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					Facilitator Guide


Youth and College
   Committee

   Relay University
      2010-2011
                         Youth and College Breakout
                                 Relay University 2010-2011



Module Overview

Audience:
    High School and College Event committee members

Objectives:
    Demonstrate methods to effectively communicate with Youth volunteers. Explore ways
       to engage Youth in Community events.

Time Required:
    2 hours 30 minutes

Preparation:
Room Set-Up:
       U-shape with participants sitting on the outside or round tables
       Table in front of the room for facilitator materials, handouts, etc.
       Decorations
       Flip Chart and Easel

Allow sufficient time to:
        Review facilitation tips document with your co-presenter (see embedded document)
        Create flipcharts
        Copy and distribute handouts
        Decorate the room
        Welcome participants




All preparation should be completed at least 30 minutes before the session.

Materials: (insert all additional materials needed for your breakout)
        Quotes to decorate the walls
        Markers (provided)
        Tape (provided)
        Boom box playing music (provided)
        Two flip chart pads (provided)
        Candy of different colors for icebreaker (M&Ms, Starbursts, jelly beans, etc.)




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                   Youth and College Breakout
                            Relay University 2010-2011

Icons

        Facilitator creates a flip chart.




        Exercise performed by participants or activity lead by facilitator.



        Facilitator asks a question of participants.



        Indicates a very important point that needs to be addressed



        Handout*
        *Note—anytime you see this icon it indicates there should be a corresponding
        document listed as a handout. All handouts will be inserted as full documents at
        the end of the guide in the order in which they are to be referenced during the
        breakout.




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                Youth and College Breakout
                        Relay University 2010-2011



Prepared Flip Charts:

      Welcome – include facilitator name(s), e-mail address(es) and title of breakout

      Agenda
      Welcome/Introductions, Agenda review, Objectives
       Get the People
       Get the Money
       Get The Fun
       Networking Time
       Review, Wrap-Up, Call to Action

      Objectives
      In this session you will learn to:
       Establish a well-organized structure that will allow for continued event growth.
       Make Relay For Life the “thing to do” on campus by engaging a wide range of
          participants.
       Appeal to the campus community selling the experience of Relay as a fun,
          exciting event.


      Ground Rules
      Thanks For… (Place this flipchart on the side wall)
       Silencing your cell phones.
       Actively participating.
       Appreciating comments and opinions of others.
       Having fun!

      Parking Lot

      Flipcharts for Topic #1

      Flipcharts for Topic #2

      A Fundraising Strategy:
       Starts early and works in conjunction with mission delivery activities
       Includes long and short term goals for ALL types of fundraising
       Reflects the successes and challenges of last year‟s fundraising efforts
       Includes a plan for engaging teams


      We save lives and create more birthdays by helping people stay well, helping
      people get well, by finding cures, and by fighting back.




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          Youth and College Breakout
                  Relay University 2010-2011



   Promote

   Incentivize

   Recognize



Flipcharts for Topic #3

Spirit Committee Traits:
o Knows a lot of people on campus
o Not afraid to meet new people
o Enthusiastic and passionate about Relay
o Willing to be innovative and “think outside the box”

Spirit Committee Tasks:
 Relay message in your email signature
 Pass out Relay stickers in class
 Write the Relay website on chalkboards
 Conduct spirit building activities on campus
 Run through the quad in purple (if it is a requirement to get the position then
   you can be sure they will do it!)
 Pass out candy with cancer facts/stats
 Provide entertainment/energy at all meetings
 Host recruitment events


A Quality Relay includes:
 Actively Engage Participants
 Diverse Entertainment
 Generate Anticipation


Coaching Tips to Impactful Ceremonies
o How are you involving all participants?
o How are you honoring various individuals?
o What can you do to make the ceremony unique?
o How can you educate Relayers on the ACS Mission?


Call to Action

Questions to consider




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                      Youth and College Breakout
                             Relay University 2010-2011

Facilitator Agenda


Welcome/Introductions, Agenda review, Objectives
     and Icebreaker                                       15 minutes

Agenda Topic #1                                           30 minutes
     Get the People

Agenda Topic #2                                           45 minutes
     Get the Money (with 15 minute break)

Agenda Topic #3                                           30 minutes
     Get the Fun

Networking Time                                           20 minutes


Review, Wrap-Up, Call to Action, Questions                10 minutes




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                          Youth and College Breakout
                                  Relay University 2010-2011

Welcome/Introductions, Agenda Review, Objectives
& Icebreaker                                                                           15 minutes


Welcome / Introductions

       Facilitators will introduce themselves.

Agenda Review

       Facilitator will review the agenda items listed on the agenda flipchart.



                   Agenda
                   Welcome/Introductions, Agenda review, Objectives
                    Get the People
                    Get the Money
                    Get the Fun
                    Networking Time
                    Review, Wrap-Up, Call to Action, Questions

Objectives

       Facilitator will review the objectives listed on the objectives flipchart.



                   Objectives Flipchart
.                  In this session you will learn to:
                  Establish a well organized structure that will allow for continued event growth.
                  Make Relay For Life the thing to do on campus by engaging a wide range of
                   participants.
                  Appeal to the campus community selling the experience of Relay as a fun,
                   exciting event.


During the last Relay For Life season, a team of volunteers and students attended some of the
best college events in the country. The purpose of these National Scout Teams was to gather
best practices that could be shared with all Youth and College events. In the course of the
visits, we learned that the most successful events focus on three categories: getting the people,
getting the money and getting the fun.

Get the People – selling the experience of Relay to your campus, identifying a structure that
works and making it effective.
Get the Money – having a fundraising plan, a plan that is comprehensive and focuses on fall
and spring.
Get the Fun – making Relay an event that people want to come back to and bring their friends.



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                         Youth and College Breakout
                                 Relay University 2010-2011



In this session, we will share some of these best practices and talk about how you can
implement them in your events.



Icebreaker:

Time Estimate: 5-10 minutes, varies upon group size

Required Materials: Candy of different colors (M&Ms, Starbursts, jelly beans, etc.)


   1.) Give each participant a few candies of different colors.
   2.) Break into small groups.
   3.) Assign each color of candy a question.
           a. What is your favorite part of Relay?
           b. What is something your Relay is really good at?
           c. What is something your Relay struggles with?
           d. How does your Relay honor Survivors?
           e. How does your Relay promote Relay Spirit?
   4.) Each participant should include the following information for their introduction.
           a. Name
           b. Affiliated Relay Event
           c. Position on the committee
           d. How long they have been Relaying, and
           e. Have each participant choose one of their candies and respond to the color-
               appropriate question within their small groups.
   5.) Post the above prompts for introductions and the candy color associated questions in a
       visible place in the room or provide participants with a written copy.
   6.) Ask the participants to introduce themselves using these prompts and questions within
       their small groups.
   7.) Finally, gather the attention of the small groups. Tell them thank you for participating
       and they can continue their networking conversations at the end of the session, where
       we have allotted time specifically to continue their conversations.




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                         Youth and College Breakout
                                 Relay University 2010-2011


Agenda Topic #1: Get the People                                                       30 minutes

The most successful High School and College events across the nation do so by making Relay
For Life the “thing to do” on their campus.

The first thing we have to do in order to build a strong, sustainable Relay is to make sure we
have a solid foundation.

The foundation of any Relay event is the committee. Committee structures can vary based on
the size of the school, the culture of the school and the amount of support you receive from your
campus or administration.

Some of the most successful events split their committee into “growth” and “production”
functions.

Pass out an example of committee examples:




Ask: how is this different from your current committee structure? What benefits do you
see to implementing this kind of process?

Positions that help to grow the event; therefore, brings in the people and the money, such as the
Team Development Chair, the Online Chair or the Fundraising Chair, require the most attention
in the first semester. For if we don‟t have people or money we don‟t have a Relay!

Other positions that are involved in “putting on the show,” including the Registration Chair or
Entertainment/Activities Chair are certainly important, but do not require as much focus at the
very start of the year.

The first place to start when building your committee is to identify any gaps that you have and to
start recruitment early.

ACTIVITY: Pass out the recruitment plan worksheet.




At the top of the page, write down your current committee position such as Event Chair,
Luminaria Chair, etc. Then take a moment to write out your key responsibilities. For example, if
you are team chair, you have to recruit teams, manage the teams, conduct meetings, etc.




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                            Youth and College Breakout
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Give the participants a moment to write.

Now take a moment and think about the help you need to accomplish your key responsibilities
and tasks. If you could break down the jobs, what would they be?

Give the participants time to write.

Now, take a moment and think of where you know people who might be willing to be part of
Relay. Are you part of a club or organization? Sorority? Fraternity? Faculty?

You now have a recruitment list of your immediate needs; by dividing your recruitment into
smaller pieces the task does not seem as overwhelming.

How do you make a plan to reach out to people beyond your sphere of influence? Who do your
fellow committee members know that might be a good fit for the tasks you need to accomplish?

Where are some places to find Youth and College volunteers and teams? The ACS has two
brainstorming tools that can help. It can be used to target committee members, team captains,
even survivors and participants.

Distribute 50 teams for College and High School.




When recruiting, don‟t forget about alumni, faculty and staff. The key to recruiting alumni is to
catch them before they leave. Utilize ACS resources to gather current contact information. The
recruitment of faculty and staff is extremely valuable to an event! Unlike students, this group on
campus experiences fewer turnovers and has the means to get things accomplished or
approved on campus.

Relay isn‟t just one night and the most successful Relays engage their campuses in the weeks
and months before the actual event through Relay and/or CAC activities and programs.
Participants at some of the top performing Relays in the country say Relay is the “thing to do” at
their school, recruiting students once they enter campus as freshman and utilizing activities
throughout the year to raise funds for the event. One way is through Summer orientation.
While this may not be as applicable to a high school event, it may give you some ideas on how
to reach freshmen during the Fall.



     PA Summer
Orientation 101 Guidebook




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                        Youth and College Breakout
                                Relay University 2010-2011



When promoting the Relay For Life events make sure that everyone on the campus knows what
Relay actually is and who it benefits.
What makes YOUR Relay different?
Why is it the thing to do on Campus?
Use humor, shock, compassion, and fun to communicate the importance of the fight.

All of you have a personal reason why you Relay. If you had to put it into one word…what
would it be? For example, it could be “Grandma”, “Aunt”. Go around the room and have
the participants give their word.

At your tables is a flyer entitled “Face of Cancer,” which is a creative tool that a school used
to show the affects cancer had on one of their committee member‟s mothers who died. Wouldn‟t
this make you turn your head?




  Face of Cancer


To recap, can someone share an idea you have implemented or will implement regarding…?
        Building your leadership structure?
        Engaging the campus?
        Selling the Relay experience?




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                         Youth and College Breakout
                                 Relay University 2010-2011


Agenda Topic #2: Get the Money                                           30 minutes (with break)

Now that we have the people, let‟s talk about another focus of successful events…getting the
Money!

When it comes to Relay, we develop a lot of strategies…a team strategy, a publicity strategy or
survivor strategy. We sometimes forget to build one for a critical area…fundraising!

How many of you have a fundraising strategy down on paper? Is it successful? What do you
think makes a strong fundraising strategy?

               A Fundraising Strategy:
                Starts early and works in conjunction with mission delivery activities
                Includes long and short term goals for ALL types of fundraising
                Reflects the successes and challenges of last year‟s fundraising efforts
                Includes a plan for engaging teams

First, the committee must develop a Fundraising Strategy
     At the start of the year develop a fundraising strategy by coming up with event-wide
         fundraisers for teams, as well as working in conjunction with mission/CAC programming
         throughout the year. We all know how hard post-fundraising can be on campus, so start
         early in the fall semester to avoid having to work at the end of the school year.
     The committee will want to create both long and short term goals for the Relay by using
         various tools available through the staff partner;
             o Identify benchmarks comparing year to date income progress from past years;
             o Discover strategies by assessing the school‟s national scorecard
             o Includes all types of fundraisers. We sometimes focus on online but neglect
                 event wide fundraisers or team fundraising.
     Reflect on last year‟s fundraisers- did you have a variety of event-wide fundraiser for
         teams? Did you partner with a major campus event to fundraise? By reflecting on these
         opportunities the committee will begin to see areas to improve fundraising efforts.
     All of the efforts may be lost if your committee does not place a focus on team
         fundraising. Nearly, 80 percent of a Relay‟s income comes through teams, so it is vital
         that we know where teams stand within their fundraising efforts year-round.


It has to start with leadership on your committee, thus volunteers solely dedicated to fostering
fundraising within Relay.

So, why have a Fundraising Committee?
    The most successful collegiate Relay in recent years, Virginia Tech, has a fundraising
      committee consisting of 4-5 members. This group focuses on educating Relayers on on-
      site fundraising, online fundraising, and coordinates an event-wide fundraiser.
    Having a fundraising chair and committee reduces the workload of the event chair and
      allows him/her to focus on other aspects of Relay. Fundraising responsibility is passed
      on to this committee.
    The saying holds true, “It‟s not about the money. It‟s about what the money can do.”
      Fundraising is a very important part of Relay!

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                           Youth and College Breakout
                                  Relay University 2010-2011


If you have a smaller school, your fundraising committee may be one or two people who work
with the event chair to plan events, coordinate teams and promote fundraisers.

Once your plan and fundraising chair are in place, you want to educate the committee, team
captains, team members, and campus on where fundraising dollars go and how the American
Cancer Society uses these funds through research, advocacy, patient services and educational
opportunities.

So, let‟s simplify it:

On chart:

                 We save lives and create more birthdays by helping people stay well, helping
                 people get well, by finding cures, and by fighting back.


(This is a great message to put in the footer of every meeting agenda or e-mail message.)

Pass out staying well, get well, find cures and fight back handouts:




Staying well is all about how we help you and your community prevent cancer or find it at its
earliest, most treatable stage. On your handout you‟ll see a few examples of how we help
people stay well.

What does it mean to help people get well? The American Cancer Society helps people get well
in many ways. We help people through their cancer diagnosis and provide information so they
can make decisions about their care.

As you all know, the American Cancer Society funds cancer research that helps us all better
understand, prevent, and cure cancer. You‟ll see on your worksheet that we‟ve had a hand in
nearly every major cancer breakthrough of the past century.

The American Cancer Society fights back in many ways. We work with lawmakers to pass laws
to defeat cancer, and we rally communities worldwide to join us.

Tell the participants to pick either the stay well, get well, find cures or fight back
worksheet.

Take a couple of minutes to jot down a few ideas about the topic you chose. What experiences
come to mind? What is a story you‟ve heard at your Relay or through volunteering that fits with
the notion of helping people stay well, get well, finding cures or fighting back? Write down those
ideas now.


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                         Youth and College Breakout
                                 Relay University 2010-2011

Ask one person to share their story.

You can use the exercise we just completed to help your committee members and team
captains understand the work of the Society and how it relates to them personally. Facilitate
one worksheet at each meeting. Challenge your participants to write their story and share with
others. Always be sure to emphasize their importance in achieving our mission.



Right now, we are going to take a 15 minute break.
When you come back, we will finish up getting the
money and talk about getting the fun!

One place we miss out is that we tell teams that they need to fundraise but we don‟t tell them
how. We need to coach and support team captains and team members by providing fundraising
ideas and how to implement them on and around campus.

Now, can someone give an example of how the committee can educate Relayers on the types
of fundraising opportunities that are available? Allow one or two volunteers to respond.
Possible answers: at TC Meetings, via the online tool, having a committee member visit
the individual team meetings.

In order to make our fundraising plan and our team fundraising efforts a success…(remember
the statistic that 80% of our income comes from teams??) we want to look at three areas:

               On Chart:

                  Promote

                  Incentivize

                  Recognize



Promote – Publicize Team Fundraisers: It is imperative that the committee work in conjunction
with the teams, online and publicity chairs to promote any and all team/individual fundraises to
the campus. Social networking can be a key factor. Facebook and Twitter can be used for
updates, education and promoting challenges. Email campaigns, when done well, can also be
an effective promotion tool.

For example, host a Fundraising Friday challenge. Provide fundraising tips to event participants
and teams each week and reward/recognize the top fundraisers each Friday.

Also, the committee should promote fundraisers that happen in conjunction with awareness
months or Colleges Against Cancer Activities.



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                              Youth and College Breakout
                                        Relay University 2010-2011

Incentivize– think outside of the traditional incentive program. What are some inexpensive
ways to incent our teams and participants to raise money? We noted that Relay incentives are a
motivational tool used to increase donations in events, encourage participants to work harder
towards their goals and provide a way of recognizing dedicated teams and individuals.

An example of an incentive challenge may be to host a team fundraising challenge where the
prize is a prime campsite location, extra electricity, or an extra tent. Use what works at your
school!

Recognize- Incentives are a great strategy, but another vital (and free) way to ensure
fundraising happens year-round is to recognize all participants for all of their efforts. Statistics
show that you must say "Thank You" seven times before someone really feels appreciated.
Recognition must happen on all levels from participants to team captains to the committee.


Break the room into three groups. Give one group “Promote”, give one “Incentivize” and
another “Recognize”. Given them 5 minutes to come up with three out of the box ideas for
promoting, incentivizing or recognizing their teams and participants. Have the participants
share their ideas.

Share examples of recognition/incentive programs:



VIP Lounge Checklist Fast Pass How To



Getting the Money- it is all about making it fun!
1. Think Big! Plan fundraising events you would want to attend, if every event throughout the
   year is fun, people will want to come to the events! As a result, the events will raise more
   money!

2. Embrace campus culture! Every school is known for something. If football is big on
   campus, make Relay a part of that football culture; whatever makes your school unique, use
   that to the Relay‟s advantage to help raise money for the event.

3. Take advantage of other events and activities on campus! Making Relay a part of major
   campus events will help raise money, but also promote Relay to untapped student groups.
   Also, by using other events allows the Relay to keep programming costs low!


Examples:



 VT Team Madness    VT Team Madness     UGA 48 Hrs Promo
      Details            Bracket             Flyer




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                          Youth and College Breakout
                                 Relay University 2010-2011



Agenda Topic #3: Get the Fun                                                          30 minutes

Just as in any major sporting event in which the student body embraces the game, school pride
exudes itself with students adorned in school colors- from hats to sweatshirts to face paint, its
clear who the students support. So how do we get our campuses excited to dress themselves
in purple and rally around Relay?

Great question, right? In this section we will review ways to develop school pride in Relay, roll
out an exciting new Spirit committee and lastly, maintain the hype and energy once we have the
campus on board.

Ask the participants to share something that brings their student body together and generates
school pride.

Once the students answer, ask how was that energy created at your school?

Thank you for sharing, we all have experienced school pride, it becomes who we are the minute
we step on campus as freshman and is seen through our campus clubs, orgs and sports teams.
Now is our time to take that one step further by creating Relay pride.

What makes a sporting event exciting, besides the actual game? (select a person or two to
respond)

The cheerleaders and band that get the crowd going by leading cheers, fight songs, etc.
Wouldn‟t it be great to have that for Relay?! You are in luck, the Spirit Committee is a suggested
sub-committee to add to your existing Relay structure. The Spirit committee is a group that can
be implemented no matter whether you are a high school or a college event.

The purpose of the Spirit Committee is to generate excitement about Relay! One of their
main goals is to maintain a presence on campus on a regular basis through creative and out-of-
the-box promotion seen through (and beyond) posters, tabling, chalking, word of mouth and
videos that all promote Relay. This group of students is the heart and soul of Relay activity,
always showing Relay pride by wearing purple or something Relay and talking to anyone and
everyone about the event.

What kind of traits would you look for in your Spirit Committee members?

                      o   Knows a lot of people on campus
                      o   Not afraid to meet new people
                      o   Enthusiastic and passionate about Relay
                      o   Willing to be innovative and “think outside the box”




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                         Youth and College Breakout
                                  Relay University 2010-2011


What are ways the Spirit Committee can create energy on campus? (write responses on a
blank piece of flipchart paper)

Thanks for sharing; let‟s see what we missed- the following ideas came from the University of
Georgia who created the Spirit Committee.


Tasks of the Spirit Committee
                     o Relay message in your email signature
                     o Pass out Relay stickers in class
                     o Write the Relay website on chalkboards
                     o Conduct spirit building activities on campus
                     o Run through the quad in purple (if it is a requirement to get the
                       position then you can be sure they will do it!)
                     o Pass out candy with cancer facts/stats
                     o Provide entertainment/energy at all meetings
                     o Host recruitment events

Maintain the Hype!
Now that we have built up school pride, see how to utilize a Spirit Committee we need to ensure
that this energy is maintained throughout the year. To maintain hype on campus comes through
kickoffs, meetings and painting the campus purple.

When developing plans for these events, think of what you did last year and do something
completely different. We need to keep the student body guessing at all times and repeating
what worked last year, makes Relay dull.

At your tables (if there are more than 4 tables move students around) you will be given one
of the following topics: kick-offs, team meetings, committee meetings and painting the campus
purple. Each group needs to brainstorm creative ways you can have fun at these events, feel
free to incorporate concepts from the Spirit Committee.

Assign each group a topic, allow a few minutes to discuss then have each group report
back.

Handouts that support the above key points:


  Spirit Chair Job
   Description


Another great way to „get the fun‟ is by building and maintaining relationships with other
campus affiliations through pre-existing activities held during the school year. By partnering with
these groups, you are reaching new networks of people, creating less work for your committee
and saving funds by using what is already in place on campus.

Furthermore, these activities involve getting students out of the classroom to learn and have a
good time and what better venue to promote Relay!


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                         Youth and College Breakout
                                 Relay University 2010-2011




What are some pre-existing activities at your school? Possible answers: homecoming, sporting
events, club events, social events (talent show, dances), Greek week, RA programming.

Pick two of the items and ask the group how they could partner with that event to
promote Relay.

How do we “Get the Fun” at the event? Keeping an event fresh and exciting is one of the most
common threads we found after talking with Relay participants across the county. Successful
events are capturing the attention of their participants and teams through the use of
entertainment and activities.

Campuses visited during the National Scout Program all showed a few key ingredients to a
quality Relay.

Create flipchart with the following points that are BOLD.

                      A Quality Relay includes:
                      o Actively Engage Participants: Incorporate activities that pull
                         participation from all teams for example „So You Think You Can
                         Dance‟ competition, Relay Idol, Minute to Win It games, Are you
                         Smarter than a Freshman trivia challenge are a few examples that
                         draw attention and laughs.
                      o Diverse Entertainment: As you begin booking entertainment for your
                         event, be sure that you consider different genres of music,
                         combination of both a DJ and live bands, school choirs, jazz bands,
                         marching bands, etc. Our Relayers‟ interests are diverse and so
                         should the means in which we entertain our participants.
                      o Generate Anticipation: Provide teams with the Relay schedule
                         before the day of the event, be sure to mix in themed laps that require
                         the teams to bring props in order to participate and advertise various
                         challenges in which teams will have to select a member to participate.


Foundation of Relay is the Ceremonies
When we begin to plan our Relay schedule, ceremonies are normally first on the list to delegate
to our committee; here are a few tips to keep in mind when coaching your committee to develop
a meaningful ceremony.


                      Coaching Tips to Impactful Ceremonies
                      o How are you involving all participants?
                      o How are you honoring various individuals?
                      o What can you do to make the ceremony unique?
                      o How can you educate Relayers on the ACS Mission?



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                             Youth and College Breakout
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ACTIVITY: In this next activity, each table will be given a case study on a ceremony. You will
have to come up with recommendations to enhance the ceremony for the new year.

Handouts that support the above key points:


  Ceremony Case      Look Good Feel
      Studies     Better Extreme Makeover Challenge




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                         Youth and College Breakout
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Agenda Topic #4: Networking Time                                                     20 minutes

Open up this time for participants to network with eachother and share best practices.

You can use the following questions to generate discussion:

      What is one way that you can embrace School Pride through Relay?
      What is one thing to keep in mind when recruiting prominent people on campus?
      What is an idea you can use to create a better quality Relay?
      How can you educate on the mission of the ACS at Relay?
      How can you ensure successful follow through?
      Someone provide an example of an incentive challenge.
      What are two ways we can recognize fundraising efforts?
      How can we make fundraising fun?
      Share with the group your best online fundraiser, team fundraiser, individual fundraiser,
       or onsite fundraiser?
      What is one we can market fundraisers online and offline?
      How do you recognize commitment and hard work?
      What are some of the unique ideas for ceremonies that you have seen?
      What is something that was really successful for your event in the past? How can you
       make it new?




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                              Youth and College Breakout
                                        Relay University 2010-2011


Review, Wrap-Up, Call to Action                                                                    5 minutes


Review the objectives of this session to make sure you have come full circle with your audience.
Make this part of the breakout interactive enough as to not lose participant attention.

Use ACS Resources to help your event reach success!


ACS Guidebooks and Online tutorials/websites

There are a variety of new tutorials available online which are geared specifically for college and
Youth events. These were made by volunteers and ACS staff and they can teach you do
anything from how to use the website to how you can recruit and energize students.

Youth & Young Adult Workgroup (YYA)

The Youth & Young Adult workgroup is comprised of ACS volunteers who are either chairs or
committee members for college events throughout the region. They have been selected
because of their vast Relay experience and passion and they are here to help you.

The workgroup has initiated a mentoring program so that they can assist their fellow event
chairs across the region. The goal of this program is to help you create new initiatives or solve
issues by connecting you with other events. This group has the ability to more easily gather
ideas or suggestions that have been successful on other college and high school campuses.
Your mentor will contact each event chair several times to ensure that assistance is always
available when it is needed.

Your YYA mentor can also serve as a connection to your Regional Council Youth Specialist.
The Regional Council sets overall ACS initiatives and programs for your region and the Youth
Specialist serves as the youth voice on the council.

ACS Staff Partner

This person‟s job to be your right hand when you need it so don‟t forget what a truly valuable
resource they can be.


Call to Action:

Get the people by establishing a solid foundation for your event and continuing to build up. Get
the money by developing a fundraising strategy early and sticking to it. Get the fun by
embracing your college/school culture and establishing a spirit committee to build the Relay
excitement. By staying focused on these tasks, and true to the ACS mission, you will create an
environment that will engage and enrich others, as well as a successful Relay culture.




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