Preston University Syllabus

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					              Preston University Syllabus
         An Introduction to the Humanities HU 1010


Location:   Distance Learning                                           Semester Credit Hours: 6
Written by: Beth Ausherman                                              Revision Date: May 20, 2006



1. Course Text:              Arts and Culture: An Introduction to the Humanities,
                             Combined Volume 2nd Edition, Prentice-Hall, Inc.,
                             Upper Saddle River, NJ\2005. ISBN: 0-13-1899915-5

2. Course Description:
      The course provides students with an introduction to the world’s civilizations by
      studying the major accomplishments of painting, sculpture, architecture, music,
      literature, and philosophy.

3. Course Objectives:
      This course will enable students to:
              consider how the arts are connected within a cultural and historical
                 context,
              see the relationships between arts of different cultures,
              make interdisciplinary connections, cultural comparisons, and
                 links between the past and the present.

4. Course Requirements:
      A. End of Module Assignments: At the end of each module, there will be an
      assignment. Complete the assigned tasks, answer the essay question(s) and
      submit the product of your efforts to Preston University for evaluation. Each
      question should take no more than one page to answer.

5. Evaluation & Grading:
      Course grades will be based upon the following criteria:
             25 essay questions ……………………..4 pts each
                                   TOTAL . . . . . . . . 100%


6. Course Outline for Arts and Culture: An Introduction to the Humanities




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Module                                            Topic                                       Assignment


1                 The Dawn of Culture                                              Starter Kit (pages 4 - 11)

2                 Ancient Egypt                                                               Chapters 1 and 2

3                 Aegean Culture & the Rise of Ancient Greece                                 Chapters 3 and 4
                  Classical and Hellenistic Greece

4                 Roman Civilization                                                          Chapter 5

5                 Judaism, Early Christianity, and Byzantine                                  Chapter 6
                  Civlization

6                 Islamic Civilization                                                        Chapter 7

7                 Indian Civilization                                                         Chapter 8

8                 Early Chinese & Japanese Civilizations                                      Chapter 9

9                 The Civilizations of the Americas and Africa                                Chapter 10

10                The Early Middle Ages and the Romanesque                                    Chapter 11

11                The Gothic and Late Middle Ages                                             Chapter 12

12                The Renaissance and Mannerism in Italy                                      Chapter 13

13                The Renaissance in Northern Europe                                          Chapter 14

14                The Baroque Age                                                             Chapter 15

15                The Eighteenth Century                                                      Chapter 16

16                Romanticism and Realism                                                     Chapter 17

17                Belle Époque: Impressionism and Post-                                       Chapter 18
                               Impressionism

18                Chinese Civilization After the 13th Century                                 Chapter 19

19                Japanese Civilization After the 13th Century                                Chapter 20

20                Age of Anxiety: World War I and After                                       Chapter 21

21                Modern Africa and Latin America                                             Chapter 22

22                Age of Affluence: World War II and After                                    Chapter 23


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23                Diversity in Contemporary Life                                              Chapter 24

                           An Introduction to the Humanities HU 1010

Essay Questions:

1.) Discuss the arts of the Mesopotamian cultures. How do the arts of the different
cultures reflect the different cultures that produced them? Use specific examples.

2.) The Egyptian preoccupation with the afterlife permeates their art, literature and
architecture. Using specific examples of art, literature and architecture, discuss the effect
of this belief upon the arts.

3.) Discuss the Greek view of the relationship between human beings and the gods.

4.) Compare and contrast Classicism and Hellenism in art, architecture, and philosophy.

5.) What elements of Classical and Hellenistic Greek art and culture are present in the art
and culture of today?

6.) Discuss the image of the emperor in the arts from Augustus to Constantine.

7.) Compare the relationship between the divine and the human in the traditions of
Judaism and Christianity.

8.) Discuss the various forms of literature that developed by Arabic, Persian and
Andalusian writers.

9.) Compare the religious teachings of Hinduism, Buddhism and Islam, as they are
discussed in this chapter and the preceding chapter on Islamic culture.

10.) Compare the religious teachings of Hinduism, Buddhism and Islam, as they are
discussed in this chapter and the preceding chapter on Islamic culture.

11.) Discuss the effects of the various geographic and climatic regions upon the art and
architecture of the indigenous cultures of North and South America.

12.) Discuss the impact of the Germanic warrior culture upon the development of
medieval culture and the arts. Use specific examples from literature, manuscript
illumination and sculpture.

13.) Compare and contrast the art, music, architecture and literature of the Romanesque
and Gothic periods. Cite specific works.

14.) Compare and contrast the visual art and architecture of the Renaissance to that of
classical antiquity. Your discussion should include formal comparison, consideration of
theme and subject matter and functions of given works of art and architecture.

15.) Compare Greek drama with Elizabethan drama. Take into account the presentation of
comedy and tragedy, the staging and costuming, the relationship with the audience, the
design of the theatre.
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16.) During the Baroque, the nature of human beings and their relationship to the divine
was a matter of intense debate and scrutiny. Discuss the art, literature and architecture of
the Catholic and Protestant Baroque in light of this debate.

17.) Compare and contrast the Rococo and Neoclassical styles in all the arts. Include
theme and subject choices, formal elements such as style and technique, as well as
philsophical or political influences.

18.) The nineteenth century was characterized by political upheavals throughout Europe
and America. Discuss the effects of these events upon the arts of the period. Be specific
in your citation of particular art, music and literature.

19.) Why was this period called "la belle Époque"? Was the name uniformly applicable to
the period? Discuss the art which embodies this era.

20.) Discuss the relationship between people and the land, as it is apparent in architecture,
city planning, garden design, landscape painting and poetry of China.

21.) Discuss the characteristics of Japanese art. In what ways is it similar to Chinese art?
In what ways is it different? (See Chapter 19.)

22.) In what ways do the arts of the period following World War One differ from the arts
of the Belle Epoque?

23.) Discuss and compare the role played by religious belief in the arts and literature of
Latin America and Africa.

24.) In what ways did the Existentialist movement influence the arts and literature in the
period immediately after World War II?

25.) Why are autobiography and history (both personal and social) so widely prevalent in
today's art and literature?




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                               The Gothic and Late Middle Ages

                                                   Chapter 12

Multiple Choice: Circle the correct letter


1.     What city dominated the later Middle Ages?
       a.     Rome
       b.         Paris
       c.         Athens
       d.         London

2.     What was the first building on the site of the Louvre?
       a.     prison
       b.     royal residence
       c.     fortress with a keep, surrounded by a moat
       d.     Institute for Advanced Studies

3.     When did the Gothic style first develop?
       a.     1080
       b.     1140
       c.     1420
       d.     161-

4.     Where did the Gothic style begin?
       a.      Notre-Dame, Paris
       b.      the royal abbey of Saint-Denis, located just north of Paris
       c.      Westminster Abbey, London
       d.      Florence Cathedral, Florence

5.     What style is the Sainte-Chapelle in Paris?
       a.      Early Gothic
       b.      High Gothic
       c.      Rayonnant Gothic
       d.      Flamboyant Gothic

6.     Early English Gothic is represented by
       a.      Sainte-Chapelle
       b.      Saint-Maclou
       c.      Salisbury Cathedral
       d.      Notre Dame, Chartres

7.     What is the most Gothic example of cathedral architecture in Italy?
       a.       campanile of Pisa
       b.       Milan Cathedral
       c.       Florence Cathedral
       d.       Westminster Abbey


8.     Les Tres Riches Heures (The Very Rich Hours) is an example of the
       a.     animal style
       b.     International style
       c.     Flamboyant Gothic style
       d.     Rayonnant Gothic style

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9.      Who combined Aristotelian philosophy and Catholic religious thought?
        a.    St. Benedict
        b.    St. Augustine
        c.    St. Thomas Aquinas
        d.    St. Francis of Assisi

10.     Who posited the central importance of "will," emphasizing the freedom of
        individuals in their actions?
        a.     St. Francis of Assisi
        b.     Duns Scotus
        c.     St. Thomas Aquinas
        d.     William of Ockham

11.     What was the most celebrated literary work of the Ages?
        The Decameron
        b.         The Divine Comedy
        c.         The Canterbury Tales
        d.         The Book of the City of Ladies

12.     In Dante’s Inferno, the most grievous and heinous of sinners are punished more
        severely than those who committed less odious crimes in life. In this regard,
        Dante’s poem is indebted to the theology of:
        a.         St. Augustine
        b.         St. Benedict
        c.         St. Francis of Assisi
        d.         St. Thomas Aquinas

13.     What is Dante’s Paradiso based on?
        a.         his notions of purgatory
        b.         the betrayal of God by Satan
        c.         the seven planets of medieval astronomy
        d.         the theology of Thomas Aquinas

14.     Duccio represents the
        a.      Flamboyant Gothic style
        b.      Romanesque style
        c.      old Byzantine style
        d.      Rayonnant Gothic style




15.     Giotto is known primarily as
        a.         poet
        b.         muralist
        c.         sculptor
        d.         theologian




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Fill in the Blanks:

1. The most remarkable feature of the Westminster Abbey in London is the ceiling, a sort
       of __________________________ in an extreme form.

2. A full-scale preparatory drawing made for a large work such as a tapestry is called a
      ____________________________________.

3. One of the most notable features of Dante’s Inferno is the law of ________________,
     which suggests how a punishment should match the sin to which it has been
     ascribed.

4.   Early polyphonic music with the voices of a fourth, a fifth, or an octave apart is
       referred to as ____________________________.

5. The common language spoken in a particular country or region is referred to as the
      ____________________________.

Short Answers:

1.     What are the principal features of a Gothic church?




2.     Describe the Flamboyant Gothic style.




3.     Describe the International style of manuscript illuminations.




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4.      Describe painting and decorative arts of the Gothic era.




3.     What did the university curriculum consist of by the end of the Middle Ages?




6.   Who are the two most prominent chant composers of the twelfth century?




7.     Compare the Nativity sculpture by Nicola Pisano with his son Giovanni’s carving
       of Nativity




8.     Compare Madonna and Child Enthroned by Duccio with that of Giotto




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                         The Renaissance and Mannerism in Italy

                                                     Chapter 13


Multiple Choice: Circle the correct letter
1. A central idea of the Renaissance is that humankind serves as a link between the lower orders of nature
    and the higher spiritual orders. The famous Oration on the Dignity of Man (1486) encapsulates this
    tenet. Who wrote it?
    a. Baldassare Castiglione
    b. Nicollo Machhiavelli
    c. Marsilio Ficino
    d. Pico della Mirandola

2. Lorenzo Ghiberti’s The Creation of Adam and Eve includes a simultaneous presentation of events that
    took place sequentially: Adam is created from the earth. Eve is created from Adam’s rib, Adam and
    Eve are tempted by Satan, and Adam and Eve are expelled from the Garden of Eden. What is this
    technique called?
    a. verisimilitude
    b. vanishing point
    c. chiaroscuro
    d. continuous narration

3. Who is regarded as the greatest architect of the Early Renaissance in Italy?
   a. Donato Bramante
   b. Michelozzo di Bartolommeo
   c. Filippo Brunelleschi
   d. Leon Battista Alberti
4. Who was the first architect to detail the principles of linear perspective in his treatise
   De pictura?
    a. Donato Bramante
    b. Michelozzo di Bartolommeo
    c. Leon Battista Alberti
   d.   Filippo Brunelleschi

5. In Masaccio’s The Tribute Money, the use of perspective directs the viewer’s eyes to
   a. Caesar
   b. Jesus
   c. Peter
   d. the tax collector

6. According to Piero della Francesca, what was the key to understanding painting—as well as nature,
    humankind and God?
     a. color
     b. astronomy
     c. mathematics
     d. science



7. What composer significantly shaped Early Renaissance music?
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     a.     Guillaume Dufay
     b.     Claudio Monteverdi
     c.     Antonio Vivaldi
     d.     George Frederick Handel

8. A composer using an ascending line with soprano voices to express joy is making use
   of
    a.     dissonance
    b.     homophony
    c.     word painting
    d.     pianoforte

9. In Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last Supper, what did Leonardo find most difficult to paint?
   a. John and Peter
   b. Judas and Jesus
   c. the table
   d. the arrangement of the five segments

10. Who were the two most celebrated Venetian painters of the early sixteenth century?
    a. Campin and Van Eyck
    b. Raphael and Michelangelo
    c. Geiorgione and Titian
    d. Titian and Tintoretto

11. In Tintoretto’s version of The Last Supper, what draws our attention to Christ?
    a. light
    b. geometry
    c. color
    d. glaze

12. What compose is most closely associated with the High Renaissance?
    a. Guilaume Dufay
    b. Antonio Vivalid
    c. Josquin des Pres
    d. George Frederick Handel

13. Who wrote the Book of the Courtier?
    a. Petrarch
    b. Cellini
    c. Macchiavelli
    d. Castiglione

14. Which work of Michelangelo reflects the Mannerist style?
    a. Pieta
    b. David
    c. Creation of Adam
    d. The Last Judgment




15. Who of the following was not a painter in the Mannerist style?
    a. El Greco
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     b. Bronzino
     c. Raphael
     d. Parmigianino

Fill in the Blanks:
1. Cosimo, Piero and Lorenzo de’ Medici were all ________________ who believed in the worth and
    dignity of the individual and who, in seeking to discover what was best about humanity, turned their
    attention to the culture of classical antiquity.

2. A technique in art in which simultaneous depiction of events occur at distinct chronological times is
    called ______________________.

3. In linear perspective, the horizon point at which all receding lines appear to converge and disappear is
    called the __________________________.

4. Dufay wrote many _______________, which are compositions that set a sacred text to polyphonic
    choral music, usually without instrumental accompaniment.
5. Leonardo da Vinci’s modeling technique, _________________________, combines subtle shifts of
    light to dark across a rounded surface to give the impression of depth.

Short Answers:
1. What unusual device did Donatello use in the Feast of Herod?




2. What is the difference between Castiglione’s and Machiavelli’s ideals?




3. How would you characterize Mannerism?




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4. Examine how the following Mannerist artists cultivated their own distinct personal
     maniera, by explaining the Mannerist style in their paintings: Michelangelo’s The Last Judgment,
     Parmigianino’s Madonna with the Long Neck, Bronzino’s Allegory with Venus and Cupid, and El
     Greco’s The Burial of Count Orgaz.




                               The Renaissance in the North

                                                     Chapter 14

Multiple Choice: Circle the correct letter

1. In Van Eyck’s Ghent Altarpiece, realism is heightened because Van Eyck’s colors and the edges of
     objects in the background are not as intense or as sharp as those in the foreground. What is this
     technique called?
     a. single-point perspective
     b. two-point perspective
     c. atmospheric perspective
     d. aerial perspective

2. In Van Eyck’s Giovanni Arnolfini and His Wife Giovanna Cenami, it has long been assumed that the
     viewer is witnessing a marriage. Recent arguments suggest, rather, that it is a(n)
     a. courtship
     b. engagement
     c. annulment
     d. divorce

3. What Flemish painter is best known for his half-man, half-animal creatures?
   a. Robert Campin
     b. Hieronymus Bosch
     b. Jan van Eyck
     d. Pieter Bruegel the Elder

4.   In Bosch’s Hay Wain, people are trying to grab the hay. According to the Flemish
     proverb, “The world is a hay wagon and each seeks to grab what he can,” what does
     the hay represent?

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    a.     heaven
    b.     youth
    c.     material possessions
    d.     pleasures of the flesh

5. What is a recurring image in the central panel of Bosch’s triptych Garden of Earthly Delights?
   a. rotting fruit
   b. the Annunciation
     c. hay bales
     c. material possessions

6. What technique did Hans Holbein the Younger use in his portraiture of Erasmus of Rotterdam?
   a. Flemish oil painting
   b. egg tempura
   c. fresco painting
   d. pointillism



7. With which of the following was Pieter Bruegel most concerned?
   a. the peasant class
   b. landscapes
   c. the ruling class
   d. self-portraitures

8. Thomas Weelkes is best know for his
   a. balletts
   b. madrigals
   c. motets
   d. oratorios

9. Whose Essays is a stunning example of Renaissance individualism grounded in humanism?
   a. Erasmus
   b. Martin Luther
   c. Montaigne
   d. Shakespeare

10. Who created the essai genre?
    a. Erasmus
    b. c. Martin Luther
    c. Montaigne
    d. d. Shakespeare

11. In Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Hamlet often has private reflections spoken aloud toward the audience, but
    not to the other characters. These private reflections are called
    a. arias
    b. cantatas
    c. soliloquies
    d. dialogues

12. What is the most important satirical work of the Renaissance?
    a. Erasmus’s The Praise of Folly
    b. Montaigne’s Essays
    c. Shakespeare’s Hamlet
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     d. Cellini’s Autobiography

13. What is the central concern of Martin Luther’s Ninety-five Theses?
    a. prayer
    b. penance
    c. almsgiving
    d. church attendance

14. Shakespeare’s Hamlet is a
     a. comedy
     b. history
     c. tragedy
     d. romance




15. What is Shakespeare’s most ambitious and best-known play?
    a. Macbeth
    b. Hamlet
    c. Romeo and Juliet
    d. The Tempest


Fill in the Blanks:

1. In visual arts, ___________________________ refers to the symbols used to communicate meaning.

2. The appearance of being true to reality defines _______________________.

3. The systematic destruction of religious icons because of their accepted religious connotations is called
    ____________________________________.

4. Bruegel’s painting depicts the daily life of ordinary people, a type of work that has come to be called
    _________________________.

5. A form of vocal music called ______________________________ is a dancelike song for a variety of
    solo voices composed mostly in homophonic textures.

Short Answers:
1. Compare and contrast Bosch’s Hay Wain wit the Garden of Earthly Delights.




2. Why did Henry VIII order the destruction of monasteries in 1535?




3. How did Erasmus differ from other reformers?



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4. Characterize the Elizabethan stage.


                                               The Baroque Age

                                                     Chapter 15



Multiple Choice: Circle the correct answer

1. The Council of Trent suggested that religious art be directed toward all of the following, except:
       a. clarity
       b. elegance
       c. emotion
       d. realism

2. How is Bernini’s David depicted?
      a. in an unspecified moment before David’s conflict with Goliath
      b. the split-second before David releases from his sling the stone that kills Goliath
           c. David looking at Goliath after the giant’s death
      d. David as a young boy
3. What era produced the opera?
        a. Baroque Age
        b. Renaissance
        c. Enlightenment
        d. Romanticism
4. What is the correct musical form of the concerto?
         a. fast-slow-fast
         b. slow-fast-slow
         c. fast-slow-fast-slow
         d. slow-fast-fast-slow
5. Who invented the concerto?
        a. Claudio Monteverdi
        b. Johann Sebastian Bach
        c. Arcangelo Corelli
        d. Antonion Vivaldi

6. In the seventeenth century, a distinctly secular brand of Baroque painting emerged in
        a. Spain
        b. Holland
        c. Germany
        d. Portugal

7. What painter is referred to as “the lord of the light?”
      a. Hals
      b. Vermeer
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         c. Rembrandt
         d. de Hooch

8. In what way does Vermeer’s light reveal the spiritual essence of things in a manner entirely consistent
    with Protestant theology?
        a. His figures are carefully posed with a planned perspective system.
        b. His paintings transform the viewer into a voyeur.
        c. The Protestants believed that God revealed himself in even the least significant details of
            public life
        d. The public space is shrouded in darkeness.

9. In what way was Poussin the opposite of Rubens?
       a. Poussin worked in terms of line rather than color.
       b. Poussin worked in terms of color rather than line.
       c. Poussin united every stroke by the curving movements of his design.
       d. Poussin was known for the sheer exuberance of his lush forms.

10. What architectural structure has at the center of its facade the look of a Roman temple with Corinthian
    columns, wings with paired columns extending outward from it, and form reminiscent of a Roman
    triumphal arch resulting in strict linear classicism?
         a. Louvre
         b. Palace of Versailles
         c. St. Paul’s Cathedral
         d. Britain’s Houses of Parliament

11. What is the tone of Handel’s Messiah?
       a. mournful
       b. fearful
       c. conciliatory
       d. jubilant and celebratory

12. Who is know as the father of modern philosophy?
       a. Rene Descartes
       b. Thomas Hobbes
         c. John Locke
         d. Francis Bacon

13. What philosopher held that humans are driven by two primal forces, the fear of death and the desire for
    power?
         a.   Rene Descartes
         b.   Thomas Hobbes
         c.   John Locke
         d.   Francis Bacon

14. Who argued that the human mind is at birth a tabula rasa?
       a. John Locke
       b. Jean-Paul Sarte
       c. Rene Descartes
       d. Thomas Hobbes




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15. Seventeenth-century French theater observed the three unities. Which of the following was not one of
    them?
        a.   unity of time
        b.   unity of action
        c.   unity of space
        d.   unity of place

Fill in the Blanks:

1. Bernini designed a cast-bronze ___________________________, or canopy, for the main altar of St.
    Peter’s basilica.
2. An _____________________________ is a sacred opera sung without costume and without acting
    because it was forbidden to present biblical characters in a public theater.

3. A ________________________ is composed of three or four independent parts of which one part, or
    voice, states a theme which is then imitated in succession by each of the other voices in counterpoint.

4. A ______________________ is a work for a single singer or group of singers accompanied by
    instruments.

5.Seventeenth-century plays took place indoors on a picture-frame stage, created with a
  _____________________________________, which was an arch that separated the
  stage from the auditorium.

Short Answers:

1. How did the Baroque writers differ from the Renaissance writers?




2. What aspect of Caravaggio’s art was criticized by his contemporaries?




3. What was the guiding principle in Carracci’s academy?




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4. The illusionist ceiling fresco is used to trick the eye into believing that the architecture of the church
    extends past the actual ceiling. What is this perspective calculated to be seen from?




                                         The Eighteenth Century

                                                     Chapter 16



Multiple Choice: circle the correct answer

1. Who established the biological classification system in 1735 that is still used to identify species?
      a. Newton
      b. Linnaeus
      c. Diderot
      d. Bacon

2. What style is marked by a shift in court taste from the poussiniste style to a more rubeniste style?
      a. Rococo
      b. Mannerism
      c. Baroque
      d. Neoclassicism

3. What painter of the Parisian Rococo is noted for his rapid brushwork, painting an entire work inside an
    hour?
         a.   Jean-Antoine Watteau
         b.   Eugene Delacroix
         c.   Jean-Honore Fragonard
         d.   Francois Boucher

4. What English painter produced picture series that were equivalent to chapters in a novel as in Marriage
    a la Mode and sought to teach by example, referring to his narratives as “modern moral subjects?”
         a. William Hogarth
         b. Sir Joshua Reynolds
         c. Thomas Gainsborough
         d. John Constable
5. In the Estates General, the Third State referred to the
         a. social critics
         b. clergy
         c. aristocrats
         d. bourgeois citizens

6. What style emerged from the turning away from the Rococo and toward the ancient classical ideals?
      a. Neoclassicism
      b. Mannerism
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         c. Baroque
         d. Renaissance



7. How did Jacques-Louis David augment the sense of immediacy and increase the emotional impact of
    Death of Marat?
       a. by achieving a double balance
       b. by placing the figure off-center
       c. by placing the figure very close to the picture plane
       d. by subordinating line to color

8. Rococo is to frivolity as Neoclassical art is to
      a. virtue
      b. clarity
      c. emotion
      d. mythology
9. Benjamin West was best known for his revision of the idea of
       a. religious painting
       b. genre painting
       c. history painting
       d. ceremonial painting
10.Which of the following is not an example of the Neoclassical style?
       a. Monticello
       b. Chiswick House
       c. La Madeleine
       d. British Houses of Parliament

11. What composer began in the Classical vein and later became known for his Romantic
    style?
          a. Haydn
          b. Vivaldi
          c. Mozart
          d. Beethoven

12. In what movement of the symphony does the aristocratic minuet often serve as the
   basis for the movement?
        a. first movement
        b. second movement
        c. third movement
        d. fourth movement

13. The third movement of the symphony is usually a
        a. sonata
        b. rondo
        c. theme and variations
        d. minuet or trio

14. Alexander Pope’s An Essay on Man reflects the eighteenth-century tendency toward
        a. satire
        b. comedy
        c. tragedy
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         d. romance


15. Who drafted the “Declaration of Independence?
       a. James Madison
       b. Benjamin Franklin
       c. Thomas Jefferson
       d. George Washington

Fill in the Blanks:
1. The philosophical belief system of the Enlightenment called ____________________
    was based on the idea that progress is possible only through learning and through the
    individual’s freedom to learn.

2. During the French Rococo, the ____________________was a reception room
   intended for fashionable social gatherings of notable people, and this term came to
   refer to such events.

3. Voltaire’s best-known work, _________________, is a scathing indictment of those
   who agree with the philosopher Leibniz that this is the best of all possible worlds, regardless of
   occasional misfortunes, and that everything that happens is part of the providential plan of a benevolent
   God.

4. In The Tennis Court Oath, 1789-1791, ________________________ captured the moment in which
    the Third Estate and their aristocratic sympathizers swore an oath that they would not separate until
    France had a new constitution.

5. Napoleon’s greatest achievement was the ___________________ which provided a uniform system of
    law for the entire country that was brief and clear.

Short Answers:
1.What two great movements occurred from the late seventeenth century through the
  eighteenth century?




2. Who were considered the leading painters of the French Rococo?




3. How was the French Revolution different from the American Revolution?


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4. What differences in stylistic development can be seen in the three periods of
   Beethoven’s music?




                                      Romanticism and Realism

                                                    Chapter 17


Multiple Choice: Circle correct answer

1. How is Francisco Goya’s Family of Charles IV like Velazquez’s Maids of Honor?
      a. Both painters reflected the Romantic style.
      b. Both painters reflected the Realistic style.
      c. Both painters include themselves in the painting.
      d. Both painters use landscape in the background.
2. Goya’s The Third of May, 1808 is a painting that gives visual form to a sense of
        a. joy
        b. fear
        c. anger
        d. hopelessness

3. What subject did Goya print in his series of 82 prints that affected him emotionally?
      a. war
      b. nature
      c. love
      d. the working class

4. What fell out of favor during the Romantic era?
      a. music
      b. painting
      c. sculpture
      d. literature

5. Ralph Waldo Emerson called himself a(n)
       a. Realist
       b. Renaissance man
       c. Transcendentalist
       d. Impressionist

6. Kant argued that there are two basic elements, “those that we receive through impressions, and those
    that our faculty of knowledge supplies from itself.” He called these respectively

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         a.   senses and matters
         b.   sensations and perceptions
         c.   phenomena and noumena
         d.   conscious and unconscious

7. What is the theme of nineteenth-century literature?
      a. good manners
      b. our ignorance of things
      c. patriotism
      d. family values

8. William Blake’s poetry focuses on what two contrary states of the human soul?
       a. good and evil
       b. hope and despair
       c. innocence and experience
       d. body and spirit
9. One of the characteristic forms of Romantic composition is
        a. cantatas
        b. oratorios
        c. absolute music
        d. program music

10. Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6 is an example of
        a. arias
        b. absolute music
        c. program music
        d. a capella music

11. The Lied was a type of art song set to an accompaniment that suited the tone, mood, and details of a(n)
        a. poem
        b. opera
        c. ballad
        d. madrigal

12. Who was one of the first successful painters of the working class?
       a. Rosa Bonheur
       b. Gustave Courbet
       c. Francisco Goya
       d. John Constable

13. Eadweard Muybridge’s sequence studies led to the invention of the
       a. automobile
       b. motion picture
       c. phonograph
       d. radio

14. Whose work influenced Winslow Homer?
       a. Manet
       b. Muybridge
       c. Courbet
       d. Gericault

15. Who laid out his theory of evolution by natural selections in On the Origin of
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    Species?
        a.     Francis Bacon
        b.     Louis Pasteur
        c.     Charles Darwin
        d.     Jean-Jacques Rousseau




Fill in the Blanks:

1. Kant argued that there are two basic elements, _______________________________,
   those that we receive through impressions, and those that come from knowledge.

2. The __________________________ is Romantic music designed for performances by a singer and
    accompanist, in a room in someone’s house.

3. In music, a recurring musical theme or idea used throughout a movement or entire composition is
    called an ___________________________.

4. In Wagner’s operatic orchestral writing, he used brief fragments of melody called
   __________________________ to remind the listeners of particular characters and
   actions.

5. The earliest photograph was called the ________________________ and was produced on silver or
    silver-covered copper plate.


Short Answers:

1. Define Romanticism




2. Describe Gothic architecture. What London landmark was designed in the Gothic style?




3. Contrast the poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson.




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4. Compare and contrast absolute music and program music.




                                               The Belle Epoque

                                                     Chapter 18

Multiple Choice: Circle the correct letter


1. The “Batignolles” group came to be called the
       a. Realists
       b. Romantics
       c. Symbolists
       d. Impressionists

2. Who most clearly bridges the gap between the Realists and the Impressionists?
      a. Manet
      b. Cassat
      c. Renoir
      d. Pisarro

3. The name “Impressionism” was derived from a painting by
       a. Edouard Manet
       b. Claude Monet
       c. Mary Cassat
       d. Pierre-Auguste Renoir

4. During the late nineteenth century, Impressionists discovered that if two bright colors are juxtaposed,
       a. both appear darker
       b. both appear even brighter
       c. they complement each other
       d. they contrast each other

5. Monet’s Haystacks at Giverny was one of a series of paintings of haystacks that Monet painted to study
      a. how colors appear when juxtaposed
      b. horizontal and vertical definition
      c. the way in which changes in light and weather alter what we see
      d. asymmetrical composition

6. According to Sigmund Freud, the human psyche is divided into the
      a. body and soul
         b.. Libido and aggressive impulses
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         b. id, ego and superego
         c. d. conscious and unconscious



7. What painter washed his brush between strokes so that each color would be distinct, referring to his
    brushstrokes as “little planes?”
        a. Claude Monet
        b. Paul Cezanne
        c. George Seurat
        d. Vincent Van Gogh

8. In Georges Seurat’s Sunday Afternoon on La Grande Jatte, what painting technique did he use to apply
    paint to the canvas in small dots of uniform size?
        a. color field
        b. pointillism
        c. tenebrism
        d. action painting

9. Who coined the phrase, “form follows function?”
      a. Auguste Rodin
      b. Walter Gropius
      c. Frank Lloyd Wright
      d. Louis Sullivan

10. Art nouveau favored forms derived from
        a. nature
        b. mathematics
        c. pop culture
        d. classical antiquity

11. The interest in abstraction takes all of the following forms, except
        a. an expressive art
        b. formalist art
        c. an art of fantasy
        d. a realistic representation

12. What two painters’ work is almost indistinguishable to the untrained eye?
       a. Van Gogh and Gaugin
       b. Cezanne and Seurat
       c. Picasso and Braque
       d. Nolde and Kandinsky

13. What does the fragment of a newspaper in Picasso’s Sill Life with Chair Caning tell us about Picasso’s
    intentions?
         a. He admits the work looks like junk
         b. The work is supposed to be temporary
         c. Collage is the new playground of the artist
         d. Pointillism is part of the everyday

14. Die Brucke and Der Blaus Reiter were separate branches of
        a. Realism
        b. Futurism
         Fauvism
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         c. German Expressionism

15. Which of the following ballet scores was composed by Igor Stravinsky?
       a. The Nutcracker
       b. The Rite of Spring
       c. Swan Lake
       d. Sleeping Beauty


Fill in the Blanks:

1. The era of leisure and elegance in Paris during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was
    known as the _________________________________.

2. The _______________________ symbolist poets sought to evoke states of mind and feeling beyond
    the surface of everyday reality.

3. A style that was popular from the 1890s to the early 1900s and noted for its ornamental decoration
    based on the forms of nature, especially the use of curvilinear and floral patterns, was called
    ___________________________.

4. Vanguard artists of the early twentieth century in France who focused on abstractions were called the
    ________________________.

5. A visual art form in which bits of familiar objects are glued on a painted canvas surface is a
    _______________.

Short Answers:

1. How did Impressionists change the focus of artistic subject matter?




2. What did the Symbolist poets attempt to convey?




3. What were the various movements that came and went that were considered the avant-garde?




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4. Following Pablo Picasso’s painting of Gertrude Stein, what approach did he pursue?




                              Chinese and Japanese Civilizations

                                                    Chapter 19

Multiple Choice: Circle the correct letter

1. The Chinese ruler’s palace was usually situated at the
       a. east end, looking west
       b. west end, looking east
       c. north end, looking south
       d. south end, looking north

2. Under the rule of the so-called Yongle Emperor, present-day Beijing was reconstructed as the imperial
    capital. The palace enclosure where the emperor and his court lived was called the
        a. Imperial City
        b. Forbidden City
        c. Gate of Heavenly Peace
        d. Gate of Supreme Harmony

3. How was the Forbidden City approached?
      a. by water
      b. through a maze
      c. through a series of gates
      d. through a series of tunnels

4. The calligraphy at the upper left of Shen Zhou’s Poet on a Mountaintop is a
       a. poem
       b. prayer
       c. song
       d. signature

5. What was the most innovative development of the Qing dynasty?
      a. poetry
      b. prose fiction
      c. autobiography
      d. essay

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6. In the Beijing opera, the performers’ roles are divided into four major categories. Which of the
    following is not a category?
         a. male
         b. female
         c. clown
         d. painted female face

7. In 1868 Japan returned to rule by an emperor, inaugurating a period known as the
       a. Meiji era
       b. Edo period
       c. Momoyama period
       d. Muromachi period

8. During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, a style of Japanese art called ukiyo-e arose, which
    became especially associated with
        a. haiku
        b. Japanese gardens
        c. woodblock prints
        d. landscape painting

9. What painters admired ukiyo-e prints because, like them, the Japanese artist was concerned with the
    world of everyday life, particularly of cultural enjoyments?
        a. Baroque painters in Italy
        b. Baroque painters outside of Italy
        c. painters of the Parisian Rococo
        d. Impressionist painters of nineteenth-century Europe

10. Woodblock prints were closely associated with the
       a. Beijing opera
       b. Kabuki theater
       c. His-wen
       d. Bunraku puppet theater
11. Kinkakuji, or the “Temple of the Golden Pavilion,” was constructed during the
        a. Edo period
        b. Meji era
        c. Muromachi period
        d. Momoyama period

12. Modern Japanese literature is traditionally dated from the beginning of the
       a. Meji era
       b. Edo period
       c. Momoyama period
       d. Muromachi period

13. The fiction of modern Japan reflects a strong concern with
        a. achievement
        b. religion
        c. identity, both cultural and individual
        d. ancient tales

14. Kabuki theater emerged in the
       a. fourteenth century
       b. fifteenth century
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        c. sixteenth century
        d. seventeenth century

15. The Noh is distinguished from other forms of drama by its
        a. music
        b. narration
        c. solemnity
        d. use of puppets




Fill in the Blanks:

1. From the fourteenth through to the seventeenth century, Chinese music was largely associated with
    ________________________, a form of musical drama.

2. A belief system indigenous to Japan called ______________________ is characterized by rituals and
    venerations for local deities and strong patriotism.

3. Although used primarily for meditation, the Garden of the Daisen-in monastery, in Kyoto, served also
    as a place of assembly for Zen priests and samurai to compose
   _____________________________.

4. A traditional Japanese puppet theater featuring large puppets and puppeteers on stage, and a samisen
    accompanist and narrator to the side, is called _________________________.

5. The _____________________ theater developed in the fifteenth century, and is noted for its solemnity,
    highly poetic texts, stylized gestures, and masked actors.

Short Answers:

1. What did architecture in traditional China signify?




2. In Beijing opera, what are the four major categories of the performers’ roles?




3. What two styles of His-wen developed?




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4. Describe the Haiku.




                                            Russian Civilization

                                                    Chapter 20

Multiple Choice: Circle the correct letter

1. Religious icons were usually small images painted on
       a. canvas
       b. wood
       c. stone
       d. doors

2. Who created the city of St. Petersburg in the early eighteenth century?
      a. Ivan Iv
      b. Nicholas Ii
      c. Tsar Peter the Great
      d. Saints Cyril and Methodius

3. Dostoyevsky’s realism is underpinned by the
       a. social
       b. spiritual
       c. psychological
       d. emotional

4. What did Tolstoy interject into Anna Karenina?
      a. a tacit approval of adultery
      b. a world with neither heroes nor villains
      c. a tone of moral criticism
      d. feelings toward St. Petersburg

5. Boris Godunov is based on a poem by
       a. Tolstoy
       b. Chekov
       c. Yevtushenko
       d. Pushkin

6. The Bolsheviks were Marxists who called for a new society ruled by the
       a. aristocrats
       b. bourgeoisie
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         c. proletariat
         d. monarchs

7. Who took over Chagall’s art school in Viebsk and called himself a “Suprematists?”
      a. Emile Nolde
      b. Kazimir Malevich
      c. El Lissitzky
      d. Vassily Kandinsky


8. What statement best describes Malevich’s paintings?
      a. the young native painters of the Revolution wanted nothing to do with the expressive impulses
             of either Malevich or Lissitzky
         b. Malevich is famous for Cubist shapes, green cows and flying horses
         c. Malevich’s Suprematism is a type of Cubism taken to the extreme
         d. Malevich’s art is seen as changing-stations between painting and architecture.

9. Malevich’s paintings were based solely on the simplest of geometric forms, particularly the
      a. circle
      b. square
      c. rectangle
      d. triangle

10. Who created a kind of art he labeled “Prouns?”
       a. Malevich
       b. Lissitzky
       c. Chagall
       d. Kandinsky
11. Eisenstein structures his film Battleship Potempkin like a(n)
        a. opera
        b. ballet
        c. soliloquy
        d. symphony

12. How did Kruschchev respond to Solzhenitsyn’s One Day in the Life of Ivan
   Denisovich?
        a. He expelled Solzhenitsyn from the Soviet Union.
        b. He was personally responsible for its acceptance for publication, viewing the book as a tool in
            his campaign against the legacy of Stalin.
        c. It offended him because of the author’s Jewish origins.
        d. It offended him because of the central character’s avowed individualism.
13. Who wrote a poem titled “Babi Yar?”
       a. Boris Pasternak
       b. Fyodor Dostoyevsky
       c. Alexander Solzhenitsyn
       d. Evgeny Yevtushenko

14. What composer was deeply moved by the poem “Babi Yar” and set it to music?
       a. Modest Mussorgsky
       b. Sergei Eisenstein
       c. Dimitri Dmitryevich Shostakovich
       d. Peter Tchaikovsky
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15. According to Karl Marx, the structure and values of a society are determined by the way it organizes its
       a. various classes of society
       b. money supply
       c. production of goods and services
       d. health and education of its poor

Fill in the Blanks:
1. A panel of icons that separates the priests from the rest of the congregation in the Eastern Orthodox
    Church is called an ___________________________.

2. The most influential nineteenth-century choreographer in Russia was ___________________ who
    collaborated with Tchaikovsky on both Sleeping Beauty and The Nutcracker to create two of the most
    popular ballets ever.

3. Chagall’s art school in Vitebsk was overtaken by a revolutionary artist named
    _________________________________ who called himself a “Suprematist” and painted solely on the
    simplest of geometric forms.

4. Eisenstein’s Odessa sequence in his silent film Battleship Potemkin includes a formal technique called
    a ______________________, which are a set of edited units of impression used to achieve dramatic
    effect.

5. Following the death of Stalin, _____________________ was named party secretary, and he led the
    way in the de-Stalinization of Russia.

Short Answers:

1. Describe the Kremlin cathedrals.




2. What is explored in Tolstoy’s War and Peace (1869)?




3. What two artists led renamed Chagall’s art school in Vitebsk “Unovis,” meaning College of the New
    Art, and introduced revolutionary art?




4. In the late nineteenth century, a number of St. Petersburg artists formed a group that called themselves
    the Wanderers. What was their objective?


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                                             The Age of Anxiety

                                                    Chapter 21

Multiple Choice: Circle the correct letter

1. What Dadaist viewed Dada as a kind of “anti-art?”
      a. Hans Arp
      b. Tristan Tzara
      c. Kurt Shwitters
      d. Marcel Duchamp

2. What movement was founded in 1917 in Holland, seeking to integrate painting, sculpture, architecture,
    and industrial design, and championed a “pure” abstration?
        a. Dada
        b. De Stijl
        c. Abstract Expressionism
        d. Surrealism

3. Who was the leading painter of the De Stijl movement?
      a. Joan Miro
      b. Georgia O’Keefe
      c. Piet Mondrian
      d. Salvador Dali

4. Joan Miro is one of the most accomplished practitioners of of
       a. pointillism
       b. automatism
       c. action painting
       d. color field painting

5. Which of the following paintings is best described as depicting the impossible and irrational with
    absolute conviction?
        a. O’Keefe’s Yellow Calla
        b. Dali’s The Persistence of Memory
        c. Demuth’s Aucassin and Nicolette
        d. Mondrian’s Composition in Red,Yellow and Blue
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6. In 1935, for Martha Graham’s dance, Frontier, Isamu Noguchi devised a simple fence set at center
    stage, with two ropes attached to it, extending from each end of the fence forward and upward to the
    portals of the theater. What did it create?
        a. a vanishing point
        b. the illusion of space
        c. atmospheric perspective
        d. a single-point perspective




7. What art work unites two opposing techniques and appears to be two entirely different works of art
    when viewed from two different angles?
       a. Isamu Noguchi’s Kouros
       b. Salvador Dali’s The Persistence of Memory
       c. Constantin Brancusi’s Bird in Space
       d. Henry Moore’s Reclinig Figure

8. What American artist’s primary interest was in natural forms and colors, with subject matter such as
    flowers and animal bones?
        a. Georgia O’Keefe
        b. Alfred Stieglitz
        c. Alexander Calder
        d. Charles Demuth

9. Picasso began work on Guernica to commemorate what disaster?
       a. Kristallnacht
       b. Britzkrieg
       c. Holocaust
       d. World War I

10. In FSA photographer Walker Evan’s Washroom and Dining Area of Floyd Burrough’s Home, Hale
    County, Alabama, 1936, the work contains visual echoes of
       a. Dalis’ surrealism
       b. Duchamp’s “anti-art”
       c. Mondrian’s De Stijl abstractions
       d. Miro’s automatism

11. Edward Hopper is associated with
       a. dadaism
       b. neo-plastaicism
       c. regionalism
       d. surrrealism

12. Edward Hopper paints those places inhabited by
      a. the wealthy
      b. the poor
      c. the middle class
      d. European immigrants
13. Thomas Hart Benton is best known for his
       a. murals
       b. photographs
       c. lithographs
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         d. hanging mobiles

14. What American writer was a chronicler of the South?
       a. William Faulkner
       b. Ernest Hemingway
       c. Langston Hughes
       d. Virginia Woolf

15. Whose stories explore ideas from Roman Catholicism that transcend the confines of Southern
    regionalism?
         a. William Faulner
         b. Flannery O’Connor
         c. Ernest Hemingway
         d. Virginia Woolf




Fill in the Blanks:

1. The ___________________art movement occurred during and just after World War I and rejected
    tradition and championed the irrational and absurd.

2. Miro was a master of the Surrealist artistic technique called ____________________, in which the
    artist gives up intellectual control over his or her work, allowing the subconscious to take over.

3. A modern literary technique that records the free flow of a character’s mental impressions is called the
    ______________________________.

4. Lack of a home key or tonal center in a musical composition is referred to as _________________.

5. In jazz, the short phrase repeated frequently during improvisation is called the
   _________________________.

Short Answers:

1. For the Surrealist, what were two approaches to depicting dreams?




2. How did the Works in Progress Administration (WPA) support regionalism?




3. Name two Southern regionalist writers and describe Southern regionalist writing.
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4. In one painting of Jacob Lawrence’s Migration series, They Also Found Discrimination, what is the
    startling effect of the piece?




                               Modern Africa and Latin America

                                                    Chapter 22



Multiple Choice: Circle the correct letter

1. What part of Africa is dominated by the Sahara desert and Islam and was historically tied to
    Mediterranean culture?
       a. Congo
       b. Kalahari
       c. Maghreb
       d. sub-Saharan Africa

2. Why have so few artifacts from the pre-colonial Africa period survived?
      a. African cultures used wood to create most of their work, and so they have long since
             disappeared.
        b. The art from that period is almost entirely in private collections.
        c. African cultures used bronze to create most of their work, so they have long
             since disappeared.
        d.   They were all destroyed by missionaries.

3. The sculpture of Benin reveals much about the role of art in
       a. pre-colonial African cultures.
       b. colonial African cultures.
       c. post-colonial African cultures.
       d. Latin American cultures.

4. The Yoruba gelede mask is used in a traditional performance ritual to appease
       a. “the mothers” who represent women who have given birth to kings.
       b. “the mothers” who represent all women.
       c. the spirits who must always be obeyed.
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         d. the king, who controls the moon and the stars.

5. The coffins of Kane Kwei of Ghana are an example of how
       a. African art always tells a story.
       b. Africans value beauty above financial rewards.
       c. contemporary African art has a functional role.
       d. the African conception of art’s purpose has changed dramatically.

6. For the Abule carvers of the Ivory Coast, the mask is seen as
        a. dance.
        b. “the mothers.”
        c. Oba.
        d. ere ibefi.



7. What is the role of African music?
      a. entertainment value only
      b. music expresses their belief system
      c. to pass stories from generation to generation
      d. to be used only on special occasions

8. What does Chinua Achebe use to convey the spirit and substance of the Igbo culture?
      a. proverbs
      b. songs
      c. poems
      d. essays

9. The fresco, Corpus Christi Procession with the Parishioners of Santa Ana, shows the converging of
       a. believers and nonbelievers
       b. Mexico’s past and future
       c. Catholics and Protestants
       d. Europeans and Native American traditions

10. What did Mexico’s president Alvaro Obregon initiate in 1920 to restore Mexico’s indigenous cultural
    identity?
         a.     a fresco movement
         b.     a mural movement
         c.     a literary movement
         d.     an oral history movement

11. What message did Siqueiros’s large-scale mural, Cuahtemoc Against the Myth, 1944, have for the
    Mexican people?
       a. Mexicans need to control their population
       b. Indigenous people could regain power
       c. Cultures can co-exist in one nation
       d. Religious faith will be rewarded

12. What artist is known for his “swollen” figures that fill the canvas like balloons and satirize the Latin
    American ruling elite?
       a. Wilfredo Lam
       b. David Alfaro Siqueiros
       c. Diego Rivera
       d. Fernando Botero
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13. The most prevalent forms of popular Latin American music are those associated with
        a. dance.
        b. opera.
        c. ballet.
        d. fold music.

14. Jorge Luis Borges often merges the “real” with the imaginary so that his readers
become disoriented and are forced to reconsider the relationship between
         a. life and death.
         b. husband and wife.
         c. fiction and reality.
         d. life and afterlife.
15. In Isabel Allende’s novel The House of Spirits (1982), she creates a fictional world
that reconstructs the history of
         a. Chile
         b. Brazil
         c. Peru
         d. Argentina

Fill in the Blanks:

1. For the Baule carvers of the Ivory Coast, the _____________________ mask is the Dye sacred mask
    and is seen as dance.

2. The _______________________ style of African music features a fusion of indigenous dance rhythms
    and melodies with Western marches, sea chanties, and church hymns.

3. A prominent Mexican painter, __________________________, is best known for her highly
    distinctive self-portraits in a wide range of circumstances and settings.

4. The literature of Latin American is written primarily in two languages,
   __________________________ and __________________________.

5. A Latin American literary style that weaves together realistic events with incredible and fantastic ones
    to convey the often mysterious truths of life is called _______________________.

Short Answers:

1. What is the Yoruba gelede mask used for?




2. What is the role of African music?




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3. What was the impetus for the Mexican mural movement?




4. Compare Lam’s The Jungle with Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon.




                                            The Age of Affluence

                                                     Chapter 23

Multiple Choice: Circle the correct letter

1. Who introduced the philosophy of existentialism?
      a. Thomas Hobbes
      b. Rene Descartes
      c. Soren Kierkegaard
      d. Jacques Derrida

2. What is regarded as Simone de Beauvoir’s most important contribution?
      a. her study of men
      b. her study of women
      c. her study of the biological differences between men and women
      d. her ideas on the complexity of choices between right and wrong

3. Because there is no recognizable subject in Jackson Pollock’s Autumn Rhythm: Number 30, the work
    is referred to as
         a. Pop Art.
         b. minimal art.
         c. post-impressionism.
         d. abstract expressionism.

4. What painter worked in a style known as color field painting?
      a. Mark Rothko
      b. Willem de Kooning
      c. Roy Lichtenstein
      d. Jackson Pollock

5. All of the following are architects of the International Style, except
        a. Mies
        b. Le Corbusier
        c. Gropius
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      d. Sullivan
6. Who designed the home, Fallingwater, in Bear Run, Pennsylvania?
      a. Mies
      b. Wright
      c. Gropius
      d. Le Corbusier

7. Rauschenberg called his work, such as in Odalisk,
       a. “action painting”
       b. “combine painting”
       c. “environmental art”
       d. “pure information”




8. Whose work embodies the world of mass production?
      a. Andy Warhol
      b. Louise Nevelson
      c. Robert Rauschenberg
      d. Roy Lichtenstein

9. What is the basis of Lichtenstein’s style?
      a. pointillism
      b. ben-day dot
      c. color field painting
      d. abstract expressionist gesture

10. What artist painted comics?
       a. Robert Rauschenberg
       b. Andy Warhol
       c. Roy Lichtenstein
       d. Claes Oldenburg

11. How did Allan Kaprow destroy the distinction between audience and artwork?
       a. He eliminated the audience.
       b. The audience was prohibited from participating in the event.
       c. He eliminated the artwork.
       d. The audience was required to participate in the event.

12. In the typical Rauschenberg, Cage, and Cunningham collaboration,
         a. the music supports the dance.
         b. the sets frame it.
         c. the dance, music and sets conflict with one another.
         d. each element remains independent of the others.
13. Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s Surrounded Islands were inspired by
        a. Dali’s Persistence of Memory
        b. Monet;s Haystacks of Giverny.
        c. Monet’s water-lily paintings.
        d. Matisse’s The Woman with the Hat.
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14. Who was the leading voice of the Beat Generation?
       a. John Cage
       b. Jack Kerouac
       c. Allan Kaprow
       d. Allen Ginsberg

15. According to Allen Ginsberg, Howl is a celebration of
       a. abstraction
       b. madness
       c. pop culture
       d. existentialism




Fill in the Blanks:

1. Jackson Pollock popularized the _______________________ style in which the artist throws, drops, or
     splatters paint on a canvas to convey a sense of physical activity and vitality.

2. Mark Rothko worked in a style known as __________________________________.

3. The early-twentieth-century German art school known as ______________________
     attempted to blend all forms of art, science and technology.

4. Robert Rauschenberg called his assemblages ___________________________.

5. Sculptor Donald Judd’s series of “Specific Objects” exemplify _________________ art.

Short Answers:

1. How did Sartre’s philosophical views of existentialism differ from Kierkegaard’s?




2. How was the work of Abstract Expressionists unified?




3.    How does Helen Frankenhaler’s painting compare to Jackson Pollock’s?



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4. What factors led to recognition of the “international” style in architecture?




5. What was the main principle of the Bauhaus?




6. Explain the ideas behind the Theater of the Absurd.




7. What three distinct features of John Cage’s work, 4’33” did artists subsequently adopt?




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                              The Diversity of Contemporary Life

                                                     Chapter 24


Multiple Choice: Circle the correct letter

1. Whose approach to culture is called “structuralism?”
      a. Barthes
      b. Derrida
      c. Sartre
      d. Kierkegaard

2. Who is the chief practitioner of poststructuralist thought?
      a. Barthes
      b. Derrida
      c. Kierkegaard
      d. Sartre

3. What was the focus of the Guerilla Girls?
      a. the imbalance of women in the art scene
      b. the nudity of female art figures
      c. the need for more minority representation in art galleries
      d. the need to make art galleries handicapped accessible

4. In Judy Chicago’s sculptural installation, The Dinner Party, 1974-79, the individual
place settings were set for
         a. apostles with Jesus
         b. women who had been abused
         c. mythological figures


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5. What woman photographer photographed herself in a variety of “self-portraits,” wearing in each a
    different wardrobe and announces that the “self” is a fictionalized construction, and is one of another of
    a series of media images?
         a. Judy Chicago
         b. Cindy Sherman
         c. Eleanor Antin
         d. Susan Rothenberg

6. In Susan Rothenberg’s Axes, 1976, what animates the canvas?
       a. flamboyant colors
       b. a sense of imbalance
       c. an afocal point
       d. bold brush strokes
7. What painter achieved notoriety as “samo,” a grafitti artist writing on walls in Soho and Tribeca?
       a. Judith F. Baca
       b. Betye Saar
       c. Roy Lichtenstein
       d. Jean-Michel Basquiat

8. What does the Great Wall mural project mean to Judith Baca?
      a. It celebrates the feminist consciousness.
      b. It attacks the expectations of the dominant white culture.
      c. It helps to recreate communities that have been destroyed.
      d. It protests the exploitation of Black heroes.

9. What is the name of the artist who painted a series of paintings based on the slaughter of Native
    Americans at Wounded Knee at the hands of the U. S. Army?
       a. Judith F. Baca
       b. Lisa Fifield
       c. Jean-Michel Basquiat
       d. Jaune Quick-to-See Smith

10. What does Jaune Quick-to-See Smith’s Paper Dolls for a Post Columbian World with Ensembles
    Contributed by the U.S. Government (1991) protest?
       a. the merging of European and Latin American traditions
       b. the commercialization of religion
       c. the lack of justice for immigrants
       d. the colonization of Native Americans and the lack of respect for their
            traditions.

11. Adrienne Rich is an important spokesperson for the
        a. Native American peoples.
        b. Vietnam veterans.
        c. feminist consciousness.
        d. civil rights movement.

12. The stories in Maxine Hong Kingston’s Woman Warrior (1976) derive from the Chinese “talk story,” a
    Cantonese tradition that is
        a. actually only about 75 years old.
        b. taken from Korean tradition.
        c. kept alive mainly by men.
        d. kept alive mainly by women.

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13. Tony Morrison’s novels focus on revealing the complexities of African-American communities,
    particularly the balance between
         a. personal identity and social identity.
         b. family and friends.
         c. men and women.
         d. mothers and daughter.




14. What is the organizing logic of most Aboriginal art?
       a. the “Being”
       b. the “Following”
       c. the “Happening”
       d. the “Dreaming”

15. What is the Dreaming for the Aborigine?
       a. the solid support of family
       b. a plan to satisfy all family obligations
       c. the presence of an ancestral being in the world
       d. the knowledge of what the future holds
Fill in the Blanks:

1. A twentieth-century philosophical approach called __________________________ assumes that in all
    systems there are gaps, and that those gaps reveal the most about the whole system.

2. _____________________________ is a public art, operating outside the art market.

3. An important African-American voice is 1996 Nobel Prize winner, _________________, whose novels
    focus on the complexities of African-American Sula (1973) and Beloved (1987).

4. An exhibition called ___________________ in 1989 in Paris, France, announced itself as “the first
    worldwide exhibition of contemporary art.”

5. Unlike most other forms of Aboriginal art, ____________________ are permanent and are not
    destroyed after serving the ceremonial purposes for which they were produced.

Short Answers:

1. Throughout the 1960s and into the 1970s, there was a dramatic shift in attitude and structure largely as
    a result of three catalysts for change. Name them.




2. What is deconstruction?




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3. What has been the single most important development in the art world in the last three decades?




4. What are Lisa Fifield’s most important works?




5. In Aboriginal culture, what person is designated as the “artist” of a painting?




What is the major difference between Western art and the art of other, non-Western cultures?




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The Course Syllabus: Its Contribution to a Successful Distance Learning Experience

Each student is given a Course Syllabus and Textbook (along with any other necessary support
materials such as the MLA Handbook for Writers and the “Preston MLA Handbook Reference
Guide” which are used in research-related courses or those where extensive writing is required).

The course syllabus provides both the student and assigned faculty mentor with:
   - a course description (a very brief overview of the course itself);
   - the course/learner objectives (the knowledge, skills, and/or tools that must be mastered
       by the student if he/she is to receive a quality grade for the course);
   - student work assignments (those that once completed will help the student successfully
       achieve the course/learner objectives);
   - the course text (the background reading necessary for accomplishing the course/learner
       objectives and performing the work assignments).

Questions regarding any aspect of the course including the work assignments should be
addressed to the assigned faculty mentor. Information regarding how to contact this person is
provided to the student when receiving the course syllabus and textbook. Other questions or
concerns regarding the student academic plan should be directed to the Academic Program
Manager at programmanager@preston.edu.

The student and faculty mentor are strongly encouraged to remain in close communication
throughout the course learning experience. Below is the procedure for submitting course work.
    - The student should complete one or two work assignments and submit to the Student
        Advisor at Preston (who will send to the faculty mentor for evaluation and feedback).
        This will help ensure that the student understands the work assignments and is carrying
        them out in accordance with the instructions provided by the course syllabus.
    - Once it is determined that the student is satisfactorily performing his/her work
        assignments, the student may complete the remaining work assignments with input and
        guidance from the faculty mentor. Submit all coursework to the Student Advisor
        accompanied by a cover sheet for each module.
    - After all course work assignments are successfully completed and the faculty mentor has
        concluded his evaluation of same, the evaluated assignments and final course grade will
        be sent to the student along with a current student survey (this document provides the
        student with the opportunity to comment on his/her course experience).

Some of the many resources available to help the student perform quality research are: the
student’s local public or university library, a host of free internet resources covering a variety of
fields of interest (see Preston website at www.preston.edu for a list of those resources);
www.NorthernLight.com (for a $10.00 per month fee the student is given access to a number of
quality, online research databases). For additional help, questions or concerns regarding these
and other resources, please contact Learning Resources Support Center at library@preston.edu.

Best wishes for a successful learning experience.




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