“The ORGANIZATION” by wuyunyi

VIEWS: 33 PAGES: 14

									                                 All 2009 Narratives in One Document

“The ORGANIZATION”
In Season Web Site Training Segment #1

This narrative is developed for use in conjuncture with the corresponding training video. We
anticipate that the user would watch the video once with the comments from the narrator, then review
our narrative highlighting philosophy, mechanics or other comments relevant to our conference. We
will reference at times the 2009 Supplemental Guidelines and Philosophy manual. I will refer to the
manual in the narratives as the 2009 SGP.

We anticipate these training segments will take the user about 20 minutes to review.

Play #1 (A3).
This is an excellent example of goal line position by the covering official. Note how he moves away
from the goal line pylon along the goal line extended. Remember if upon contact with the ground the
ball comes loose and the receiver loses control of the ball, the play would be an incomplete pass.
Review page 11, item D 6 of the 2009 SGP.

Play #2 (A6).
This is an example of the poor fade mechanics by the FJ. The goal of fade mechanics is to maintain
a 7-10 yard cushion until the ball is caught. In this play note the right arm of the defender. This could
quickly become an arm bar or perhaps cutoff situation. From the position the deep official is in, he
would NOT be able to see those acts. If the cushion is maintained, the ability to see what the inside
arm is doing is much easier. Get the angle and position to see the play.

Second item, near the end of the play, a Team B player is moving toward the receiver from the inside
or middle of the field. The second person arriving late is the player who has the prime opportunity to
deliver a blow to a defenseless player. The flank official and offside deep official would need to help
with that potential call in this play situation.

Play #3 (A7)
This is a real good example of our fade mechanics. Note not only the cushion the deep official has,
but the angle and perspective he has looking back at the play compared to the deep official in the
prior play. When an eligible receiver steps out of bounds, simply use your bean bag. Save the hat.
Also when you have a call there is no need to produce the wild signaling as used by the deep official
in this play. If you feel you need to use the signal, one CALM signal will do. We would prefer that you
simply sell the call by signaling incomplete. The fact that he is on or near the sideline will sell the call.

Play #4 (A9)
On this kickoff, the flank official who the Referee turns his back to should move up field 8-10 yards to
view the initial blocks at the wedge. The other flank official can move up field, especially if his goal
line is not challenged. He would not move as far or fast as the other flank official, but will be in
position to view runner and initial blocks at the wedge. The winding of the clock etc is the
responsibility of the Referee.

Play #5 (A11)
This play is an excellent example of our mechanics and keeping the flank officials at the line until the
pass crosses the line. As you can see from this view, since the linesman is at the line of scrimmage,
he has a great view of whether the runner has crossed the line of scrimmage.

 IF this pass had been forward, not only would it be easy to sell the call, but anyone watching the tape
(ie coaches) could see the position of the official. This position by the official would make it difficult to
argue a subsequent call for passer beyond the line (if that ruling had been necessary on this play
situation)l.

In addition, the umpires are not required to get to the line of scrimmage on pass plays, the flanks have
all responsibility related to pass plays impacted by the line of scrimmage. (Exception is goal line
mechanics). Our mechanics do not stipulate that the covering official give a directional signal

Play #6 (A12)
This is very poor mechanics by the covering official at the goal line pylon. The official should have
moved back from the sideline on the goal line extended. The covering official clearly has no
perspective, and appears to guess wrong on the play. From the camera angle this should be a
touchdown. Compare this position to the mechanics in the first play and you should have a pretty
clear picture of what is expected and why.

Play #7 (B1)
Excellent example of a hook and turn type of pass interference. The upper body of the receiver is
clearly turned creating restriction and impeding the receiver from reaching for the pass. Review the
types of PI in the SGP page 12. Remember there must be the intent to impede, restriction, and
contact.

Play #8 (B5)
Good example of OPI. Please take to heart the comments regarding excessive signaling after the
play. In our program we DO NOT want the calling official signaling to the referee what he may have.
After the play is over, run quickly while blowing the whistle to get the Referee’s attention and report
the foul.
“The ORGANIZATION”
In Season Web Site Training Segment #2

This narrative is developed for use in conjuncture with the corresponding training video. We
anticipate that the user would watch the video once with the comments from the narrator, then review
our written narrative highlighting philosophy, mechanics or other comments relevant to our
conference. We will reference at times the 2009 Supplemental Guidelines and Philosophy manual. I
will refer to the manual in the narratives as the 2009 SGP.

LOS Philosophy #1.
This play is an example of almost perfect alignment for a punt from scrimmage kick formation.
Review page 16 item D-2 in 2009 SGP.

LOS Philosophy #2
The right tackle is highlighted and clearly off the LOS, as is the left tackle. Please review page 16
item D-1 in the 2009 SGP. As noted in the narrative, allowing the tackles so much distance from the
line of scrimmage is a huge advantage. If the opponent has to pass rush, the opponent would need to
rush at least 4-5 yards before contacting the tackle. In addition the tackle has a great angle to be able
to slow down or stop any inside rush.

Another advantage comes on a running play where the guard pulls, and the tackle must try to fill
block. This position creates an excellent angle to move over and cut the defensive player off. If the
tackle was forced to be on the LOS, that same block is very difficult and often turns into an illegal
block because there is no angle.

Please understand that working the tackles is not a cosmetic issue, allowing them to set off the line
(not even breaking the centers backside) is a huge advantage.

LOS Philosophy #4
As officials we do not want to nit pick, but we also can become too lenient and walk into another
potential foul. An example would be the first play in this section, where the wide out maybe near the
centers backside, but not breaking the center’s backside. The flank official assumes the tight end is
an eligible receiver, so he allows the wide out to be a little further off the line. Team A could be lined
up in an unbalanced line where the “tight end” is really a tackle and you have the wide out clearly off
the line. Now there are 5 in the backfield, and you will probably have an illegal formation foul.

   1. Simply make sure you give wide outs a good look at your leg on the offensive side of the ball
      in order to help them get aligned.

   2. Warn the head coach after the down or after the first series in the half. Don’t let this go
      unnoticed.

We are NOT concerned about the defense being confused whether a receiver is eligible or not. We
don’t want sloppy formations which one week is not addressed properly, and then the following week
the crew handles the situation correctly, giving the appearance of two philosophies in two consecutive
weeks related to the same issue of formations.

These two plays are good examples of a wide out potentially in the “gray area” that you would try to
work with the coach, the other is clearly a cover up situation.
LOS Philosophy #5
Note on the first play, the offensive LT is not on the line.

On all these plays, the fouls are on Team B. A corollary to this philosophy, that Team B must be in
the neutral zone to threaten the player. For example, on direction from the linebacker the entire Team
B D-line shifts to the right without coming close to the neutral zone, or moving toward the
offensive team, and a Team A lineman reacts, it will be a false start.
Another example would be if the defensive end is in a three point stance on the line of scrimmage,
then drops or backs away from the line of scrimmage and that position to become a line backer.
Team A lineman then reacts, this will be a false start.

Do not restrict Team B from the right (by rule) to move positions prior to the snap. Team B can’t
threaten the offensive formation, and in most circumstances this occurs when B enters the neutral
zone.

LOS Philosophy #6
In each of these plays, Team B clearly moves into the zone, or in some instances into the backfield.
There should be no hesitation on the part of the flank officials as noted in the narrative. Make sure
that if you do have this call, you are HUSTLING toward the referee with the whistle blasting. All crew
members including referee and umpire need to move toward the line creating a presence to prevent a
cheap shot.

LOS Philosophy #7
The two plays highlight excellent formations on apparent kick plays that become trick plays. The first
play is the responsibility of the flank official to know where the wide out came from and whether he
met the rules for Team A formation in chapter 7.
“The ORGANIZATION”
In Season Web Site Training Segment #3

This narrative is developed for use in conjuncture with the corresponding training video. We
anticipate that the user would watch the video once with the comments from the narrator, then review
our written narrative highlighting philosophy, mechanics or other comments relevant to our
conference. We will reference at times the 2009 Supplemental Guidelines and Philosophy manual. I
will refer to the manual in the narratives as the 2009 SGP.

D1 – Special Teams
First this shows an excellent outline of the tackle box. Remember this extends all the way to Team
A’s end line. Remember the kicker must carry the ball out of the box before he loses his protection. If
the ball is muffed outside of the box, or if the punter never leaves the box, he can still re establish
himself as a kicker and have the standard roughing the kicker protection.

The second item to look at is the position of the side judge. In six man mechanics, the SJ would have
to be at the pylon on this play. The ball is in his third of the field, thus he would have signaled the field
judge that he has the ball (“punch off” with arm extended straight back See SGP page 42). The SJ
would have to be at the pylon to cover this properly. Again these comments are related to six man
mechanics.

The last item on this play is the Team A coverage at the goal line. This is an excellent example of the
Team B player clearly controlling the football by firmly holding the ball at the one although he is lying
in the end zone. The ball was clearly stopped and down at this point. His teammate’s actions with
the ball are ignored as the down was over prior to him picking the ball up.

D-2 – Special Teams
This is an excellent example of kick catch interference. By rule the receiver is clearly “in position and
attempting to catch” the kick. As noted, interference does not require contact for the foul to occur.

Review the play a second time, and freeze the video prior to the receiver attempting to catch the kick.
Note all the players outside the inbounds line 5-20 yards in front of the receiver prior to the catch. The
field judge is focused on the catch/muff/signal and other acts by the potential receiver. This is a
perfect example of why the line judge must release at the snap and move down field to help cover
illegal acts in this zone. (Please review SGP item E 8 on page 5).

D-3 – Special Teams
This is an excellent example of the “get away” signal, which is also an invalid signal. Remember two
things, whenever a valid (legal) or invalid signal is given, the down will end upon Team B’s possession
of the ball.

Second item, if after the signal the ball is allowed to continue to roll, the player who gave the signal
(valid or invalid) can not contact an opponent during the down. This restriction would cease if the
player who gave the signal subsequently touched the ball. Field judge would stay with the ball as it
continued down field toward B’s goal line. The SJ and HL would have to be aware of the actions of
the player who gave the signal. Remember that a valid or invalid signal (any signal) creates the
restriction regarding blocking during the down.
D-6 – Special Teams
Freeze the play prior to the snap and note the wide splits in this formation. The key will be for the
referee to determine the “tackle box” in case the punter wanted to create the rugby kick situation.
Secondly the flank officials MUST make sure there are only 4 in the backfield.

This is another excellent example of the position of the side judge at the pylon. However note that the
ball is first touched in flight at the B4 yard line. This is the spot of first touching, and although the ball
is downed at the B1 yard line, this ball should be placed at the B4 yard line.

E-1 – Roughing
This is an excellent example of our philosophy on roughing the kicker (SGP page 10 Section Two,
Item 2 A). The kicker still has his leg fully extended as part of the natural kicking motion. This would
be roughing the kicker per our philosophy.

G-1 – Progress
This play requires the covering official to apply judgment on this catch/no catch. (Please review page
11, item D-6) Our philosophy is that control, possession and a football act must occur. When in
doubt, it is an incomplete pass.

G-2 - Progress
As the QB scrambles note the linesman’s position at the line of scrimmage. This is one of our
mechanics, and you can see the excellent position he is in to determine if line of scrimmage is
challenged on the play. (See SGP page 6 item D)

The second item to note is the excellent position of the deep official at the pylon. This is yet another
example of why it is so important that the covering official (who ever it may be on a given play) needs
to be at the pylon.

G-3 – Progress
Referees this is a good example of a quarterback, attempting to pass, and the defense controlling the
QB with contact. This effectively “stops” his progress, clearly pushing the QB back prior to attempting
to pass. If the QB is controlled in this manner, stop the play and mark him down. Don’t let the play
continue, and then call a foul for an illegal forward pass!
“The ORGANIZATION”
In Season Web Site Training Segment #4

This narrative is developed for use in conjuncture with the corresponding training video. We
anticipate that the user would watch the video once with the comments from the narrator, then review
our written narrative highlighting philosophy, mechanics or other comments relevant to our
conference. We will reference at times the 2009 Supplemental Guidelines and Philosophy manual. I
will refer to the manual in the narratives as the 2009 SGP.

This week will focus on DPI. The plays presented should provide strong examples of the various
types or categories of pass interference.

Prior to starting the tape, please review the following two items:

A. Rule Book: FR-104, rule 7-3-8-c
“DPI is contact beyond the neutral zone by a Team B player whose intent to impede an eligible
receiver is obvious and it could prevent the opponent the opportunity of receiving a catchable pass”.

I have highlighted the key points to DPI:
    1. Contact,
    2. Beyond the neutral zone
    3. Intent to impede is obvious
    4. Catchable pass

This is the basis or items that must occur to have defensive pass interference. Remember that the
defense’s act usually restricts the opponent’s opportunity to catch the pass.

B. 2009 SGP: Judgment Criteria Page 12
This clearly defines some key points on DPI, describing the TYPES of physical acts that occur, and
the categories (or descriptions) of these acts of pass interference.

As you review the definitions or descriptions, note that each contains some type of physical contact
and inference to restriction of the opponent within the description.

Page 13 of the SGP outlines some errors that officials make in trying to apply the judgment criteria in
deciding DPI has occurred.

The descriptions and comments in this narrative sum the types of DPI. As you review the plays, note
the position or angle the officials have due to fade mechanics, and the criteria outlined above in both
the rule book and 2009 SGP references.
“The ORGANIZATION”
In Season Web Site Training Segment #5

This narrative is developed for use in conjuncture with the corresponding training video. We
anticipate that the user would watch the video once with the comments from the narrator, then review
our written narrative highlighting philosophy, mechanics or other comments relevant to our
conference. We will reference at times the 2009 Supplemental Guidelines and Philosophy manual. I
will refer to the manual in the narratives as the 2009 SGP.

This segment will be on holding. Prior to starting the tape, please review the following pages from the
rule book:

FR-126 Section 9-3-3 Use of Hand or Arms By Offense
The key phrase in the rule references physical acts that “illegally impedes or illegally obstructs an
opponent”. Another key point of the holding rule relates to the frame of the opponents body (FR-45
section 2-3-5), which is below the shoulders and not in the back. By definition, if both players are
head up, and the blocker has his hands outside the shoulders, or outside the chest on each side of
the ribs, he is still within the frame of the opponent’s body. The key judgment criteria is once the
blocker has point of contact, does the blocking act illegally impede or obstruct the opponent.

Please review our 2009 SGP, pages 14 and 15, (emphasis on the judgment criteria on page 15).
These criteria provide a clear definition of what you will usually see if an opponent has impeded,
obstructed or restricted an opponent. Generally holding occurs when the opponent gets outside of the
blockers body or is trying to disengage from the block and can’t shed the blocker. The physical
restrictions highlighted in this section will be evident in each of the holding calls highlighted in this
segment.

H-1
Initial contact is ok, but as the defender attempts to disengage and move back in toward the ball
carrier, you will see the restriction. Note how the opponent’s feet come together and rather than
naturally moving side to side in order to pursue the runner, the defender appears to stumble around.
This is result of the blocker restricting or pulling the opponent.

On open field blocks, the covering official must see the opponent being restricted. (Upper body being
turned, unable to disengage which causes footwork to be destroyed etc) If the defender stays in
contact, and never attempts to get off the block or move outside the frame of the opponent, and never
appears to loose natural footwork-balance, unlikely you would have a hold.

H-2
At initial contact, the blockers arms are outside the shoulders of the opponent. As soon as the
opponent then begins his spin move to disengage, the blocker further grasps and restricts the
opponent. The attempted block quickly disintegrates.

H-4
Clearly a take down, but note how the opponent is physically turned, restricted from pursuing and
footwork (natural balance) is destroyed. This all occurs in the split second prior to the take down.

H-5
This is another example of open field blocking, which would also apply on open field blocking
situations such as kick returns or other change of possessions. Initially the blocker has one arm
outside the shoulders. The indication of the restriction occurs when the upper body is then turned and
twisted, which results in the opponent’s footwork/balance being restricted and then the take down. IF
after the initial contact, if the upper body had not been turned, and the footwork did not become
altered, the likelihood of holding occurring would be minimal. It may look bad that the arm encircles
the opponent, but if there is no evidence of restriction as outlined by our judgment criteria, the
chances of holding would be reduced. In other words, just because the arm appears to be around the
body, we must SEE restriction for holding to occur.

H-6
On this play this is another example where at the INITIAL contact, holding does not occur. Holding
subsequently occurs as the upper body is turned, defender is restricted and can’t disengage.

H-7
Here is an example of a marginal call. Blocker does a good job of staying “squared up” on opponent
(keeping blockers body in front of and within frame of opponent’s body). As contact occurs, there is
no apparent twisting, turning, or pulling downward of the opponent’s body during contact. The
opponent is able to continue to use footwork and push forward toward QB. Obvious restriction is not
there.

A second item to note, prior to the snap, the tackle is close to being in illegal formation. Note the
cushion this occurs, especially just after the snap when the tackle takes his first step back. At that
point the Team A player has created a cushion of almost 3-4 yards before the defender contacts him.
This has given Team A a huge advantage. If Team B was going to employ a stunt, due to the cushion
Team A has the angle to react. If the Team B end was going to use a technique including a speed
rush, there is cushion for Team A to prepare and react. Formations are critical.

H-8
Another example that restriction occurs as opponent attempts to disengage and pursue.

A second item to look at is the block by the third man in at the top of the screen and the back on that
side of the formation. The Team B player at the 25 yard line, aligned across from the third receiver in,
will read the play, move inside the receiver and into the Team A backfield. The block by the two
Team A players appears to be a chop block. Probably R would have best look at this, along with the
flank official.

H-9
Note the physical restriction after the initial contact.
“The ORGANIZATION”
In Season Web Site Training Segment #6

This narrative is developed for use in conjuncture with the corresponding training video. We
anticipate that the user would watch the video once with the comments from the narrator, then review
our written narrative highlighting philosophy, mechanics or other comments relevant to our
conference. We will reference at times the 2009 Supplemental Guidelines and Philosophy manual. I
will refer to the manual in the narratives as the 2009 SGP.

This segment will focus on catch/no catch, specifically control and possession of the ball as the
receiver contacts the ground. One of the key provisions in the play situation where the receive makes
a diving catch in middle of the field, or tries to get a foot down in bounds before landing out of bounds
relates to control of the football. When the receiver contacts the ground, if the ball is dislodged or still
moving, it is incomplete.

In addition, the covering official has primary responsibility to view and judge on both feet and ball on
plays at the sideline. The covering official is the official who has the clear look at the football. There
can be instances where both the side officials can see the ball, or on a quick pass of the middle both
the umpire and deep official can see the ball, but normally in most of this situations where the catch is
made between two officials, one will have the clear look at the football (versus the other official
looking through the body and restricted vision of the football).

As you watch these examples, note the excellent position of the side officials. The deep officials
consistently maintain their cushion from their fade mechanics, and the flank officials hold at or near
the line, which allows them to simply pivot along the sideline and have an excellent angle to view the
play.

Catch/No Catch J-2
You can see that the receiver has control (ball is secured, not moving at contact with ground). The
covering official has responsibility for feet and ball. Our mechanics do not have one official looking
solely at feet, the other official looking at ball. If you have view of the ball, you have the call. When in
doubt, the play is incomplete.

Catch/No Catch J-3
From the second view, note that the ball is moving as contact occurs with the ground, sliding or
moving through the arms. By rule and philosophy, this is clearly incomplete.

Catch/No Catch J-4
The second view of this play will provide an excellent look. As the receiver contacts the ground, ball
is still moving within his body and arms. When contact with the ground occurred, if there is no
movement, within the receiver’s body, it is a catch.

Catch/No Catch J-5
Again on this play the second view is the best look at the play. Note the foot is clearly in contact with
the ground inbounds. When player subsequently hits the ground, there is no movement of the football
within the receiver’s body or arms. If the ball is moving when he hits the ground, or comes loose, it is
incomplete.

Catch/No Catch J-6
On this interception, the foot is in contact with the ground, and as the player lands out of bounds, the
ball is firmly controlled between the arm and body with no movement at all. Note the excellent
position the deep official is in. If he had not maintained a cushion from his fade mechanics, and was
even with the players, or trailing the play, in would not be in position to sell the call.

Catch/No Catch J-7
This is good coordination between the side officials. Keep in mind that if you are the covering official
and you have 100% positive knowledge that the pass is incomplete, you sell the incomplete pass.
Do not look to confer with other officials. Make the call.

Catch/No Catch J-8
Excellent example of why the flanks hold the line of scrimmage. The flank official simply pivots on the
sideline, and is in excellent position to see feet and ball by maintaining an angle and distance to see
the whole play. Clearly the player was touching out of bounds with his arm prior to completing the
catch.

Catch/No Catch J-9
This is a more traditional catch/no catch situation. The key is whether the ball is controlled and
possessed as the receiver runs with the ball. If ball was still moving, or attempting to control the ball,
this becomes an incomplete pass. When in doubt, it is incomplete.
“The ORGANIZATION”
In Season Web Site Training Segment #7

This narrative is developed for use in conjuncture with the corresponding training video. We
anticipate that the user would watch the video once with the comments from the narrator, then review
our written narrative highlighting philosophy, mechanics or other comments relevant to our
conference. We will reference at times the 2009 Supplemental Guidelines and Philosophy manual. I
will refer to the manual in the narratives as the 2009 SGP.

K-1
This is an example of Team B with 12 men on the field, just prior to the snap. It is evident that Team
B players are making no attempt to leave the field, this was not a hurry up or late substitution situation
where the referee had the umpire over the ball. At this point, we want to shut the play down before it
is snapped with a dead ball foul. We will not wait until the snap hoping Team B might call a time out
prior to the snap.

We do not want to wait until the snap to try and shut the play down for the dead ball foul for illegal
substitution. If you wait until the ball is snapped to try to shut this down, you now have a snap,
players are in action mode, which creates the strong likelihood of some player contacting the runner
or opponent as the officials are trying to stop the dead ball action. We have created the opportunity
for a personal foul situation or worse.

Remember if the Team B player is trying to leave the field, we will give the player the opportunity to
reach the sideline. If he fails to leave the field prior to the snap, it is a live ball 5 yard penalty.

Please review 2009 SGP page 10 and 11 related to excessive Team B players. Also review In
Season bulleting 08-2009 as this topic is discussed there.

K-2
This is an example of Team A having possession, and Team B attempting to wrestle the ball away. It
appears that the officials ruled Team A had possession, or joint possession, when progress was
stopped, based on the narrative. When the play or down ends with possession by a team, let’s kill the
down (if by rule the down is over), and immediately signal who has ball.

We DON”T want dead ball wrestling matches. As soon as that occurs, you have team mates wanting
to run to the ball and start pulling, pushing or creating other issues. If you see a fumble clearly
possessed and controlled on the ground by a player, rule possession. Don’t let 10 players jump
on the grounded player and have a two minute scrum. Obviously this does not apply if you do not
clearly see control and possession.

The same philosophy holds for a pass where two players appear to have the ball jointly. In that
instance, rule joint possession, Team A’s ball by rule, signal possession and let’s go. We will not
stand there and let them wrestle around waiting to see who is the strongest. While you wait, the
cavalry will soon arrive and all kinds of unnecessary action occurs (as noted above), with the potential
for someone to commit a dead ball foul. No need to let that happen.

K-3
This is a unique play to say the least. The snap is legal, and there were no other fouls prior to the
snap. If Team B linemen had reacted and contacted Team A lineman after the snap, there would
have been no personal fouls for contacting defenseless players etc, unless Team B linemen created a
non football act such as a fist to the top of the head etc.
K-4
This is an excellent example of leaping. In Season Bulletin 05-2009 outlines this rule; please take a
moment to review. The umpire has the primary responsibility for this call in our conference, and the
flanks may be able to help under certain situations.

The key will be to identify Team B players more than a yard from the LOS, and at the snap if they
sprint toward the LOS, your awareness factor should immediately go into over drive.

K-6
Excellent example of why side officials must work on the sideline or out of bounds. Some key
questions on this play:

    1. Did runner’s foot touch out of bounds before ball hit ground in bounds?
    2. Can the ground cause a fumble if the football is in runner’s possession and the first contact
       with the ground is the football?
    3. If loose ball is touched by out of bounds player, is it dead in bounds or out of bounds?

These are good discussion points as they could relate to any loose ball situation near the sideline or
end line. Remember touching always precedes possession when the ball is loose during a pass, kick,
backward pass or fumble.

K-7
Prior to a free kick, if the ball begins to move or fall from the tee, even if still in contact with the tee,
the crew will shut the play down, and we will have a “do over”. There will be no fouls called as noted
in the narrative (unless there is some type of dead ball personal foul).

K-8
This is the worst scenario for deep officials on punts. Try to always maintain 6-8 yard cushion until
the kick ends. Remember if you get too close to the yard line of the receiver, and he muffs the kick as
in this example, or allows the ball to hit the ground, and the bouncing ball is headed toward Team B’s
goal line, you don’t want to be behind the player’s as they chase the ball.

For discussion purposes, what would the ruling be on this play if Team B player’s kicking of the ball
was ruled an obvious intentional act of kicking a loose ball? At the end of the down, if Team B is in
possession you would have a post scrimmage enforcement situation. If Team A has the ball, Team A
could enforce from previous spot, or more than likely, decline the foul and take possession at the spot
of recovery ( if this did not end in the end zone).

K-9
In on side kick situations, we need all officials on Team A and B restraining line to get a look at the
ball as it is kicked. For some, this will be a secondary consideration, but we must be sure that the
ball isn’t double kicked (in this play, the kicker’s plant leg comes close to touching the ball also).
Remember K can’t block until they can legally touch the ball. The contact by Team B player is
definitely an attempt to target an opponent, should be a personal foul and ejection.
“The ORGANIZATION”
In Season Web Site Training Segment #8

This narrative is developed for use in conjuncture with the corresponding training video. We
anticipate that the user would watch the video once with the comments from the narrator, then review
our written narrative highlighting philosophy, mechanics or other comments relevant to our
conference. We will reference at times the 2009 Supplemental Guidelines and Philosophy manual. I
will refer to the manual in the narratives as the 2009 SGP.

This segment has many plays that you have probably already seen. There are a couple of key points
to note on each of these clips;

   1. Each act is a willful, planned act to either draw attention to a player, or demean an opponent.
   2. The majority of these acts occur well AFTER the play, which is why the CREW must keep
      heads on swivels, especially aware of actions after change of possession or touchdowns.
   3. For our level, if the gesturing, posturing, signing is not handled immediately, the crew runs the
      risk of every play an opponent trying to respond in kind to a taunt, posture etc.

A very good example of this is the second or third play, where the offense scored on about a 20 yard
run. The initial acts by the runner near the end line pounding his chest etc are border line, but as he
continues down the end line, the subsequent signing is clearly meant to draw attention. On that play,
of officials on that players sideline should be watching the players come off the field and be able to
catch that act.

Another example is the last play of this segment where after the catch, the receiver jumps up, and
makes a emphatic first down signal. This act was planned to draw attention, and if not flagged will
open Pandora’s Box. The next opportunity, an opponent will then try to top the receiver’s act.

This is not the same reaction as a dive play near the first down marker, and players standing by the
pile giving a “ first down signal” while everyone is looking at the ball and forward stake.

In each of these examples, the simple question comes to mind:

How does this act relate to football? The answer is they don’t.

If you fail to police these types of acts, you will have other uglier incidents later in the game.

								
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