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					         TV CHOICE EDUCATIONAL FILMS


                                   DVD Programs


                               Business
                                  &
                           Management Studies




                            November 2008
                                   Catalog Number: M2110


             Sinostar Ltd.
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                                                         P.1
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                                                              P.2
                                          Introducing Business
ENTERPRISE CASE STUDIES I: WINNERS AND LOSERS
                                                           Starting a business isn't easy. Half of new businesses go bust within
                                                           the first three years. How do you keep yourself going before the
                                                           money starts rolling in? What if the money DOESN'T start rolling
                                                           in? The following case studies tell stories of enterprise success --
                                                           and failure.
                                                           THE SMELL OF SUCCESS: S'Amuser is a bold experiment in
                                                           retailing -- a business in Glastonbury offering customers the chance
                                                           to blend their own perfumes. But this high street perfume bar is
                                                           only the beginning of the founders' business concept. Their aim is
                                                           to launch franchises all over the country.
THE CRISP MAKER: Will Chase started his business life as a farmer. When he was 20 Will bought his family farm with
a £200,000 bank loan. But he couldn't pay it off, and in 1992 Will went bust. Then he bounced back, selling potatoes to the
big supermarkets.
But fed up of being pushed to cut prices by the supermarket buyers Will thought of something else to do with his spuds -
make them into crisps -- hand-cooked artisan crisps. It was a big investment and a huge risk, but it paid off. Tyrrells crisps
are Britain's big snack food success story of recent years.
BONE BUSINESS: Ayshe is an osteopath - she cures people who have pains in their backs without using drugs or surgery.
Most osteopaths work in clinics - but Ayshe has set up her own business called Backbone. She's experimented with different
types of marketing and advertising - but believes the best promotion for her business is word of mouth. She now hopes to
open her own clinic. But it all means lots more responsibility and hard work.
THE ONE THAT FAILED: Jonny had a bright idea for a business. It seemed like a good plan -- finding venues for
companies that wanted to hold events. Jonny went for it -- but turning the idea into reality took time and money. Cash flow
was a big problem, debt mounted up. After two years he had to give up. He feels his biggest mistakes were not having a
proper business plan and spending too much, too soon.
Duration: 45 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2007


ENTERPRISE CASE STUDIES II:TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION
                                                              Many people start up new businesses looking to make money from
                                                              technology and innovation. But what are the realities of starting a
                                                              technology-based business? The following case studies illustrate
                                                              both the possibilities and the pitfalls.
                                                              SELLING GLASSES ONLINE: Three years ago Jamie was in
                                                              university. Today he's the boss of £3 million company. The secret
                                                              of his success - selling glasses direct to customers over the internet.
                                                              It all started when he was doing his exams and needed a pair of
                                                              glasses. He believed the high street price of £150 was a rip-off - so
                                                              started "Glasses Direct" a web-based firm which sells its glasses at
                                                              an amazing £15 a go.
Buying is simple - you just type in your prescription into the website. You can even try out your glasses out online! But
success didn't come without problems - to begin with everything was done from home and the high street retailers gave
Jamie a hard time by putting pressure on his suppliers.                 The big secret, according to Jamie, is start small, grow big.
THE MOBILE PHONE BROTHERS: It's got a dodgy image, but two brothers claim to be bringing an "ethical" approach
to the mobile phone sales business with an enterprise called Foneoptions.
The brothers literally started their call centre operation in a bedroom - but got into trouble with the neighbours. But now
they're in commercial premises and aim to be the best in the business - by, they say, being honest. It's hard work and they
fight all the time -- but the brothers reckon it's all worth it.
THE WEBSITE DESIGNERS: Fed up of working for someone else, Jill and Jonathan set up their own business - Futurate
-- designing websites. Most of their customers are in the public sector and this involves tendering for business - a long and
difficult process. Futurate almost went bust after an important client took their web-design work in-house.

Duration: 35 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2007




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                                                                P.3
THE LOCAL COUNCIL
                                                          Local government is a massive part of the UK economy – but why
                                                          is it there? What does it do? This film goes inside Cornwall County
                                                          Council to find out.
                                                          THE LOCAL COUNCIL:
                                                          A local council may appear similar to a private business. It employs
                                                          people who undertake many of the same functions as a private
                                                          business. But councils don’t have to make a profit. And they have
                                                          to provide a wide array of services, from looking after the elderly
                                                          to maintaining the roads.Private businesses have shareholders and
                                                          are run by directors on their behalf. Councils have councillors who
                                                          are elected by local people and the council is accountable to the
public for its actions.
AIMS & OBJECTIVES
Private businesses aim to make profits. Historically local government has set out to improve people’s lives. Many people are
attracted to work for councils because they want to serve the community and help people. People in the public sector are
often paid less than people with similar abilities in the private sector, but some claim to get more satisfaction from their
work.
MAKING DECISIONS & CONSULTATION
People sometimes complain that democratic decision-making takes too long because too many people have to be consulted.
But on the other hand is the quality of those decisions better? Do people on the street feel that their voices are
heard?Cornwall put in a bid to become a world heritage site, involving large sums of money – but how much say did
residents have?
MEASURING SUCCESS
Private sector businesses measure their success in terms of how much money they make. In the public sector it’s not so
straightforward. Councils are judged by the quality of their services they provide – a much harder thing to quantify. Some
people think they’re not getting value for money from their taxes.
PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
The council tries to measure their effectiveness using performance indicators – what are these? Do the performance
indicators measure the right things? How do you measure what care workers do? Is there a danger of spending more time on
measuring work than actually doing it?
PERCEPTION & REALITY
Councils often get a bad press. And many residents feel they’re not getting value from the taxes they pay. In particular
social services are often attacked publicly when things go wrong. And form-filling and procedures are the bane of many
council workers’ lives. But despite the problems, many of the people who work for the council feel they are making a real
difference both to their community and to society as a whole.
Duration: 25 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2006

WHOSE BUSINESS? STAKEHOLDERS, ETHICS AND THE MARKET ECONOMY
                                                       How do you define a business? Is it the people who work for it? Is
                                                       it figures on a balance sheet? This thought-provoking film explores
                                                       the different ways of looking at a business using case-study
                                                       examples.
                                                       Business Activity: Any business, whatever size, has INPUTS,
                                                       FUNCTIONS and OUTPUTS. But EXTERNAL FACTORS, too,
                                                       play a key role.
                                                       Stakeholders: These are the groups who should have a say in how a
                                                       business operates. But does that work in practice? How many
                                                       companies really take account of stakeholders' needs, how much is
                                                                         lip service?
                                                  Conflict In Business: In practice, the various interest groups in a business
often have competing goals. What are these conflicts? How can these conflicts be reconciled?
Corporate Social Responsibility: Many organisations proudly publicise their codes of practice regarding ethical trading and
the environment. Yet the profit motive still drives the market economy: what about the companies whose products are
inherently irresponsible?
Duration: 25 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2005




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                                                              P.4
BUSINESS STRUCTURES
                                                     You can't see it, but it's probably the most important thing in a
                                                     business. This film offers a comprehensive guide to business
                                                     structures with examples including Daimler Chrysler, Easy Jet and
                                                     Stena Line.
                                                     FUNCTIONS: The most common business structure is by function,
                                                     such as marketing and production. But some companies also
                                                     organise themselves around particular products or geography.
                                                     TALL v FLAT: "Tall" organisations have layers of managers
                                                     structured in a hierarchy. "Flatter" companies have fewer layers -
                                                     which they claim gives them more flexibility.
                                                     CHAIN OF COMMAND: A tall company has a long chain of
command, but managers have a narrow span of control. Everybody knows what they're supposed to be doing - but are tall
hierarchies too rigid?
TEAM WORKING: In multinational drugs company Eli Lilly staff work in numbers of different teams with different team
leaders. This is known as a matrix structure.
HUMAN COSTS: Companies flatten their structures by cutting out layers of managers. But what about the human cost -
large-scale redundancies and stress at work?
Customers' feedback: "Generally a very good video. It relates the organisation to real industry examples." Professor N D
Burns, Loughborough University.
Duration: 26 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2004

HOW A BUSINESS WORKS
                                                        What makes a company tick? This video explains basic business
                                                        functions inside Cameron Balloons, the world’s largest maker of
                                                        hot air balloons.
                                                        MARKETING: Like all firms, Cameron has to market its balloons.
                                                        Specialist publications, ―word of mouth‖ and the internet are vital
                                                        parts of its ―marketing mix‖.
                                                        PRODUCTION: We show how a balloon is manufactured from
                                                        the basic design to the production line.
                                                        PERSONNEL: Cameron employs 70 people and it’s down to the
                                                        human resources department to do everything from hiring and
                                                        firing to training people. ACCOUNTS: Tight control of the firm’s
money is a key aim of the accounts function. To ensure they get paid, Cameron has a very simple formula - no money, no
balloon.
STRUCTURE: Textbooks imply businesses are divided up into functions and departments, but the real world doesn’t work
like that. In Cameron everyone has to muck in to meet deadlines and solve problems.
Customers’ feedback: “Very good as a general introduction.” Mrs H Shergold, Blue CE School.
“Very good. I am very pleased with it.” Jonathan Blane, Latymer School.
Duration: 25 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2004

ORGANISATIONS COMPARED
                                                        Dave Nellist takes us on a light-hearted exploration of the basic
                                                        types of organisations. Within the private sector, Dave explains the
                                                        principles behind sole proprietorships, partnerships, private and
                                                        public limited companies, as well as franchises and co-operatives.
                                                        Case study examples illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of
                                                        each type of organisation.
                                                        The film also covers the public sector, in the shape of central and
                                                        municipal government. Over 20% of the working population are
                                                        employed here.
                                                        Customers' feedback: “It enlivened the subject. One of the best
videos I've seen in this area.” Mr Donegan, Portobello High School

Duration: 25 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2002




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                                                              P.5
STARTING A BUSINESS/THE CAFÉ BAR
                                                          The film tells how Dave and his brothers set up a cafe-bar. They
                                                          get planning permission, they design the interior, open up and
                                                          customers pour in.
                                                          But six months on, there's a crisis. Money's going out as fast as it's
                                                          coming in. And a lack of control means they don't know where it's
                                                          going.The business comes close to going bust. Key staff resign,
                                                          angry at not having been paid their bonuses. Eventually the cafe bar
                                                          weathers the storm. A new management regime is introduced, with
                                                          tighter financial controls and a new stock control system. The key
                                                          lesson: a new business needs a sound financial base.
                                                          Customers' feedback: “Paints a picture of what a business is
like.” Mr A Slay, The Henry Box School.

Duration: 30 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2000




HOW TO DO A BUSINESS PLAN

                                                   Every business needs a business plan — but how do you put one together?
                                                   Jay, a clothes designer, and Robin, in the forestry business, explain how
                                                   they wrote their business plans.
                                                   OBJETIVES: the business plan has to state what the business has been
                                                   set up to do.
                                                   MARKETING: the plan describes the product, who it’s aimed at, how
                                                   they’ll buy it and at what price.
                                                   PRODUCTION: the production plan outlines how they’ll make their
                                                   product.

                                             RESOURCES: will the business need start-up cash to get going and what
                                             assets will it have?
FINANCE: how much cash will the business really need to keep going while setting up?
Customers’ feedback: “Very informative. Snappy and to the point.” Judith Goodman, Malborough School.

Duration: 30 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1997


WORKING IN ORGANISATIONS
                                                          People in a range of organisations describe their jobs. John is
                                                          hooked on sales work, but Gloria is finding tele-sales too
                                                          demanding — she has to ring 100 people a day.
                                                          A supermarket worker complains of repetitive strain injury and
                                                          abusive customers. Twin sisters describe the thrills and spills of
                                                          setting up their own small business.A woman worker describes
                                                          how manufacturing life is changing. And we follow a council
                                                          housing manager as he deals with complaints, evicts a woman who
                                                          can’t pay and faces a violent ex-tenant.
                                                          Customers’ feedback: “It gives a good insight and holds the
                                                          students’ interest.” Gill Wright, Brentford Girls School.

Duration: 39 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1996




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                                                              P.6
WHAT IS A BUSINESS?
                                                          A clear explanation of the features common to all businesses. The
                                                          film takes us on a tour of a toy firm and explains how staff tackle
                                                          day-to-day problems.
                                                          We look at how the business is organised: the company structure
                                                          and its aims and objective. We explore how they develop a new
                                                          product line, and demostrate the crucial role of marketing. We
                                                          explain the importance of the finance function and, underpinning
                                                          everything, production, in other words how the firm manufactures
                                                          its goods and the part played by the workforce.
                                                          Customers’ feedback: “I find both the video and support material
                                                          extremely useful.” A Curry, Stranmillis College.

Duration: 22 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1995


INTO THE FIRE
                                                       The story of Brian and Linda on the perilous path to running their
                                                       own business. We see them visit the bank and an investor to try to
                                                       raise the money. We see them acquire their premises and hire their
                                                       first member of staff.
                                                       At last they start up - and everything goes wrong. They nearly go
                                                       bankrupt, and they are only saved by Linda's valiant efforts. She
                                                       has to chase debts in person to get the money needed to stay in
                                                       business. The film demonstrates that survival relies on strictly
                                                       monitoring cash flow. The story of Linda and Brian is continued in
                                                       ―Managing the Money‖
Customers’ feedback: “Interesting, realistic, watchable.” Tony Bravo, Croydon Business School

Duration: 27 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1992



                                                    Marketing
THE COLA CONQUEST I: COCA-COLA: A CLASSIC MARKETING STORY

                                                            Coca-Cola began life more than a century ago as a "brain tonic"
                                                            aimed at businessmen. Now it's the most recognised brand name on
                                                            earth. How did this happen? With examples of classic adverts, on
                                                            both print and film, this award-winning US film explores the
                                                            marketing techniques which lie behind Coke's historic success.
                                                            HISTORY: The Coca-Cola story begins in the deep south of
                                                            America at the end of the nineteenth century. Coke is invented as
                                                            an exotic cure-all by a man trying to kick his addiction to morphine.
                                                            THE BIRTH OF MODERN ADVERTISING: But the secret of
                                                            the new drink's success lie in its marketing. Revolutionary mass
advertising techniques are used to sell it as a refreshing drink for everyone.
IMAGES OF WOMEN: Images of Coke appear everywhere. Coca-Cola spends an unheard of 20% of its revenue on
advertising. Women become vital to Coke both in its advertising and as a market. A bottle with a distinctive design becomes
a vital asset in its marketing effort.
SANTA CLAUS: Coke resists accusations that it's taregeting kids, but cleverly uses young people in its adverts.The image
of the Santa Claus of today owes much to early Coke advertising.
BATTLE OF THE BRANDS: Integral to the Coke story is its long-running battle with Pepsi. A wealth of marketing and
advertising imagination is employed on both sides. Coke is the "real thing", but drinking Pepsi makes you part of the "Pepsi
generation" - as promoted by superstar singer Michael Jackson.
A NEW RELIGION: Market researchers examine the responses of people to Pepsi and Coke, trying to work out why we
choose one over the other -- even though there's almost no difference in the taste. And what about their social impact? Is
Coke part of a new, fantasy-driven, consumerist religion in which what we buy defines who we are?
MORE THAN WORDS: In the twenty-first century Coke faces new challenges - to produce healthier, less fattening

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                                                              P.7
products and become more environmentally friendly. The company claims to have made big efforts to clean up its act - but
is this more than fine words and PR?

Duration: 40 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2008 (Updated Version)




THE COLA CONQUEST II: HOW COCA-COLA TOOK OVER THE WORLD

                                                          This award-winning film tells the story of how Coca-Cola became
                                                          the world's most famous multinational company and follows its
                                                          quest to be the globe's number one beverage.
                                                          HISTORY: After the First World War Coke and Pepsi are both in
                                                          commercial trouble, hit by the high price of sugar. But Coke's new
                                                          boss Robert Woodruff sets the company up for radical growth.
                                                          COKE AT WAR: In the Second World War Woodruff promises
                                                          that every US soldier will get a bottle of Coke for five cents.
                                                          Bottling plants are shifted overseas. Coke employees become part
                                                          of the US military effort. Coca-Cola becomes a worldwide symbol
of the American way of life.
CIVIL RIGHTS: In the 1960s, Coke is boycotted by Martin Luther King and the US civil rights movement for racist
policies. Coke has no black board members or black salespeople - and finds it has to change its ways.
COKE'S GLOBAL QUEST: In the 1980s Coca-Cola is top of the world's soft drinks. But now it sets out to go further - to
become the number one drink on earth.
CHINA: Since ancient times the drink of choice in China has been tea. Coke sets out to change this - and builds up a
bottling network which spans the country. But Coke still faces formidable cultural obstacles.
FRANCE: When the US liberates France at the end of the Second World War, Coca-Cole comes over with the troops. But
many French people resist "coca-colonisation", denouncing the drink as a threat to their identity.
MEXICO: In Mexico, unlike China or France, Coke meets with little resistance. In some towns, Coke and Pepsi even
become incorporated into local religious rituals as a kind of holy water.
GUATEMALA: Coke directs an empire of independent bottlers across the world. Coke claims not to interfere with local
politics - but in Guatemala the activities of one of its bottlers cause a scandal when employees trying to start a union are
murdered. Outrages in other countries -- most notoriously Colombia -- also blacken the company's name.
THE BATTLE GOES ON: Coke's quest for world domination goes on. Coke's priority is the emerging markets - countries
like China and India. But critics claim the costs to local people are too high and press for government action to curb the
company's power.

Duration: 40 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2008 (Updated Version)


INNOCENT DRINKS: GOOD ETHICS - GOOD BUSINESS?
                                                          This is the story of the highly successful company Innocent Drinks
                                                          - a company that claims to have been ethical in all aspects of its
                                                          business. Innocent makes fruit smoothies - and is now using its
                                                          healthy image to carve out a unique position for itself in the drinks
                                                          market. HOW IT ALL STARTED: The company was set up by
                                                          three young men in 1998 who knew each other at college and
                                                          always wanted to have their own business. The early days were
                                                          difficult - raising the start-up money was a particular problem.
                                                          Business boomed and the firm's turnover is now running at over
                                                          £70 million.
                                                          A NEW WAY OF MARKETING: Their main market is people
like themselves - the cash-rich, time-poor. At the heart of their marketing approach is the language they use to sell their
drinks - engaging with customers in a lively, jokey, informal way. Customers chat back with e-mails.
NEW PRODUCTS: Building on the success of their smoothies, the company has launched a range of other products, all
with a health-related angle. They moved into the children's market in 2005. It's been a big success -- in one year they've seen
£10 million revenue from selling kids' smoothies alone.
ADVERTISING: Their first TV advert they made themselves with their own video camera. The second they made out of
"recycled" existing clips and footage. The accent, as in all their marketing, is, they say, on a simple, homely, honest
approach - "the innocent way". THE INNOCENT WAY: Grass covered vans, grass even on their office floor and fun
events like "Fruitstock" are all part of the Innocent way. But it also takes an ethical approach which includes giving 10 per
cent of its profits to charities which run community projects in the countries it gets its fruits from. But is 10 per cent enough?
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                                                              P.8
THE MANUFACTURING PROCESS: Innocent outsources the actual manufacture of their juices to other companies.
Innocent claim they are pushing them to be ethical, too - but would not allow the film-makers to visit their factories.
HOW GREEN IS MY COMPANY: The firm has its own "sustainability squad" whose job is to monitor and reduce the
company's carbon dioxide emissions. Their cars and vans are hybrids or run on bio-fuel, they use green electricity in the
office and they're introducing 100% compostible packaging.
BUT IS IT ENOUGH? But how much difference does one off-beat company like Innocent make in the scheme of things?
Is Innocent part of a trend to healthier eating and drinking, and more environmentally friendly ways of doing a business? Or
a mere drop in the ocean of the big companies and the capitalist system?
AN ALTERNATIVE VIEW: But exactly how innocent is Innocent? How healthy are their products? Dietician Catherine
Collins outlines her own reservations about the company and argues that they stand guilty of misleading marketing. (This
section is at the end of the video and is an extra on the DVD.)
Duration: 27 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2006

MCLIBEL
                                                         What happens when you criticise the world's most famous
                                                         multinational company? This is the story of two people who took
                                                         on McDonald's in what became the biggest corporate PR disaster in
                                                         history. The story begins when two ordinary people, Helen Steel
                                                         and Dave Morris, refuse to apologise for publishing a leaflet
                                                         criticising McDonald's. McDonald's turns its £10 million legal team
                                                         on them. The case comes to court. With no money, Steel and
                                                         Morris have to defend themselves. Argument rages over the
                                                         healthiness of McDonald's burgers, the conditions of its workers
                                                         and the welfare of its animals. Does McDonald's unfairly target
children with their TV advertising and marketing tactics? Or is this just standard business practice? One ex-Ronald
McDonald explains why he quit promoting hamburgers. McDonald's wins the legal case - but not the battle of the headlines.
This film is about the importance of free speech at a time when multinational companies have become more powerful than
countries.
Duration: 54 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2005

WHAT’S GOING ON IN MARKET RESEARCH?

                                                         Market research is big business, with clients demanding more and
                                                         better ways of finding out what their customers want. The internet
                                                         is now widely used -- as are mobile phones and other new
                                                         techniques.
                                                         But the classic divisions of market research still apply. We explain
                                                         QUALITATIVE and QUANTITATIVE research: also PRIMARY
                                                         and SECONDARY research. The publishing giant IPC uses
                                                         market research for long established titles such Melody Maker, as
                                                         well as for launching new titles, such as the controversial Nuts.
                                                         Readers' views are vital to them. How do they go about researching
                                                         them? UNIVERSAL RECORDS also wants to keep in touch with
its buyers. For example, how will the market react to the launch of a new band? For CANCER RESEARCH UK, market
research is about testing how effective their promotions are. How are people reacting to the latest TV ad? But WHAT'S IT
ALL FOR? What use is market research if it supports products we don't need?

Duration: 28 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2005

MARKETING LEISURE I
                                                           ―There is no end product - only the memory of the experience...‖
                                                          Spectrum Guilford claims to be Britain's biggest one-stop leisure
                                                          complex.This video takes a critical look at the centre's marketing
                                                          mix, including its product, promotion, price and place.
                                                          The marketing team plans an ice rink spectacular to promote the
                                                          centre. The event is not a great success - what went wrong?
                                                          Duration: 25 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
                                                          Year: 1993



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                                                              P.9
MARKETING LEISURE II
                                                          The Guildford Spectrum leisure centre was first featured in the film
                                                          ―Marketing Leisure‖ in 1993. Over a decade later TV Choice
                                                          re-visits the centre and explores how its marketing approach has
                                                          changed. Product: Spectrum's product is the day-out - the ―total
                                                          experience‖ of visiting the centre. But are they really catering for
                                                          the needs of local people? Promotion: Spectrum now has a website
                                                          and uses e-mail for active marketing. But word of mouth remains
                                                          the centre's number one marketing tool.
                                                          Place: Centralisation means you get lots more leisure facilities in
                                                          one place - but what about the parking and traffic problems? Price:
                                                          The centre has to offer prices which make a profit, but also provide
a public service. It's now offering special family ―fun-day‖ tickets - but they're not exactly going like hot cakes.
Did they get it right? Commercially, Guildford Spectrum is making a profit - but what about its public service commitments
such as fighting obesity? Why is it selling ―junk food‖? Is it too expensive?
Duration: 26 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2004

THE MARKETING MIX AT TESCO
                                                           Tesco is the biggest UK supermarket. What are the secrets of its
                                                           marketing mix?
                                                           Tesco's product isn't the stuff on the shelves - it's the fact that it
                                                           sells everything from mince to mortgages.
                                                           Tesco used to ―pile' em high and sell' em cheap‖. Today, it still
                                                           fights price wars. But how cheap is Tesco, in reality?
                                                           In the '60s Tesco's place was in the high street. Then it began out of
                                                           town shopping. Now it has specialised outlets everywhere. It uses
                                                           TV ads to create a cuddly image.
                                                           But it has other promotional tricks, too - its club card and
                                                           ―computers for schools‖ scheme. But are such tactics ethical?
Tesco claims to pursue socially responsible policies. But how is it really using its enormous power?
Customers' feedback: “Very good, went down well with the students. Good for summarising the main marketing issues.”
Fiona Miller, Lanark Grammar School
“Very good. Liked the way it splits into the four Ps so it can be used in sections.” Pat Haslam, Robert Pattinson School.
“Very clear, got the message across very well.” Nikki Reach, Llanfyllin High School, Powys
Duration: 30 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2003


THE MARKETING MIX EXPLAINED
                                                      The marketing mix is central to marketing and this entertaining
                                                      guide goes to the heart of what it is all about. With simple
                                                      illustrations it explains the concepts of product, price, place and
                                                      promotion, and why they are important.
                                                      We also look at three more Ps - people, process and physical
                                                      evidence - which, with the growth of the service sector, have
                                                      become increasingly significant.
                                                      The film also explains the product life cycle, the role of marketing
                                                      research and the Internet.Featuring Glaxo, Unilever, Sainsbury's
                                                      and Comet, among others, the film also looks at the dangers of
                                                      over-consumption.
Customers' feedback: “Puts the subject over clearly. Well paced for students.” E Benson, Wilmington Hall School.

Duration: 25 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2002




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                                                              P.10
THE MARKETING MIX AT HAAGEN DAZS
                                                          Paying £4.50 for a tub of ice cream was once laughable. Yet within
                                                          a year of the launch of its luxury ―adult‖ ice cream in 1992,
                                                          Haagen-Dazs had 19% of the non-impulse buy ice cream market.
                                                          But now the firm faces problems. Initially its sexy adverts caused a
                                                          sensation. But more recent ads failed — many people just don’t
                                                          understand them.
                                                          Haagen-Dazs faces competition, too. The tiny Beechdean Dairies
                                                          aims to be Britain’s answer to Haagen-Dazs. They can’t afford TV
                                                          adverts or find space on the supermarket shelves, and resort to
                                                          guerrilla marketing techniques.
                                                          But can people really distinguish between Haagen-Dazs,
Beechdean and Tesco’s finest?
Customers’ feedback: “I found it very valuable.” C Griffiths, Tenbury High School.

Duration: 32 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2001


THE MARKETING MIX AT CADBURY’S

                                                   The film tells how Cadbury launched a new chocolate bar called
                                                   Fuse. We discover how the marketers locate a gap in the market,
                                                   and then set about giving their new bar a "personality"- something
                                                   to distinguish it from other products.
                                                   Fuse benefits from the Cadbury name - the ―masterbrand‖. To
                                                   launch the new bar there is a big advertising campaign. But not
                                                   everyone likes the ad. Some think it too ironic, others just silly.
                                                   Public relations, too, plays a key part. The launch of the new bar
                                                   gets TV, radio and press coverage. The launch is a great success -
                                                   but does the world really need another chocolate bar?
Customers' feedback: “Colourful. EDUtainment. Very, very good.” Christine Borrill, Branksome School.

Duration: 35 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1998


WHAT IS MARKETING?

                                                     The 1950s saw the start of a consumer boom. TV enabled
                                                     advertisers to enter people’s homes. Marketing became a huge
                                                     industry and was defined as the ―4ps‖: product, price, promotion
                                                     and place. But how helpful is this?
                                                     You buy one product, not another. Is it because of the packaging or
                                                     where you live? Firms spend vast sums on research and focus
                                                     groups - all to find out who their customers are, how they think.
                                                     Much of advertising isn't about new products, it's about established
                                                      names -                                                     Disney,
                                                     McDonalds, M&S, C&A... what goes on behind the brand?
Marketing promises more choice. But what about the ―costs‖ of consumerism - pollution and global warming - which seem
to threaten our world?
Customers' feedback: “The students found it very valuable. I liked the bite-sized sections and good examples of adverts.”
David Quick, Lees Brook School.

Duration: 32 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2001




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                                                             P.11
MARKETING A HOTEL
                                                          The Crown Hotel, Scarborough, used to cater for wealthy holiday
                                                          makers, but with the decline of British seaside, the Crown fell on
                                                          hard times. In 2000 it was up for sale and falling to pieces. Then
                                                          came new hope.
                                                          Local businessman Richard Frank set about restoring it to its
                                                          former glory. He brought in new features - a gym and a cafe-bar. A
                                                          website now offers a ―virtual tour‖ of the hotel. Celebrities are used
                                                          to get the hotel publicity and prices are cut to make sure the rooms
                                                          are filled. The marketing tactics are radical - but will they work?
                                                          Custumers' feedback:“It's great as a focus for discussion.” Peter
                                                          Arlidge, George Watson's College

Duration: 25 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2005


MARKETING HOLIDAYS
                                                          How do you market a holiday? The starting point is the holiday
                                                          brochure, backed up by TV and newspaper advertising. Public
                                                          relations is important but getting exposure on holiday programmes
                                                          is unreliable.
                                                          54% of holidays are sold through travel agents - but that share is
                                                          dropping under pressure from call centres and the Internet.
                                                          Few products can vary in price like a holiday, and endless
                                                          re-pricing is essential to the marketing mix.         The big tour
                                                          companies market sun, sea and comfort but independent operator
                                                          Sunvil takes a different approach. It markets cultures. What about
the social and environmental impact?
Customers' feedback: “Gets students to think about the subject.” J Allan, City College, Norwich.
Duration: 25 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2001

MARKETING A THEME PARK

                                                       This tells how Alton Towers launched Oblivion, the world’s first
                                                       vertical drop roller-coaster.
                                                       Alton Towers has been successful in pulling in families, but is
                                                       losing its thrill-seeking customers. Marketing staff hope Oblivion
                                                       will change all that.
                                                       Much of their £5m marketing budget goes on a TV advert
                                                       campaign for the new ride. The advert has to be exciting enough to
                                                       appeal to teenagers, but not so scary that it will put off families.
                                                       They use public relations to promote the new ride to the public and
                                                       to trade customers - coach operators, schools and businesses. There
are complaints about long queues and pressure for even more exciting attractions.
Customers' feedback: “An excellent video.” R Dransfield, Heineman AVCE Business Tutor's File.

Duration: 35 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1998




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                                                             P.12
MARKETING ON THE WEB

                                                        How are companies using the web to market their wares? This
                                                        looks at two very different firms: giant bookseller, WH Smith
                                                        Online, and specialist wine dealer, Madaboutwine.
                                                        It's estimated there is a web-site for everyone on the planet, so
                                                        companies have to target who they want to visit them. A prime
                                                        target is the ―time-poor‖ - busy, high income individuals.
                                                        Madaboutwine use off-line advertising - for example, giving away
                                                        20,000 bottles of wine. WH Smith relies more on online advertising
                                                        - developing links with other web-sites and using banner adverts.
                                                        Web-design is cucial and ―viral marketing‖ a powerful tool.
Will the web lead to a consumer revolution? Or to job losses and more congested roads?
Customers' feedback: “Really positive feedback from my students.” J Allan, City College, Norwich.

Duration:Duration: 28 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2000


THE LANGUAGE OF ADVERTISING
                                                           How does advertising work? What make one advert succeed and
                                                           another fail? What part is playing by stereotyping, imagery and
                                                           irony?
                                                           Using old and new examples, we demonstrate changing techniques
                                                           and styles. We see how ads are made, the part accents play and the
                                                           changing role of women. The video shows how advertisers try to
                                                           use the power of association and the way music and images are
                                                           often now more important than any written words. As advertising
                                                           media proliferate, it gets harder for adverts to stand out. Some
                                                           advertisers don't try to persuade people, but provoke them.The
video features many classic examples of TV ads, from Gibbs SR and Oxo to the Prudential. Customers' feedback: “An
excellent analysis... Very useful for students studying advertising in depth.” Peter Arlidge, George Watson's College.
Duration: 30 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2001


THE TV ADVERT: LUCOZADE AND LARA CROFT
                                                          How computer game heroine Lara Croft became the star of the
                                                          Lucozade TV advert. Lucozade began life as a drink for sick people,
                                                          but marketers hope Lara Croft will help change its image. The
                                                          video follows the process of making the advert, from the brief to
                                                          final production.
                                                          A specialist media agency plans out where it will be aired. Buying
                                                          a space in the commercial break during Coronation Street gets
                                                          Lucozade 20% to 30% of all 16-34 year olds in one shot. The ad
                                                          makes great play of it being an energy drink, but how good is it for
                                                          your health?
                                                          Customers' feedback: “Excellent content, real engagement by
class.” Mr Ayling, Worcester Royal Grammar.

Duration: 32 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2000




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                                                             P.13
MARKETING DECISIONS

                                                     Three cases studies show fictional companies grappling with
                                                     different marketing dilemmas.
                                                     Design firm Apex has to decide how to promote itself. Does it go
                                                     for advertising, public relations, direct marketing - or rely on ―word
                                                     of mouth‖?How can Tony Spence's photocopier firm stop sales
                                                     falling? Send salespeople further afield, do market research, or lash
                                                     sales staff harder?A new marketing manager wants to change a
                                                     traditional mail order firm's image, going after niche markets like
                                                     the ―lads‖. But will this work?
Customers' feedback: “Very popular with students. Very useful.” Sarah Holliday, Burnley College.

Duration: 33 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1999


MARKETING A SERVICE
                                                          This video looks at the experience of three very different
                                                          organisations: the AA, the Co-op Bank and Amnesty International.
                                                          Service companies have no product - so they have to clearly
                                                          identity their service: make it real.
                                                          Successful companies need to know their customers. They must
                                                          also give a consistent message - one everyone in the organisation
                                                          can understand and believe in. Customer loyalty is vital, too - and
                                                          all three organisations put special efforts into keeping customers
                                                          with them.
                                                          But what do customers really think of their service?
                                                          Customers' feedback: “Very, very useful. Superb stimulus.” Mr
M. Telford, Adams College.

Duration: 33 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1999



NICHE MARKETING IN THE SPORTSWEAR BUSINESS

                                                     Facing the global giants like Nike and Reebok, British sportswear
                                                     companies have to find niches to survive. This video looks at the
                                                     approaches of two very different sportswear makers.
                                                     Jacetts is a small company making customised sports shirts for
                                                     local football clubs. Sponsorship is vital to their marketing
                                                     approach.
                                                     Sprayway, a much bigger firm, makes clothes ―engineered‖ for
                                                     outdoor pursuits. They, too, use sponsorship, but rely more on
                                                     targeted advertising. Sportswear tends to be made by poorly-paid
                                                     workers. But does the customer really care?
Customers' feedback: “The teachers raved about it. Helped hugely in preparing for the exams.” David Cossey, Maplesden
Noakes School.

Duration: 35 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1999




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                                                             P.14
MARKETING RESEARCH IN ACTION

                                                           A detailed study of how a US marketing research firm helps a
                                                           client plan its marketing. Focusing on a car dealer, we show how a
                                                           market survey questionnaire is designed, tested and put into
                                                           practice.
                                                           The video explains the use of ―closed‖ and ―open‖ questions, the
                                                           importance of taking a representative sample and the abuse
                                                           telephone researchers take.
                                                           Customers' feedback: “Splendid! Best I've seen on the subject.”
                                                           Christine Borrill, Branksome School.

Duration: 35 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1995


WHAT IS MARKETING RESEARCH?
                                                     All kinds of organisations use marketing research to help them
                                                     make decisions.
                                                     Quantitative research is about amassing numerical data. This can
                                                     take the form of primary research (compiling data, questionnaires
                                                     and telephone surveys) or secondary research (using existing
                                                     sources of information).
                                                     Qualitative research is more exploratory and attempts to discover
                                                     why customers do what they do. A popular form of qualitative
                                                     research is the focus group, where people are encouraged to discuss
                                                     their feelings about particular topics or products. But, in the final
                                                     analysis, what's the real value of marketing research?
Customers' feedback: “A good introduction. Very useful.” David Quick, Lees Brook School.

Duration: 27 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1996



                                      People In Organisations
CASE STUDIES IN RECRUITMENT
                                                            Getting a job. It's one of life's big challenges -- and one of the most
                                                            nerve wracking. But how does it look from the employers’ point of
                                                            view? How do THEY find the person they want? This film looks at
                                                            three very different kinds of organisation -- small business, a
                                                            hospital, and a supermarket – and explores how they set about
                                                            recruiting staff.
                                                            THE SMALL BUSINESS: First, the employer has to work out
                                                            exactly what they want from the person they're recruiting - the job
                                                            specification. Small business SNS supplies computer networks to
                                                            schools and has to work out their job - for a general admin person
                                                            -- from scratch. Role and responsibilities are an important
consideration. They advertise the job by means of word of mouth and put a lot of store by how well presented their job
applicants' letters and CVs are.
THE INTERVIEW: The small business works out a short-list of three people who are interviewed by one of the firm's
directors, Nick, and his wife,. Margaret. They mark the candidates under particular headings, such as enthusiasm, trust,
leadership and customer focus.
THE HOSPITAL: East Kent and Canterbury hospital is looking to fill a vacancy for an office job with important
responsibilities -- ensuring cancer patients get their treatment on time.          Unlike the small business, the hospital
advertises the job in the newspaper and internally - and the wording of the ad is a crucial consideration.
THE INTERVIEW: The hospital interviews two people for the job. Both candidates have failings - Tom is nervous and
Kayleigh has failed to send in a supporting statement. This, it turns out, is a crucial mistake. Even worse - Kayleigh failed to
fully read the job description and didn't know enough about the job she was applying for.
THE SUPERMARKET: Giant supermarket Asda is looking for someone who can work in any part of the shop. Asda asks
its candidates to fill in an application form -- except it's more like a questionnaire designed to weed out people with the
wrong personality. Unlike the hospital or small business, Asda also asks candidates to come to a group assessment which
involves a form of psychometric testing. Candidates are asked to form teams and complete exercises such as building a
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                                                               P.15
house of cards.
THE INTERVIEW: But as in the other organisations, the final choice comes down to an interview. Body language and
appearance are important to Asda interviewer, Bev, but in the end, she admits, there is no magic formula.
Duration: 30 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2006

A DECENT FACTORY?

                                                          With the fastest growing economy in the history of the world,
                                                          China is the workshop of globalisation. But are workers paying the
                                                          price for a manufacturing revolution? This unique fly-on-the-wall
                                                          documentary uncovers the hard realities of working conditions in a
                                                          Chinese factory.
                                                          The film focuses on a German-owned company in Shenzhen, China,
                                                          which makes the chargers for Nokia's mobile phones. Nokia sends
                                                          in a two-woman team to carry out an ―ethical audit‖ on its working
                                                          practices. The inspection reveals people are working 12 hour shifts,
                                                          also problems of noise, smells and hazardous chemicals stored near
drinking cups. Worst of all, the factory is ignoring local laws on minimum wages. Some workers are being paid the
equivalent of £14 pounds a month. Workers live eight people per room in a huge dormitory near the factory. Living
conditions are basic. State-controlled birth control is compulsory. Workers speak candidly about their working life. Hours
are long and tiring. There are bullying supervisors and the food is bad.

Duration: 33 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2005

MCLIBEL
                                                            What happens when you criticise the world's most famous
                                                            multinational company? This is the story of two people who took
                                                            on McDonald's in what became the biggest corporate PR disaster in
                                                            history.
                                                            The story begins when two ordinary people, Helen Steel and Dave
                                                            Morris, refuse to apologise for publishing a leaflet criticising
                                                            McDonald's. McDonald's turns its £10 million legal team on them.
                                                            The case comes to court. With no money, Steel and Morris have to
                                                            defend themselves. Argument rages over the healthiness of
                                                            McDonald's burgers, the conditions of its workers and the welfare
                                                            of its animals.       Does McDonald's unfairly target children
with their TV advertising and marketing tactics? Or is this just standard business practice? One ex-Ronald McDonald
explains why he quit promoting hamburgers.
McDonald's wins the legal case - but not the battle of the headlines. This film is about the importance of free speech at a
time when multinational companies have become more powerful than countries.
Managing Personnel: Systems Story At Sainsbury's Jenny Wooledge has one of the most important jobs in a supermarket
-- personnel manager. Crucial to her job is a computer system. This film tells the story of what she does in Sainsbury’s,
Thanet branch.
RECRUITMENT: First you need to get the workers to manager. Sainsbury’s goes in for what’s called ―reality
recruitment‖. Candidates for jobs are given ten minutes to check out the store and then questioned about what they think of
it. They’re also given typical supermarket scenarios and asked how they’d handle them.
KEEPING AN EYE ON THEM: Once someone’s recruited to Sainsbury’s, they’re assigned to a particular department.
Here a manager is supposed to keep an eye on them – and it’s Jenny’s job to keep an eye on the managers! Control
self-assessments and mentoring are two methods Jenny uses to monitor managers’ performance and at the same time get
feedback on their problems.
SCHEDULING: The schedule is the plan which says who’s going to be doing what and when. It’s central to the
supermarket’s drive to squeeze their staff’s efforts for maximum efficiency. Producing the schedule is maybe the most
important part of Jenny’s job -- and for this, she turns to her computer.
WORKBRAIN: Jenny uses a number of information systems – such as Workbrain. Everyone who works in the
supermarket has a record on Workbrain. Workbrain knows what skills staff have, when they’re due holidays and their
reasons for being off-sick. But the most important thing Workbrain knows about staff is exactly when they’re due to be
working.
THE FORECAST: Jenny has to match the staff available with the work coming through the door. The problem with this is
that sometimes they’re busy, sometimes not so busy. Jenny has to make sure she doesn’t have too many or too few staff on
hand on any particular day.          So they have to do a FORECAST of how busy they’re going to be -- based on the
business going through the checkouts….
WORKING TO BUDGET: The system tells them how many hours of staff time they’ll need. But that doesn’t mean they
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                                                             P.16
can actually HAVE those hours. They have to work to a budget laid down by head office -- and Jenny often has to make
cuts . Basically this means looking at the different departments, seeing how many hours they need in theory -- and making
cuts where she thinks she can get away with it.
THE PEOPLE JUGGLING ACT: The nitty-gritty of scheduling work begins as Jenny, in consultation with the
departmental managers, changes people’s working hours -- and maybe even what they do -- to meet the changing workload.
It’s a kind of juggling act – a people juggling act in which the computer system plays a key part.
TROUBLE-SHOOTING: In the final analysis, Jenny’s job, as personnel manager, is a trouble-shooter. She has to solve
ALL and ANY people problems Sainsbury’s has. As part of what she calls an ―open and honest‖ culture, the store goes in
for what’s called ―360 degree feedback.‖ In other words staff don’t just have to TAKE criticism from their bosses, they can
give it back.
PEOPLE WITH PROBLEMS: But not EVERYONE seems to get their problems solved – some staff complain about
being too cold and the checkouts are often under-staffed. One checkout operator, Lucy, was so fed up with the way she was
treated by Sainsbury’s managers that she quit.
THE DISMISSAL: Probably the toughest problem a personnel manager has to deal with is staff who break the rules. It’s
the part of her job Jenny says she likes the least. She and the store manager sack a member of staff for stealing.
Duration: 26 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2006


CRISIS AT WORK I: BULLYING: A CASE TO ANSWER?
                                                           Bullying at work is a major personnel issue - but it's hard to prove.
                                                           This dramatised case study focuses on a thorny problem. Simon's
                                                           job is to change the way his department operates. To most he seems
                                                           friendly but he comes into conflict with conscientious admin
                                                           worker Viv.
                                                           Problems start when Simon has Viv's desk moved without
                                                           consulting her. Simon apologises, but Viv isn't happy. Other
                                                           incidents follow - apparently small things, but Viv sees a pattern.
                                                           Eventually Viv accuses Simon of undermining her.Simon says he's
                                                           just doing his job and if Viv doesn't like it, she should consider her
                                                           position. Viv complains to the company and its grievance
procedures begin. Now it's Simon's turn to complain. He claims he's been unfairly accused. Why is he on trial on Viv's
say-so?
Viv approaches her union, but discovers that pursuing her complaint will not be easy. Ultimately she may have to resign and
sue for constructive dismissal - but is she prepared to go this far?
Customers' feedback: “Very impressive.” Carol Sears, Education Officer, GMB trade union.
“I will be delighted to use this video... it will promote quite extensive discussion on human resources issues.” Elizabeth
Thomson, John Ogilvie School.
Duration: 25 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2003


MANAGEMENT STYLES I
                                                  This classic best seller vividly illustrates different management
                                                  styles in action. Tony Spence is the epitome of the autocratic
                                                  manager. Shouting and swearing, he bullies and generally
                                                  humiliates his team of sales people.
                                                  By contrast, supermarket personnel manager June takes a more
                                                  bureaucratic approach, strictly applying the rules and regulations.
                                                  Consultative manager Geoff believes in the human touch and says
                                                  his door ―is always open‖. Marketing manager Marion has a special
                                                  challenge: trying to push through change against bitter opposition
                                                  in a local council.
WARNING: There is some strong language which has been bleeped.

Customers' feedback: “Excellent for provoking discussion on what is acceptable and unacceptable.” Peter Arlidge,
George Watson's College.
“Blunt, realistic - very good.” P Chadwick, Cleveland College.
Duration: 31 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1992




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                                                              P.17
MANAGEMENT STYLES II
                                                          Textbooks speak of three management styles — autocratic,
                                                          democratic and laissez faire. But how neatly do people fit into these
                                                          categories? Lively case studies show what happens in the real
                                                          world.
                                                          Angel or devil? Notoriously autocratic manager Tony Spence has
                                                          found religion! When his assistant comes late, he forgives him. But
                                                          then his patience snaps...
                                                          Limits of Democracy: Simon prides himself on being open-minded.
                                                          He listens to staff and involves them in decision-making. But if
                                                          they show initiative, he gets heavy.     Honest Tyrant: Janice
                                                          lays down the law and heaven help those who cross her. But at least
she's honest -- and looks after her people.
The Invisible Manager: Richard makes much of ―empowering‖ his staff - in reality he leaves them to sink or swim. When
vital decisions are to be made, Richard takes refuge in the toilet!
Customers' feedback: “Very amusing. Good contrast of the different styles. Like real life!” Nikki Reach, Llanfyllin High
School, Powys.
Duration: 25 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2003


MOTIVATION DECISIONS

                                                 Four case studies of staff in sales, administration and support roles.
                                                 Their motivational problems challenge the viewer to work out
                                                 what’s gone wrong.
                                                 What, if anything, could improve their situations?
                                                 1 - Top salesman Francis - does he want more money or more
                                                 respect? 2 - Why is Parminder struggling at work? Is she being
                                                 harassed? 3 - Patrick complains he hasn't got a desk -- but is there
                                                 a deeper problem? 4 - Debbie's started making ―silly mistakes‖ - is
                                                 it because she's afraid of the new system the management are
                                                 bringing in?
Customers' feedback: “Mesmerising!” People Management.
Duration: 25 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2000


PERSONNEL DECISIONS
                                                          Three companies grapple with thorny ―people‖ problems. The
                                                          viewer is left to work out their own solutions.
                                                          1 Unfair dismissal: A boss tells a receptionist off for ―being lippy‖.
                                                          The receptionist sues for unfair dismissal. Should the firm take the
                                                          case to court?
                                                          2 Sexual harassment: Debbie claims she's being sexually harassed.
                                                          Her manager says Debbie is incompetent. What should the
                                                          personnel manager do?           3 A failing employee: Boss Tony
                                                          Spence wants to sack a failing salesman. Manager Sharon argues
                                                          they should try to help him. A meeting leads to an angry clash.
                                                          Customers' feedback: “Very useful, easy to follow and true to
life.” Tracey Griffin, Coventry Technical College
“Three rich, intensely gripping scenarios.” People Management.
Duration: 34 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1998




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                                                             P.18
WHAT IS MOTIVATION?

                                                          What motivates people to work? Money? A sense of achievement?
                                                          Would you work if you didn't have to? This is a guide to motivation
                                                          in theory and practice. The video explains the classic theories of
                                                          Maslow and McGregor, and looks at how companies have tried to
                                                          manage workers from Ford's production line to Japanese-style
                                                          team-working.
                                                          Customers' feedback: “An excellent introduction. The support
                                                          material was very useful.” Bette Hay, Ayr College.
                                                          Duration: 27 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
                                                          Year: 1999

WORKING IN ORGANISATIONS
                                                          People in a range of organisations describe their jobs. John is
                                                          hooked on sales work, but Gloria is finding tele-sales too
                                                          demanding — she has to ring 100 people a day.
                                                          A supermarket worker complains of repetitive strain injury and
                                                          abusive customers. Twin sisters describe the thrills and spills of
                                                          setting up their own small business.       A      woman   worker
                                                          describes how manufacturing life is changing. And we follow a
                                                          council housing manager as he deals with complaints, evicts a
                                                          woman who can't pay and faces a violent ex-tenant.
                                                          Customers' feedback: “It gives a good insight and holds the
                                                          students' interest.” Gill Wright, Brentford Girls School.
Duration: 39 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1996


THE TEAM WORKING EXPERIMENT
                                                          Manager Tony Spence used to be an autocratic bully. Now he’s
                                                          trying to bring a new team-working approach to his firm. The idea
                                                          is to give staff a feeling of ownership over their work. But the
                                                          team-working experiment goes badly wrong when trust between
                                                          Tony and his staff breaks down. This is a dramatic illustration of
                                                          both the benefits and dangers of team-working.
                                                          Customers' feedback: “The return of Tony Spence! I had students
                                                          pleading to borrow the video.” Bruce Carron, Bexhill College.
                                                          “Excellent. Very up-to-date and well-acted.” Diane Kelly,
                                                          Bradford College.
                                                          Duration: 29 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1999

RECRUITMENT IN ACTION
                                                     How does a firm recruit a new member of staff? This is a
                                                     blow-by-blow account, from specifying the job, to the interviews
                                                     and final selection.
                                                     Dream Cruises advertise for a new marketing assistant.
                                                     Applications flood in and they draw up a short list. Spelling and
                                                     presentation of CVs are key issues.
                                                     Three candidates are interviewed. We see how the candidates put
                                                     themselves across and how the managers try to assess their
                                                     qualities. One of the strongest candidates on paper is an Asian
                                                     woman, but she's rejected. Is the company guilty of racial
                                                     discrimination?
Customers' feedback: “Wonderful, shocking, very effective.” Frances McGarry, Bexley College.
Duration: 27 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1995




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                                                             P.19
HEALTH & SAFETY IN THE OFFICE

                                                          People usually think factories and building sites are the most
                                                          dangerous places to work, but the modern office presents new
                                                          hazards.
                                                          The appearance of call centres means that hundreds of people now
                                                          work under constant pressure in huge, open plan offices. Offices
                                                          now resemble factories. Stress is endemic.
                                                          Sick building syndrome, ―hot desking‖ and dangling wires can all
                                                          pose problems. Bullying by management, too, may damage the
                                                          health of hard-pressed workers. Keyboard workers are victims of
                                                          repetitive strain injury.
Real-life cases illustrate key problems and highlight the employer's legal responsibilities.
Customers' feedback: “A useful introduction to office safety.” Safety Management.

Duration: 34 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1997


FLATTENING THE ORGANISATION

                                                          What does a company do when it wants to flatten its hierarchy?
                                                          Lloyd's Bank decided to send some of its information technology
                                                          staff on an extraordinary training weekend to prepare them for
                                                          revolutionary change.
                                                          They dress up as King Arthur and his men, and undertake all kinds
                                                          of strange ―quests‖, designed to encourage empowerment.But
                                                          things don't go according to plan...

                                                          Duration: 42 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
                                                          Year: 1993


A QUALITY REVOLUTION
                                                          What is ―total quality management‖? This film tells the story of
                                                          Kemble Instruments, a manufacturing firm which set out to
                                                          improve quality at levels by transforming the culture of the
                                                          company.
                                                          The starting point is to involve the workforce and gain their
                                                          commitment to change. At the same time the company introduces a
                                                          just in time approach to manufacture.This is aimed at minimising
                                                          money tied up in stock and storage.        The company claims
                                                          significant improvements in productivity. But not everyone signs
                                                          up to the changes and there are casualties along the way.

Customers' feedback: “Works very well. Excellent material for discussion purposes.” A Parks, Rockingham College.
Duration: 24 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1992


EMPOWERING THE PEOPLE
                                                          Can Japanese-style working practices succeed in Britain? This
                                                          video looks at a factory which claims to have empowered its
                                                          workforce and achieved world class productivity.
                                                          Oxford Automotives Components, part of the Unipart Group,
                                                          makes fuel tanks for cars. Once upon a time it ran itself like
                                                          traditional British manufacturers and had traditional problems, such
                                                          as chronic ―them and us‖ attitudes.
                                                          But in 1989 total quality management and Japanese-style working
                                                          practices were introduced. Clocking in and supervisors were
                                                          abolished.         Team-working and quality circles were brought
                                                          in. The factory was de-unionised.
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                                                             P.20
Management claim these changes have not only transformed productivity but also reinvigorated the workforce, giving them
a chance to have a real input into how products are made. But union leaders disagree. One worker claims that in reality shop
floor morale is at rock bottom.
Customers' feedback: “Superb, excellent.” A Parks, Rockingham College.
Duration: 25 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1992

MAKING THE DIFFERENCE
                                                   As more and more businesses become international, so the risk
                                                   increases of cultural misunderstandings. And it's not just a question
                                                   of the language barrier: many other problems can arise.
                                                   RESULTS V RELATIONSHIPS: In the west people believe in
                                                   "getting down to business"; elsewhere it's more important to first
                                                   establish a relationship.
                                                   TIME: Across the world there are widely different attitudes to time
                                                   and what it means to be late.        BODY LANGUAGE: The
                                                   simplest gesture can cause great offence. Attitudes to women:
                                                   different cultural attitudes can make doing business difficult for the
                                                   unwary.
YES MEANS NO: People in some cultures hate to say no even when they want to say no.
Duration: 20 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1992

STAYING THERE
                                                          Setting up a company is one thing - but how do you ensure it
                                                          survives in the long term? Rose Toys, once a highly successful
                                                          manufacturer of model trains, is in crisis. Sales of its traditional
                                                          products are falling.
                                                          Harold Rose, its founder, is on the verge of retirement, but is
                                                          reluctant to let go of the reins of power. His son Michael is set to
                                                          replace him, but falls out with Geoff, the company's loyal and
                                                          long-serving manager. Geoff resigns.
                                                          This video continues the story of Rose Toys, introduced in the film
                                                          What is a Business?


Duration: 23 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1991


THE LEARNING ORGANISATION

                                                          Much is heard about the development of a firm's ―human
                                                          resources‖ - its people - can transform the fortunes of a business.
                                                          This case study shows how Club 24 claims to have achieved
                                                          exactly this by using active learning techniques. Club 24 collects
                                                          payments from people buying clothes on credit. Its staff have a
                                                          tough job - dealing with customers who are difficult and sometimes
                                                          abusive. Poor collection rates and high staff turnover have brought
                                                          the threat of closure. In response management have introduce a
                                                          new ―learning culture‖, in which staff are mentored and take part in
                                                          active learning exercises. Now morale has improved and staff are
                                                          staying longer - and financial disaster has been averted.
Duration: 25 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1992




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                                                             P.21
                      Business, Economy And Environment
BHUTAN: THE IMPACT OF GLOBALISATION
                                                                  Globalisation is having a huge impact on countries across
                                                                  the world. But not all countries have bought into the
                                                                  consumerist dream. This film is about Bhutan -- a country
                                                                  pursuing an alternative economic path.
                                                                  Bhutan is a tiny country in the Himalayas bordering on
                                                                  China and India. Until recent years it's been off-limits to
                                                                  outsiders and out of touch with the outside world.
                                                                  People have little material wealth but the country claims
                                                                  to be achieving unique levels of contentment. The
                                                                  people's Buddhist faith and the way they live in harmony
                                                                  with their environment, it seems, have been the
foundations of their "gross national happiness". Visitors come here to discover the secret of their happiness.
But in recent years things have begun to change. Tourism has become big business. People are leaving the countryside and
the cities are growing. Perhaps most dramatically television has come to Bhutan, bringing with it 46 channels exposing
people to advertising and programmes from all over the world. On the positive side people can now understand discuss
world events. On the down side consumerism is taking off. New fashions, pop music, mobile phones are appearing.
Electronic goods and cosmetics are coming to the shops. Traditional dress is giving way to trendy T-shirts. Young people
are becoming more violent. Drugs and AIDS have become significant problems.
People are worried that young people are neglecting Buddhism for computer games and Nike. People are working harder to
buy material goods and there are fears that community life is breaking down.
How will the forces of globalisation affect this unique mountain kingdom? Will they be able to retain their happiness
despite the forces of globalisation?
Duration: 30 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2008


THE GREEN PIONEERS: THE SCIENCE OF SUSTAINABILITY
                                                              This is a profile of two companies that seem to have proved it's
                                                              possible to be green and make a profit. Ecover make cleaning and
                                                              washing products. They avoid raw materials based on
                                                              petrochemicals which, they claim, make "the big brands" so
                                                              damaging - to our health and the environment. Green People make
                                                              skin care products, using only natural, organic ingredients. They
                                                              take the same position as Ecover. They believe conventional
                                                              products are the cause of many of our modern health problems,
                                                              from allergies to even cancer.
                                                              SO WHAT'S THE BIG PROBLEM?Ingredients based on
                                                              petrochemicals have one big advantage for the companies that use
them - they're cheap. But some of these ingredients are harsh chemicals, they have a different molecular structure to
"natural" ingredients. It means our bodies don't recognise them, they can't break them down. The result? They built up in the
fatty tissue with unknown long term consequences.
ANOTHER VIEWNot everyone takes this view. Toxicology consultant Paul Illing disputes that man made chemicals are
any more damaging than their natural equivalents.
BUT IS IT WORTH THE RISK?A link between these chemicals and cancer has not been proven, "but the contrary has
not been proven either," says Peter Malaise, of Ecover. Ian Taylor of Green People agrees. "While there is a doubt, we
would prefer not to deal with these substances."           THE LONG HARD ROAD TO GREEN PERFECTIONBut
finding natural alternatives to synthetic ingredients is not easy. Ecover has been developing its formulae for 30 years. Green
People are often disappointed when developing a new product: either the formulation breaks down or they find it's been
contaminated by synthetic chemicals: it's back to the drawing board!
A NEW FORMULA FOR BUSINESS?Both companies have found new formulae for their products, have they found a
new formula for business, too? Although profits are important, they are not the be-all and end-all of business. Says Malaise:
"I think that attitude is completely wrong. Companies are there to serve the needs of people."
A DROP IN THE OCEAN?Both Ecover and Green People are small players in a multi-billion pound market. Can they
ever change the approach of the "big brands"? Can their niche market for "green consumers" ever become a mass market?
They are both growing at about 20%. Says Ecover's managing director Mik Bremens: "I think that is considerable growth. I
don't think that's a drop in the ocean, I think it will be a great wave!"
Duration: 27 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2008




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                                                             P.22
FAIR TRADE IN ACTION
                                                          In a world where producers in developing countries are often
                                                          cruelly exploited, fair trade is seen as a small oasis of humanity.
                                                          But what is fair trade? How does it work in practice? How might it
                                                          improve the life of a worker in a poverty-stricken country like
                                                          Bangladesh? This is the story of fair trade fashion company People
                                                          Tree.
                                                          SWEATSHOP LABOUR: The UK fashion business is worth over
                                                          £40 billion annually. But beneath the industry's glamorous façade,
                                                          there's an inconvenient truth: most of the clothes are made in the
                                                          developing world using sweatshop labour. People Tree, set up by
                                                          Safia Minney, claims to be trying to make a difference, by selling
well-designed clothes produced in the developing world for a fair price.
THE BREAKTHROUGH: A big breakthrough for People Tree came in 2006 when they began to sell in Topshop's
flagship Oxford Circus store in London. They're now working with 50 producer groups in 15 different countries. UK
turnover is £1.5 million.
FAIR TRADE V FREE TRADE: Free trade means big companies get their products made wherever they want in the
world - mostly by the cheapest producer, where workers are often paid a pittance. Fair Trade, on the other hand, means
paying producers a wage that means workers can live a decent life, send their children to school and have access to health
scare.
BETTER WAY OF DOING THINGS? All People Tree's garments are hand-made. This means it is all much more labour
intensive and slower than in factories where machines are used. But that's the whole point: to create as much employment as
possible. The result, say People Tree, are products which are much more individual than machine-made garments.
ENVIRONMENT: Care for the environment is also part of People Tree's plan. They use natural dyes and avoid toxic or
synthetic raw materials. They use organic cotton which means not relying on harmful pesticides - but they're not totally
organic yet.        DESIGN PROBLEMS: Workers need retraining to make the clothes People Tree can sell. Natural fibres
aren't easy to work with. The limitations of production mean a big challenge for People Tree's designer. Hand-made
production means long lead times - another problem for a company working in the fast-changing fashion business.
THE WORKER IN BANGLADESH: One worker in Bangladesh does seem to be benefiting from fair trade. She tells how
working on producing fair trade clothes has improved her life, brought her more money and freed her from being stuck at
home. Fair trade means she can put her child in a day care centre allowing her to work full time.
BUT IS IT REALLY FAIR? How we can be sure fair trade really is fair and that workers aren't being exploited?
Independent bodies, like the International Fair Trade Association, monitor organisations claiming to be fair trade - but the
price of certification is high.
MARKETING & SALES: People Tree has little money left over for advertising and marketing. To promote their goods
they rely on public relations, good will and collaborating with "like-minded" companies like Café Direct and Ecover. Their
website has now overtaken their catalogue as their main selling tool - it now brings in 80% of their sales.
BUT HOW FAR CAN IT GO? People Tree is what they call a "social enterprise" - set up not to make money for its owner
but to help people. However, they still have to compete in the real world and every day is a struggle. Fair trade is still only a
small fraction of the fashion business - can it ever go mainstream?
DVD EXTRAS include interviews with a fair trade sceptic, a fair trade supporter and a fair trade fashion shop owner.

Duration: 29 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2008


GREENING A BUSINESS

                                                          In these case studies two very different organisations call in
                                                          eco-auditor Donnachadh McCarthy to help them operate in a more
                                                          environmentally sustainable way.
                                                          CASE STUDY 1: ESSEX FLOUR & GRAIN
                                                          EFG is a food and drink wholesaler selling to schools, hospitals and
                                                          other organisation. Boss Michael Spinks is a green enthusiast who
                                                          wants to ―do something worthwhile‖.
                                                          Donnachadh tours the business and finds lots of problems. There
                                                          are badly positioned radiators, plastic cups in the kitchen, fridges
                                                          that are empty or too cold, the wrong kind of copier paper and
toilets with the lights always on.
EFG isn’t recycling its waste either and a warehouse is using up huge amounts of electricity for lighting and heating to no
good purpose. Donnachadh also takes issue with EFG’s product line – they sell bottled water imported from abroad instead
of local products.
Donnachadh submits the findings of his eco-audit suggesting many changes. Twelve months later some improvements have
been made. They’re recycling their waste, using bio-diesel in their trucks and switching the lights off in the toilets. They’ve
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                                                              P.23
also introduced more fair-traded and organic products – and UK bottled water.
But not everyone is cooperating with recycling the waste and one member of staff feels strongly they’re not getting enough
support from the top to carry out the changes. Boss Michael Spinks is optimistic for future progress in his business – but
less hopeful about the future of the planet.
CASE STUDY 2: MERTON VOLUNTARY SERVICE COUNCIL
MVSC is an organisation funded by Merton council in south London to help voluntary groups. Donnachadh is called in to
help them become greener.
He discovers a problematic water cooler, plastic cups, lights and computers wasting electricity, printers wasting paper,
inefficient use of heating, and plastic bags in the rubbish bins. And they’re not using recycled paper.
But Donnachadh’s toughest problems are with the managers of the building in which MVSC is a tenant. Lights outside and
inside the building are on when no one’s around. They don’t recycle their rubbish, there are toilets which are wasting water,
and central heating that’s too hot or heating empty rooms. The building managers are sceptical whether they can make
changes.
Six months later Donnachadh revisits MVSC. Progress has been made – they’re saving money as well as saving the planet.
As well as recycling more paper and saving a lot by switching to double-sided printing, they’ve hired an organic caterer,
who makes healthier, cheaper food. Even a sceptical building manager seems to have been converted to recycling.
But one big problem remains with the heating of the building – the loft needs insulating – and this is a big expense to meet.
Donnachadh has a meeting with staff who explain how much the greening of their business has inspired them and how they
hope to influence the other organisations they work with. Donnachadh tells them they have made great progress – but it’s
not enough.

DVD EXTRAS include a tour of an eco-house and an in-depth interview with Donnachadh on the wider issues of global
warming

TWO FILM PACKAGE
Duration: 31 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2007

CAN YOU BE SURE OF SHELL? - PROFILE OF A MULTINATIONAL

                                                         Shell is one of the richest companies on earth. It does business in
                                                         140 countries dealing with 25 million customers every day. It
                                                         claims to be dedicated to renewable energy and sustainable
                                                         development. But is Shell as green and clean as it claims? This film
                                                         offers a profile of this famous multinational, explains its growth,
                                                         and investigates the impact of its activities on countries throughout
                                                         the world. Living next door to Shell can be a hazardous business --
                                                         as the residents of a community in Louisiana found out. Tests
                                                         indicated they were being exposed to between 100 and 1000 times
                                                         the normal levels of dangerous chemicals. Eventually Shell agreed
to relocate the residents. In 1995 Shell announced they were going to dispose of a giant oil tank called the Brent Spar in the
Atlantic Ocean. Environmental activists Greepeace occupied the Spar and the whole issue became a global sensation.
But there's one story which will always stick to Shell - Nigeria, where oil spills destroyed the homelands and livelihood of
the Ogoni people living near Shell installations. Writer Ken Saro Wiwa led international protests a gainst Shell. In 1994 he
was arrested on trumped-up charges by the Nigerian government and hanged. Shell washed its hands of involvement.
Since the early '90s Shell has made strong efforts to reinvent itself as a more caring company and made significant
investment in renewable forms of energy. But how much is real and how much is pr "greenwash"?

Duration: 30 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2006


ALWAYS COCA COLA
                                                          For years the huge multinational Coca Cola company has sold itself
                                                          through an image of love and global harmony. But what's the
                                                          reality behind the image? This film highlights the company's
                                                          controversial activities in Germany and India.
                                                          THE WORLD CUP: Coca Cola is one of the sponsors of the
                                                          World Cup in Germany and only allows its own soft drinks to be
                                                          consumed at the matches. Coke hopes sponsoring football will
                                                          boost its sporting image - but for many German workers the
                                                          multinational has a bitter taste.
                                                          COKE IN GERMANY: Coke got over 10 million euros in
                                                          government grants to come to a region of high unemployment in
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                                                             P.24
East German. But now it's closed seven of its bottling factories and hundreds of jobs have been lost. Workers believe they
are victims of globalisation as the multinational organises itself to employ fewer and fewer people.
COKE'S WATER PROBLEM: Coke's bottled water has got it into trouble, too. Coke uses its sponsorship of the World
Cup to promote sales of its little known bottled water, Bonaqua. But the company has been plagued with scandals about its
water - most famously the Dasani fiasco in Britain. Dasani was shown to contain excessive levels of bromine, and Coke
took it off the market.
COKE IN INDIA: Coca Cola also faces anger in the developing world. Farmers in India believe one of Coke's factories is
polluting their water supply. "The Coca Cola factory ruined my life," said one farmer, who has had to give up his farm and
become a labourer on someone else's farm.
WATER SHORTAGE: In a land of severe water shortage many Indians feel Coke's factories are unfairly using up a
precious resource. To produce a bottle of coke requires a litre of water. In some villages near Coke's factories water levels
have dropped by 60 metres.
PROTESTS: Indians at all levels are united against Coke. Villagers accuse the company of being a water thief. Coke
denies all responsibility and blames water shortages on wasteful locals. People protesting against Coke's actions are brutally
attacked by the police.
WORKING FOR COKE: Coke is also accused of poor treatment of its Indian employees. Workers receive around 50
cents for a 12 hour shift. They have no unions and employees who protest are sacked. One worker complains of not being
compensated for a serious industrial injury. He appears at the Coke factory every day, and every day he's turned away.
THE REAL WINNER? Coke sponsors the World Cup to associate its product with fun, achievement and being active -
and the company gets big marketing benefits from this. No matter who wins on the football field, the real winner, it seems,
is always Coca Cola.
Duration: 29 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2006

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

                                                        This film offers a stark account of the dangers threatening the
                                                        planet and looks at what we can do to avoid disaster. The problems
                                                        start about 250 years ago with the industrial revolution. First coal,
                                                        then oil, fuelled a world of mass production, mass consumption --
                                                        and cars. But burning oil and carbon has been a disaster for our
                                                        planet - most scientists blame it for global warming. New deserts
                                                        will form, the polar ice cap will melt and sea levels will rise
                                                        bringing floods and disaster. Rainforests are called the "lungs of the
                                                        earth" - but they're disappearing, and the industrialisation of
farming and fishing is depleting natural resources and destroying biodiversity. Population and life-style are major factors,
too, creating rubbish and pollution. Tourism has been become a huge global industry - but local cultures and the
environment have suffered. Some people are taking action to make life sustainable -- planting trees, controlling traffic and
promoting renewable forms of energy. But will this be enough? Is it too late?

Duration: 30 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2006


MADE IN CHINA
                                                          New Orleans carnival revellers throw shiny beads to pretty girls to
                                                          get them to take off their clothes. But where do the beads come
                                                          from? This acclaimed film visits a factory in China to reveal the
                                                          human realities of globalisation.
                                                          The Chinese factory workers, mainly teenage girls, work long
                                                          hours for low pay, and are ―punished‖ for making mistakes or
                                                          missing quotas. The Chinese factory boss says punishment is
                                                          crucial to productivity.
                                                          The workers earn 1 cent for every 12 necklaces they make –
                                                          necklaces which in the US sell for as much as $20 dollars each. The
                                                          US holiday-makers who flock to the carnival have no idea of the
conditions in which the beads they buy are made. Both the Chinese factory boss and the US company who buy the beads
from China deny charges of exploitation. If the young Chinese girls didn’t work in the factory, the US boss claims, they’d
be labouring in the fields, doing harder, more poorly paid work.
The film climaxes when carnival-goers in the US are shown the harsh realities in the factory which makes their beads, and
the Chinese factory girls see what happens to the beads they make. Both sides are shocked.
DVD contains full-length version of the film and many extras including an interview with Noam Chomsky


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                                                             P.25
Duration: 33 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2006


A DECENT FACTORY?

                                                       With the fastest growing economy in the history of the world,
                                                       China is the workshop of globalisation. But are workers paying the
                                                       price for a manufacturing revolution? This unique fly-on-the-wall
                                                       documentary uncovers the hard realities of working conditions in a
                                                       Chinese factory. The film focuses on a German-owned company in
                                                       Shenzhen, China, which makes the chargers for Nokia's mobile
                                                       phones. Nokia sends in a two-woman team to carry out an ―ethical
                                                       audit‖ on its working practices. The inspection reveals people are
                                                       working 12 hour shifts, also problems of noise, smells and
hazardous chemicals stored near drinking cups. Worst of all, the factory is ignoring local laws on minimum wages. Some
workers are being paid the equivalent of £14 pounds a month.
Workers live eight people per room in a huge dormitory near the factory. Living conditions are basic. State-controlled birth
control is compulsory. Workers speak candidly about their working life. Hours are long and tiring. There are bullying
supervisors and the food is bad.

Duration: 33 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2005


BUSINESS AND EXTERNAL FACTORS

                                                      How do external factors affect businesses? The experiences of the
                                                      companies in a seaside town demonstrate the meaning of P-E-S-T.
                                                      POLITICS: People often complain about European politicians. But
                                                      business is booming at the Royal Albion Hotel - and it's all thanks
                                                      to a European grant.
                                                      ECONOMICS: Economic factors led famous model train maker
                                                      Hornby Hobbies to close its factory and move its manufacturing to
                                                      China. Hornby's done well - but what about the social costs?
                                                      SOCIETY & TECHNOLOGY: The Happy Elephant jewellery
                                                      company is making sales from a social trend called the ―New Age‖.
Meanwhile technology has helped turn round the fortunes of the Bottleneck off-licence.
THE RETAIL PARK: But external factors are rarely clear-cut. How will a big new out of town shopping centre affect the
high street shops?

Duration: 24 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2005


BUSINESS IN THE ECONOMY II

                                                          For over two hundred years the Black Country has been a
                                                          manufacturing centre. But now the factories are closing and
                                                          young people want to move away.
                                                          The film explores the area via the experience of Maureen, a
                                                          factory worker who has lived there all her life. It explores the
                                                          impact of the varying fortunes of primary, secondary and
                                                          tertiary industries on the local economy. Can the service sector
                                                          replace jobs lost in manufacturing?
                                                          We also explore the changing nature of the workforce, and
                                                          discover problems of racism. Maureen's job seems safe - where
                                                          will her grandchildren get work?

Customers' feedback: “An interesting and worthwhile video.” Tony Casey, Strode's College.

Duration: 30 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2002

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                                                             P.26
CAN REGENERATION WORK?
                                                         A study of the Cardiff Bay regeneration project. Cardiff was once a
                                                         major international port, but the decline in the coal and steel
                                                         industry led to a decline in the docks. Unemployment soared and
                                                         Cardiff docks became a depressed area.
                                                         Then in the 1980s the Government began a series of urban
                                                         regeneration schemes across Britain. After London Docklands,
                                                         Cardiff became one of the most high-profile of the new schemes.
                                                         The old industrial areas were demolished and a new area of offices
                                                         and leisure facilities, called Cardiff Bay, was planned. A quango
                                                         called the Cardiff Bay Development Corporation was set up to
                                                         guide the regeneration project, promising boom times to come.The
single most expensive part of the regeneration scheme was a barrage across the mouth of the Bay. The aim is to create a
freshwater lake to provide a glamorous setting for the new development. The authorities claim the Cardiff regeneration
scheme has been a success. But many in Cardiff are unhappy about it. The barrage, built across the bay, cost too much, they
claim and is bad for the environment. The jobs created are badly paid and residents complain of a lack of consultation.
Customers' feedback: “Good general introduction.” Dr J Roberts, Taunton School.
Duration: 30 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1998


BUSINESS IN THE ECONOMY I
                                                          What drives a market economy? The video visits South Wales to
                                                          explore this question. It illustrates primary, secondary and tertiary
                                                          industries, and explains basic economic terms - demand and supply
                                                          and the market price. In the 1980s many Welsh coal pits were
                                                          declared ―uneconomic‖. The miners disagreed and fought a bitter
                                                          battle to keep the pits open. Now with the pits shut the video
                                                          vividly illustrates the social costs of a market economy: poverty
                                                          and unemployment. Is there an alternative?
                                                          Customers' feedback: “Excellent. Courageous in the way it
                                                          presented the argument.” Mr Stephenson, Roedean School.
                                                          Duration: 34 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1997


                                       Finance & Accounting
FINANCE IN BUSINESS I: FINANCE FOR STARTING A BUSINESS
                                                       You can have a great product, great marketing ideas: if you don’t
                                                       understand how FINANCE works, you’re in trouble. In this
                                                       entertaining guide, Dave Nellist talks us through the importance of
                                                       finance for business start-ups: what the main sources are, and the
                                                       pros and cons of each.
                                                       CASE STUDIES from real-life businesses illustrate the points and
                                                       theories.LOAN CAPITAL v SHARE CAPITAL. Loans are
                                                       repayable, with interest, regardless of the company's ability to
                                                       pay.Share capital is more flexible, but it means losing some control.
                                                       Other sources of finance include grants, and pooling money
                                                       through partnerships.
ROLE OF BANKS and VENTURE CAPITALISTS also featured. And CREDITORS are a source of finance. In effect,
they're lending you money - even though they wish they weren't!
OVERALL MESSAGE: setting up a business is NOT EASY. It takes luck, determination and good control of the money
side.
Duration: 23 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2005




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                                                             P.27
FINANCE IN BUSINESS II: THE ESTABLISHED BUSINESS / THE PLC
                                                          How does the established business get finance? Dave Nellist makes
                                                          the points, illustrated by real-life case studies.
                                                          SALES REVENUE is, of course, the best finance a business can
                                                          have, because it's self generated. ―Retained profits‖ can be
                                                          ploughed back into the business without any of the ―strings‖
                                                          attached to loans and shares.
                                                          But even established businesses have cash flow problems. We look
                                                          at the role of OVERDRAFTS in helping them through. How does
                                                          an overdraft compare to a loan? Another way of easing a cash flow
                                                          crisis is to delay paying creditors, but this can damage the
                                                          reputation of the business - and it's immoral!
MAXIMISING WORKING CAPITAL. Through stricter financial discipline a company can free up much more of the
money that's already there, through good credit control, low stock levels, etc.
THE PUBLIC LIMITED COMPANY. For companies that need to generate large amounts of finance to expand, ―going
public‖ is the only answer. We look at the pros and cons.
Duration: 25 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2005


THE BASICS OF FINANCE I: ARE WE MAKING A PROFIT?
                                                  A light-hearted case study offering a clear guide to the financial
                                                  ideas businesspeople need to grasp Jay's business, designing
                                                  web-sites and CDs, is doing well. But then he meets an old friend
                                                  who's now an accountant. She gives him some tough lessons on the
                                                  value of accounting knowledge and takes him through the basics of
                                                  finance.
                                                  Just because there's a lot of cash floating around in the business
                                                  doesn't mean that this money is profit.        How much of it is
                                                  owed to his creditors? Maybe Jay's making money now, but what if
                                                  there's a downturn in his main markets?
Customers' feedback: “Sharp pace and appealing story - a real achievement in a film about accounts!” Claire Jackson,
Moat Community College.
Duration: 23 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2001


COMPUTERS IN ACCOUNTING
                                                       Dave Nellist presents a lively explanation of accounting systems
                                                       and what they do.
                                                       Bill Brookman Productions is a small street-theatre company. They
                                                       use Sage software for their accounts. The basic elements of sales,
                                                       purchase and nominal ledgers are explained, including invoicing.
                                                       The film also looks at the accounting systems at Clinton Cards and
                                                       the huge Arcadia Group, owners of several big high street retail
                                                       chains. Big as they are, the same principles apply to these firms just
                                                       as much as to small businesses. The film also includes a brief
                                                       history of accounting systems, and explanation of double-entry
book-keeping and the important role of accounting systems in providing management information.
Customers' feedback: “Very good for both beginners and advanced students. Definitely worth buying.” Lawrence Britt,
City College Norwich.
Duration: 29 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2002




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                                                             P.28
FINANCIAL DECISIONS

                                                       Three case studies show companies trying to make tricky financial
                                                       decisions. Viewers are invited to consider what they should do.
                                                       1. Cash flow crisis: How can Comtex solve its cash flow problems?
                                                       Should they cut costs or ask for an overdraft? The sales director,
                                                       Tony Spence, proposes a radical solution - duck and dive!
                                                       2. Spending profits: What should tour operator Avalon Travel
                                                       spend its surplus money on - new premises, developing product or
                                                       a staff bonus?           Martin, the managing director, wants to
                                                       keep it all for himself!
                                                       3. Takeover crisis: Simco plc is subject to a takeover bid. What
action should the board recommend to its shareholders? Should they reject or accept the bid?
Customers' feedback: “Very popular with students. Very useful.” Sarah Holliday, Burnley College.

Duration: 29 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1998


WHERE DOES ALL THE MONEY GO?

                                                           Money is the life-blood of a business. We look at how it works in
                                                           one company – Avalon Travel, a holiday tour operator.
                                                           We explore where the business got its initial start-up finance and
                                                           describe the indirect and direct costs which it has to meet in order
                                                           to stay in business.
                                                           We explain key documents like orders and invoices. We see
                                                           howAvalon prices its holidays and what cost-plus pricing means.
                                                           The finance director explains how they calculate the firm's
                                                           break-even point. We explore Avalon's trading cycle and what's
                                                           meant by the added value. Finally, Avalon makes a profit - but what
does it do with it?
Customers' feedback: “A valuable teaching aid… I wish I had had it last term!” Jill Turner, Godalming College.

Duration: 33 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1996

MANAGING THE MONEY
                                                           How does a firm plan and monitor its financial performance? This
                                                           video looks at the experience of Linda and Brian who run a small
                                                           business. How they first set up their business is told in the film
                                                           Into The Fire.
                                                           Now several years after setting up, Linda explains how their
                                                           financial systems work.
                                                           We look at the firm's sources of finance. Linda demonstrates how
                                                           she forecasts the company's profit & loss and its cash flow. In the
                                                           process we discover the role of the sales and purchase ledgers and
                                                           how the net profit is calculated. We see how Linda uses the balance
                                                           sheet to monitor the financial health of the firm. She feels that tight
financial control is essential to running the business. But Brian thinks she's taking things too far…
Customers' feedback: “An excellent video.” Rob Dransfield, Heineman AVCE Business Tutor's File.
“Realistic and relevant. It related well to actual business situations.” Enid Blott, Rye Hill School.
Duration: 32 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1996




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                                                              P.29
                                               Customer Care
A - Z OF CUSTOMER SERVICE: AN ESSENTIAL GUIDE
                                                                    Without happy customers a business can't survive. But
                                                                    how do you make them happy? How do you keep them
                                                                    happy? This film visits the Dickensworld theme park and
                                                                    the upmarket MacDonald hotel chain to find out.
                                                                    FIRST IMPRESSIONS: A friendly smile and open body
                                                                    language are vital to customer service -- but it's also
                                                                    important to realise that every customer is different and
                                                                    have different needs. First impressions are critical.
                                                                    THE WEBSITE: But these days customers often get
                                                                    their first impressions from a company's website. The key
                                                                    to a good website is make it accessible and easy to use.
The hotel's website adds extra value by providing visuals of the building and its rooms.
COMPLAINTS: Handling complaints is an essential part of customer service. It's important to apologise - even if it isn't
the company's fault. You need to stay calm - even if the customer isn't. You have to listen to the customer - so you can
understand what they're complaining about. And you must take responsibility for the problem and deal with it.
DIFFICULT CUSTOMERS: In theory the customer is always right - but what about difficult customers or people who
complain in the hope of getting something free? Hotel concierge Neil sees difficult customers as a challenge: "If you can
change a bad situation into a good situation you're doing your job properly."
INTERNAL CUSTOMERS: Customers can be inside the company, too - in other words, members of staff. Happy
customers inside the company will mean happy customers outside the company. Staff will provide better service if they feel
valued and their morale is high. KNOW THE PRODUCT: You can have the best smile in the world, but if you don't know
what you're talking about it, it won't help you. Whether it's a hotel or a theme park, staff have to know their product to give
customers good service.
COMPLAINTS ARE OPPORTUNITIES: A complaint may be less a problem, more an opportunity - to turn unhappy
customers into happy ones. But companies can also learn from complaints. You can pick up trends in the things going
wrong and anticipate problems in the future.
STANDARDS: To maintain levels of customer service businesses set standards and then monitor how well they meet those
standards. This means questioning their customers and using mystery shoppers - people who pose as customers and go
undercover to test out how well the organisation is performing.
THE WOW FACTOR: But it's not enough to have happy customers - businesses want to do things to surprise and delight
customers: the "wow" factor. Health and safety and data security are integral to good customer service, too.
TEAMWORKING & TRAINING: Underpinning customer service in both McDonald hotels and Dickensworld theme
park is a system of close-knit team-working. Everyone has an important part to play. Training is essential - not just in
dealing with customers but in all aspects of the business. In the hotel mentoring plays an important part in training new staff.
WORD OF MOUTH: Good customer service is all about people telling their friends, which in turn creates new customers.
This can often mean the difference between the success and failure of a business.
Duration: 29 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2008

A GUIDE TO CONSUMER RIGHTS
                                                    Three lively scenarios illustrate customer’s rights and explain the
                                                    laws which apply.
                                                    I WANT MY MONEY BACK: Barney takes a faulty vacuum
                                                    cleaner back to the shop. He wants his money back. But the shop
                                                    say they only need to repair it. Is this true?
                                                    THE EXTORTIONATE KITCHEN: Mrs Keating buys a kitchen
                                                    on credit, but she discovers the interest payments are extortionate.
                                                    Can she cancel the agreement?                 FOOD POISIONING:
                                                    Mr Geddes blames a restaurant for giving him food poisoning. The
                                                    restaurant manager thinks Geddes is ―trying it on‖. Who's in the
                                                    right?
Customers' feedback: “Thought-provoking. It has proved really useful for the students.” Valerie Jones, Swanshurst School,
Birmingham.
Duration: 27 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2001




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                                                             P.30
COACHING IN CUSTOMER CARE
                                                          How do you coach people in customer care? Three case studies
                                                          illustrate the problems.
                                                          1 - Receptionist Janet is off-hand with customers, but when her
                                                          manager mentions it, she feels upset. What is she doing wrong?
                                                          2 - John is an experienced salesman and responds badly to being
                                                          ticked off in public for a minor fault. How should he have been
                                                          treated?            3 - Cheryl is failing to communicate with clients,
                                                          but Frazer's attempt to coach her just confuses her. In the end he
                                                          shows her exactly what he means.
                                                          Customers' feedback: “A rich source of interesting material.”
                                                          People Management.
Duration: 37 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1999


KEEPING THE CUSTOMER SATISFIED

                                                          A travel firm sets out to improve its approach to customer care.
                                                          Secret filming captures where staff go wrong. Role play exercises
                                                          demonstrate how to get it right. But what about the tour guide with
                                                          his own eccentric approach to customer care? And can even the
                                                          best techniques make up for a shoddy product or a poor holiday?
                                                          The film ends with a dramatic confrontation between the boss of
                                                          the firm and a member of staff who claims their customers are
                                                          being short-changed.
                                                          Customers' feedback: “Useful in bringing real situations to life.”
                                                          Linda Whiter, Seevic College.

Duration: 32 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1996


                                            Business Systems
SYSTEMS AT DICKENS WORLD
                                                         Behind the Victorian façade of the Dickens World theme park
                                                         state-of-the-art systems are at work. You might not see them, but
                                                         without them Dickens World wouldn't have a business.
                                                         It all starts at the front desk with a "point of sale terminal". This
                                                         runs Gamma software specially designed for leisure attractions.
                                                         More than simply a source of tickets, the system also collects
                                                         valuable management information.
                                                         Then when you get inside you find a 4D cinema complete with 3D
                                                         pictures and real gusts of wind. There's a haunted house complete
                                                         with ghosts, too, and both attractions are controlled by computers.
                                                         Dickens and other characters make appearances - courtesy of
computer-controlled animatronics. But the star attraction is the Great Expectations boat ride. Computer-linked sensors play
a key role in making sure the boats are kept far enough part. The theme park's restaurant and shop also depend on computers,
with the system telling them when to reorder and what the most popular purchases are. But perhaps the most vital
information Dickens World's systems collect is marketing information - the facts it needs to save itself from financial
disaster.
Duration: 28 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2008




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                                                             P.31
SYSTEMS IN LOCAL GOVERMENT
                                                           Local councils are often huge organisations, providing a wide
                                                           variety of services, from running libraries to keeping the roads free
                                                           of ice. Critical to their operation are information systems. This film
                                                           visits Cornwall County Council to explore how five of these
                                                           information systems work.
                                                           ADMINISTRATION: Councils are vast bureaucracies generating
                                                           mountains of information. Storing this in a way that people who
                                                           need it can access it quickly is a major systems challenge which
                                                           goes to the heart of local government efficiency. Cornwall Council
                                                           is developing a system called ERDMS - Electronic Document
Report Management System. Freedom of information and data protection are key considerations in the system.
TRANSPORT: The council has to make sure the roads don't get dangerously icy by knowing what the weather's going to
do and gritting them at the right time. To help them in this they use a system called Roadcast, which is linked to sensors
dotted throughout the county. Another system -- the pavement management system -- allows them to monitor the road
network and helps them decide when roads need resurfacing.
WEBSITE: The council's old website was hard to use - each department of the council designed their own pages and there
was little overall control of how the website looked or how users found their way round it. So now they've redesigned and
rebuilt the site, and introduced new software which means people have to stick to a single standard style. But it hasn't been
easy to persuade staff of the value of a more standardised approach.
CARE MANAGEMENT: Another responsibility of the council is to offer care to people who are unable to look
themselves - for example, the elderly or handicapped. Cornwall Council has a care management system which is designed to
identify the needs of people being offered and to highlight problems which have to be addressed. Their aim is to have a
single assessment system, so that all the different people involved in looking after someone can co-ordinate their efforts.
PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: One of the big challenges facing local government is to prove their spending
tax-payers money well. Councils are using performance indicators to try to measure how well they're doing - and in
Cornwall these performance indicators are brought together in a single system. The idea is that this will help them highlight
areas where they're falling down they can then take action to improve things. But are they measuring the right things?
Duration: 34 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2006


MANAGING PERSONNEL: A SYSTEMS STORY AT SAINSBURY'S
                                                            Jenny Wooledge has one of the most important jobs in a
                                                            supermarket -- personnel manager. Crucial to her job is a computer
                                                            system. This film tells the story of what she does in Sainsbury’s,
                                                            Thanet branch.
                                                            RECRUITMENT:First you need to get the workers to manager.
                                                            Sainsbury’s goes in for what’s called ―reality recruitment‖.
                                                            Candidates for jobs are given ten minutes to check out the store and
                                                            then questioned about what they think of it. They’re also given
                                                            typical supermarket scenarios and asked how they’d handle them.
                                                            KEEPING AN EYE ON THEM: Once someone’s recruited to
                                                            Sainsbury’s, they’re assigned to a particular department. Here a
manager is supposed to keep an eye on them – and it’s Jenny’s job to keep an eye on the managers! Control
self-assessments and mentoring are two methods Jenny uses to monitor managers’ performance and at the same time get
feedback on their problems.
SCHEDULING: The schedule is the plan which says who’s going to be doing what and when. It’s central to the
supermarket’s drive to squeeze their staff’s efforts for maximum efficiency. Producing the schedule is maybe the most
important part of Jenny’s job -- and for this, she turns to her computer.
WORKBRAIN: Jenny uses a number of information systems – such as Workbrain. Everyone who works in the
supermarket has a record on Workbrain. Workbrain knows what skills staff have, when they’re due holidays and their
reasons for being off-sick. But the most important thing Workbrain knows about staff is exactly when they’re due to be
working.
THE FORECAST: Jenny has to match the staff available with the work coming through the door. The problem with this is
that sometimes they’re busy, sometimes not so busy. Jenny has to make sure she doesn’t have too many or too few staff on
hand on any particular day.           So they have to do a FORECAST of how busy they’re going to be -- based on the
business going through the checkouts….
WORKING TO BUDGET: The system tells them how many hours of staff time they’ll need. But that doesn’t mean they
can actually HAVE those hours. They have to work to a budget laid down by head office -- and Jenny often has to make
cuts . Basically this means looking at the different departments, seeing how many hours they need in theory -- and making
cuts where she thinks she can get away with it.
THE PEOPLE JUGGLING ACT: The nitty-gritty of scheduling work begins as Jenny, in consultation with the
departmental managers, changes people’s working hours -- and maybe even what they do -- to meet the changing workload.
It’s a kind of juggling act – a people juggling act in which the computer system plays a key part.
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                                                              P.32
TROUBLE-SHOOTING: In the final analysis, Jenny’s job, as personnel manager, is a trouble-shooter. She has to solve
ALL and ANY people problems Sainsbury’s has. As part of what she calls an ―open and honest‖ culture, the store goes in
for what’s called ―360 degree feedback.‖ In other words staff don’t just have to TAKE criticism from their bosses, they can
give it back.
PEOPLE WITH PROBLEMS: But not EVERYONE seems to get their problems solved – some staff complain about
being too cold and the checkouts are often under-staffed. One checkout operator, Lucy, was so fed up with the way she was
treated by Sainsbury’s managers that she quit.
THE DISMISSAL: Probably the toughest problem a personnel manager has to deal with is staff who break the rules. It’s
the part of her job Jenny says she likes the least. She and the store manager sack a member of staff for stealing.
Duration: 26 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2006

SYSTEMS IN A THEATRE
                                                   A star from Eastenders, Toyah and a load of corny gags – the
                                                   pantomime at the Marlowe Theatre has the lot. But how do their
                                                   information systems work?
                                                   TICKETING: The computerised ticketing system reserves you a
                                                   seat and even warns if there's bad language in the show. But the
                                                   real prize is online booking via the Internet.
                                                   MARKETING: The address of everyone who buys a ticket goes
                                                   into the theatre's database - crucial for mailshots and targeted
                                                   marketing.          FINANCE: Monitoring finance is the job of
                                                   theatre director Mark. His spreadsheets not only keep tabs on how
                                                   the panto's doing but also ice cream sales.
LIGHTING: Without lights the show can't go on. And these days without a computer system the theatre can't manage the
lights. But what happens if the system goes phut?
Duration: 24 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2004

SYSTEMS IN BANKING AND DATA PROTECTION
                                                         Banks rely on information systems but how do they work? Dave
                                                         Nellist investigates. He pays a cheque into his bank. It enters the
                                                         clearing system, becomes a piece of data and finally allows him to
                                                         draw out cash to buy his mum a present. Every stage in the process
                                                         involves systems and the video explains how they work.
                                                         EFTPOS, BACS, home banking, the smart card - information
                                                         technology is changing every aspect of the way we handle money.
                                                         But with so much business being done electronically now, security
                                                         is a big issue. The Data Protection Act gives you a right to know
                                                         what's in the computers, but there are loopholes and civil liberties
                                                         are at risk. Are banks getting too powerful?
Customers' feedback: “Very easy to follow. Good to use as teaching material.” Eric Forester, Bishopsbriggs High School.
“Content was excellent - it covered all areas. Presentation was ideal.” J G Stewart, Portobello High School.
Duration: 30 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2003

SYSTEMS IN A THEME PARK
                                                          Theme parks set out to scare and excite us. But behind the fun,
                                                          information systems are at work. What are they? This film takes us
                                                          behind the scenes at Drayton Manor Park.

                                                          TICKETING: The theme park used to issue admission tickets
                                                          using adapted bus ticket machines. Now a computerised system
                                                          gives them much more customer information.
                                                          THE HAUNTING: A trip around a haunted house climaxes in
                                                          horror. Behind the scenes computers control every step of your
                                                          spooky experience.
                                                          STOCK CONTROL: The park makes more money from selling
you food than the price you pay for going on rides. A stock control system monitors every sale they make.
SENSORS & CONTROL: With the Storm Force 10 water ride sensors check where boats are, feed the data back to a
central computer and the boats are electronically controlled to prevent crashes happening.
TECHNOLOGY OF TERROR! The Internet and computer controlled turnstiles are bringing change to the theme park,
but even more important are the bigger - and more terrifying - rides computers now enable the theme park to operate.
Customers' feedback: “I really loved it. Very, very useful.” I Wilson, Bulmershe School.

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                                                             P.33
“Went down well with the class, kept them interested.” C Bytheway, Bishopston Comprehensive.
“Excellent preparation for the GSCE exam. Ideal.” R A Parker, Lady Manners School, Bakewell.
Duration: 23 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2003

SYSTEMS IN RETAILING THE MARKS & SPENCER EXPERIENCE
                                                        Bar-codes, electronic point sale systems, hand-held terminals…
                                                        information technology has transformed UK retailing.
                                                        At Marks & Spencer's IT centre, mainframe computers monitor
                                                        what's been sold in all its stores and order up new stock.
                                                        Computers control every step of the M&S national distribution
                                                        system. And IT isn't confined to inside the supermarket, but also
                                                        links it to suppliers. We visit one of M&S's suppliers where
                                                        computers also            control the whole manufacturing process.
                                                        M&S has an Internet-based shopping system so you can even buy
                                                        from the comfort of your home.
IT makes superstores more efficient and powerful - but what about the impact on the environment and smaller shops?
Customers' feedback: “Extremely impressed. I would definitely recommend TV Choice to other schools and colleges.” S
Ellis, Head of ICT, Shiplake College.
Duration: 25 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2002

COMPUTERS IN ACCOUNTING
                                                          Dave Nellist presents a lively explanation of accounting systems
                                                          and what they do.
                                                          Bill Brookman Productions is a small street-theatre company. They
                                                          use Sage software for their accounts. The basic elements of sales,
                                                          purchase and nominal ledgers are explained, including invoicing.

                                                       The film also looks at the accounting systems at Clinton Cards and
                                                       the huge Arcadia Group, owners of several big high street retail
                                                       chains. Big as they are, the same principles apply to these firms just
                                                       as much as to small businesses. The film also includes a brief
                                                       history of accounting systems, and explanation of double-entry
book-keeping and the important role of accounting systems in providing management information.
Customers' feedback: “Very good for both beginners and advanced students. Definitely worth buying.” Lawrence Britt,
City College Norwich.
Duration: 29 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2002

SYSTEMS IN TRAVEL
                                                          The film charts the radical changes that IT has brought, through the
                                                          experience of tour operator Sunvil Travel and Internet-based travel
                                                          agency Expedia.While Sunvil uses computers to put its customers'
                                                          holidays together, Expedia does everything on the web. Its website
                                                          allows you to book your hotel room or seat on a plane with
                                                          ―e-tickets‖, so you don't need a physical ticket - you rely on IT.
                                                          What does the future hold - increasing standardisation of holidays
                                                          and complete elimination of the human element? What about the
                                                          effect on holiday destinations?
                                                          Customers' feedback: “A good introduction to e-commerce.” R J
                                                          Verrall, Sussex University.
Duration: 25 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2002




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SYSTEMS IN A HOTEL
                                                 This demonstrates the systems in a large hotel. The hotel's booking
                                                 system shows the rooms available and helps maximise income
                                                 from the rooms, discounting prices when things are quiet. For each
                                                 guest the system records a guest history, with details of their likes
                                                 and dislikes.
                                                 When a guest feels a room is too hot, staff use a building
                                                 management system to turn down the temperature. A housekeeping
                                                 system records details of a defective lamp to be reported for repair.
                                                 But while all these different systems bring efficiency, do they really
                                                 improve the quality of a guest's stay? Or is it all a bit too
                                                 impersonal?
Customers' feedback: “Good video showing many aspects of the use of information technology.” D Jones, The Chafford
School.
Duration: 27 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2000


SYSTEMS IN A CINEMA
                                                    How do cinemas use information technology? We compare two
                                                    very different examples.
                                                    The huge Film Works multiplex, in Manchester, has its own
                                                    web-site. The much smaller Gate cinema, in London, uses e-mails
                                                    to keep in touch with its customers but otherwise has much more
                                                    limited IT.
                                                    The Gate still issues tickets manually, while in the Film Works
                                                    customers can book and pay for their seats automatically over the
                                                    phone. Digital technology promises to revolutionise the showing of
                                                    films. Movies will be sent as data files on disks or over satellite
                                                    links. But how will the smaller cinemas cope?
Customers' feedback: “Probably the best video we show in ICT.” Richard Wooley, Heatfield Community College.
Duration: 27 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2000


SYSTEMS FOR LEISURE I

                                                           TV Choice’s first film about Guildford Spectrum leisure complex
                                                           and the information systems on which it depends. Computers are
                                                           used in ticketing, support marketing and finance. They help keep
                                                           the swimming pool warm and the ice-rink cold.
                                                           The systems are explained clearly and simply by the staff who
                                                           use them.Customers’ feedback: ―A good quality video. Shows
                                                           students what can be achieved with information technology.‖

                                                           Duration: 26 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
                                                           Year: 1993


SYSTEMS FOR LEISURE II

                                                        This is a completely new film which updates the original Systems
                                                        For Leisure (TV Choice 1993), but featuring the same leisure
                                                        complex, Guildford Spectrum - still the UK's largest leisure centre.
                                                        TICKETS PLEASE: In 2002 Spectrum changed over to a new
                                                        ticketing system called TOREX. What benefits does it offer? What
                                                        were the problems in changing over?
                                                        FINANCIAL: TOREX feeds into the centre's financial systems.
                                                        Control of money in and out of the business is as vital as ever. Also
                                                        - are they making a profit?
                                                        MARKETING: Spectrum now uses a marketing research system
called SPSS, which allows them to store information on customers and target them for specific promotions. E-mail is now a
major marketing tool: it was non-existent in 1993. Also, the Internet, and advances in desktop publishing, have had a major
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                                                             P.35
impact on their marketing.
BUILDING MANAGEMENT: As in 1993, controlling the heating and air conditioning systems are vital for customer
satisfaction and minimising costs. We explain developments in this area.
Customers' feedback: “Useful … gets students thinking about the systems around them in an everyday context.” ICT Dept,
Hall Cross School.
Duration: 26 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2004

THE INTERNET IN BUSINESS
                                                            The film features case studies of three US companies relying on the
                                                            Internet to conduct their business.
                                                            RETAILING: CDnow is a record shop - without a shop. They offer
                                                            customers a vast selection of CDs which they can buy via the
                                                            Internet. CDnow doesn't have to hold any stock - this is stored by
                                                            wholesalers who also supply the goods when customers order them.
                                                            CUSTOMER SERVICE: Federal Express, one of the world's most
                                                            well-known delivery companies, have for some time used
                                                            computers to keep track on where packages are, but the Internet
                                                            now means customers can get this information, too.
BANKING: Security First Network Bank claims to provide the most advanced model for how to provide financial services
online. Their customers can do all their business electronically over the Internet - and they can access their accounts from
anywhere in the world.
But there are still problems and uncertainties with the Internet's use in business. For example, many are worried about
security aspects: how safe is it really to buy things over the Internet? And who in the final analysis is going to benefit most?
Will it be big, predominantly American companies? Will the Internet end up extending the power of the world's richest
economy?
Customers' feedback: “Very useful and relevant.” Alison Purdue, Barnfield. College.
Duration: 25 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1999

THE GREAT I.T. HORROR STORY
                                                          This film tells the story of how a computer project drove one
                                                          company almost to bankruptcy.
                                                          Comic distributor Craven Books bought a new IT system with the
                                                          aim of improving its efficiency.But the system was over-ambitious
                                                          - they went for the ―big-bang‖ approach. The result:
                                                          disaster.Craven lost many customers. It only saved itself from
                                                          going bust by sacking many of its staff and going back to its old
                                                          system. The key lesson: sort out your organisation's needs and
                                                          problems first - only then think about the technology.
                                                          Customers' feedback: “Excellent.” Mrs Dennis, Hewett School.
                                                          Duration: 31 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1999

I.T. DECISIONS
                                                          Three companies have to make difficult decisions about their IT
                                                          systems.
                                                          Choosing a new system: The computer system of tour operator
                                                          Avalon Travel is old and breaking down. What do they replace it
                                                          with?This system doesn't work: Copier company Comtex brought
                                                          in a database system - but it isn't working. Should they scrap it?
                                                          Competitive advantage: Marina believes her firm, Apex Design,
                                                          should break into web-site design. But is such a radical move too
                                                          risky for the business?
                                                          Customers' feedback: “Excellent. It helps pupils understand how
                                                          IT systems work.” Mrs Race, Barrington Comprehensive.
Duration: 28 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1998




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                                                             P.36
BUSINESS SYSTEMS
                                                          The video demonstrates how a firm's information systems work
                                                          through a lively, dramatised case study, set in the backstabbing
                                                          world of the Comtex copier company.
                                                          Systems examined include invoicing, email and customer database.
                                                          Comtex boss Tony Spence wants ―push-button‖ efficiency, but
                                                          things don't go to plan.
                                                          Customers' feedback: “Encourages a critical view of the
                                                          subject.” Times Educational Supplement
                                                          Duration: 28 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
                                                          Year: 1998


I.T. AT WORK
                                                          How much is new technology changing work?
                                                          This video includes cases studies of small businesses, a local
                                                          council and an ambulance service. Applications demonstrated
                                                          include databases, electronic mail, image processing and voice
                                                          recognition. The video also examines the impact on jobs and on
                                                          people's health.
                                                          Customers' feedback: “The video made things very real for
                                                          people who haven't worked.” Chris Barnatt, Nottingham University

                                                          Duration: 28 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1998


MARKETING ON THE WEB
                                                        How are companies using the web to market their wares? This
                                                        looks at two very different firms: giant bookseller, WH Smith
                                                        Online, and specialist wine dealer, Madaboutwine.
                                                        It's estimated there is a web-site for everyone on the planet, so
                                                        companies have to target who they want to visit them. A prime
                                                        target is the ―time-poor‖ - busy, high income individuals.
                                                        Madaboutwine use off-line advertising - for example, giving away
                                                        20,000 bottles of wine.        WH Smith relies more on online
                                                        advertising - developing links with other web-sites and using
                                                        banner adverts. Web-design is cucial and ―viral marketing‖ a
                                                        powerful tool.
Will the web lead to a consumer revolution? Or to job losses and more congested roads?
Customers' feedback: “Really positive feedback from my students.” J Allan, City College, Norwich.
Duration: 28 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2000

COMPUTERS IN MANUFACTURING
                                                          Computers don’t necessarily mean cutting people out of
                                                          manufacturing. These case studies show how technology can be
                                                          used in a ―human-centred‖ way.
                                                          In Germany operators program their own CNC machine tools,
                                                          achieving high degrees of flexibility and productivity. A UK
                                                          wire-making company uses a computer-based planning and
                                                          scheduling system to make best use of their machines and people.
                                                          A paint spray firm takes a cellular approach to manufacturing, with
                                                          islands of technology, in            which       workers        are
                                                          self-managing and have control over their work.

The video ends with a demonstration of a futuristic system designed to ―informate‖ the production worker of tomorrow.
Customers' feedback: “Gets the message across.” Lynne Parker, Nene College
Duration: 31 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1994



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                                                             P.37
                                       Communication Skills
THE PRESENTATION
                                                 You’ve got something to say, a case to argue, and an audience
                                                 waiting to listen. But how do you make sure you put your points
                                                 across?
                                                 The video explores this question through a workshop in which
                                                 three novice presenters address a critical audience. Robert rambles
                                                 and mumbles. Sharon uses jargon and doesn't look her audience in
                                                 the eye. Graham has a load of visual aids - but doesn't know how to
                                                 use them. Key points include: structuring your argument, the
                                                 importance of body language, getting the level right for your
                                                 audience and the need to communicate enthusiasm.
Customers' feedback: “Grown-up material is always effective - pupils connect it with the 'real world'.” Mr McCrea,
Oswestry School.
Duration: 32 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1998

LETTER WRITING FOR BUSINESS
                                                          Personnel manager Paul throws most letters applying for jobs
                                                          straight in the bin — not because the person lacks qualifications,
                                                          but because their letters are so poorly put together.
                                                          This video explores the classic mistakes people make when writing
                                                          letters for business.
                                                          Keys areas covered include the importance of a clear structure,
                                                          accurate spelling and punctuation. The video also explains the need
                                                          for effective presentation and illustrates the critical need to hit the
                                                          right tone. How do you write a letter that puts a strong case without
                                                          upsetting the reader? It helps to get their name right!
                                                          Customers' feedback: “Excellent... helpful focus on skills.” Mr
Messon, Mount School.
Duration: 34 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 1997


                                                   Production
THE GREEN FACTORY: ECOVER CLEANING PRODUCTS
                                                          This film tells the story of a "green factory", of a company called
                                                          Ecover, which claims it is possible to make a profit and help save
                                                          the planet.
                                                          Belgium-based Ecover make washing products - for washing
                                                          clothes, dishes, floors and more. But one thing their products have
                                                          in common is they're made from what they call "living nature".
                                                          Unlike the big brands they avoid ingredients based on
                                                          petrochemicals, which, Ecover claim, damage the environment.
                                                          PRODUCING LIQUID PRODUCTS: Ecover produces many
                                                          liquid products -- washing up liquid is the main one. Production
                                                          involves mixing a variety of raw ingredients. It's vital they're mixed
in the right amounts - and in the right order. Bottling takes place in the filling room - one line can fill 23,000 litres in one
shift, all controlled by a single person. When the bottles are filled and boxed, robots put them onto pallets, ready for
wrapping and warehousing.
POWDER PRODUCTION: The other main production process at Ecover is making washing powder. Washing powder is
a complex product - with up to 22 ingredients. Glycerine is used to stick together the mix of ingredients into granules.
ENERGY EFFICIENCY: A sustainable product is one thing - but how sustainable is Ecover's process? The company uses
a unique granulating technique which requires less energy than the norm. The liquids are pumped about the factory using an
air compressor - very energy efficient. And in the warehouse, sensors ensure lights only go on when they're needed. All
electricity they do use comes from renewable sources.
PACKAGING: Ecover is constantly fighting what it calls its war on packaging. Bottles are made of biodegradable plastic.
The bottles are sold in larger volumes to minimise packaging. Customers can take refill bottles back to health food shops.
Ecover's cardboard boxes may be reused up to 15 times, going to and fro between them and a supplier.
THE BUILDING: Ecover claims its factory is the first ecological factory. The building is made mainly of renewable raw
materials, sourced as near to home as possible. It's designed to be energy-efficient and there's even a "green" roof covered in
plants which absorb water and help to prevent flooding. The factory's waste water is cleaned biologically - using a waste

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                                                             P.38
eating bacteria.
SCHEDULING SYSTEM: Booming sales means the company has a problem meeting demand. A computer system called
Odyssey to help them keep in stock of the materials they need to meet incoming orders.
PLCS & SENSORS: Vital to running Ecover's automated lines are light sensors which detect when a bottle goes past them.
They feed this information back to a PLC -- a programmable logic controller, in effect the brains of the production line. But
operators can intervene using a HMI - a human machine interface. Touch panels allow operators to vary how the factory's
robots work, too.
Duration: 35 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2007


INSIDE A FACTORY III: THE CRISP MAKERS -- WALKERS V TYRRELLS

                                                          Walkers and Tyrrells both make the same basic thing -- crisps. But
                                                          they’re very different outfits. One is a huge, mass production
                                                          operation; the other produces hand-cooked, select ―chips‖. But
                                                          success for both of them depend on HOW their crisps are made --
                                                          on what happens INSIDE the factory.
                                                          CHANGING MARKET: Owned by PepsiCo -- the world’s
                                                          biggest snack food company -- Walkers dwarfs its crisp-making
                                                          rivals. But changing tastes and new crisp makers are changing the
                                                          face of the market. The brightest new star in the crisp industry is
                                                          called Tyrrells.
HOW CRISPS ARE MADE: Crisp-making at Tyrrells starts with the potatoes grown in fields near its factory. They’re
washed, peeled, sliced and fried in oil. The chips are spun dry, then flavoured, weighed and dropped into a tube of film
which is sealed air-tight at each end. And that’s how you make a bag of crisps.
INFORMATION SYSTEMS: Despite Tyrrells’ carefully cultivated rural image, they’re keen users of information
technology. ―Magic eyes‖ – electronic sensors -- are dotted throughout the factory and monitor and control all aspects of the
production process.
PRODUCTION CONTROL: Electronic sensors actually PULL the crisps through the production process, summoning up
more product whenever it’s needed. The whole point is to never let the line stop -- a big improvement on the less
sophisticated system they had in their old factory.
WALKERS V TYRRELLS: Whether it’s Walkers or Tyrrells, manufacturing crisps is the same basic process. But there
are crucial differences, too.        Tyrrells use different, older, varieties of potato – which they reckon make tastier crisps.
And, unlike Walkers, Tyrrells don’t just make crisps from potatoes but also parsnips, carrots, beetroot, and even apples.
DIFFERENT TYPES OF PRODUCTION: But the biggest difference between Walkers and Tyrrells lies in the types of
production they employ. Walkers manufacturing is continuous flow – continually producing as many crisps as possible as
cheaply as possible. Tyrrells, on the other hand, operate BATCH production – in other words constantly making short runs
of products.
KEEPING UP STANDARDS: Crisp-making means meeting crucial standards in areas like quality, hygiene and food
safety, and the environment. Maybe the biggest thing Tyrrells has got going for it environmentally is that it’s a prime
example of what’s called local production.
BUT AREN’T THEY BAD FOR YOU? Health worries have hit crisp sales in recent years. Walker’s answer? Make
healthier crisps, heavily promoted in a campaign starring their advert star Gary Lineker. But how do Tyrrells’ crisps
compare in health terms? And regardless of the brand, are we just eating too many salty snacks?
EXTRAS ON DVD:

        INFORMATION SYSTEMS IN A CRISPS FACTORY
        TYRRELLS FOUNDER, WILLIAM CHASE
        CRISPS & YOUR HEALTH
        WALKERS TV ADVERT
        GARY LINEKER & WALKERS
        WALKERS BAKED CRISPS

Duration: 29 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2006




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                                                             P.39
MADE IN CHINA
                                                          New Orleans carnival revellers throw shiny beads to pretty girls to
                                                          get them to take off their clothes. But where do the beads come
                                                          from? This acclaimed film visits a factory in China to reveal the
                                                          human realities of globalisation.
                                                          The Chinese factory workers, mainly teenage girls, work long
                                                          hours for low pay, and are ―punished‖ for making mistakes or
                                                          missing quotas. The Chinese factory boss says punishment is
                                                          crucial to productivity.
                                                          The workers earn 1 cent for every 12 necklaces they make –
                                                          necklaces which in the US sell for as much as $20 dollars each. The
                                                          US holiday-makers who flock to the carnival have no idea of the
conditions in which the beads they buy are made. Both the Chinese factory boss and the US company who buy the beads
from China deny charges of exploitation. If the young Chinese girls didn’t work in the factory, the US boss claims, they’d
be labouring in the fields, doing harder, more poorly paid work.
The film climaxes when carnival-goers in the US are shown the harsh realities in the factory which makes their beads, and
the Chinese factory girls see what happens to the beads they make. Both sides are shocked.
DVD contains full-length version of the film and many extras including an interview with Noam Chomsky
Duration: 33 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2006

INSIDE A FACTORY II: CADBURY’S
                                                          T his is the story of how Cadbury’s makes a chocolate bar. Alison
                                                          Hammond (from Big Brother) takes us round their famous factory
                                                          and explains the systems that underpin the process.
                                                          QUALITY CONTROL: is a vital part of the business, ensuring
                                                          that the right ingredients are mixed at the right temperature.
                                                          PROCESS CONTROL: Cadbury's have a computer system which
                                                          ensures each part of the process works in harmony with the rest.
                                                          PACKING: In the old days, the chocolate was packed by hand.
                                                          Everything's now done by machines.
                                                          BUT WHAT ABOUT OBESITY? Cadbury's say their chocolate
                                                          has been around since long before obesity was a national problem -
but can they avoid responsibility?
Duration: 26 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2005

SYSTEMS IN A FACTORY
                                                            This film looks at the key systems used in a factory, using two case
                                                            studies: the Glaxo Smith Kline toothpaste factory and a smaller
                                                            plastic injection moulding company called Time RPS.How do they
                                                            compare?
                                                            Types of production: GSK is an example of continuous flow
                                                            production: they make a million tubes of toothpaste a day. Time
                                                            RPS mostly does lower volume, batch production.
                                                            CAD/CAM: We show one product from design stage on the CAD
                                                            screen through to final production. We explain how computer aided
                                                            design feeds through to computer aided manufacture.
                                                            Stock control and production planning: We look at the importance
of ordering the right amounts of raw materials to fulfill orders: at GSK, this is achieved by two key systems: materials
requirement planning and scheduling.
Production and quality control systems: Quality is an essential factor in both factories. We look at individual quality
systems and the overall role of ISO 9000.
Robotic control systems: What work do robots do? How are they controlled? What are the benefits? We use examples from
both factories.But what's it all for? Cleanliness and efficiency INSIDE the factory is one thing. What about pollution caused
by transportation? How useful are the products anyway?
Duration: 26 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2004




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                                                             P.40
INSIDE A FACTORY I: THE NEW MINI
                                                          How is a car manufactured? Alison Hammond, of ―Big Brother‖
                                                          fame, goes inside BMW’s Mini factory in Oxford and explores the
                                                          production process.
                                                          First comes the production planning. Orders are analysed by a
                                                          program called ―Kiss‖. Stage two is ―Body in White‖. 228 robots
                                                          weld the basic framework together.
                                                          Quality control is essential and the main aim is to spot any
                                                          problems before the car is painted and finished. Painting each mini
                                                          takes 10 hours including the pre-treatment, electro painting, and
                                                          drying time.
                                                          Parts come from all over the world. They're ordered on just in time
principles, to minimise on storage space and costs. Stage four is the final assembly of the car. Teamworking and worker
health and safety are important but do we really need lots more cars on our roads?
Customers' feedback: "Ideal. Pupils instantly have an interest, and the humour of the presenter goes down well. The
content is well balanced and the pace maintains interest." Peter Chillingworth, Head of Design Technology, Sherborne
School.

Duration: 29 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2003


HOW A FACTORY WORKS
                                                         How does a factory work? This describes how Leisure Consumer
                                                         Products makes its cookers. . Production at LCP starts with the
                                                         design for the product, in which appearance and healthy eating are
                                                         the key considerations.
                                                         Manufacturing begins with batch production as sheet metal is
                                                         formed into batches of key components. In the assembly section,
                                                         flow production begins as single products are made on a continuous
                                                         basis.
                                                         Recently the company has undergone a revolution - they've gone
                                                         over to lean manufacture. This means cutting out waste at every
                                                         level. Just in time techniques are designed to match production to
demand by supplying goods to order and parts only when they're needed. This cuts down stocks of raw material and reduces
bottlenecks.
The factory's workers are now organised into a number ofself-managing teams. They're expected to be multi-skilled and
able to do each other's jobs.
Management believe that such changes are leading to the end of ―them and us‖ attitudes in the factory. But people on the
shop floor disagree and speak candidly of their grievances.
Customers' feedback: “Very thorough introduction to factory life. As it's nowadays more difficult to organise visits, this
film is particularly useful.” Claire Jackson, Moat Community College.
Duration: 30 min. DVD £125 + Support Booklet £26
Year: 2001




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                                                             P.41
Index
A - Z OF CUSTOMER SERVICE: AN ESSENTIAL GUIDE                                                                    P. 30
A DECENT FACTORY?                                                                                                P. 16, 26
A GUIDE TO CONSUMER RIGHTS                                                                                       P. 30
A QUALITY REVOLUTION                                                                                             P. 20
ALWAYS COCA COLA                                                                                                 P. 24
BHUTAN: THE IMPACT OF GLOBALISATION                                                                              P. 22
BUSINESS AND EXTERNAL FACTORS                                                                                    P. 26
BUSINESS IN THE ECONOMY I                                                                                        P. 27
BUSINESS IN THE ECONOMY II                                                                                       P. 26
BUSINESS STRUCTURES                                                                                              P. 5
BUSINESS SYSTEMS                                                                                                 P. 37
CAN REGENERATION WORK?                                                                                           P. 27
CAN YOU BE SURE OF SHELL? - PROFILE OF A MULTINATIONAL                                                           P. 24
CASE STUDIES IN RECRUITMENT                                                                                      P. 15
COACHING IN CUSTOMER CARE                                                                                        P. 31
COMPUTERS IN ACCOUNTING                                                                                          P. 28, 34
COMPUTERS IN MANUFACTURING                                                                                       P. 37
CRISIS AT WORK I: BULLYING: A CASE TO ANSWER?                                                                    P. 17
EMPOWERING THE PEOPLE                                                                                            P. 20
ENTERPRISE CASE STUDIES I: WINNERS AND LOSERS                                                                    P. 3
ENTERPRISE CASE STUDIES II:TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION                                                               P. 3
FAIR TRADE IN ACTION                                                                                             P. 23
FINANCE IN BUSINESS I: FINANCE FOR STARTING A BUSINESS                                                           P. 27
FINANCE IN BUSINESS II: THE ESTABLISHED BUSINESS / THE PLC                                                       P. 28
FINANCIAL DECISIONS                                                                                              P. 29
FLATTENING THE ORGANISATION                                                                                      P. 20
GREENING A BUSINESS                                                                                              P. 23
HEALTH & SAFETY IN THE OFFICE                                                                                    P. 20
HOW A BUSINESS WORKS                                                                                             P. 5
HOW A FACTORY WORKS                                                                                              P. 41
HOW TO DO A BUSINESS PLAN                                                                                        P. 6
I.T. AT WORK                                                                                                     P. 37
I.T. DECISIONS                                                                                                   P. 36
INNOCENT DRINKS: GOOD ETHICS - GOOD BUSINESS?                                                                    P. 8
INSIDE A FACTORY I: THE NEW MINI                                                                                 P. 41
INSIDE A FACTORY II: CADBURY’S                                                                                   P. 40
INSIDE A FACTORY III: THE CRISP MAKERS -- WALKERS V TYRRELLS                                                     P. 39
INTO THE FIRE                                                                                                    P. 7

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                                                             P.42
KEEPING THE CUSTOMER SATISFIED                                                                                   P. 31
LETTER WRITING FOR BUSINESS                                                                                      P. 38
MADE IN CHINA                                                                                                    P. 25, 40
MAKING THE DIFFERENCE                                                                                            P. 21
MANAGEMENT STYLES I                                                                                              P. 17
MANAGEMENT STYLES II                                                                                             P. 18
MANAGING PERSONNEL: A SYSTEMS STORY AT SAINSBURY'S                                                               P. 32
MANAGING THE MONEY                                                                                               P. 29
MARKETING A HOTEL                                                                                                P. 12
MARKETING A SERVICE                                                                                              P. 14
MARKETING A THEME PARK                                                                                           P. 12
MARKETING DECISIONS                                                                                              P. 14
MARKETING HOLIDAYS                                                                                               P. 12
MARKETING LEISURE I                                                                                              P. 9
MARKETING LEISURE II                                                                                             P. 10
MARKETING ON THE WEB                                                                                             P. 13, 37
MARKETING RESEARCH IN ACTION                                                                                     P. 15
MCLIBEL                                                                                                          P. 9, 16
MOTIVATION DECISIONS                                                                                             P. 18
NICHE MARKETING IN THE SPORTSWEAR BUSINESS                                                                       P. 14
ORGANISATIONS COMPARED                                                                                           P. 5
PERSONNEL DECISIONS                                                                                              P. 18
RECRUITMENT IN ACTION                                                                                            P. 19
STARTING A BUSINESS/THE CAFÉ BAR                                                                                 P. 6
STAYING THERE                                                                                                    P. 21
SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT                                                                                          P. 25
SYSTEMS AT DICKENS WORLD                                                                                         P. 31
SYSTEMS FOR LEISURE I                                                                                            P. 35
SYSTEMS FOR LEISURE II                                                                                           P. 35
SYSTEMS IN A CINEMA                                                                                              P. 35
SYSTEMS IN A FACTORY                                                                                             P. 40
SYSTEMS IN A HOTEL                                                                                               P. 35
SYSTEMS IN A THEATRE                                                                                             P. 33
SYSTEMS IN A THEME PARK                                                                                          P. 34
SYSTEMS IN BANKING AND DATA PROTECTION                                                                           P. 33
SYSTEMS IN LOCAL GOVERMENT                                                                                       P. 32
SYSTEMS IN RETAILING THE MARKS & SPENCER EXPERIENCE                                                              P. 34
SYSTEMS IN TRAVEL                                                                                                P. 34
THE BASICS OF FINANCE I: ARE WE MAKING A PROFIT?                                                                 P. 28
THE COLA CONQUEST I: COCA-COLA: A CLASSIC MARKETING STORY                                                        P. 7

The price shown are in GBP and exclusive of shipping charges
SINOSTAR LTD. Tel: (852) 2417 4522 Fax: (852) 2490 9742 Email: sinostar@sinostarltd.com   Website: http://www.sinostarltd.com
                                                             P.43
THE COLA CONQUEST II: HOW COCA-COLA TOOK OVER THE WORLD                                                          P. 8
THE GREAT I.T. HORROR STORY                                                                                      P. 36
THE GREEN FACTORY: ECOVER CLEANING PRODUCTS                                                                      P. 38
THE GREEN PIONEERS: THE SCIENCE OF SUSTAINABILITY                                                                P. 22
THE INTERNET IN BUSINESS                                                                                         P. 36
THE LANGUAGE OF ADVERTISING                                                                                      P. 13
THE LEARNING ORGANISATION                                                                                        P. 21
THE LOCAL COUNCIL                                                                                                P. 4
THE MARKETING MIX AT CADBURY’S                                                                                   P. 11
THE MARKETING MIX AT HAAGEN DAZS                                                                                 P. 11
THE MARKETING MIX EXPLAINED                                                                                      P. 10
THE PRESENTATION                                                                                                 P. 38
THE TEAM WORKING EXPERIMENT                                                                                      P. 19
THE TV ADVERT: LUCOZADE AND LARA CROFT                                                                           P. 13
WHAT IS A BUSINESS?                                                                                              P. 7
WHAT IS MARKETING RESEARCH?                                                                                      P. 15
WHAT IS MARKETING?                                                                                               P. 11
WHAT IS MOTIVATION?                                                                                              P. 19
WHAT’S GOING ON IN MARKET RESEARCH?                                                                              P. 9
WHERE DOES ALL THE MONEY GO?                                                                                     P. 29
WHOSE BUSINESS? STAKEHOLDERS, ETHICS AND THE MARKET ECONOMY                                                      P. 4
WORKING IN ORGANISATIONS                                                                                         P. 6, 19




The price shown are in GBP and exclusive of shipping charges
SINOSTAR LTD. Tel: (852) 2417 4522 Fax: (852) 2490 9742 Email: sinostar@sinostarltd.com   Website: http://www.sinostarltd.com
                                                             P.44

				
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