STORY HAITI BREASTFEEDING TENTS by wpr1947

VIEWS: 5 PAGES: 2

									STORY: HAITI / BREASTFEEDING TENTS
TRT: 2:13
SOURCE: UNICEF
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /CREOLE / NATS

DATELINE: 16 FEBRUARY 2010, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI

SHOT LIST:
1. Med shot, car crushed by collapsed building
2. Wide shot, temporary living camp with tents, shacks
3. Wide shot, a "baby tent" where women receive breastfeeding counseling
4. Med shot, woman sitting on ground breastfeeding her infant
5. Wide shot, "baby tent" set up in Haiti's national stadium
6. Close up, sign that reads "ACTION CONTRE LA FAIM" ("Action Against Hunger")
7. Med shot, UNICEF worker talking with group of mothers
8. Close up, Anastasia Saint Joseph breastfeeding her infant
9. Med shot, pile of rubble where a house was destroyed
10. Med shot, people standing in the middle of temporary housing camp
11. SOUNDBITE (Creole) Anastasia Saint Joseph, 19 years old:
"They taught me that if I breastfeed my baby girl exclusively for the first six months, it
will help her stay healthy."
13. Med shot, women breastfeeding infant
14. Wide shot, temporary structures
15. Med shot, group of mothers talking with staffer from Action Against Hunger
16. Med shot, woman cradling her baby
17. Med shot, collapsed building with two standing buildings in the background
18. Med shot, mother preparing food
19. Med shot, children milling around temporary metal shacks
20. Close up, father and mother wash clothes with child looks on
21. Med shot, girl bathes her younger sibling in bucket in front of a tent
22. Med shot, mother lies on mat next to her sleeping infant
23. Med shot, mother in black bandana plays with her infant on a mat
24. Med shot, girl in light dress stands next to gate
25. Med shot, white UNICEF tent
26. Close up, bottle of ready-to-use infant formula, next to blue cup
27. Close up, poster promoting breastfeeding
28. SOUNDBITE (English) Lucile Grosjean, ACF International:
"There is a huge need of this kind of tent everywhere in Port-au-Prince because there are
a lot of children in Haiti. And with the earthquake, a lot of mothers stopped
breastfeeding, so it's really important for the well-being of the children to have this tent.
And also the psycho-social support is really important in the moment."
29. Close up, mother in black top holds child in her lap
30. Close up, mother breastfeeds infant wearing green
31. Close up, boy sitting in front of his father
32. Med shot, mothers and babies in tent
STORYLINE:

Amidst the collapsed buildings and temporary camps of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, are 12
special tents dedicated to providing mothers and their infant children a respite, with a
focus on breastfeeding.

They're called "baby tents," and they're run by Action Against Hunger, with support from
UNICEF.

Anastasia Saint Joseph is a 19-year-old mother, who gave birth just 12 days after the
earthquake. Her family home in Port-au-Prince was destroyed and she's now living under
a tarp with a dozen family members.

SOUNDBITE (Creole) Anastasia Saint Joseph, 19 years old:
"They taught me that if I breastfeed my baby girl exclusively for the first six months, it
will help her stay healthy."

Action Against Hunger estimates that nearly 500 lactating mothers like Anastasia are
using the baby tents, and workers are spreading word of the service throughout nearby
housing camps.

The issue of breastfeeding is a matter of life and death, as many Haitian mothers have
stopped breastfeeding. Myths about breastfeeding arose after the quake, like stress makes
a mother's milk dry up, or if a mother is not eating properly, her milk is no good.

Misconceptions triggered a massive influx of powdered infant formula into Haiti, which
could lead to a bigger problem. Haitians lack access to clean water, so they may be
tempted to mix the formula with dirty water, which can leave infants with life-threatening
diarrhea. Exclusive breastfeeding eliminates this threat.

In the case of children who've lost their mothers to the earthquake, UNICEF and Action
Against Hunger are providing the children ready-to-use infant formula. But the focus is
breastfeeding whenever possible.

SOUNDBITE (English), Lucile Grosjean, ACF International:
"There is a huge need of this kind of tent everywhere in Port-au-Prince because there are
a lot of children in Haiti. And with the earthquake, a lot of mothers stopped
breastfeeding, so it's really important for the well-being of the children to have this tent.
And also the psycho-social support is really important in the moment."

As is the case in any emergency, Haiti's infants and young children are the most
vulnerable survivors of the quake. Breastfeeding is an extremely effective and affordable
way to help keep them alive and healthy.

								
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