewing
http://www.physorg.com/news141878394.html



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Invisibility cloaks could take sting out of tsunamis
http://technology.newscientist.com/article/dn14829-invisibility-cloaks-could-take-sting-out-of-
tsunamis.html?DCMP=ILC-hmts&nsref=news8_head_dn14829

Wildfire chars Calif.'s Los Padres forest
http://www.usatoday.com/weather/wildfires/2008-09-30-los-padres-wildfire_N.htm

Faster genetic test for flu virus approved
http://www.physorg.com/news142013405.html

EPA issues radiation exposure rules for Yucca dump
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080930/ap_on_go_ot/yucca_mountain_radiation

Engineer sent text 22 seconds before fatal train crash (California)
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/10/01/train.crash.probe/index.html




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Public Safety Communications, Interoperability, 3-1-1 and 9-1-1 News
State unveils $32 million interisland emergency communications system (Hawaii)
http://www.honoluluadvertiser.com/article/20080930/BREAKING01/80930034/-1/RSS01




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Other
Cal Fire Wins Tech Award
http://firechief.com/technology/calfire_wins_0926/

Chief Turns Fire Lessons into Book
http://firechief.com/hazmat/chief_book_0925/

IAFC to Launch Internet TV
http://firechief.com/communications/iafc_tv_0926/

NFPA Appoints Fire Prevention Manager
http://firechief.com/leadership/nfpa_appoints_0925/

NTSB Says Medevac Chopper Hit Tree (Maryland)
http://www.wbaltv.com/cnn-news/17579204/detail.html

Teen survives, 4 killed in medevac crash (Maryland)
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/09/28/medivac.crash/index.html

Medevac helicopters under scrutiny (Maryland)
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2008-09-29-airmed_N.htm?loc=interstitialskip

$10.9B health bill for 9/11 workers is nixed
http://www.nydailynews.com/news/2008/09/28/2008-09-
28_109b_health_bill_for_911_workers_is_nixe.html

Alaska Air National Guard takes over MAST rescue calls
http://newsminer.com/news/2008/aug/21/alaska-air-national-guard-takes-over-mast-rescue-c/

Was it worth it? 2 sides of Central Florida's property tax situation
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/politics/orl-proptax0108oct01,0,1944400.story

Pathfinder Technology Revolutionizes Hurricane Relief Efforts
http://www.firerescue1.com/fire-products/press-releases/430076/

Pilot's license found in Calif. may be Fossett's
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081001/ap_on_re_us/fossett_search

Fossett plane found, sheriff says
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/10/02/steve.fossett.search/index.html

O3b Networks: A far-out plan to deliver the Web
http://features.csmonitor.com/innovation/2008/09/24/o3b-networks-a-far-out-plan-to-deliver-the-
web/

Metrolink chief says agency would consider installing safety systems (California)
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-metrolink26-2008sep26,0,86283.story

Team of lone rangers scours the new Wild West (California)
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-ranger25-2008sep25,0,5188771.story

2 Investigation Brings Changes To Traffic Control (Illinois)
http://cbs2chicago.com/local/traffic.control.aides.2.826926.html

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Former fire marshal's faith bolstered his commitment (Pennsylvania)
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/cityregion/s_590198.html?source=rss&feed=1

Space exploration key to mankind's survival: NASA chief
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080925/sc_afp/usspacenasaanniversarygriffin_080925062652;_ylt=AhGsSY5YTA4
pYUHiwO8voP_POrgF

MAYBE RESCUES SHOULDN'T BE COST-FREE
http://hstoday.us/content/view/5275/151/

Wildfires force $400M in cuts at Forest Service
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2008-09-29-forest-service_N.htm

U.S. to investigate post-Katrina bridge shootings
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2008-09-30-post-katrina-shooting_N.htm

Commentary: America's chilling future
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/10/01/beck.future/index.html




You Think Your Boss Is Bad?
Some Managers Can't Manage. What to Do If You've Got a Boss Who Only Makes Things
Worse.

By Tara Swords
Special to The Washington Post
Sunday, September 28, 2008; N01

Maybe your co-workers are friendly and caring. Maybe your company's mission stirs your
passions. Maybe you bring home a fat paycheck for a predictable 40 hours a week. Still, it can
take just one sour ingredient to turn your occupational utopia into a recurring nightmare: a jerk for
a boss.

Bad bosses run the gamut from meek and uninspiring to unethical and even psychologically
abusive. But all bad bosses have one thing in common, says Steve Miranda of the Alexandria-
based Society for Human Resource Management.

"Bad bosses are energy vampires," he says. "When employees interact with them, they literally
come away from that interaction feeling more drained, worse and less energized."

The No. 1 reason people leave jobs is because they work for bosses they don't respect and who
don't inspire employees to reach their potential, says Miranda, who serves as chief human
resource, strategic planning and diversity officer for the society.

For most people, job success partly defines self-worth. So a boss who disparages instead of
encourages not only damages productivity, Miranda says, but also casts a long, dark shadow on
morale.


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                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
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"A friend of mine called it the shame spiral," says Katy, a 36-year-old Rockville resident who
found herself in a work environment she describes as filled with interoffice affairs, racist
comments and other inappropriate behavior, often condoned, if not spearheaded, by the boss.
"You start thinking, 'I must have done something. How is this happening to me?' "

We asked four people to share their experiences with bad bosses. We have identified them by
their first names only so that they could speak freely about the problems they faced.

Some of these situations took place several years ago, but the memories are still painful.
Nevertheless, the four agreed to dredge up their recollections in hopes that others might find
some nugget of wisdom about dealing with their own energy vampires -- and how to know when
it's time to cut and run from a jerk.

The Boss's Way or the Highway

Maybe the boss isn't Dr. Evil, but he does want an army of Mini-Mes. He wants things done his
way, and he doesn't trust employees to do it their way.

"Some people are great at delegating details but not authority," says Mo Fathelbab, president of
Alexandria-based Forum Resources Network and author of "Forum: The Secret Advantage of
Successful Leaders." Letting go of authority and trusting employees, Fathelbab says, is a big
challenge because the boss is no longer in control. "And when they're not in control, they're not
comfortable in their own skin."

When Tammy took a public relations job at a D.C. hospitality business, she tried to be proactive
by suggesting fresh ideas. But the boss criticized her way of working, yelled at her, accused her
of negativity and faulted her for her 8-to-6 schedule.

"He was nitpicking every single thing I was doing," says Tammy, who's now 39 and lives in
Alexandria. She knew he clearly wanted things done his way, but he was also vague about what
his way entailed. She tried consulting with him. "I went back and said, 'I just want to make sure I
have this right.' But if I didn't, that would fire him up."

Eventually, Tammy's boss put her on probation. He gave her three months to fix the problems,
but Tammy says he never made clear what those problems were. She felt blindsided.

"In every position I've ever had, I've always had a great relationship with [bosses]," Tammy says.
"I've always received accolades from the people I've worked with and for."

Tammy says she could have enlisted the help of human resources but feared being blacklisted or
seen as a complainer. Her health bore the brunt of her stress.

"It had gotten to a point that I couldn't even brush my teeth in the morning without gagging," she
says. "I have never been that upset about going into work ever before. I ended up losing 17
pounds, and I'm not a very big person to begin with."

Tammy thought her personality didn't jell with her boss's more aggressive style. In these
situations, Miranda recommends that employees ask the HR department to administer personality
profiling tests such as the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator or the Predictive Index.




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 26
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                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
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"Things come to the surface" in these tests, Miranda says. "Employees and the boss look at each
other and say, 'Oh, that's why we're having this problem.' What starts off as an adversarial
relationship moves into something more positive."

Tammy was interviewing for new jobs when her boss moved to a different city. Her probation
ended, and she got a new manager who trusts her to do her job well -- and she has thrived at the
company ever since.

"The sky opened up. Things got clear again," Tammy says. "I love what I do."

Inappropriate to the Extreme

On TV's "The Office," boss Michael Scott is an endless source of outrageously inappropriate
comments and behavior. The character is funny and sometimes even lovable. But in real life,
such a boss can alienate employees and create a toxic environment.

When Katy, the Rockville resident, took a job planning events for a D.C.-based nonprofit
organization, she joined a tiny department with an established culture in which nothing seemed
off-limits. Katy remembers hearing the boss fight with her husband on the phone -- the same boss
who she says was having a romantic affair with a co-worker.

Katy was uncomfortable because her boss condoned an environment in which racist and sexual
comments were acceptable, but the only person Katy felt she could approach for help had been
sexually involved with the boss.

If there's any hope of resolving this sort of problem, it's best done with classic "I" phrases,
Miranda says. Don't accuse the boss of bad behavior, but say how the behavior makes you feel.
The boss will either apologize or be indifferent to your concern, at which point you'll know how to
proceed.

"Some people are more than willing to change," Miranda says. "Other people, quite frankly, are
jerks. And employees need to vote with their feet."

Katy says she took suggestions for improving the workplace to her boss but nothing changed.
She ultimately filed a grievance and hired a lawyer after her boss falsified performance-related
information in Katy's file. She began documenting her boss's actions in hopes of getting the boss
reprimanded, or at least getting herself transferred, but she only felt worse.

"I had migraines. I felt sick to my stomach," Katy says. "I used all of my sick leave just because it
was so horrible."

In the end, she did vote with her feet and resigned before her grievance was resolved.

"It was so bad that I left before I vested in the pension," she says. "It was worth it to leave and
give up that money rather than stay and be around those people."

The Silent Treatment

When Dawn took a job with an Alexandria nonprofit group in 1991, she was a recent college
graduate eager to build a career in communications. She loved the organization's mission and
had completed a successful project there as a consultant. The environment fostered discipline

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and teamwork, and Dawn had a good working relationship with the boss. But when Dawn
became an employee, the boss's behavior changed.

"It became a command-and-control environment," says Dawn, who now lives in San Francisco.
The boss "was constantly over my shoulder. She'd occasionally listen to my phone calls. I was
forbidden from having conversations with board members. I was seeing a dynamic that was really
counterproductive to the organization."

Dawn says she thought the boss had confidence in her abilities, which made the dynamic all the
more confusing. And, eventually, there was no hope of clearing up the confusion after the boss
stopped communicating altogether.

"I'd come in the office, and she wouldn't even look up," Dawn says. "In a small office with only
three people, it's a little awkward."

Fathelbab says the situation reminds him of a place where he worked years ago. "This was the
boss's style of saying, 'I'm going to punish you, but I can't do it verbally.' " In such cases, he says,
it's critical to restart the communication. A 360-degree evaluation system, in which everyone
reviews the people they work with and for, can uncover the problem and get people talking about
how to solve it.

For Dawn, the lack of communication reached a head one day when she borrowed a friend's car
to drive to work and her boss had it towed from the company lot. "As opposed to walking in the
office and just asking, 'Is that anybody's car?' she made a decision to call a tow truck and have
the car removed," Dawn says. "Hours later she said, 'I didn't know that was yours.' She offered no
recourse, no reimbursement, no help to drive me down to get it."

At review time, Dawn and her boss agreed on the need to communicate better. But Dawn felt
they were going through the motions.

Dawn eventually moved on with a valuable lesson: how not to behave as a manager.

"I knew I didn't want to be anything like that person," she says. "When you're young, sometimes
you can get caught up in insecurities trying to please your boss. But when I feel a little insecure or
feel paranoia creeping in, I address that internally rather than project that on anybody else."

Since that job, Dawn has managed many people and worked in companies of varying sizes. She
says she learned from that early experience that it's helpful to address problems immediately. But
it was a hard-won lesson.

"It's so funny: As I start to remember this stuff, I get the same anxious feeling I had," Dawn says.
"I internalized so much."

Bullying and Intimidation

When Bethesda resident Tash took a job at a grocery store deli in her native Australia, she was
just 17. She and her boss had agreed that she would work 12 hours each week. But the boss
soon pressured her to take on more shifts, often with only a few hours' notice.

"She would say that if I didn't come do this shift, she would cancel everything I had that week,"
says Tash, now 22. "I was in high school, and I wasn't as self-assured as I should have been, and
she probably capitalized on that."
   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 28
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                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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Tash eventually decided to assert herself, with some success. The boss gave her fewer hours but
didn't cancel all of her shifts as threatened. Tash belonged to a union and today says she thinks it
might have helped to bring the situation to the union's attention.

"I was too scared to talk to anyone," she says. "I think you get paid less, so people assume they
can treat you badly -- or you assume they can treat you badly."

Fathelbab says standing up for yourself can be scary but worth it.

"The bullying personality will keep bullying until at some point in time you stand up and say, 'I'm
not going to take it anymore,' " Fathelbab says. "It might work. It might not work, and that means
you might have a better future somewhere else."

Ultimately, enough people complained about the boss that she was transferred to a different
location. "After that, it kind of made the whole staff feel unified," Tash says.

Be Fair, Then Firm

Experts say it's good to remember that today's managers have a lot of responsibilities: increasing
revenue, keeping customers happy, managing a diverse workforce that comprises four
generations of people who are motivated and fulfilled differently. A little empathy for the boss
can't hurt.

But when you conjure up all of your objectivity and empathy and still think the boss is in the wrong
-- and your attempts at resolution are fruitless -- it's time to go.

"If you have a mediator, go to them," Katy says. "Try, but realize that it's not always going to
work."




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                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                               International News Stories

Civil Preparedness, Security and Humanitarian Affairs
German cops raid plane, arrest 2 terror suspects
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080926/ap_on_re_eu/eu_germany_flight_stormed

U.N.: 20,000 flee from Pakistan to Afghanistan to avoid fighting
http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2008-09-29-afghanistan-refugees-
pakistan_N.htm?loc=interstitialskip

Disaster management lessons for Chennai hospital (India)
http://www.newkerala.com/topstory-fullnews-27459.html

N.B. power crews come to aid of Nova Scotia after Kyle blows through (Canada)
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/nova-scotia/story/2008/09/29/kyle-novascotia.html

Australia and European Commission Complete Historic Deal on Emergency Management
http://www.iaem.com/about/membership/regions/IAEMOceania/IAEMOceania.htm#Oceania0930
08

Wales to Hold Emergency Planning Exercise to Prepare All Agencies for All Hazards (United
Kingdom)
http://www.iaem.com/regions/iaemeuropa/EuropaNews.asp#Europa093008

Al-Maliki: Security pact in U.S., Iraq interest
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26949019/

City Considers $1 Tax For Emergency Preparedness (Canada)
http://www.citynews.ca/news/news_27213.aspx

In Myanmar, cyclone continues to take a toll
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-recovery26-2008sep26,0,2198521.story

U.N. reports losses due to Myanmar exchange rate
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-myanmar29-2008jul29,0,5958200.story

Emergency Management to partner with Microsoft (New Zealand)
http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/AK0809/S00310.htm

Concerns over emergency NHS care (United Kingdom)
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/7635518.stm

Nigeria: Tallen Supports Students Involvement in Disaster Mgt
http://allafrica.com/stories/200809260167.html

Testing EU's Emergency Management and Response Mechanisms
http://euroalert.net/en/news.aspx?idn=7859

Ethiopia: UN Helps Improve Emergency Health Readiness
http://allafrica.com/stories/200809270008.html

Police to put up own radio station (Philippines)
http://www.sunstar.com.ph/static/man/2008/09/27/life/police.to.put.up.own.radio.station.html
   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 30
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


Lavrov proposes summit on collective European security
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080928/wl_afp/undiplomacyassemblyrussiaeuropesecurity_08092
8020235

French police arrest 10 Basque separatists
http://www.expatica.com/fr/articles/news/French-police-arrest-10-Basque-separatists-.html

Exercise simulates terror attack in Russia
http://www.upi.com/Emerging_Threats/2008/09/24/Exercise_simulates_terror_attack_in_Russia/
UPI-83261222299926/

Island gets emergency expertise (United Kingdom)
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/isle_of_man/7640718.stm

Human Migration Patterns Get Global Forecast
http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2008/09/29/human-migration.html

Nigeria: Nema Stakeholders Sign MoU On Disaster
http://allafrica.com/stories/200809300372.html

MI6 secrets found on camera sold on eBay (United Kingdom)
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26958931/

US to build new, more secure embassy in London
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081002/ap_on_re_eu/eu_britain_us_embassy




Indian Police Accused Of Using Undue Force On Terror Suspects
Muslims Bear Brunt of Zeal to Solve Bombings

By Rama Lakshmi
Washington Post Foreign Service
Monday, September 29, 2008; A13

HYDERABAD, India -- A week after two bombs rocked an amusement park and a restaurant here
in September 2007, plainclothes policemen barged into the home of Abdul Raheem, an auto-
rickshaw driver. Throwing a black cloth over his face, they shoved him into their vehicle.

"I kept asking them if I had jumped a red light by mistake or parked my auto-rickshaw at the
wrong spot. I had no idea they were picking me up for the bomb blasts," said Raheem, 27, a
bearded man with a thick mop of oiled hair.

For three days, the police questioned him nonstop: Had he driven the bombers to the scene? Had
he heard suspicious conversations among passenger? They beat him with straps made from
truck tires, he said, and "tied my ankles . . . and gave me electric shocks all over my body."

In the end, authorities found no evidence to charge him in the bombings but kept him in jail for six
months on unrelated allegations of distributing DVDs of the 2002 Hindu-Muslim riots in Gujarat
state and possessing "jihadi literature."


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In the past three years, 12 Indian cities have been hit by bombs in crowded places. About 580
people have died. Police have secured no convictions in the attacks, but they have arrested and
reportedly roughed up countless people during their investigations, building ill will among many of
the country's 130 million Muslims.

In interviews in three states, investigating officers offered a different view, saying the laws prevent
them from going after the perpetrators with full force. At the same time, they said, every new
bombing triggers a public outcry that officials are soft or incompetent and demands for tough
action and stronger anti-terrorism laws.

"The public pressure on the police is enormous. Everybody wants quick results, and nobody has
patience. The TV news channels question the police every day," said Shailendra Srivastava,
inspector general of police in the central Indian city of Bhopal, who has interrogated some alleged
members of a banned group called the Students Islamic Movement of India, or SIMI. His city is on
a publicly announced hit list of a new group called the Indian Mujahideen, which has asserted
responsibility for the recent bombings in Jaipur, Ahmedabad and New Delhi.

"But how can we crack down on the supporters and sympathizers of these groups?" he said. "The
various human rights and minority rights groups are watching every step and questioning the way
we police, detain, interrogate. It is very difficult."

In Hyderabad, police have detained about 100 youths in the past year and formally arrested 28.
"But we have not charged a single person in the bombings," said B. Prasad Rao, the city's police
chief. "We examined many men but could not make much headway. We only have some vague
leads. Our intelligence network in the Muslim community is weak." He denied that detainees have
been tortured. "Maybe they were examined for a longer time," he said. "The police were under
tremendous pressure."

Families of the suspects say that, charges or not, their sons' reputations are permanently scarred
from having their faces and names featured in newspapers and on television. About two dozen
men have emerged from detention since February, and many are questioning the police in public
hearings.

"The police in Hyderabad have been acting with total impunity and no accountability, resorting to
illegal detention, torture and intimidation," said Lateef Mohammad Khan, a human rights lawyer
who represents the youths. "There is a lot of anger in the society, which strengthens extremist
groups. I am not saying these boys are innocent, but I want the police to stop using extralegal
measures. Just follow the law of the land."

Despite all their work, the police have yet to identify a theme or group that weaves the bombings
together.

Until last year, officials said groups based in Bangladesh were training Indian Muslims to carry
out attacks. But after the bombings in the northern city of Jaipur in May, the Indian Mujahideen
started asserting responsibility for the violence. Police are still largely uncertain about the origin
and structure of this group.

Police in Gujarat, the scene of bombings in July, pinned all the blame on SIMI and said that group
and the Indian Mujahideen were the same. But the New Delhi police investigating the bombings
that killed 21 people in the capital Sept. 13 said the Indian Mujahideen is separate, assembling
and planting the bombs with peripheral support from SIMI.


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There is similar disagreement among police on who the blasts' architects were. In August, the
Gujarat police said they had found the "mastermind" of the bombings in that state, a SIMI
member known as Abu Basher. A week ago, the New Delhi police said a software engineer
named Abdul Suban Tauqeer was the chief conspirator in all the blasts. On Sept. 19, police
officers in New Delhi broke into a small apartment in a Muslim neighborhood and gunned down
two suspects, including Mohammad Atif, whom they declared the real "mastermind."

"Atif, a 24-year-old graduate student of human rights, coordinated the bombings in at least three
Indian cities. He used to go on reconnaissance missions before the blasts," said Karnail Singh,
joint commissioner of police in New Delhi. He said authorities were examining the contents of a
laptop computer and a memory stick seized from the apartment and are interrogating 13 people
suspected of having worked with Atif. "We have the mobile phone with which they shot the clips
of blast sites and attached to their e-mails claiming responsibility."

Yet, on Wednesday, police in Mumbai arrested five Indian Mujahideen suspects, one of whom
they said was Atif's boss.

The last e-mail from the Indian Mujahideen after the New Delhi blasts ridiculed what it called the
"false claims" of police. If officials boast "of arresting masterminds and key terrorists all over India,
then which mastermind executed today's attack?" the message said.

For now, the investigation is focusing on the 13 Indian Mujahideen suspects. Police describe
them as middle-class, educated and technically savvy young men who led dual lives.

One of them, Zeeshan Ahmed, was a graduate student of business management. His school said
he scored high in subjects such as commercial law and organizational behavior. Another was a
graduate student in business and had won a gold medal in his undergraduate degree in
economics.

Residents and families protested the arrests last Monday and produced school records to argue
that the men could not be terrorists.

In Hyderabad, even after Raheem and others are out of jail and fighting their cases in court, the
terror tag follows them. "I lost my auto-rickshaw, my fiancee and my honor. Nobody wants to hire
me anymore, although I tell them I was not booked for the bombing. Friends have deserted me,
relatives don't invite us over anymore," he said. "I carry the stigma all day."




Iraqi Red Crescent Paralyzed by Allegations

By Amit R. Paley and Ernesto Londoño
Washington Post Foreign Service
Thursday, September 25, 2008; A01

BAGHDAD -- The Iraqi Red Crescent, the country's leading humanitarian organization, has been
crippled by allegations of embezzlement and mismanagement, including what Iraqi officials call

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the inappropriate expenditure of more than $1 million on Washington lobbying firms in an
unsuccessful effort to win U.S. funding.

The group's former president, Said I. Hakki, an Iraqi American urologist recruited by Bush
administration officials to resuscitate Iraq's health-care system, left the country this summer after
the issuance of arrest warrants for him and his deputies. He and his aides deny the allegations
and call them politically motivated.

The Red Crescent oversees the largest humanitarian operation in the country, with thousands of
employees and an annual budget of $60 million funded in large part by the Iraqi government. The
group has ceased nearly all its humanitarian work in recent months after the government froze its
assets. The agency, which distributed more than 35,000 emergency food packages in June,
handed out just 2,000 in July.

The crisis at the Red Crescent -- detailed in interviews, internal agency documents and
investigative reports -- illustrates many of the challenges Iraq faces as its leaders seek to assert
more control over security, reconstruction and humanitarian work. Iraqi officials point to Hakki and
other former exiles brought to Iraq by the U.S. government as one reason that key institutions
remain inefficient and corrupt.

"We are supposed to be an organization that helps people, and instead we have been infected by
a culture of corruption," said Abdul Kareem Aboud al-Humeidi, a critic of Hakki who was elected
interim president of the Red Crescent this summer. "If the whole world is so concerned about the
humanitarian crisis in Iraq, why has no one fixed the problems at the Red Crescent?"

In several telephone interviews from Beirut, Hakki said his expansion of the organization's size
and budget has helped millions of Iraqis. He called the probes a ploy by Prime Minister Nouri al-
Maliki to purge him and other allies of former prime minister Ibrahim al-Jafari from top jobs in the
country.

"I risked my life to come to Iraq and build the largest and the only effective organization working
in the country," said Hakki, 64. "I will not stand by and let the Iraqi Red Crescent be destroyed."

Hakki's management practices caused alarm among his colleagues shortly after he arrived at the
Red Crescent.

A former adviser to Saddam Hussein's Health Ministry, Hakki fled the country in 1983 and
eventually settled in Florida, where he became a U.S. citizen. He developed a urology practice,
taught at the University of South Florida and became known for his patented work on prosthetic
penile implants.

Just before the 2003 invasion of Iraq, the Bush administration asked Hakki to return to Baghdad.
At the time, the administration sought to fill positions in Iraq with Republican supporters; Hakki
has donated $13,800 to Republican candidates and party organizations since 1988. Jafari, Iraq's
premier from mid-2005 to mid-2006, appointed Hakki to lead the Red Crescent. Jafari declined to
comment for this article.

"We were impressed with him at the beginning. He was an American and an academic," said
Humeidi, then a member of the board of directors.

But Hakki soon clashed with the head of the society's accounting division, Faiza Fadhil Whayeb,
who insisted that Hakki and his deputies put out all contracts for competitive bidding, according to

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Humeidi and other agency officials. Hakki refused, they said. In an interview, Hakki said it was
sometimes necessary to avoid time-consuming bidding procedures because of the pressing need
and the difficulty of working under wartime conditions. Whayeb said she could not comment.

Another confrontation came over a 2005 government grant for the Red Crescent to build camps
for Iraqis making the Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca, in Saudi Arabia. After the society spent the
money, Hakki told Whayeb that the grant was a loan that needed to be repaid to the government,
and directed her to transfer the money to him, which she did, according to Humeidi and other
agency officials.

An Iraqi judge issued an arrest warrant for Hakki in 2005 on corruption charges related to the
controversy, though the warrant was later rescinded. Iraq's public integrity commission is still
reviewing the matter. Hakki said that he has no recollection of the project and that he has never
embezzled money.

Under Hakki's leadership, the Red Crescent expanded rapidly. Its budget over the past five years
has swelled from about $3 million to $60 million and its staff from 50 employees to 3,500,
according to Mazin A. Salloum, the group's secretary general.

But several humanitarian organizations grew concerned over what they considered the Red
Crescent's lack of transparency with funds, and some, including UNICEF, stopped working with
the organization. "We simply don't know where our money went," said the head of one aid
program, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he feared retaliation against his
organization.

Hakki alienated some of his colleagues by employing Washington lobbying firms to help the Red
Crescent seek U.S. government funding and to arrange for Hakki to meet U.S. officials. The
arrangement is highly unusual for foreign humanitarian groups.

Since last year, the Red Crescent has paid $1.1 million to Cassidy & Associates and the Carmen
Group. The lobbying has not resulted in any U.S. government funding for the Red Crescent, but
Hakki defended the expenditure. "If we end up receiving millions of dollars for the Iraqi Red
Crescent, then it is worth it," he said.

The Red Crescent retained both firms in February 2007 and ended its contract with Cassidy in
March; the Carmen account remains active. Cassidy said it helped raise awareness of the
humanitarian crisis; Carmen said it helped to improve the Red Crescent's relationship with the
U.S. government and develop a refugee resettlement program.

Raheem Hassen al-Igeeli, the head of Iraq's Commission on Integrity, called the hiring of the
firms "unacceptable" and said it was an improper use of government funds. "This money should
be spent on humanitarian issues inside Iraq," he said.

Humeidi and other officials said the Red Crescent contracted to buy emergency aid packages
from a company owned by a relative of one of Hakki's deputies for about $50 each -- even though
the packages are worth only $10. Hakki said he could not recall the cost of the packages, which
contain basic food items including rice and cooking oil, but said the agency worked hard to
procure goods at the lowest price. He said he was not aware of the owner's connection to any
Red Crescent employee.

In 2007, the Iraqi Bureau of Supreme Audit, the government's top auditing agency, said it had
identified financial irregularities at the Red Crescent. Abdul Bassit Turki Saeed, the agency's
president, said he could not determine what happened to about $50 million the government had
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sent to the organization. Hakki called the audit part of the government's smear campaign against
him and said all the money was spent on sick and needy Iraqis.

"Why are they doing this to the only effective organization in Iraq helping people?" Hakki said in
one interview. "I came from America to do something good for the people of Iraq. And I feel I
have succeeded. I don't want the political parties to take over the Iraqi Red Crescent and ruin the
success."

The Red Crescent's work began to stall late last year after the agency's audit. It reached the point
of collapse in early July, when arrest warrants were issued for Hakki, Red Crescent Vice
President Jamal Karbouli and at least 11 other officials.

Hakki's attorney, Hamid Ibrahim al-Awadi, acknowledged that Hakki sometimes exceeded his
authorized spending limits on cash disbursements. But he insisted that the actions were not
illegal because they were done only in exigent circumstances and because the accounting office
never told him to stop.

Karbouli had been wanted by Iraqi officials since the spring on charges that he used Red
Crescent ambulances to transport weapons to the Sunni insurgent group al-Qaeda in Iraq. Yet
after his arrest by the Interior Ministry, he was taken by FBI agents in Baghdad and then escaped
to Jordan, according to a senior Iraqi official. The incident prompted Maliki to cancel a joint task
force with the FBI, according to a copy of the order reviewed by The Washington Post.

Karbouli's brother Ahmed said his sibling was innocent but refused to discuss the matter further.
A U.S. Embassy spokesman declined to comment on the case.

Hakki visited northern Iraq this month, saying the arrest warrants against him had been dropped
and pledging to resign if the Red Crescent did not agree to several demands. On Sept. 15, the
agency's leadership rejected his requests. On Monday, the Red Crescent elected Jowan Fuad
Masoum, a former minister of communication, as president. But another government official,
appointed by Maliki, also claims to be president.

Igeeli, the head of the integrity commission, said that the warrants remain in effect and that he
expected the United States would extradite Hakki if he returns to Florida. U.S. officials in
Baghdad, who would not speak for attribution, said they would support extradition.

The Iraqi government froze the Red Crescent's assets on July 10. Since then, the organization
has stopped funding free medical care for poor Iraqis. Employees were not paid until this month,
when some received one month's salary.

"The Iraqi people should not be punished just because the head of the office is accused of
corruption," said Awadi, Hakki's attorney. "We can't go on like this. A lot of people need our help."




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Hazard Research and News
Explosion Rips Through Indian Flower Market
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1845131,00.html

Haitian City Encased in Mud Needs Global Help
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1844929,00.html

Bomb reportedly kills 17 in Syrian capital
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26910506/

Death toll from Vietnam floods rises to 41
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/asiapcf/09/28/vietnam.floods.ap/index.html

Leaders try to rid world of malaria deaths by 2015
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-
bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2008/09/25/international/i154451D51.DTL&type=science

Space Explorers Plead With UN to Prepare for Killer Asteroids
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/80beats/2008/09/26/space-explorers-plead-with-un-to-
prepare-for-killer-asteroids/

Hello, Sunspot! Where Have You Been?
http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2008/09/26/sun-spot-solar.html

Lava Flows Help Trace Magnetic Field Reversals
http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1570113/lava_flows_help_trace_magnetic_field_reversals/
index.html

Three held as Mohammed book publisher set ablaze (United Kingdom)
http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=080927204747.vj5srmx9&show_article=1

Taiwan braces for Typhoon Jangmi
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26918610/

Hurricane Kyle races north toward Nova Scotia (Canada)
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26893171/

One dead in Lebanon camp bombing
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/7632297.stm

Attacks In Afghan Capital Kill Six Police
http://www.turkishweekly.net/news.php?id=59834#

Fidaen-e-Islam threatens attacks on US facilitators (Pakistan)
http://thenews.com.pk/updates.asp?id=56189

Finland fears copycat attacks, Sweden arrests teen
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080925/ap_on_re_eu/eu_finland_school_shooting_43

Storms kill 5 Mexicans; thousands of homes flooded
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080926/ap_on_re_la_am_ca/lt_mexico_floods;_ylt=ApZGLEUigbP
erNDRNo7fur23IxIF


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                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Fear of power blackouts dismissed (United Kingdom)
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7638564.stm

Spain seeks stolen case with low-level radioactive material
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080929/sc_afp/spainnuclearenergyhealthenvironment_080929181
504;_ylt=Al20.8mMUq64iKqSqIk2w.jPOrgF

Invisibility cloaks could take sting out of tsunamis
http://technology.newscientist.com/article/dn14829-invisibility-cloaks-could-take-sting-out-of-
tsunamis.html?DCMP=ILC-hmts&nsref=news8_head_dn14829

Reports: 40 dead in India temple stampede
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/asiapcf/09/29/india.stampede.ap/index.html

Mixed views on new nuclear build (United Kingdom)
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7642067.stm

UK university probes "Nazi" initiation video
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20081002/wl_nm/us_britain_students

Flash floods in Algeria claim 29 lives
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/africa/10/02/algeria.floods.ap/index.html

Suicide attackers strike Shiite mosques, kill 24 (Iraq)
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081002/ap_on_re_mi_ea/ml_iraq




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                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
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International Affairs
Chavez reaffirms Russia alliance during visit
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/americas/09/26/russia.chavez/index.html

Iran Denounces Support of Israel
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1845108,00.html

Security Council agrees on new Iran resolution
http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2008-09-27-iran_N.htm?loc=interstitialskip

Right Wing Makes Big Gains in Austria
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1845336,00.html

IAEA chief urges Iran to end its nuclear secrecy
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080929/ap_on_re_mi_ea/eu_nuclear_conference

The Latest Star Wars Woes: Launching Fake Targets
http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1845354,00.html?cnn=yes

The Pentagon's new Africa command raises suspicions about U.S. motives
http://news.yahoo.com/s/mcclatchy/20080929/wl_mcclatchy/3058466

Karzai Seeks Saudi Help in Peace Talks (Afghanistan)
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1845668,00.html

Suspected U.S. missile strike kills 6 in Pakistan
http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2008-10-01-usmissile-pakistan_N.htm

General wants more troops in Afghanistan now
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-afghanistan2-2008oct02,0,1479957.story

Somalia: World can use force against the pirates
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081001/ap_on_re_af/af_somalia_piracy

US Navy: Shipping companies must tackle piracy
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080923/ap_on_re_mi_ea/ml_gulf_us_navy_piracy;_ylt=AtVtQeWr
Cw8_l31oQBGcG3MLewgF

Pirates face down U.S. warships, 'copters
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/africa/09/30/somalia.piracy/index.html

Somalia asks Russia for help with pirates
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/africa/10/01/Russia.Somalipirates/index.html

Somali pirates stick to $20 million ransom demand
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081002/ap_on_re_af/af_somalia_piracy

US envoy takes new nuclear proposal to North Korea
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081001/ap_on_re_as/as_koreas_nuclear

EU monitors begin patrols in Georgian territory
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081001/ap_on_re_eu/eu_georgia_russia


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 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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Britain: Diplomats' children must leave Pakistan
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/asiapcf/10/01/britain.pakistan.children.ap/index.html

UN Raises Pakistan Security Level
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1846475,00.html

Pakistani troops fire on US helicopters at border
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080925/ap_on_re_as/as_afghanistan

Pakistan to US after clash: Stay away from border
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080926/ap_on_re_as/as_pakistan_us

Bush rejected Israeli strike on Iran: report
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080926/ts_nm/us_israel_irannews

What's Behind North Korea's Nuclear Power Play
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1844181,00.html

Russia blasts US dominant role in world affairs
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080927/ap_on_re_eu/un_un_general_assembly_russia

Israeli officials say US provides advanced radar
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080928/ap_on_re_mi_ea/ml_israel_us_radar

Olmert laments 'evil wind of extremism' in Israel
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080928/ap_on_re_mi_ea/ml_israel_palestinians

Gen. Odierno: Iraqi government must improve services
http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/iraq/2008-09-29-odierno_N.htm?loc=interstitialskip

U.S.-Syria talks may be step toward thaw
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/meast/10/01/us.syria.talks/index.html

Russian billionaire, Gorbachev to form political party in Russia
http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2008-09-30-gorbachev_N.htm

Russia to deploy new nuclear missile
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20081002/wl_nm/us_russia_forces

Putin accuses Ukraine of aiding Georgia
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081002/ap_on_re_eu/eu_russia_putin




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Young Saudis Reinvent Ramadan
Holy Month Devoted to Self-Sacrifice Instead of Self-Absorption

By Faiza Saleh Ambah
Washington Post Foreign Service
Saturday, September 27, 2008; A13

JIDDAH, Saudi Arabia -- During Ramadan this year, Faten Jiddawi and a few friends from a
charity packed into a hot van and delivered a new washing machine and refrigerator to a needy
family.

Like many Saudis, Jiddawi used to mark the Muslim holy month by shopping, eating lavishly and
watching television until the wee hours. Then she slept, sometimes all day until sunset prayers
signaled the end of the daily dawn-to-dusk fast.

"That's what everyone did, but that's not really fasting," said Jiddawi, 28, a bank teller. "Fasting is
about feeling your hunger, getting close to God and helping the poor."

In Saudi Arabia, one of the world's wealthiest Muslim countries, some people have started to
criticize how many here observe Ramadan by essentially turning day into night to make fasting
easier. Work and school hours have been shortened, shops stay open until right before dawn,
and doctors and dentists offer appointments until 2 a.m.

But Jiddawi and many other young Saudis are trying to revive the holy month's original spirit of
sacrifice and giving by volunteering during the day, attending religious lectures at night and
spending more time reflecting on their faith.

"This is a religious duty, what we're doing," Jiddawi said. "And it's a wonderful feeling. This is
really how Ramadan is meant to be."

The trend has partly been inspired by Ahmad al-Shugairi, a popular young preacher who for the
past couple of years has been speaking out against the excesses of Ramadan. Several
Facebook groups are also telling people to abstain from watching TV during the month, and at
least half a dozen newspaper articles have criticized the lack of Ramadan spirit in the kingdom
and the proliferation of soap operas made especially for the month.

"People used to get together to worship Allah during Ramadan," commentator Nourah al-Khereiji
wrote in the English-language Arab News. "They would spend the night worshipping Allah and
looking for the poor so they could do something to alleviate their suffering. These days we get
together to watch TV!"

Salem Bajunaid, a university student who hosts religious lectures at his home during Ramadan,
which ends next week, said that about a dozen people attended each session last year but that
the number has risen to about 30 this year.

"Every year, there's more demand for this kind of thing," Bajunaid said. "I've noticed that people
are hungry to return to the spirit of Ramadan."

Some young Saudis viewed a more puritanical interpretation of Islam as "cool," said Ali
Ghazzawi, 22, a clinical pharmacology student. But after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks in the United
States, which were carried out mainly by Saudis, many gained a more moderate and spiritual


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understanding of the faith, and "now preachers in jeans, like Shugairi, are Muslim cool,"
Ghazzawi said.

"Spirituality is not about abstaining from food or performing physical prayers. It's about a closer
connection to God. It's about intentions," he said. "Are you doing this to perform a set of
movements you are meant to do, or are you doing it for God?"

Jawaher Abbar, 22, whose family owns a company that donated the new appliances Jiddawi and
her friends delivered, started working with the charity last year. "This kind of work is really
spreading. It's contagious," Abbar said. "One friend starts, you go with them, and it just grows."

For Jiddawi, the shift came after she became a fan of Shugairi. His nightly TV program, the most
popular religious show among young people, encourages viewers to focus on their civic duties as
part of their religion and to become more productive members of society. Several of his shows
this year have stressed a need to watch less television, eat less, shop less.

"We replaced the pain of hunger during Ramadan with the pain of overeating and indigestion,"
Shugairi, 35, said on one of his programs. "We've turned it into a month of soap operas and
entertainment, a month of the supermarkets. We've turned the month of Ramadan into a holiday.
Instead of saying hello to the month that purifies us of sin, we're saying hello to the month of
samosas, entertainment, soap operas and shopping malls."

Shugairi started a Ramadan campaign to get young Muslims to do 1 million good deeds this
month, such as feeding a hungry family, donating clothes or buying medicine for someone in
need.

"He's one of us. He speaks the language of my generation. He's not judgmental and he wasn't
always as religious as he is now, so he understands," Jiddawi said.

Ghazzawi, the pharmacology student, said Ramadan was meant to be a precursor to an ideal
Muslim life to be followed year-round.

"What we do during Ramadan -- being kind, thinking of others, helping them and feeling God's
presence during the whole day -- that's how we're supposed to live," he said. "That's what I pray
for every Ramadan, to be able to live like this for the rest of the year."




Low-Profile U.N. Chief Struggles as Diplomatic Peacemaker

By Colum Lynch
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, September 29, 2008; A15

UNITED NATIONS -- In the days after Georgian and Russian troops marched into the separatist
province of South Ossetia, Secretary General Ban Ki-moon frantically telephoned key leaders
and offered the United Nations' diplomatic help in stemming further violence. But Russian

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President Dmitry Medvedev refused to take his calls for more than a week, say senior U.S. and
U.N. officials.

The rebuff highlighted Russia's displeasure with Ban, who had clashed with Moscow over
Kosovo's independence drive and riled it again by issuing a statement supporting the territorial
integrity of Georgia, a nation Russia intended to carve up. It also provided another example of the
humbling struggles of the world's top diplomat to prod foreign leaders to embrace peace.

After more than 20 months in office, Ban is straining to make his mark as a diplomatic
peacemaker as his efforts to stem bloodshed in Sudan's Darfur region have faltered and Burma's
political players refuse to meet with his special envoy. The United Nations has been relegated to
a supporting role in many of the world's diplomatic flare-ups, including in Kenya and Zimbabwe.

Ban convened a meeting of key foreign ministers Saturday on the sidelines of the General
Assembly session to energize efforts to press Burma's generals to democratize the country and
to secure the release of nearly 2,000 political prisoners, including Nobel laureate Aung San Suu
Kyi.

But the meeting, which Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice did not attend, produced no
breakthrough, and Ban canceled plans to speak to the media. Instead Ban issued a statement,
pressing Burma to release the prisoners.

Behind the scenes, Ban has resisted calls from the United States, Britain, Singapore and other
countries to travel to Burma to meet with military ruler Senior Gen. Than Shwe in December,
fearing it might end in failure. There is a risk of Ban "going and coming back empty-handed," a
close aide said.

"No one is going to make a case that we are in the middle of a big diplomatic breakthrough on
some of these cases you've mentioned," said Robert Orr, a special adviser to Ban. "But the fact is
that is not the nature of this business. These things move quietly until they break into the open.
The secretary general's style is to work very hard, persistently, behind the scenes" to achieve
that.

Orr and other U.N. officials say Ban has had far greater success in prodding governments on
some long-term threats such as climate change and the global food and energy crises and by
helping to secure billions of dollars in commitments to fight poverty during the world's worst
financial crisis in a generation. They say his persistence paid off after Tropical Cyclone Nargis in
May, when he traveled to Rangoon, the former Burmese capital, to persuade Than Shwe to pry
open the borders for relief workers.

But Ban has been pushed into the background in Africa, where local powers have taken the lead
in solving regional problems. South Africa effectively blocked a U.S. and British initiative to grant
the United Nations a more central role in mediating an end to an election crisis in Zimbabwe,
where President Robert Mugabe cracked down on opposition leaders to prevent his more popular
rival, Morgan Tsvangirai, from winning the election.

At the height of the crisis, Mugabe told Ban to butt out of his country's affairs and accused him of
carrying water for the region's formal colonial power. But Mugabe ultimately agreed to a
compromise that gave the United Nations a supporting role in a diplomatic process led by his
friend Thabo Mbeki, who was South Africa's president at the time.

Ban's low-profile diplomatic style contrasts with the activism of his predecessor, Kofi Annan, a
Ghanaian national who sought to expand the authority of the office. At a similar stage in his
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tenure, Annan had carried out a high-profile trip to Baghdad, where he temporarily averted a
U.S.-led air war by persuading Saddam Hussein to open his presidential palaces to U.N.
inspectors. That peace was short-lived, and the United States and Britain launched Operation
Desert Fox, a four-day air war against Iraq, several months later in 1998.

"It is possible that Ban's decision, for whatever reason, to keep away from those extremely
melodramatic settings may be prudent," said James Traub, author of "The Best Intentions: Kofi
Annan and the UN in the Era of American World Power." "But it also has the effect of reducing his
size in the world. There can't be any question he is a smaller figure than Kofi in his secretary
generalship. That's just a fact," Traub added.

When violence erupted in Kenya after a disputed presidential vote, the African Union recruited
Annan to help restore calm. He assembled a team of former aides and helped hammer out a
power-sharing deal.

"To his credit, Ban asked Kofi what he needed, and Kofi said, 'Staff.' Ban said, 'Take what you
want,' " said Fred Eckhard, a former U.N. spokesman brought in by Annan to handle the media
during the Kenya crisis. "It was indeed an all-U.N. effort but led by Kofi."

In Darfur, Ban has been in control, cultivating a relationship with Sudanese President Omar
Hassan al-Bashir to help secure support for a U.N.-African Union peacekeeping mission and a
political settlement. But fighting has resumed, political talks have stalled, and the peacekeepers'
deployment is months behind schedule.

Ban's ability to engage in direct talks with Bashir, meanwhile, has been curtailed since the
International Criminal Court's chief prosecutor requested an arrest warrant for the Sudanese
leader on charges of genocide and crimes against humanity. Ban's attorneys have instructed him
to limit contact with Bashir unless it is urgent, a senior U.N. official said. "We have to be very
careful about our dealings with him," the official said.

The setbacks have begun to take a toll on Ban, who lashed out at his senior advisers during a
retreat in Turin, Italy, for failing to make the organization more responsive to the challenges of the
day.

"Our job is to change the U.N. -- and through it, the world," Ban told his staff members last month.
"This is the big picture. I am frustrated by our failure, so often, to see it."




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For Refugees, Georgia Conflict Stirs Up Old Fears
Resettled Chechens In Valley Haunted By War With Russia

By Tara Bahrampour
Washington Post Foreign Service
Sunday, September 28, 2008; A23

DUISI, Georgia -- When war broke out last month and helicopters appeared over the valley in
which this town lies, Taos Yerznukaiva did not wait to see what would happen. She packed up
her family members, including a 2-month-old baby and a pregnant woman, and fled south to the
border with Turkey.

She had learned in Chechnya, she said, how to escape from the Russians.

The second Chechen war, which started in 1999, sent thousands of refugees like her over the
Russian border from Chechnya into Georgia's Pankisi Gorge. There they settled in a smattering
of villages at the foot of the Caucasus Mountains, which are home to Kists, or Georgian
Chechens, who speak the same language as their neighbors in Chechnya and practice the same
religion, Islam.

About 1,100 Chechen refugees remain in the valley today, according to the United Nations, living
in dilapidated Soviet-era schools and administrative buildings, stranded between an old home
they are afraid to return to and a new one that has not granted all of them citizenship.

Yerznukaiva, 52, who arrived with her family nine years ago, said she feared that the Russians --
who attacked Georgia in August -- would turn this town into another Grozny, the Chechen capital,
which was largely destroyed in the earlier war. "We were sure," she said. "The locals were also
very afraid. The locals also were going, so we went."

This area of fruit orchards and towering mountains has not been stable for long. During the
Chechen war, it became a base for fighters making excursions into Chechnya and attracted a
stream of money and fighters from Muslim nations. For years, it was a lawless pocket where men
strode through villages with automatic weapons strapped to their bodies and where street
shootings were common. At one point, Russia dropped bombs here to wipe out the fighters.

Then, after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, the United States began a $64 million program to train
and equip Georgian forces to help root out suspected al-Qaeda agents -- a program that
eventually expanded into a general training program for the Georgian army. The valley is now
under the Georgian police's control, and locals say the "Arabians" who had settled here have
melted away.

The war last month did not reach the valley, and Georgian officials say the helicopters spotted by
the locals were most likely Georgian, conducting routine border patrols. But for Chechens living
here, seeing Russian tanks cross into Georgia reawakened old fears. It also brought surprise.
Some recalled watching TV reports of Russian tanks near the capital and finding it strange to see
no resistance from the Georgians, not even a rock thrown.

Chechens would never have let that happen, said Lia Margoshvili, a Georgian Chechen who
works with refugees here. "Chechen kids, when they're in fifth or sixth grade, they learn that they
have to kill Russians -- but the Georgian kids, they learn, I don't know, books or something."



   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 45
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Even among the battle-hardened people of the Caucasus, Chechens have a reputation for
fierceness. During the war, rumors were afloat that Chechens were among the irregular militia
accompanying the Russian army, looting homes and terrorizing residents; the rumored Chechen
role injected an extra degree of menace into the accounts.

Georgian officials could not corroborate reports of Chechen irregulars but confirmed that two
battalions of Chechen fighters came as part of the Russian army.

Alexander Lomaia, secretary of Georgia's National Security Council, said he met one of them at a
checkpoint when Russians had occupied the city of Gori and its surroundings.

"I asked him, 'Do you remember what happened back in the second Chechen war? Did you know
that Georgia was the only country in the region who actually sheltered thousands of women,
children and elderly Chechens, probably even including your relatives?' I asked him, 'Is this your
way of expressing your gratitude?' " Lomaia said the soldier responded with a look of
embarrassment.

In Pankisi, people had harsh words for Chechens who reportedly had fought with the Russians,
and many said they were glad to see the United States and other Western countries support
Georgia. But they expressed disappointment that they did not get similar assistance against the
Russian army in their war.

"I'm thinking a lot about this, and I can't understand it -- why they are so focused on Georgia and
not Chechnya," said Cameta Temirbulatova, 38, who fled here six years ago with her husband
and children. Although full-scale fighting has ended, and although Grozny has a Russian-backed
Chechen leadership, she said: "There is war there still. If they don't like you, they come to your
home and kill you."

Margoshvili, who said her displaced relatives returned to their homes in Chechnya after the war
only to be killed by Russians, agreed. "If the world had helped Chechnya the way they helped
Georgia now, there wouldn't have been a war in Georgia now," she said.

Some said this summer's war did not come as a surprise. In June and July, Temirbulatova said,
she started receiving calls from family members who had good relations with Russian troops
based in Chechnya near Grozny. "They said, 'Come back to Chechnya, because the Russians
say they are going to start a war here in August,' " she recalled. "The soldiers told our relatives to
warn us."

But many say they will never go back. "We have no house in Chechnya; the Russians destroyed
it," said Yerznukaiva, who returned here with her family after they were unable to cross into
Turkey without valid passports.

As for Russia's diplomatic recognition of the Georgian breakaway regions South Ossetia and
Abkhazia, which some analysts say could encourage separatism within Russia's borders, some
people here called it a cynical move.

"We are several million, and the Ossetians, they are several thousand," said Temirbulatova as
her four children played around a rusty swing set. "We remember how they killed a lot of people,
even children. A lot of people vanished. And now they say to others, 'You are free, you are
independent.' "



   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 46
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

"In Tskhinvali, Russia is saying they are protecting their citizens," she said. "But we were citizens
of Russia, and they killed us."




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 47
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

      Global Warming/Climate Change News Articles (U.S. and
                         International)
WHO says climate change poses health risks
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080924/sc_afp/whoclimatephilippines_080924203313;_ylt=ArZi01
lGSMd5vyVv_qDWPUjPOrgF

Global warming pollution increases 3 percent
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080925/ap_on_sc/warming_emissions;_ylt=AveRAzfjpG_PgfZ4uk
pmeRRvieAA

Eco-Cities: Urban Planning for the Future
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=eco-cities-urban-planning

EARTH 3.0: SOLUTIONS FOR SUSTAINABLE PROGRESS
http://www.sciam.com/report.cfm?id=earth3

Governor sees greener future for state (California)
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2008/09/27/BASM1367FB.DTL&type=science

Solar water heaters growing in power-hungry Burkina Faso
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080928/sc_afp/environmentenergysolarafricaburkina_080928200
957

Nation's first greenhouse gas auction nets $38.5M
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2008-09-29-greenhouse-gas-auction_N.htm

Researchers attribute thinning of Greenland glacier to ocean warming preceded by atmospheric
changes
http://www.physorg.com/news141916684.html

Climate change: Floods, drought, mosquito disease aim at Europe
http://www.physorg.com/news141911174.html

Failure on climate change will 'haunt humanity': Australian expert
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080930/sc_afp/australiaclimatewarming_080930161808;_ylt=AjFJ
.aPXWLabYbfU1JK_HzfPOrgF




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 48
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

           Alternate Energy Research and Development News

Ocean offers hope for green energy
http://www.physorg.com/news141556007.html

Are some solar projects no longer „green‟?
http://features.csmonitor.com/environment/2008/09/25/are-some-solar-projects-no-longer-
%e2%80%98green%e2%80%99/

Aquarium scum: fuel of the future
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/environment/2008-09-27-algae-energy_N.htm

Madagascar: solar power ends dark age for rural clinics
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080929/sc_afp/environmentenergysolarafricamadagascar_08092
9160846;_ylt=AmCobQWVp4qHELOJapjzSX3POrgF

Free Publication on Energy Security for Local Governments
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/418706




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 49
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                                           Reports
GAO, Disaster Recovery: Past Experiences Offer Insights for Recovering from
Hurricanes Ike and Gustav and Other Recent Natural Disasters
http://www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-08-1120

Effects of School Closures, 2008 Winter Influenza Season, Hong Kong
http://www.cdc.gov/eid/content/14/10/pdfs/08-0646.pdf

World Vision, Planet Prepare: Preparing Coastal Communities in Asia for Future Catastrophes
(Asia Pacific Disaster Report)
http://www.wvasiapacific.org/downloads/PlanetPrepare_LowRes.pdf

Congressional Research Service, Vulnerability of Concentrated Critical Infrastructure:
Background and Policy Options Report
http://assets.opencrs.com/rpts/RL33206_20080912.pdf

Congressional Research Service, Federal Liability for Flood Damage Related to Army Corps of
Engineers Projects Report
http://assets.opencrs.com/rpts/RL34131_20080904.pdf

Public Health Emergency Preparedness: Six Years of Achievement
http://www.astho.org/pubs/PHEPPartnersReport.pdf

Congressional Research Service, Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response: The
SAFER Grant Program Report
http://assets.opencrs.com/rpts/RL33375_20080910.pdf

Access to Readiness Coalition, 2007 Southern California Wildfires After-Action Report
http://www.jik.com/CaliforniaWildfires.pdf

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION
RESPONSE TO THE 2008 SEPTEMBER HURRICANES
http://www.eda.gov/ImageCache/EDAPublic/documents/pdfdocs2008/hurricaneresponse091608_
2epdf/v1/hurricaneresponse091608.pdf

2005 Disability & Aging: Seeking Solutions to Improve Health, Productivity and Community Living
Final Report and Recommendations
http://www.whcoa.gov/about/policy/meetings/mini_conf/FINAL%20REPORT_07_21_05.pdf

2007 NOD Emergency Preparedness Initiative Annual Report
http://www.nod.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=Page.ViewPage&PageID=1573

U.S. Chamber of Commerce, On the Brink: Re-Engineering the Nation's Disaster Response
Processes
http://www.uschamber.com/NR/rdonlyres/e6or55wgj4kfijyyemfycwff7b7bjx5rtoo6u7tq5zge4n3tay
myedzkrldpknb34cfh4lgqvuxih47zsem6ggphxue/OnTheBrinkPDF.pdf

International Association of Police Chiefs, “To Protect and Serve”: Challenges to Public Safety
and Homeland Security facing the next U.S. President
http://www.theiacp.org/documents/pdfs/PressRelease/ProtectDefend%2Epdf




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 50
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                                Additional Information
International Association of Emergency Managers Live Learning Center
http://www.softconference.com/iaem/

IAEM Membership Videos
http://www.iaem.com/video.asp

Emergency Information Infrastructure Virtual Forum
http://www.emforum.org/

Florida Division of Emergency Management External Affairs Website
http://www.floridadisaster.org/externalaffairs/

Florida Division of Emergency Management, Training and Exercise Website
http://www.floridadisaster.org/Preparedness/TrainingandExercise/index.htm

FEMA, National Advisory Council Website
http://www.fema.gov/about/nac/

U.S. Department of Homeland Security Leadership Journal
http://www.dhs.gov/journal/leadership/

United Nations, Office of the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Website
http://ochaonline.un.org/

United Nations Platform for Space-based Information for Disaster Management and Emergency
Response (UN-SPIDER)
http://www.unoosa.org/oosa/unspider/index.html

Principles of Emergency Management
http://www.iaem.com/publications/documents/EMPrinciples091107.pdf

Disaster Zone: Emergency Management in the Blogosphere (Eric Holdeman‟s Blog Site)
http://www.disaster-zone.com/

Southern Poverty Law Center, Intelligence Project Website
http://www.splcenter.org/intel/intpro.jsp

National Response Framework Website
http://www.fema.gov/emergency/nrf/mainindex.htm

Emergency Management Professional Organization for Women's Enrichment™ (EMPOWER)
Website
http://www.empower-women.com/mc/page.do

Association for Public Safety Communications Officials-International Website
http://www.apco911.org/

FX Networks: 30 Days
http://www.fxnetworks.com/shows/originals/30days/index.php

We can solve the Climate Crisis.org
http://www.wecansolveit.org/

   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 51
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


U.S. Geological Survey Website
http://www.usgs.gov/

A&E Television, the Cleaner
http://www.aetv.com/the-cleaner/index.jsp

National Hydrologic Warning Council's 2009 conference in Vail, Colorado
www.hydrologicwarning.org

Management of Dead Bodies after Disasters: A Field Manual for First Responders
http://www.paho.org/english/dd/ped/DeadBodiesFieldManual.pdf

YouTube, FEMA Channel
http://www.youtube.com/fema

National Research Council, Framework for Assessing the Health Hazard Posed by Bioaerosols
http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=12003

Project on National Security Reform and Center for the Study of the Presidency
http://www.pnsr.org/data/files/pnsr%20weitz%20case%20studies%20vol%20i.pdf

FEMA Prepared Responsive Committed Brochure
http://www.fema.gov/pdf/about/brochure.pdf

Staff Management in Emergency Evacuation Preparedness and Response
http://www.bepress.com/jhsem/vol5/iss1/46/?sending=10333

A White Paper Recommending the National Weather Service Establish Storm Surge Warnings
ftp://ftp.nhc.noaa.gov/users/franklin/White_Paper_on_Storm_Surge_Warnings-Sep_29.pdf

Homeland Security Advisory Council Subcommittee Recommendations 2008
http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/hsac-2008-subcommittee-recommendations.pdf

Portraits from the UN General Assembly
http://www.time.com/time/photogallery/0,29307,1845515,00.html

University of Washington Office of Emergency Management October 2008 Newsletter
http://www.washington.edu/emergency/newsletter/showedition.php?edition=56

Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, Emergency Contact Information
http://www.flhsmv.gov/EmerContInfoHistory1.html

Director Henry Renteria released the following statement regarding Governor Schwarzenegger
signing legislation (AB38) merging the Governor's Office of Emergency Services with the
Governor's Office of Homeland Security creating the California Emergency Management Agency
(CalEMA)
http://www.oes.ca.gov/WebPage/oeswebsite.nsf/Content/133E6011D9901DF4882574D3007871
65?OpenDocument

IAEM-USA and the International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Adminstrators Sign
Joint Letter to U.S. Dept. of Education on Proposed Rulemaking to Implement Sections of the
Higher Education Opportunity Act
http://www.iaem.com/Committees/College/documents/080925iaemiaclealettertoed.pdf

   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 52
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Natural Hazards Center Disaster Research 510, September 25, 2008
http://www.colorado.edu/hazards/dr/currentdr.html

Mind the gap! The world's biggest cruise ship squeezes out of dock and sets sail
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1063793/Mind-gap-The-worlds-biggest-cruise-ship-
squeezes-dock-sets-sail.html

Minnesota Department of Health, Minnesota Heathcare Preparedness Program Flyer
http://health.state.mn.us/oep/healthcare/standards.pdf


Center for Homeland Defense and Security MET Seminar
The MET seminar focuses exclusively on enhancing the capacity of top government officials to
successfully address new Homeland Security challenges. For states, the target audience is the
Governor and his/her Homeland Security team, which is expected to consist of the Governor‟s
senior staff and the heads of each department and agency that has a role in Homeland Security.
The MET seminar is also available for major urban area senior Homeland Security leaders.

Complete details at:
http://www.chds.us/?met


Minnesota, Code Ready Website
Good emergency planning involves getting informed, getting you and your family prepared, then
helping at local and community levels to get others prepared.

Initially launched as a state website, codeReady has become a public-private partnership of
groups who want Minnesotans to be prepared for emergencies such as tornadoes.

It has three primary sections: Get informed, Get prepared and Get connected, and it encourages
families to create emergency plans (who do we call when you can't go home?) and emergency
kits.

The website is located at:
http://www.codeready.org/


Interagency Coordinating Council on Emergency Preparedness and Individuals with
Disabilities, September 2008 Updates

US Department of Homeland Security

DHS OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS AND CIVIL LIBERTIES (CRCL) ENHANCES STAFF PREPAREDNESS
Throughout the month of September, CRCL reminded staff to better prepare for disasters,
focusing on personal preparedness in the workplace and at home. The month began with an all-
hands meeting to introduce National Preparedness Month and the overall importance of personal
preparedness. A lunchtime brownbag session provided individuals the opportunity to go through
a checklist to ensure their go-kits contained appropriate supplies. CRCL staff conducted
evacuation and shelter-in-place drills, plus tested their emergency communication system. In
addition, staff were encouraged to scan and save their vital records to CDroms for storage in a
safe place. This is a vital step to rebuild their lives if a fire or flood should destroy their homes.
Individuals can request a one-on-one consultation to help develop personal home and workplace
disaster plans throughout the months of October and November.

DHS AWARDS $63 MILLION IN EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS GRANTS
   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 53
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                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) Federal Emergency Management Agency
(FEMA) announced approximately $63 million in grant awards is available to improve emergency
management and preparedness capabilities under the new Emergency Operations Centers
(EOC) Grant Program and the new Interoperable Emergency Communications Grant Program
(IECGP).

More than $14.5 million in fiscal year (FY) 2008 EOC grant awards will help address identified
deficiencies and needs in order to support flexible, sustainable, secure, and interoperable EOCs.
Fully capable emergency operations facilities at the state, local, and tribal levels are essential to a
comprehensive national emergency management system, ensuring continuity of both operations
and government in major disasters, whether natural or man-made.

The FY 2008 IECGP awards $48.5 million to improve interoperable emergency communications
for response to natural disasters, acts of terrorism, and other man-made disasters. IECGP
funding will assist states and territories in implementing their components of Statewide
Communications Interoperability Plans and aligning priorities with the goals outlined in the
National Emergency Communications Plan.

FY 2008 EOC Grant Program funds are to be used over a 36-month period for EOC construction
projects, and are limited to $1 million for new construction or $250,000 for renovation projects,
and one project per facility. Twenty states and jurisdictions were awarded funds for projects at 22
facilities. Grantees were required to meet a 25 percent cost share cash or in-kind match
requirement.

IECGP funding allocations were announced in June 2008; funds are expected to be awarded by
September 30. To date, DHS has spent approximately $3.9 billion in grants to improve
interoperable communications.

Environmental Protection Agency

EPA HOSTS AN INTERACTIVE EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FAIR
The Office of Administration and Resources Management (OARM) in collaboration with EPA‟s
Office of Homeland Security and Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response hosted an
interactive Emergency Preparedness Fair on September 17. Participants from various internal
and external organizations distributed emergency preparation literature and giveaways as well as
discussed issues relating to emergency readiness at home and in the workplace. Trivia games
were an effective method to reinforce preparedness principals.

In addition, Automated External Defibrillator (AED) and CPR/First Aid training were offered, as
well as Continuity of Operations and OEP exercises to enhance readiness. (An AED is a portable
electronic device that stops arrhythmia, allowing the heart to reestablish an effective rhythm.
AEDs are designed to be simple to use and the use of AEDs is taught in many first aid basic life
support level CPR classes.)

Federal Communications Commission

THE FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (FCC) HOSTS SUMMIT ON PANDEMIC PREPAREDNESS
On September 18, the FCC‟s Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau (Bureau) hosted a
half-day summit for the general public on Pandemic Preparedness: Enhancing Communications
Response for Health Care and First Responders. The Summit, held in the FCC facility in
Washington, DC, focused on communication and coordination between the health care sector,
first responders, government, and the communications industry in preparation for a pandemic.
The panel discussions highlighted ways that communication may be expanded and enhanced in
response to a pandemic and how the communications industry will serve an instrumental role in
such a response.
   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 54
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


US Department of Health and Human Services

PLANFIRST W EBCAST ON PANDEMIC INFLUENZA
In recognition of National Preparedness Month, HHS offered a live discussion on September 25
to help families and individuals plan for an influenza pandemic. The discussion was designed to
help citizens learn more about pandemic flu and the steps they can take now to plan for a
pandemic and to protect their loved ones. Speakers included: Admiral Joxel Garcia, Assistant
Secretary for Health, HHS; Dr. Richard Benjamin, Chief Medical Officer, American Red Cross;
Harlan Dolgin, Co-chair, PandemicPrep.org, St. Louis, MO; and Tim Woerther, Co-chair,
PandemicPrep.org, St. Louis, MO. The public submitted questions prior to and during the
program to ensure that their concerns were addressed.

HHS will continue this PlanFirst Webcast series on October 29, 2008. For more information, go
to http://www.pandemicflu.gov/news/panflu_webinar.html.

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS TOOLKIT AVAILABLE TO EMERGENCY MANAGERS
The Office on Disability (OD) launched the revised Emergency Preparedness Toolkit. The Toolkit
was developed as a result of needs identified during Hurricane Katrina. It is designed to serve as
a comprehensive guidebook and resource for the emergency management community at the
federal, state, local, and tribal government levels; however, anyone can access the toolkit and
utilize its information and resources. The goal of this project is to increase the level of training
and understanding regarding the needs of persons with disabilities in emergency situations. This
knowledge should be incorporated when planning for response, recovery, and mitigation in the
event of a natural or man-made disaster. The Toolkit can be accessed at
http://www.hhs.gov/od/disabilitytoolkit/index.html.

REVISED INITIAL INTAKE AND ASSESSMENT TOOL NOW USED IN SHELTERS
April Wood, Manager Disaster Health Services, American Red Cross (ARC), provided an update
on the Initial Intake and Assessment Tool. The main purpose of the Initial Intake and
Assessment Tool, developed through a joint OD/ARC effort, is to enable shelter staff to decide if
simple accommodations can be provided that will enable individuals to stay in general population
shelters. The secondary purpose is to ensure proper and safe placement of those clients with
medical or functional needs beyond the scope and expertise of care offered in ARC shelters.
ARC is determined to maximize the use of this assessment in order to minimize stress and
emphasize the safety and well being of those served during times of disaster.

This assessment form significantly changed since its inception. Ms. Wood compared the original
May 2007 version of the form to the most recent July 2008 document. She explained the
changes and shared feedback provided by local chapters on field use of the assessment. ARC
shelters have utilized this form during the California wildfires, the Midwest flooding, and most
recently in Louisiana in the aftermath of Hurricane Gustav. ARC National Headquarters has
received very positive feedback regarding the revised version. OD and ARC will continue to work
cooperatively to improve the form and expand its use.

US Department of Labor

OSHA STAFF AND RESOURCES AID IN HURRICANE IKE CLEANUP AND RECOVERY EFFORTS
OSHA has deployed occupational safety and health professionals to Texas and Louisiana to
provide technical assistance during ongoing hurricane cleanup and recovery efforts along the
Gulf Coast. Employees from OSHA's Dallas region are focusing on the safety and health of
employees involved in power restoration, oil, and chemical facility startup, tree trimming, and
debris removal. Officials will maintain a presence in impacted areas to continually monitor
recovery operations. Similar actions were taken by officials in OSHA's Atlanta and Dallas regions
in response to Hurricane Gustav.
   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 55
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


The agency produced public service announcements (PSAs), read by Assistant Secretary of
Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Edwin G. Foulke, Jr., to help protect employees from
hazards such as electrocution and falls. The PSAs are available in both English and Spanish from
the Labor Department's audio news releases page and OSHA's hurricane recovery Web page at
http://www.osha.gov/OshDoc/hurricaneRecovery.html#PSA. Employers and employees looking
for more information or with specific questions should call the department's toll-free helpline at
866-4-USA-DOL
(487-2365).

US Department of State

DEPARTMENT OF STATE EMPLOYEES LEARN ABOUT DISASTER SERVICE VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES
The Department of State (DoS) began the month with an Emergency Preparedness Volunteer
Fair. The purpose of the fair was to provide information about volunteering with disaster service
organizations and to offer employees an opportunity to sign up. Four organizations joined the
DoS Office of Emergency Management (OEM) to staff information tables. A “Speakers‟ Corner”
provided the venue for each organization to introduce their services and volunteer opportunities.
Representatives from the following organizations presented information: American Red Cross,
Council for Excellence in Government, Humane Society, and DHS‟s Community Emergency
Response Team (CERT) Program. The event was video-taped and will be available on DoS‟s
internal desktop video program.

On September 25, OEM offered a Go-Kit Demonstration where employees could see both
homemade and commercial kits for home, car, and for individuals on the go. Literature illustrating
how to make a kit and resources on where to find emergency preparedness information, plus
locations to buy complete kits were made available. The Office conducted a raffle to give away
an ARC emergency kit.

Each week of the month had a different theme: Get a Kit, Make a Plan, Be Informed, and Get
Involved. During a specific week, employees received corresponding information to expand on
that theme.

US Department of Transportation

DEPARTMENTAL OFFICE OF CIVIL RIGHTS PRESENTS AT NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION CIVIL RIGHTS
CONFERENCE
The 2008 American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO)
National Transportation Civil Rights Conference took place on September 5 through 10 in
Anchorage, Alaska. The theme of this year‟s conference was “The Evolution of Transportation-
Civil Rights in Motion.” The Departmental Office of Civil Rights (DOCR) staff and representatives
from the Federal Highway and the Federal Transit Administration served as panelists on the
Evacuating Populations with Special Needs Workshop held on Wednesday, September 10. This
panel discussed the mission of the Interagency Coordinating Council under the leadership of
DHS and the Coordinating Council on Access and Mobility under the leadership of the
Department of Transportation (DoT) and their roles in encouraging and facilitating state, local,
and tribal governments and private organizations to include special needs population in their
emergency planning. In addition, the panelists gave an overview of the areas of work DoT
completed and is making available to other organizations.




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