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Teacher Resource Guide Flight and flying

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					Saskatchewan Youth Heritage Fair
 Inquiry-Based Research Projects




 Teacher Resource Guide
   “Flight and flying”
              Teacher Resource Guide – “Flight and flying”
How can students have an opportunity to tell stories of people, places, artifacts, and events
that are meaningful to them? How can we provide experiences that allow students to work
with their families, their community, and others? How can students change a bland “tell all
about” story into a valuable learning experience?

Saskatchewan Youth Heritage Fairs provide a positive answer to all the above questions for
educators of grades 4 to 9. Individual classroom or school-wide Heritage Fairs offer
students the opportunity to explore their stories through a curriculum-centered process.
Heritage Fair projects integrate outcomes from various curricula, most typically those of
Social Studies, Science, English or French Language Arts, and Arts Education. Collaboration
between classroom teachers and teacher-librarians ensure resource-based, information and
technology infused experiences for learning.

Heritage Fair projects become rich literacy experiences as students think about, read, listen,
view, write, speak, and represent information and ideas. The research process comes alive
as they find a wealth of material in a variety of primary and secondary resources in many
formats. Students have opportunities to develop and practice their skills, attitudes, and
competencies in determining the need for information, locating and using information from
a variety of sources, evaluating information for its relevance and credibility, and creating
products to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding.

The excitement of pursuing personally significant projects motivates students as they
engage in a framework for learning. An inquiry framework guides students through
learning activities that build critical thinking capabilities and information literacy
competencies. Inquiry models are provided in provincial curricula which are then
supported by specific research requirements at each school or in classrooms. School
developed supports such as project organizing tools or logbooks, style sheets for citations,
format requirements, oral presentation guidelines, and project rubrics are aids for
successful learning experiences and assessments of students.

Inquiry models include stages for preparing to research, accessing information, processing
information, and communicating learning. All the stages incorporate information literacy
competencies which are developmentally organized to apply across all grade levels. Using a
consistent inquiry model across all grades/ subjects in a school can ensure comprehensive,
sequential development of the essential competencies.

Inquiry is a circular process in which students return to certain stages more than once as
they take time to reflect on their progress and to revise their plans based on new
information, new questions, and consideration of how their project is evolving. As students
work through the stages of their projects and develop the various components – the
research, the presentations, the displays – they learn more about their own learning
processes. Their final products demonstrate their learning of the content, the inquiry
process, and their own development as a learner.

 Saskatchewan Youth Heritage Fairs offer opportunities for schools to engage their students
in authentic, individualized learning experiences. Through the project a broad range of
curricular outcomes are addressed as well as providing experience with inquiry-based
research to incorporate literacy and information competencies. The benefit of a Heritage
Fair program to the students, their families, and the community is worth the planning and
organization required by the school and teachers.


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             Teacher Resource Guide – “Flight and flying”

                                   Inquiry Process
What is inquiry?

“Inquiry is the dynamic process of being open to wonder and puzzlements and coming to
know and understand the world” (Galileo Educational Network, 2004).

What is inquiry-based learning?

Inquiry-based learning is a process where students are involved in their learning, formulate
questions, investigate widely and then build new understandings, meanings and knowledge.
That knowledge is new to the students and may be used to answer a question, to develop a
solution or to support a position or point of view. The knowledge is usually presented to
others and may result in some sort of action.

Why would I use inquiry-based learning approaches in my teaching?

Inquiry-based learning provides opportunities for students to:

       •   develop skills they will need all their lives
       •   learn to cope with problems that may not have clear solutions
       •   deal with changes and challenges to understandings
       •   shape their search for solutions, now and in the future.

A systematic approach to the development of these skills is essential to prepare students for
problem solving and lifelong learning. A systematic approach ensures that students have
the opportunity to engage in inquiry, to learn an overall process and to understand that this
general inquiry process can be transferred to other inquiry situations.

How would I use inquiry-based learning?

Building a culture of inquiry also means recognizing, supporting and teaching the role of
metacognition. Metacognitive skills are part of the “learning to learn” skills that are
transferable to new learning situations, in school and out of school. Through reflecting on
the process during inquiry-based learning activities, students are given opportunities to
explore and understand both the cognitive and affective domains of “learning to learn”
(Hacker, 1999; Kuhlthau, 1988). Understanding and dealing with thoughts and feelings
makes inquiry-based learning a powerful learning experience for students and teachers.
Classrooms where teachers emphasize inquiry-based learning have the following
characteristics (Drayton & Falk, 2001):

   •   Inquiry is in the form of authentic (real-life) problems within the context of the
       curriculum and/or community.
   •   The inquiry capitalizes on student curiosity.
   •   Data and information are actively used, interpreted, refined, digested and discussed.
   •   Teachers, students and teacher-librarian collaborate.
   •   Community and society are connected with the inquiry.
   •   The teacher models the behaviours of inquiry.



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             Teacher Resource Guide – “Flight and flying”
   •   The teacher uses the language of inquiry on an ongoing basis.
   •   Students take ownership of their learning.
   •   The teacher facilitates the process of gathering and presenting information.
   •   The teacher and students use technology to advance inquiry.
   •   The teacher embraces inquiry as both content and pedagogy.
   •   The teacher and students interact more frequently and more actively than during
       traditional teaching.
   •   There is an identifiable time for inquiry-based learning.

Source: Focus on Inquiry, Alberta Learning, 2004

How do I guide inquiry-based learning?

There are a number of different models which outline the stages or processes of inquiry-
based learning. Based on the work of Alberta Learning (2004), Grant Wiggins and Jay
McTighe (1995) and the University of Illinois, the Saskatchewan Youth Heritage Fairs
Association suggests the following model:


                                     Pose Real
                                     Questions


                   Assess

                                                      Make a Plan


                 Create and
                 Share

                                           Investigate
                                           and Process



It is suggested that the inquiry-based research process be systematic and that teachers
guide the students through the cycle through the aspects in order. To more fully explain
what is involved in each stage, we have created a table wherein each of the five steps are
described in greater detail.




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            Teacher Resource Guide – “Flight and flying”

                                 The Process of Inquiry

Pose Real       In their book, Understanding by Design, Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe (1995)
Questions       assert that there are six facets of understanding. According to Wiggins and
                McTighe, we truly understand when we:
                      •    Can Explain: provide thorough, supportable and justifiable accounts of
                           phenomena, facts and data
                      •    Can Interpret: tell meaningful stories; offer apt translations; provide a
                           revealing historical or personal dimension to ideas and events
                      •    Can Apply: effectively use and adapt what we know in diverse contexts
                      •    Have perspective: see and hear points of view through critical eyes and
                           ears; see the big picture
                      •    Can empathize: find value in what others might find odd, alien, or
                           implausible; perceive sensitively on the basis of prior direct experience
                      •    Have self-knowledge: perceive the personal style, prejudices,
                           projections, and habits of mind that both shape and impede our own
                           understanding; aware of what we do not understand and why
                           understanding is so hard.
            These facets of understanding can help teachers identify the enduring
            understandings that students will think deeply about throughout the research
            process.

            An inquiry-based approach also suggests that another critical aspect to a complete
            understanding of a topic, idea, invention, event, trend or issue is the ability to:

                  •       Connect, extend or extrapolate: How is the topic, idea, invention, event,
                          trend or issue related to others? What are the similarities or differences?
                          How is today’s reality based on the past, and where might the topic, idea,
                          invention, event, trend or issue lead us in the future?

            In his book, Benchmarks Of Historical Thinking: A Framework For Assessment In
            Canada, Peter Seixas (2006) proposes that there are 6 facets of “historical
            thinking”. Adapting the 6 facets to encompass all topics of interest for inquiry-based
            learning yields the following:

            •     Significance: Why we care, today, about certain ideas, inventions, events,
                  trends and issues in society. For example: What if the topic, idea, invention,
                  event, trend or issue to be investigated had never happened? or What difference
                  does the idea, invention, event, trend or issue to be investigated make to us
                  today in Saskatchewan?

            •     Primary source evidence: How do we find, select, contextualize, and interpret
                  sources? How do we know that the information we are gathering is complete,
                  reliable, honest and without bias?




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              Teacher Resource Guide – “Flight and flying”

              •   Continuity and change: What has changed in regards to the topic and what has
                  remained the same over time? If the topic, idea, invention, event, trend or issue
                  to be investigated has changed, what were the primary reasons for that change?

              •   Cause and consequence: In considering the topic, how and why have certain
                  conditions and actions led to others? How is the topic, idea, invention, event,
                  trend or issue to be investigated related to other events over time?

              •   Broad perspective: How have the different social, cultural, intellectual,
                  technological and even emotional contexts that shape people’s lives and actions
                  impacted the topic? For example, how has the topic, idea, invention, event, trend
                  or issue to be investigated been influenced by the fact that we live in
                  Saskatchewan or Canada?

              •   Moral dimensions: Are there any moral or ethical issues related to the topic?
                  How might people from different cultures or countries, or who have different
                  spiritual beliefs or value systems react to the idea, invention, event, trend or
                  issue to be investigated?


   Make a     What suggested activities are there in the SYHF Research Project Ideas Guide or
     plan     online to help you answer your key questions? Who will be your ‘audience’? How
              will you gather information to answer the key questions? Who can help you with
              your research? How will you know that the information is correct, reliable and
              without bias? How will you organize your information? How will you present the
              findings? How might you use media to communicate your understanding? What
              “other” ways might you use for communicating your understanding (e.g. visual art,
              music, dance or drama)?


Investigate   At this stage the learner begins to gather information: researching resources,
       and    studying, crafting an experiment, observing, or interviewing, to name a few. The
   Process    information-gathering stage becomes a self-motivated process that is wholly owned
              by the engaged learner.


Create and    The learner now undertakes the creative task of shaping significant new thoughts,
     Share    ideas, and theories outside of his/her prior experience. Comparing notes, discussing
              conclusions, and sharing experiences are all examples of this process in action.
              Fellow students, family members or community members can be involved in helping
              to “make meaning” of the information found and the new understandings formed. In
              terms of the Heritage Fairs Projects, how are you going to organize and present the
              information?




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              Teacher Resource Guide – “Flight and flying”


     Assess    This is the time to re-view the entire research project: What did you learn about the
               topic, idea, invention, event, trend or issue that you did not know before? What did
               you learn about yourself as a learner? What different points of view, or perspectives,
               did you learn? What was the most surprising thing that you learned from doing this
               research? If you had to do the research project over again, what would you do
               differently?



 Sources: http://inquiry.illinois.edu/inquiry/process.php3; Focus on Inquiry. Alberta
 Learning, Alberta, Canada; Understanding by Design, Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe
 (1995)

To assist both teacher and learner in the inquiry-based process, the Saskatchewan Youth
Heritage Fairs Association is pleased to offer a series of research templates which
correlate with each stage in the research process. Please refer to the Appendix for the
templates.

How do we help students identify a topic, idea, invention, event, trend or
issue?

Step 1: Narrow the focus:

Teachers are directed to the online portal for SYHF research projects. The web address is:
www.saskyouthheritagefair.com/homepage.htm. The portal has been designed to allow
teachers to browse the goals, outcomes and suggested activities for youth heritage fairs
research projects based on the Saskatchewan Ministry of Education’s curriculum guides for
grades 6 -9 in Social Studies, Science Education, Health Education and Arts Education. The
portal has been organized into three sections: (1) Grade Level (6-9) Project Ideas; (2)
Subject Area (Social Studies, Science Education, Health Education and Arts Education)
Project Ideas; (3) “Big Ideas” (Topic or thematic approach, grades 6-9) in research projects.

From the portal, teachers can assist students with identifying a topic, idea, invention, event,
trend or issue based on a particular grade level, subject area or “big idea”. Because all of the
suggested project topics, ideas, inventions, events, trends or issues are correlated to the
Ministry of Education’s curriculum guides, teachers can be assured that the SYHF research
project approach is consistent with the stated goals and outcomes for each grade level and
subject area. Please refer to the Appendix for the “Big Ideas” Main Index page as well as a
link to a pdf formatted version of the entire collection of research project ideas.

In terms of the topic of “Flight and flying”, three major categories or “Big Ideas” present
themselves:

        The Natural World                       Flight                  Flying




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              Teacher Resource Guide – “Flight and flying”
Step 2: Pose Real Questions (Appendix: Research Guide - Template A)

Are you interested in …………………..


           Natural                          Flight                            Flying
           World


   • How birds fly?                 • How birds fly?                •   A specific type of flying
   • A specific species of          • Some aspect of                    innovation (e.g. jets, or
   birds common to                  aerodynamics (e.g. lift,            helicopters)?
   Saskatchewan or                  drag, flying)?                  •   A specific aircraft (e.g.
   Canada?                          • How technology has                the Avro Arrow, military
   • First Nations                  changed our ability to              aircraft, marine aircraft,
   perspectives on the              fly?                                personal aircraft)?
   value of birds and               • Some First Nations            •   A particular use of
   wildlife?                        technologies that were              aircraft (military, search
   • How airplanes                  developed that used                 and rescue, personal,
   benefit or harm the              basic principles of                 commercial)?
   natural world (e.g.              flight?                         •   The historical
   pollution, airport               • Some early attempts               development of aircraft
   development, resource            at building flying                  (e.g. early attempts at
   management,                      machines?                           flying, Canada’s role in
   transportation to                                                    WWI, WWII and Korea,
   remote Northern                                                      present day uses of
   communities)?                                                        aircraft in
                                                                        Saskatchewan)?
                                                                    •   A person connected with
                                                                        the topic of “Flight and
                                                                        flying” (e.g. a pilot, a war
                                                                        hero, careers in the
                                                                        aerospace industry)?
                                                                    •   Some early attempts at
                                                                        building flying machines?
                                                                    •   Some First Nations
                                                                        technologies that were
                                                                        developed that used
                                                                        basic principles of flight?



At this point the teacher is advised to consider ways in which a “big idea”, a series of specific
questions within that big idea and then suggested activities might be combined into one
research plan. For example:

“Big Idea”



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                Teacher Resource Guide – “Flight and flying”
   •   Flight

Specific Question(s)

   •   How has technology changed our ability to fly?

Based on the work of Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe (1995) and Peter Seixas (2006), the
teacher can now pose the following questions for the student to consider based on the
general topic of how has technology changed our ability to fly?

   •   Explanation and Interpretation: What information about how technology has
       changed our ability to fly do you want to know? What do you already know about
       the question? How might you organize the information you find? How might you use
       tables, graphs, diagrams or charts to make sense of the information about your
       question that you will discover? How might you use media to communicate your
       understanding of your question?

   •   Significance: Why is the question as to how technology has changed our ability to
       fly important to you? What difference has Canadian innovations made in
       Saskatchewan, Canada and the world?

   •   Primary source evidence: Are you interested in investigating local, Saskatchewan
       or Canadian aspects of how technology has changed our ability to fly? If you are
       interested in investigating a local pilot, who would that be? How might you find,
       select and interpret information about how technology has changed our ability to fly
       in general or a specific innovation (e.g. jet engines, or helicopters)? How will you
       know that the information you are gathering on the topic is complete, reliable,
       honest and without bias?

   •   Continuity and change: What aspects of how technology has changed our ability to
       fly have stayed the same or changed over time? What changes can you identify over
       the last 10, 20, 50 or 100 years? In particular, what have been Canada’s
       contributions to flight and flying?

   •   Cause and consequence: What are the major factors which cause how technology
       has changed our ability to fly within “Flight and flying” to change? For example, how
       might the topics of materials, world events, space exploration or resource
       development affect how technology has changed our ability to fly?

   •   Broad perspective: How have Canadian accomplishments or contributions in the
       area of technology and flight been influenced by the people in your own community,
       in Saskatchewan or Canada? What would be a First Nations, Métis or Inuit
       perspective on “Flight and flying”? How have First Nations, and in particular remote
       Northern communities been affected by developments in “Flight and flying” in the
       past 100 years? How does Canada use aircraft to patrol its borders and maintain our
       protection of Canada?

   •   Moral dimensions: Are there any moral or ethical issues related to how technology
       has changed our ability to fly? How might people from different cultures or
       countries, or who have different spiritual beliefs or value systems react to some


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             Teacher Resource Guide – “Flight and flying”
       aspects of technological advances (e.g. tourism, destruction of natural resources,
       noise pollution, air pollution)? What do you believe about the importance of “Flight
       and flying”?

   •   Connect, extend or extrapolate: How is technological advances in “Flight and
       flying” related to other topics such as the land, environmental concerns, economics,
       climate change, pollution, careers and education? How has technological advances
       in flight and flying been influenced by events in the past (e.g. wars, economics,
       resource development, agriculture or politics)? If we maintain or even improve
       technological aspects of “Flight and flying” in Saskatchewan and Canada, what will
       be the long term effects (e.g. How best can we support Canadian companies like
       Bombardier in their development of Canadian designed and built aircraft; or should
       Canada continue to develop aerospace technologies)?

Step 3: Make a plan (Appendix: Research Guide - Template B)

At this point in the process the student must be guided to create a research plan. According
to Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe (1995) as well as Peter Seixas (2006), the following
questions will help the student to detail a research plan:

   •   What suggested activities are there in the SYHF Research Project Ideas Guide to help
       you answer your key questions about “Flight and flying”? For example, on the
       chosen topic of “Flight and flying”, the SYHF Research Project Ideas Online Portal
       and print documents lists the following suggested activities:

The Natural World
       1. Observe, research and describe the physical characteristics and adaptations that
          enable birds (e.g., ravens, hawks, loons, geese, hummingbirds, sandpipers,
          cranes, and sparrows), insects (e.g., mosquitoes, dragonflies, grasshoppers, bees,
          wasps, and butterflies), and bats to fly.
       2. Present how First Nations and Métis art and storytelling highlight
          understanding of and respect for birds.
       3. Investigate how inventions based on principles of flight have changed the way
          people work, live, and interact with the environment locally, nationally, and
          globally (e.g., bush planes in northern Saskatchewan, scheduled airline travel,
          supply of cargo to remote communities and mine sites, and transoceanic air
          travel).

Flight
       4. Research the role of inspiration and aesthetic design in the development of
          flying devices (e.g., initial attempts at trying to fly were based on observations of
          birds).
       5. Research design problems that had to be overcome to develop devices that fly
          (e.g., balloons, kites, gliders, airplanes, helicopters, and rockets) and explain how
          various creative solutions to those problems have resulted in the development
          of flying devices with different designs.




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            Teacher Resource Guide – “Flight and flying”
      6. Investigate historical and current contributions of scientists, including
          Canadians, who have contributed to scientific understanding and technological
          developments related to flight.
      7. Research examples of traditional and modern technologies developed by First
          Nations, Métis, and other cultures that are based on principles of flight (e.g.,
          atlatl, bow and arrow, slingshot, catapult, boomerang, and trebuchet).
      8. Research how the aerodynamic forces of thrust, drag, lift, and gravity act on
          living things or devices that fly through the air.
      9. Describe and represent methods for altering drag in flying devices, such as a
          bird spreading wings or an airplane employing flaps.
      10. Investigate examples of how science and technology have been used to solve
          problems related to drag in devices that fly.
      11. Compare the sources of thrust of various constructed flying devices including
          the propeller, jet engine, and solid or liquid-fuelled rocket.
      12. Design experiments related to the principles of flight (e.g., “Why can some
          gliders travel farther than others?” or “What effect does wing shape have on the
          distance a glider can travel?” or “How is lift is affected by the shape of a
          surface?”).
      13. Investigate the characteristics of flying objects (e.g., balloon, kite, glider,
          airplane, helicopter, and rocket).
      14. Construct a prototype of a flying object that meets specified performance and
          aesthetic criteria.
               o Analyze personally collected data and suggest improvements to a
                   prototype design.
               o Identify new questions or problems about flight that arise through the
                   prototype design process.
      15. Create and present designs for futuristic flying devices that meet a particular
          student-identified need.

Flying

      16. Research career opportunities in Canada related to the science and technology
          of flight.
      17. Research Canadian women in space. Who were these women and how did they
          become involved in the Canadian space program?
      18. Create a model of the Avro-Arrow , and research the reasons for the demise of
          the project.
      19. Construct a prototype of a flying object that meets specified performance and
          aesthetic criteria.
               o Analyze personally collected data and suggest improvements to a
                   prototype design.
               o Identify new questions or problems about flight that arise through the
                   prototype design process.
      20. Create and present designs for futuristic flying devices that meet a particular
          student-identified need.

  •   How will you gather information to answer the key questions about “how
      technology has changed our ability to fly”?




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              Teacher Resource Guide – “Flight and flying”
   •    Who can help you with your research about “how technology has changed our
        ability to fly”?

   •    How will you know that the information about “how technology has changed our
        ability to fly” is correct, reliable and without bias?

   •    How will you organize your information about “how technology has changed our
        ability to fly”?

   •    How will you present the findings about “how technology has changed our ability to
        fly”? How might you use media to communicate your understanding?

   •    What “other” ways might you use for communicating your understanding (e.g. visual
        art, music, dance or drama) about “how technology has changed our ability to fly”?

To access additional, excellent resources, teachers are referred to Focus on Inquiry, a
publication from Alberta Learning. Specifically, Chapter 6 deals with planning for inquiry-
based research.

Step 4: Investigate and process (Appendix: Research Guide - Template C)

At this stage the learner begins to gather information: researching resources, studying,
crafting an experiment, observing, or interviewing, to name a few. Because students have
excellent access to the Internet both at school and at home, it can be assumed that the
majority of the research activity will take place online. Suggestions for making this process
more efficient and effective include:

   1.   Start narrow. Define your search criteria as specifically as possible.
   2.   Find exact phrases.
   3.   Trim back the URL.
   4.   Look for similar pages.

Source: http://webquest.sdsu.edu/searching/fournets.htm

Other considerations include:

        1. Accuracy. If your page lists the author and institution that published the page
           and provides a way of contacting him/her, and . . .
        2. Authority. If your page lists the author credentials and its domain is preferred
           (.edu, .gov, .org, or .net), and . . .
        3. Objectivity. If your page provides accurate information with limited advertising
           and it is objective in presenting the information, and . . .
        4. Currency. If your page is current and updated regularly (as stated on the page)
           and the links (if any) are also up-to-date, and . . .
        5. Coverage. If you can view the information properly—not limited to fees,
           browser technology, or software requirement, then you may have a higher
           quality Web page that could be of value to your research!

Source: http://kccesl.tripod.com/search.html#howto



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              Teacher Resource Guide – “Flight and flying”
To access additional, excellent resources on supporting the investigative process, teachers
are referred to Focus on Inquiry, a publication from Alberta Learning. Specifically, Chapter 7
deals with retrieval of information for inquiry-based research.

Step 5: Create and share (Appendix: Research Guide - Template D)

While the preferred presentation format is the 3 panel display, nonetheless, with some
creativity and guidance from the teacher, the 3 panel display can also incorporate a number
of different ways and means of communicating what students have learned.

                              Suggested Presentation Formats


  Display                 •   Collages                         •   Timeline
                          •   Three-panel displays             •   Artifacts
                          •   Brochures                        •   Posters


  Performance             •   Role play                        •   Storytelling
                          •   Mock Trial                       •   Song writing
                          •   Re-enactment                     •   Dance
                          •   Drama                            •   Music
                                                               •   Visual Arts


  Production              •   Map                              •   Recipe Book
                          •   Model                            •   Doll clothes
                          •   Prototype                        •   Myths and Legends
                          •   Diary                            •   Cooking
                          •   Diorama                          •   Mobile
                          •   Poetry                           •   Comic strip/cartoon
                          •   Journal                          •   Heritage Minute
                          •   Picture dictionary               •   Board Game
                          •   Magazine                         •   Tourist guide
                          •   Newspaper                        •   Technology (Presentation,
                          •   Scrapbook                            web site, blog, wiki,
                          •   Photographs                          WebQuest)
                          •   Video recording                  •   Experiment
                          •   Audio recording                  •   Simulation


Students are encouraged to combine a number of different presentation formats within the
context of a 3 panel display. For example, a 3 panel display on the question of “how
technology has changed our ability to fly” might well contain one or more display activities
(posters or artifacts), one or more performance activities (i.e. role play, dance or song
writing) and one or more production activities (i.e. model, magazine, experiment,
multimedia presentation or board game).




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              Teacher Resource Guide – “Flight and flying”

Step 6: Assess (Appendix: Research Guide - Template E)

This is the time to re-view the entire research project. This step is critical to guide the
students to deepen the students’ understanding of the topic and the inquiry process. By
referring back to the work of Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe (1995) we can generate the
following list of questions to ask the student:

     •   Can Explain and interpret: What did you learn about how technology has
         changed our ability to fly that you did not know before?
     •   Can apply: If you had to do the research project over again, what would you do
         differently?
     •   Have perspective: What different points of view, or perspectives, did you learn?
     •   Can empathize: What was the most surprising thing that you learned from
         doing this research?
     •   Have self-knowledge: What did you learn about yourself as a learner?




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    Teacher Resource Guide – “Flight and flying”




                   APPENDIX



“Big Ideas” in SYHF Research Projects Main Index

Research Guide – Template A – Pose Real Questions

Research Guide – Template B – Make A Plan

Research Guide – Template C – Investigate and Process

Research Guide – Template D – Create and Share

Research Guide – Template E – Assess




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             Teacher Resource Guide – “Flight and flying”

        The “Big Ideas” in Heritage Fairs Research Projects
Teachers are referred to a printable copy of the “Big Ideas” available at the following
web address: http://www.saskyouthheritagefair.com/homepage.htm. The online
resources are best viewed using Internet Explorer.

Society and Culture                         Living Things

   •   Society (p. 5)                           •    Plants and animals (p. 23)
   •   Historical developments (p. 6)           •    Genetics (p. 25)
   •   Relationships (p. 12)                    •    Cells (p. 26)
   •   Worldview (p. 14)                        •    Illness (p. 27)
   •   Culture (p. 16)                          •    Infections (p. 28)
   •   Your community (p. 19)                   •    Diversity (p. 29)
   •   Citizenship (p. 20)                      •    “Flight and flying” (p. 30)
   •   Social issues (p. 21)                    •    Human Body (p. 32)


Politics and Law                            People

   •   Citizenship (p. 34)                      •    Identity (p. 55)
   •   Government/Politics (p. 35)              •    Artists (p. 57)
                                                •    Immigrants and refugees (p. 58)
Economy and Business                            •    Human behaviour (p. 61)
                                                •    Human Welfare (65)
   •   Trade (p. 37)                            •    People who made a difference (p. 66)
                                                •    Families (p. 68)
                                                •    Citizenship (p. 68)
Science World                                   •    Addictions (p. 69)
                                                •    Social issues (p. 70)
   •   Electricity (p. 39)                      •    Sexuality (p. 72)
   •   Flight (p. 43)                           •    Human body (p. 73)
   •   Matter (p. 45)                           •    Tragic Events (p. 74)
   •   Mixtures and solutions (p. 48)
   •   Heating and cooling (p. 49)
   •   Light (p. 50)
   •   Radiation (p. 52)
   •   Water (p. 52)
   •   Technologies (p. 54)
   •   Machines (p. 55)




                                         16
               Teacher Resource Guide – “Flight and flying”




Interactions                               Natural World

   •   Human Behaviour (p. 75)                 •   “Flight and flying” (p. 98)
   •   Your community (p. 80)                  •   Earth's Crust (p. 100)
   •   Advertising (p. 81)                     •   The Land (p. 103)
   •   Immigration (p. 82)                     •   Climate and Weather (p. 107)
   •   Treaties (p. 84)                        •   Disasters (p. 107)
   •   Government/Politics (p. 85)             •   Plants and animals (p. 108)
   •   Climate and Weather (p. 87)             •   Diversity (p. 110)
   •   Disasters (p. 88)
   •   Citizenship (p. 88)
   •   Power and authority (p. 89)
   •   Historical developments (p. 91)
   •   Trade (p. 97)

First Nations, Métis and Inuit

   •   Cultural groups/culture (p. 111)
   •   Artists (p. 112)
   •   The Land (p. 113)
   •   Worldview (p. 114)
   •   Treaties (p. 115)
   •   Arts (p. 116)




                                          17
                           Teacher Resource Guide – “Flight and flying”
          RESEARCH
         TEMPLATE A
                                        What do you want to know about how technology has changed our
                                        ability to fly?




                                        Why is learning more about how technology has changed our
                                        ability to fly important to you?




                                        How might you find, select and interpret information about how
                                        technology has changed our ability to fly?




                                        How is technology and “Flight and flying” connected or related to
                                        other topics? What aspects of how technology has changed our
                                        ability to fly have stayed the same or changed over time?




                                        What are the major factors which cause how technology has
                                        changed our ability to fly to change?

Are there any moral or ethical issues
related to how technology has
changed our ability to fly?



                                        How have the different social, cultural, intellectual and
                                        technological contexts that shape people’s lives and actions
                                        impacted how technology has changed our ability to fly?



                                                        18
          RESEARCH Teacher Resource Guide – “Flight and flying”
         TEMPLATE B
                                  What suggested activities are there in the SYHF Research Project
                                  Ideas Guide to help you in researching how technology has changed
                                  our ability to fly?




                                  How will you gather information to answer the key questions about
                                  how technology has changed our ability to fly?




                                  Who can help you with your research?




                                  How will you know that the information is correct, reliable and
                                  without bias?




                                  What are the major factors which cause how technology has
                                  changed our ability to fly to change?
What other presentation formats
might you include?




                                  How might you include different types of displays, performances or
                                  productions in your 3 panel display?




                                                 19
    RESEARCH Teacher Resource Guide – “Flight and flying”
   TEMPLATE C
                             Online sources:




                             Books, magazines, newspapers:




                             Personal contacts, interviews:




                             Field trips, museums, heritage sites:




Photographs, video, audio:




                                               20
 RESEARCH Teacher Resource Guide – “Flight and flying”
TEMPLATE D
                    Displays:

                        •   Collages
                        •   Three-panel displays
                        •   Brochures
                        •   Posters
                        •   Timeline
                        •   Artifacts


                    Performance:

                       •    Role play
                       •    Mock Trial
                       •    Re-enactment
                       •    Storytelling
                       •    Song writing
                       •    Dance
                       •    Music
                       •    Visual Arts
                       •    Drama

                    Production:

                       •    Map
                       •    Model
                       •    Prototype
                       •    Diary
                       •    Diorama
                       •    Poetry
                       •    Journal
                       •    Picture dictionary
                       •    Magazine
                       •    Newspaper
                       •    Scrapbook
                       •    Photographs
                       •    Video recording
                       •    Audio recording
                       •    Recipe Book
                       •    Doll clothes
                       •    Myths and Legends
                       •    Cooking
                       •    Mobile
                       •    Comic strip/cartoon
                       •    Heritage Minute
                       •    Board Game
                       •    Tourist guide
                       •    Technology (Presentation, web site, blog, wiki, WebQuest)
                       •    Experiment
                       •    Simulation

                                   21
                    Teacher Resource Guide – “Flight and flying”
        RESEARCH
       TEMPLATE E
                                     What did you learn about how technology has changed our ability to
                                     fly?




                                    What did you learn about yourself?




                                     What different points of view did you learn?




                                      What was the most surprising point you learned from the process?




If you had to do the project again, what would you do differently?




                                                   22

				
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