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Volunteer Emory's Guide to Service

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					  Volunteer
Emory’s Guide to
   Service


 Undergraduate Edition
  Fall 2009-Spring 2010
        TABLE OF CONTENTS
Alpha Phi Omega …………………………………………………………………..……………………………..                              1
Alpha Kappa Psi ……………………………………………….…………….……………...…………………….                            1
Alternative Spring Break ………………………………………………………………………………………….                          1
Amnesty International …………………………………………………………………………………………….                            1
Best Buddies ………………………………………………….……………………………………………..…….                               2
Black Student Alliance …………………………………………………….……………………………………...                         2
Camp Kesem ……………………………………………..……………….……………………………………….                                 2
Challah for Hunger ………………………………………………….………………………………………...….                           3
Circle K …………………………………………………………..………………………..……………………….                                3
Colleges Against Caner ……………………………………………………………………………………..…….                          3
Culinary Club ……………………………………………………………………………….…………………….                                4
Dance Marathon ……………………………………………………………………..…………………………....                             4
Dooley Noted ……………………………………………………………………..…..…………………………..                              4
Emory China Care …………………………………………………………………………………………..…….                              4
Emory READ ……………………………………………………………………….…………………………….                                   5
Emory University Global Health Organization (EUGHO) ……………………………………………….……             5
Emory University Pre-Health Association (EUPHA) …………………………………………………………….              5
FIMRC ………………..…………………………………………………………………………………...………                                   6
Global Business Brigades ………………………………………………………………………..……………….                         6
Global Medical Brigades ……………………………………………………………..……………………..……                         6
Global Water Brigades ………………………………………………………………….………………………...                          7
Goizueta Service Organization …………………………………………………………………………………...                      7
Greeks Go Green ……………………………………………………………..……………..…………………….                             7
Habitat for Humanity …………………………………………………………………………………….………                             7
Hand in Hand …………………………………………………………………………………..………………...                               8
Health Assessment Education and Leadership …………………………………………………………………                  8
Minority Pre-Med Society ………………………………………………………………………………………...                         9
Muslim Student Association ……………………………………………………………………………………..                         9
National Association for the Aancement of Colored People (NAACP) ……………………………..………….   9
Open Hand ……………………………………………………………………………………………………..…                                   9
Pawsitive Outreach ……………………………….………………………………………………………………                              10
Project SHINE ………………………..…………………………………………………………….……………                                10
Send-A-Smile ………………………………………………………………………..…………………………….                                10
Slow Food Emory …………………………………………………………………………………………………                                 11
South Asian Health Initiative (SAHI) ………………………………………….………………..………………                  11
Students Helping Impact Foster Teens(SHIFT) ………………………………………………………………                  12
Students Promoting Education Among Kids (SPEAK) ………………………….……………………………..              12
Synergy …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….                                    13
Unite for Sight ………………………………………………………………..…………………………………...                            13
United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) …………………………………….……………………………...                 13
Waller Scholars ……………………………………….………………………………………………………...…                             13
What’s in a Doctor’s Bag ………………………………………………..……………………………………..…                        13
The Office of Student Leadership and Service …………….……………………………………………………               14


                                           1
                                           Alpha Phi Omega
                                Alpha Phi Omega is a national co-ed service fraternity committed to developing leadership,
                                promoting friendship, and providing service to humanity. Different projects are coordinated
                                by brothers are available to the whole chapter. Our service projects include the Ronald
                                McDonald House, Trees Atlanta, MedShare International, FurKids, Atlanta Community Food
                                Bank, Shearith Israel Night Shelter, and ushering at the Schwartz Performing Arts Center.
                                Never forgetting chapter friendships, our fellowship events include trivia nights, trips to
                                Bruster's, enthusiastic intramural sports teams, and our annual semi-formal. APO holds its
Rush Week at the beginning of both fall and spring semester.
Emory’s Alpha Phi Omega chapter recently welcomed its Fall 2009 Pledge Class and has already completed over 400 hours of
service this semester! While these hours have been through a number of projects, some of
our recent favorites include Habitat for Humanity builds throughout September, working at
Shakespeare’s Tavern, and volunteering at the Atlanta Botanical Garden’s Annual Scarecrows
in the Garden. Scarecrows in the Garden showcases the scarecrow creations of local
businesses, organizations, and individuals throughout the Garden. APO volunteers help out
by manning craft and game tables for families. Activities include vegetable printing, pumpkin
toss, scarecrow puppet making, and the ever-popular pumpkin bowling.
Along with our regular and newly added service projects, APO participated in the Atlanta
AIDS Walk on October 18 and looks forward to National Service Week in November.
          Contact: Matt Buendia, APO_President@learnlink.emory.edu
                    Website: www.students.emory.edu/APO

                                            Alpha Kappa Psi
Alpha Kappa Psi is the oldest and largest co-ed professional business fraternity in the United States. It exists to mold today’s
business students into tomorrow’s business leaders. Through a combination of professional, philanthropic and brotherhood
events, Alpha Kappa Psi challenges its members to achieve evermore in the world of business. At Emory University, Alpha
Kappa Psi reaches out beyond the world of business into the local community by volunteering at the Jones Boys and Girls
Club every other Friday as mentors to youth from disadvantaged economic, social, and family circumstances.
                                    Contact: Zahra Dharani, zdharan@emory.edu

                                  Alternative Spring Break
Each Year, Alternative Spring Break will organize a volunteer trip for students. This year, the organization will be going to
New Orleans, Louisiana and work with Rebuilding Together. Rebuilding Together’s mission is to preserve and revitalize
houses and communities, assuring that low-income homeowners, particularly those who are elderly and disabled, can live in
warmth, safety, and independence.
                                         Contact: Latoya Hill, lthill@emory.edu

                                     Amnesty International
                   Amnesty International’s global mission is rooted in a fundamental commitment to the rights, dignity, and
                   well-being of every person on Earth. The purpose is to protect people wherever justice, freedom, truth,
                   and dignity are denied. The members investigate and expose abuses, educate and mobilize the public and
                   help transform societies to create a safer, more just world.
                                         Contact: Anjani Chitrapu, anjani.chitrapu@emory.edu

                                                                1
                                                Best Buddies
Best Buddies is an international, nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to establishing a global volunteer movement that
creates opportunities for one-to-one friendships, integrated employment and leadership development for people with
intellectual and developmental disabilities. Specifically at Emory University, the Best Buddies program is hosted by Emory's
Autism Center so we mainly work with autistic young adults between the ages of 16-24. Keeping in contact is key to
maintaining the one to one friendships. Events are bi-monthly with one typically on the first Sunday from 3-5Pm and the
other on the third Thursday from 7-9Pm. Best Buddies is a lot of fun and a very rewarding experience. We hope to see you
soon!
                                           Contact: Jie Jiao, jjiao@emory.edu
                                            Website: www.bestbuddies.org


                                     Black Student Alliance
The Black Student Alliance (BSA) promotes the edification and maintenance of a conscious black community, seeks to
promote the knowledge of black culture and heritage, and builds ties within the black community. In addition, it serves as a
forum for the study and evaluation of ideas and goals beneficial to the black community. Realizing that no problem can be
solved in the same consciousness from which it came, Black Student Alliance seeks to “elevate the minds of its members and
better our condition as a people.” This past semester, BSA committed to several service events in the Emory and Atlanta
communities. The services events included the following: volunteering at Volunteer Emory’s Sports Camp, working with
NAACP to volunteer with young men through the Prodigy Project, participating in AIDS Walk Atlanta, participating in Quilt
on the Quad for World AIDS Day, and restoring Clay Cemetery on Emory Cares Day.

                                     Contact: Danielle Willis, dnwill2@emory.edu


                                                Camp Kesem
Camp Kesem or Camp “Magic” is a student-run camp for kids whose parents have or
have had cancer. Why is this camp so magical? Because one of the main goals of Camp
Kesem is to bring “magic” to the lives of families that are affected by cancer, by providing
kids a weeklong camp away from the stresses of home. We understand that these children
have additional needs and we address them by giving them attention and support in a
positive and fun environment. Our goal is to create a safe, supportive atmosphere away
from home where they can have a memorable camp experience. Our first camp was held
this August, and it was an AMAZING experience – not just for the campers, but for all the volunteers involved. The camp is
free for the kids, and is run by the efforts of Emory students. We welcome volunteers to help us fundraise, publicize, and
                                          organize the camp all throughout the school year! During Krazy Kesem Week, we
                                          hold different fun activities to help us fundraise. We need all the help we can get, so
                                          please come out and support this cause and help Camp Kesem 2009-2010 be a great
                                          experience for these kids!

                                                         Contact: Rosy Gomez, rmgomez@emory.edu
                                                              or So Y. Yim, syim@emory.edu


                                                                2
                                         Challah for Hunger
                          Challah for Hunger raises awareness and money for hunger and disaster relief through the
                          production and sale of challah bread. During the spring 2008 semester, the Challah for Hunger
                          chapters collectively baked more than 500 loaves of challah every week and donated a total of
                          $20,000 to non-profit organizations providing aid directly to people who need it. Every other week
                          on Tuesday evenings from 6:00-9:00pm, Challah for Hunger Emory student volunteers bake
                          delicious challah at the Hillel house and then sell them at Wonderful Wednesdays on Asbury Circle
                          from 11:30-2:00pm for $5 each. Half of the proceeds are donated to the American Jewish World
Service’s Sudan Relief and Advocacy Fund (the current national Challah for Hunger cause) and the other half are donated to a
local organization, Refugee Resettlement and Immigration Services of Atlanta (RRISA) which supports refugee families living
in Atlanta. Along with the sale of challah, Challah for Hunger volunteers provide information about the crisis in Darfur,
actions that are being taken, and what students can do to help.
                                  Contact: Elizabeth Smulian, esmulian@emory.edu

                                                        Circle K
Emory Circle K is a division of Circle K International (CKI), the largest co-ed collegiate organization dedicated
to service, leadership, and fellowship. CKI provides college students with the opportunity to participate in a
variety of community service activities and leadership development while fostering lasting friendships through
fellowship as part of the college experience
                               The Circle K Pledge states: “I pledge to uphold the objects of Circle K
                               International, to foster compassion and goodwill toward others through service
                               and leadership, to develop my abilities and the abilities of all people, and to dedicate myself to the
                               realization of mankind’s potential.”
                               For the 2009-2010 school year, Circle K is aiming to increase membership. Members are eligible
                               for several $500-$1000 scholarships. Circle K also has the goals of offering 1 service trip a week
                               and 1 social event a month.
                                      Contact: Carmen Collins, ccolli9@emory.edu


                                   Colleges Against Cancer
Colleges Against Cancer is a non-profit organization that seeks to improve cancer awareness, advocacy, and
education on-campus as well as help those fighting cancer through the survivorship division. Each year, we
hold events such as GASO (Great American Smokeout) and the annual Strides Walk in the fall and Cancer
Education Week in the Spring. This fall we are holding events including Wonderful Wednesday Breast
Cancer Awareness with various fundraisers, walking at the Making Strides Against Breast Cancer walk (with
American Cancer Society), Cancer Panel and T-shirt selling for Great American Smokeout. We also have Hope Lodge dinners
where we travel with a group to make dinner for around 50 cancer patients and their families who are staying at the Hope
Lodge, in order to stay closer to Emory hospitals where they will seek treatment. We do activities such as tie-dying T-shirts,
                  arts and crafts, or making pottery on the cancer floor at the Children's Hospital of Atlanta at Egleston two to
                  three times each month. In the spring, we will continue Hope Lodge and Children's Hospital of Atlanta
                  volunteering as well as host the Cancer Education Awareness Week, and help with Relay for Life. We hope
                  to make a difference in bringing awareness about cancer to the college community and help share the stories
                  and journeys of cancer survivors through our various initiatives.
                      Contact: Melissa Danesh, mdanesh@emory.edu (Colleges Against Cancer)
             Nirvi Shah, nirvi.shah@emory.edu or Shea Cochi, secochi@emory.edu (Relay for Life)

                                                                 3
                                               Culinary Club
The Culinary Club volunteers in several communities around the Atlanta area. They volunteer at Cafe 458 in Atlanta, making
food and serving patrons to generate funds to feed the homeless two times each semester, as well as volunteer at
Whippoorwill Farm, helping the local organic farmers there harvest and plant crops. Members also helped out at the Field of
Greens Festival and will be working at the Earth Day Festival to be held at the farm. Apart from these opportunities, the
Culinary Club also volunteers with another team of local organic farmers on the Roswell Kenari Farm. This year, they will be
part of the Volunteer Emory’s MLK Day event.
                                      Contact: Shivani Jain, sjaiin22@emory.edu

                                           Dance Marathon
 Emory's Dance Marathon is an organization that raises money for the Children's Miracle
Network throughout the year. Children's Miracle Network provides Children's
Healthcare of Atlanta with assistance in providing medical care for over 17 million
children. Get involved in this worthy cause by forming your own team to raise money.
Teams can set monetary goals for the year and fundraise with the assistance of Dance
Marathon. At the end of the year, we have a Dance Marathon party complete with free
food, entertainment, prizes, fun, and the families we help to celebrate the hard work that
teams put in during the year and to bring the Emory community together to celebrate
this great cause! Be on the look out for information about our general body meeting
coming soon and go ahead and start thinking about your forming your team, after all it's
for the kids!
                                Contact: Katherine Werbaneth, kwerban@emory.edu

                                               Dooley Noted
Dooley Noted is Emory’s only community service a cappella group. Its members sing at many non-paid gigs throughout the
semester. This past semester, they have sung at nursing homes, and event such as Emory’s Take Back the night, which
promoted sexual assault awareness on campus.

                                   Contact: Mallory Roberts, mnrobe2@emory.edu

                                         Emory China Care
                     The Emory China Care Club supports the mission of the China Care
                     Foundation with fundraisers on Emory's campus as well as throughout
                     the Atlanta area. Previous fundraisers have included selling bubble tea,
                     clubbing events, and date auctions. We also hold an annual banquet, in
                     which we typically raise over $5,000.
                     Emory China Care also teaches Chinese culture and language to children
                     in the Atlanta area who were adopted from China through the American
                     Dragons Mentorship Program [ages 9-14] and the Dumplings Playgroup [ages 2-6]. We are delighted that
                     you share our mission
                                   Contact: Sabrina Chang, ychang9@emory.edu
                                        Website: www.emorychinacare.org

                                                               4
                                            Emory R.E.A.D.
    Emory READ is Emory University’s largest student run tutoring organization. We have approximately 200 active tutors
traveling to inner-city Atlanta elementary schools to tutor students in mathematics and reading. Schools we tutor at, or have in
the past, include: Benteen, Herndon, Bethune, Slater, Heritage, Venetian Hills, Fitch, Gideon, Connally, Stanton, Parklane, and
Belmont Hills. In order to get our tutors from campus to our target schools we have carpools running Monday through Friday
    from roughly 10am until 6pm and from 9am-1pm on Saturdays. In total this semester, we run 55 carpools per week. In
addition to weekly tutoring, our organization throws an event on campus at the end of each semester called Bring Your Kid to
Emory Day. The event, open to the entire Emory population, busses some of the children we work with from their respective
 schools to Emory so that they can get a feel for what a college campus is like. For many of these students, they have had little
  exposure to individuals who have attending college. It is our goal that through this event, in some small part, we can inspire
                   these students to work hard in school in the hopes of receiving a college education one day.
            Contact: Elyse Preiss, epreiss@emory.edu or Cameron Oddone, coddone@emory.edu

        Emory University Global Health Organization
                        (EUGHO)
This year, EUGHO wants to reinforce the community service initiative at Emory. Although we
promote the awareness of and education about Global Health, the most effect and direct
contributions that can make to healthcare and overall well-being are to our community here, in
Atlanta, GA.
For the 2009-2010 school year, EUGHO will be cosponsoring with Volunteer Emory in various
volunteer activities. With 55 active members, EUGHO will be an effective and consistent
partner. In Fall 2009, EUGHO participated in the AIDS Walk as well as the Halloween party at
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston.

                                  Contact: Samantha Mandel, samande@emory.edu


             Emory University Pre-Health Association
                           (EUPHA)
                           During the month of September, EUPHA began “Steppin’ for Health” at Slater Elementary School.
                           Steppin’ for Health is an eight-week project aimed at increasing nutrition education and promoting
                           exercise among children in the greater Atlanta area. On Friday afternoons, volunteers participate in
                           an interactive lesson about healthy eating habits and teach students a step routine that will be
                           performed for their parents at the end of the program. This program is part of the Childhood
                           Obesity Prevention Initiative of HealthSTAT (Health Students Taking Action Together), a non-
                           profit organization comprised of health students committed to improving community health
                           through service, education, and activism. This service project will continue into November, so it’s
not too late to get involved!
In addition to Steppin’ for Health, EUPHA is also collaborated with other pre-health organizations on campus to throw a
Halloween party for patients at the Children’s Hospital of Atlanta at Egleston. Our organization will also participates in the
annual Emory Cares Day.
                                        Contact: Elise Mike, emike@emory.edu


                                                               5
       Foundation for International Medical Relief of
                    Children (FIMRC)
 FIMRC’s mission is to provide access to medical care for the millions of underprivileged and
 medically underserved children around the world. Members partake in a mission trip every year
 during school breaks. They strive to accomplish our mission through the following efforts:
 1. Fundraising for the construction of pediatric clinics in areas currently lacking a reliable source
 for healthcare. 2. Directly influence the health of children by encouraging and supporting
 individuals and groups who desire to travel to medically underserved areas of the world.
 3. Encourage future health leaders to become involved in our purpose by recognizing their
 achievements.
                                      Contact: Sam L. Frenkel, sfrenke@emory.edu
                                                Website: www.fimrc.org

                         Global Business Brigades (GBB)
                                 Global Business Brigades (GBB) provides business consulting and strategic investment to
                                 support under resourced microenterprises in developing countries while respecting local
                                 culture and improving the environment. Our current focus is in remote and rural
                                 communities in Panama where we partner with other local development organizations to
                                 assess, implement and monitor sustainable development projects in 15 partner
                                 communities. The business brigade volunteers serve as a catalyst to the development
projects, providing consulting methodologies, financial workshops and “capital investment,” a monetary donation to the
project to improve profitability or social impact. Between brigades our in-country team maintains relationships with the
partner organizations and communities to provide follow-up and measure outcomes.
                                        Contact: William Guo, wdguo@emory.edu


                         Global Medical Brigades (GMB)
Global Medical Brigades develops sustainable health initiatives and provides relief where there is limited access to healthcare.
As a secular, California-based 501c3 nonprofit organization, our mission is to empower students to provide communities in
developing nations with sustainable solutions that improve quality of life while respecting local culture. Our current focus is in
Central America where more than 3,000 annual student volunteers and health professionals travel to establish mobile medical
clinics in under resourced communities. Each community that we partner with receives a brigade every 3 to 4 months where
hundreds of patients are treated and volunteers deliver public health workshops. Between brigades our in-country team
maintains relationships with the communities to provide follow-up and conducts community health worker trainings to
empower local leaders to perpetuate a consistent level of health care.
We are an international network of more than 50 university clubs and volunteer organizations that
provide communities in developing nations with sustainable health care solutions. Our current
emphasis is in Honduras, where nearly 1,000 GMB volunteers travel annually to deliver services to our
40 communities. In 2007, GMB volunteers provided aid to nearly 40,000 patients in low-income
villages with limited to no access to medicine otherwise.

                                  Contact: Nikhat Dosani, nikhat.dosani@emory.edu


                                                                 6
                           Global Water Brigades (GWB)
                                 Global Water Brigades designs and implements water systems to prevent communicable
                                 illnesses in communities with limited access to clean water. Our current focus is in Central
                                 America where hundreds of student volunteers and engineers travel annually to implement
                                 our community-based water projects with our local partners. Our in-country team members
                                 work with water experts and community leaders to design large scale water systems for the
entire community. Once the water system is blueprinted, volunteers work side-by-side with community members to
implement and provide the education for maintenance through the creation of “community water counsels.” Between brigades
our in-country team insures that the water counsels are functioning and have the necessary funding to perpetuate the longevity
of the systems created.
                                 Contact: Gouthami Rao, gouthami.rao@emory.edu

                         Goizueta Service Organization
The Goizueta Service Organization is exceptionally passionate about our mission of helping those less fortunate than
ourselves. This semester we launched a SAT tutoring program at Druid Hills High School, which is located next door to
Emory. Every Friday for about six weeks, 20 dedicated GSO members tutor 50 high school seniors and juniors at Druid Hills,
covering everything from basic algebra to essay writing skills. We are considering expanding the classes to Wednesdays and
including sophomores in the program next semester. The lead on this project is sophomore Robert Sigman, Vice President of
GSO, who has done a phenomenal job with this initiative. As co-President of GSO, I am especially proud of this SAT
program that helps students achieve their goals of a college education. In addition to the tutoring program, we plan to launch
other programs next semester such as a tax advising session with senior citizens and a mentor program with high school
students in the City of Atlanta. Social responsibility is so important in corporate America today, and we are proud of the
Goizueta students who have taken the initiative in their college years to get involved and help the less fortunate.
                               Contact: Tao Bu, BBA Council President, co-president

                                           Greeks Go Green
For three years, Greeks Go Green (GGG) has been making Eagle Row one of the most eco-conscience spots on campus.
Founded in 2006 by Nicolai Lundy 09C and Whitney Hannan 09B, GGG has brought environmental awareness to Emory’s
Greek community. By introducing competition, film screenings, campus speakers, and educational programming and
encouraging Greek leaders to make environmentalism one of their chapter’s values, GGG has made the Greek community a
key part of the sustainability initiative
                                     Contact: Rachel Gluck, rlgluck@emory.edu

                                     Habitat for Humanity
Habitat for Humanity is a non-profit organization founded on the conviction that every man, woman,
and child should have a decent, safe, and affordable place to live. The organization builds with
people in need regardless of race or religious
Our main focus is to help Emory University students, faculty, and staff, gain access to Habitat Builds.
We are also focusing on fundraising events so that we can co-sponsor a home in the name of all
Emory University Habitat Volunteers, past and present.

                        Contact: Mei Johnson, mejohn4@emory.edu


                                                               7
                                             Hand In Hand
Emory Hand in Hand cultivates nurturing mentorships between members of Emory University and students at DeKalb
County’s International Community School in order to foster cultural understanding, promote personal development, help
students succeed in school, and build lasting friendships. Volunteers go once a week to help with homework and assist with
enrichment activities. They help out on the playground, the swing set, or in a game of freeze tag. The energy and charisma of
the children combined with the helpful and friendly staff created an environment at ICS that one volunteer described as “a
breath of fresh air.” The students at the school represent 30 countries and over 40 different language groups. Approximately
half are refugee/immigrant children, and the remainder are native born. Hand in Hand’s goals include:
                                                    1. Maintaining an ongoing partnership with the International Community
                                                        School
                                                    2. Facilitating a structured opportunity for mentorships
                                                    3. Providing our members with the training and information necessary to
                                                        become a successful mentor
                                                    4. Organize transportation for our members
                                                    5. Offering additional ways for members to get involved at the
                                                        International Community School
                                         Contact: Pace Austin, epausti@emory.edu

        Health Education, Assessment, & Leadership
                         (HEAL)
The HEALing Community Center is in partnership with City of Refuge, a faith-based non-profit agency. The City of Refuge
began in 2002 located in the 30314 Atlanta area. City of Refuge offers both life saving resources and life building tools to
individuals and families in Atlanta who are identified as living in “the margin”. They understand the need for programs that
span multiple areas of need – from food, clothing, and shelter, to job training, placement, housing, life skills, and
transportation. Their goal is to provide the best possible opportunities for success to those who are willing to work hard to
change their lives. Health Education, Assessment & Leadership (HEAL) was started by Dr. Charles Moore and provides
health education and medical services to at risk and underserved populations. It is committed to assess the needs of
communities and to build leaders from within those communities through training and supportive programs. Dr. Moore
created a partnership with the City of Refuge. The HEALing Community Center is the newest attachment to the nonprofit.
The clinic is just starting off the ground and rapidly expanding. Currently the clinic houses two general medicine rooms and
an office. The final clinic construction will be expanded into a giant warehouse. The clinic treats all individuals who are
without healthcare and are 200% of the poverty line. The clinic is also receiving referrals from local hospitals: Grady
Memorial Hospital and Emory Midtown Hospital. The HEALing Community Center has also coupled with an organization
to help get patients over 4000 free medications. There are some hired medical staff, but a lot are also volunteers. The
HEALing Community Center offers all regular clinic work for its patients and lab sample testing.
Mitch Rostad from Emory University has partnered with HEAL and has created the student group HEAL on Emory College
Campus. He has partnered with the various graduate schools of Emory University: Emory School of Medicine, Rollins School
of Public Health, and Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing (and potentially the B-school and Law School). Through
HEAL, the graduate schools are offering an array of specialized volunteer care ranging from health education courses on
diabetes to foot and wound care. Emory College students will have many opportunities to work with these graduate school
students. Students will have many opportunities including leadership and volunteer opportunities at the City of Refuge and
HEALing Community Center.
                                 Contact: Mitchell P. Rostad, mrostad@emory.edu
                                    Website: www.healingourcommunities.org


                                                              8
                                Minority Pre-Med Society
The Minority Pre-Med Society serves as a guide for pre-med students while they go through their process from freshman to
senior year of preparing and applying for medical schools. Throughout the year, the organization does several service projects
including, but not limited to, volunteering at Grady hospital, volunteering at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston,
participating in the AIDS Walk, providing summer opportunities packet of internships and summer opportunities, and
volunteering at health fairs.
          Contact: Susan Kim, susan.kim@emory.edu or Samyukta Mullangi, smullan@emory.edu

                     Muslim Student Association (MSA)
Each year, the MSA holds the Fast-a-thon fundraiser, through which it asks students, faculty, and staff to fast from dawn to
sunset from food, drinks, and vices. As a token of gratitude for everyone's support, the MSA hosts a fast-breaking iftaar dinner
for all participants in Cox Ballroom, where, this year, guest speaker Chaplain Yusuf Yee spoke about Ramadan and the
importance of fasting and charity to Muslims. Chaplain Yusuf Yee is a third-generation Chinese-American who graduated
from West Point Academy, converted to Islam in 1991, and served as a Chaplain at Guantanamo Bay. In addition to raising
awareness about and appreciation for Islam, Ramadan, and the significance of fasting and charity, the Fast-a-thon strives to
raise awareness and funds for a cause that receives little or no media attention. This year, the MSA donated all proceeds to
Zindagi Trust, a nonprofit organization that puts the working children of Pakistan into classrooms where they can receive
quality education. Zindagi Trust aims to provide the children with a source of income and an education by giving those
students a weekly stipend for going to school. The Fast-a-thon was held on Monday, October 26 at 6:30pm in Cox Ballroom.
                                   Contact: Karim Lalani, karim.lalani@emory.edu

         National Association for the Advancement of
                  Colored People (NAACP)
                                 The Prodigy Project is an organization dedicated to combining reading improvement with
                                 positive role models for young African American males. The NAACP has recently initiated a
                                 partnership with The Prodigy Project and held its Orientation session last Saturday. During
                                 the session, volunteers from within and outside the NAACP assisted with a day of interactive
                                 activities for the boys. Through discussions about life goals, entering college, and keeping a
                                 positive attitude and high grades throughout school, we connected on an individual basis
                                 with each of the boys. Some of the activities used to assist the boys include reading story
                                 books, playing word games, introducing technology concepts, and discussing leadership. This
                                 is a sustainable partnership that will continue for some time to come and that I hope will
                                 outlast my time at Emory.
             Contact: Willie Reaves, wreaves@emory.edu or Rachel Wyley, rwyley@emory.edu


                                                 Open Hand
 Open Hand helps people prevent or better manage chronic disease through Comprehensive Nutrition Care™, which
combines home-delivered meals and nutrition education as a means to reinforce the connection between informed
food choices and improved quality of life. The organization seeks to eliminate disability and untimely death due to nutrition-
sensitive chronic disease. Volunteers go to the agency on a weekly basis to help prepare and package meals that will be
delivered to various homes.
              Contact: Priya Gulati, priya.gulati@emory.edu or Shetoria Cash, scash@emory.edu

                                                               9
                                        Pawsitive Outreach
                         Pawsitive Outreach takes weekly trips to local nursing homes and elderly
                         communities to visit with the residents. Volunteers bring several puppies from
                         PAWS Atlanta, a no-kill animal shelter in Decatur, on each trip. PAWS Atlanta
                         provides love, nutrition, medical care, basic training and enriches the lives of
                         orphaned pets until permanent, safe homes can be found. Their mission is to
                         promote responsible pet care, prevent pet overpopulation, and enhance the
pet-human bond. The goal of our weekly trip is two-fold. On the one hand, volunteers will be helping
the puppies become better socialized in preparation for their adoption into permanent homes (PAWS Atlanta provides them
with basic needs like food, water, and shelter, but does not have the means to provide the individual attention many of the
animals need). On the other hand, they will be making a difference in people's lives, as many of the residents we visit are
unable to venture out on their own but love meeting new people. Trips are scheduled every week; they will alternate between
Saturdays and Sundays, and will always be from from 12 - 2 pm. Although there will be a trip every week, there is no minimum
requirement as to the number of times individuals need to attend.
                                   Contact: Alexia Romero, amromer@emory.edu

                                            Project SHINE
Project SHINE is a national service-learning initiative that builds partnerships among community colleges, universities and
community-based organizations to benefit older immigrants, refugees and college students. It links college students with older
immigrants and refugees seeking to learn English and navigate the complex path to U.S. citizenship. In community centers,
temples, churches, senior housing, and classrooms, students tutor elders in English, helping them become more actively
engaged in their communities and teaching the U.S. history and civics needed to pass the citizenship exam.
Project SHINE is coordinated through the Center for Intergenerational Learning at Temple University and is currently being
replicated at 18 institutions of higher education in 9 cities across the United States, including Emory and Georgia Perimeter
College in the greater Atlanta area. Since 1997, over 3000 college students have provided more than 60,000 hours of service to
9000 older immigrants and refugees across the country.
At Emory, Project SHINE is a collaborative effort being facilitated by the Office of University-Community Partnerships, the
Emory College Language Center, and the International Community Connections program of the Institute for Comparative
and International Studies.
                                 Contact: Lauren Henrickson, ltenhar@emory.edu

                                               Send-A-Smile
Send-A-Smile delivers personal, caring messages to hospitalized children as reminders that people are thinking
about them and their well-being. Every card is hand-crafted and contains a positive message “sent with a smile.”
Send-A-Smile seeks to provide opportunities for involvement in direct, compassionate community service to the
broadest possible number of interested participants. Throughout the year, card events are held to create cards with
themes including Halloween, the Holidays, Valentine’s Day, Birthdays, and more. Cards are then distributed at
Children’s Health Care of Atlanta at Egleston. What truly make Send-A-Smile cards unique are the inspiring
messages each card features. Recognizing messages such as “Get well soon” and “Feel better” are unfortunately
not appropriate since recipients may have long-term or permanent conditions, or terminal illnesses, the cards feature
careful and inspirational messages, such as “Be Strong” and “We’re rooting for you.” To date, Send-A-Smile has
sent over 2,050 cards.
                                   Contact: Reina Factor, rsfacto@emory.edu

                                                             10
                   South Asian Health Initiative (SAHI)
SAHI works to promote healthy behavior among South Asians both in the Emory and great
Atlanta communities through health fairs, screenings, and educational projects focusing on
cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Throughout the year, SAHI members partner up with local
organizations to put on health fairs where members of the South Asian in Atlanta can come to
learn more their health and what they can do to live a healthier lifestyle. Attendees often
participate in blood test and other diagnostic tools that help them get to know if they’re staying
in shape and help Emory researchers with samples for the latest up-do-date medical research.

                             Contact: Samrath Bhimani, samrath.bhimani@emory.edu


                                          Slow Food Emory
Slow Food Emory is a local chapter of the international Slow Food
movement that strives to reconnect students to the soil, water, organisms,
cultures, and traditions salient to the production of food and establish
sustainable communal interactions. Slow Food on Campus members
represent a passionate cross-section of youth addressing food system and
food justice issues, spanning environmental and social causes. Through
creative and innovative events, projects, and programs, these students are
leading the Youth Food Movement in the United States.

Last year, students from Slow Food Emory donated their time, talents and
energy to creating an edible school garden for the Captain Planet
Foundation, for their X-Mas Party, the annual fundraiser for their projects. The mission of the Captain Planet Foundation is
to fund and support hands-on, environmental projects for children. They encourage innovative programs that empower young
people around the world to work individually and collectively to solve environmental problems in their neighborhoods and
communities through active service. To create this project for Captain Planet, the Emory students enlisted the aid of urban
farmer Daniel Parson of GAIA Gardens, at Eastlake Commons. With the guidance of farmer Daniel, the students planted
quick-growing crops such as rye, peas, and radishes, and transplanted broccoli, Savoy cabbage, purple cabbage, and green
cabbage, and nurtured them in GAIA’s hoop house for several weeks in containers. The garden showcased the work of
Captain Planet and their ongoing support of Edible School Gardens in metro Atlanta. The garden was dismantled the
following day and taken to Jerusalem House to be installed yet again, this time in the ground, in its new home. Jerusalem
                                                    house, near Emory University, is a half-way house for homeless persons,
                                                    mostly children, living with HIV/AIDS. The Slow Food Emory students,
                                                    who maintain their own edible school gardens on campus, mentor the
                                                    students who run the garden at Jerusalem House
.

                                                              Contact: Julie Shaffer, julie.shaffer@emory.edu




                                                               11
                 Students Helping Impact Foster Teens
                               (SHIFT)
SHIFT Organization has over 20 dedicated members on the board. The group works with
foster care advocacy group, Empowerment. Members work help by tutoring as well as
fundraising. Last, year they hosted a large benefit night at Los Loros, complete with
discounted margaritas, t-shirts for sale, and a DJ from WMRE. With the help of their
sponsors, ZBT, PRIDE, ESI, AKPsi, LSO, FIA, and WMRE, they had a huge turnout of
Emory students and raised $600. The donations they raised at the benefit night, as well as
from past fundraisers like their annual car wash, Mario Kart fundraiser, and change drives, all
went to help their organization increase their involvement in the foster care community. They
work closely with CHRIS Kids, an organization that manages group homes and independent
living programs in the Atlanta area. This organization does great therapeutic work with
children of all ages, giving them a second chance succeed. CHRIS Kids has always been very
appreciative of SHIFT’s help, and a group of SHIFT members recently went to one of the group homes to provide a home-
cooked meal and some much-needed entertainment for the teens. Last year, they put on a culture night for some of the
younger children with the help of LSO and food from Willy’s. Plans for the upcoming semester include more fundraisers,
more publicity, and working with CHRIS Kids to develop tutoring and mentoring programs that the members can be a part
of.

                                Contact: Rachel Forman, rachel.forman@emory.edu


          Students Promoting Education Among Kids
                          (SPEAK)
In past years, SPEAK hosted 24 eighth grade students from Benjamin Carson Middle
School. SPEAK continues to host disadvantaged area students each semester. The
purpose of SPEAK is to host a group of local students from a disadvantaged area of
Atlanta at Emory for a day. The idea is that by giving such students a college
experience day, they will be motivated to care about their current education. Kids have
a chance to meet Emory students and learn what college is about, both inside and
outside of a classroom. The day includes visiting a class, taking a tour of the campus,
lunch, and more. The goal is to show kids that education is worthwhile and fun. The
                                         program targets eighth grade students.
                                         SPEAK participants decided that the program
                                         would have a greater and more lasting effect on middle school students than on
                                         elementary students, and that high school students were already on a fairly set track to
                                         attend or not attend college. The students are hosted by Emory students. Meeting
                                         times are determined each semester to accommodate
                                         as many people’s schedules as possible and are
                                         open to anyone who is interested.

                                                          Contact: Martin Benn, mabenn@emory.edu


                                                               12
                                                       Synergy
Synergy is a group that promotes building a community based upon the values of love, respect, and generosity, which enable
everyone to work together more efficiently and with integrity on Emory's campus and in the broader Atlanta community. As
part of Synergy’s goals, we want to involve college students in the local Atlanta community by having them give back. We do
this through a program called Camp Synergy. Camp Synergy is a two-hour camp in which 10-15 students go to after school
programs and teach a lesson that addresses themes related, but not limited, to kindness, diversity, manners, and respect. Skits,
crafts, and discussion organized and led by Emory students all create an environment where children can grow in a single
session.
                                   Contact: Austin Van Grack, avangra@emory.edu

                                              Unite for Sight
Unite For Sight® is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that empowers communities worldwide to improve eye health
and eliminate preventable blindness. Unite For Sight applies best practices in eye care, public health, volunteerism, and
social entrepreneurship to achieve our goal of high quality eye care for all. In addition to being a leader in providing cost-
effective care to the world's poorest people, our Global Health University develops and nurtures the next generation of
global health leaders. The Emory Chapter works with Georgia Lions Lighthouse Foundation throughout the semester to
conduct vision screenings.
                                  Contact: Rohan Bhandari, rbhanda@emory.edu


           United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF)
Emory Chapter of UNICEF is dedicated to the benefit of children throughout the world through fundraising, volunteerism,
advocacy, and awareness of their great needs (physical, educational aspects). This organization engages volunteers to assist
with testing, counseling, public education, and more related to HIV/AIDS. Apart from advocacy, education, and promoting
awareness, members volunteer at activities in the Atlanta area related to children, such as at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
                                     Contact: Lauren S. Kim, lskim2@emory.edu


                                              Waller Scholars
                                                              )
Waller Scholars Chapter at Emory is a new mentoring program working in conjunction with a program at the local Drew
Charter School entitled the Waller Scholars. The Waller Scholars at the Drew Charter School are in grades 5-8, working
together with the hopes of better education in America. The Waller Scholars Chapter at Emory runs service trips every other
week and has monthly gatherings. These mentor relationships are fostered with weekly contact and monthly check-ins.
Everyone is welcome to be a Waller Scholar at Emory...come join us!
                                   Contact: Dorothy Abrams, dkabram@emory.edu

                                 What’s in a Doctor’s Bag
                                                             )
At "What's in a Doctor's Bag?" we use dynamic and entertaining presentations to teach children what happens at a doctor's
check-up. By learning about very basic medical concepts and instruments, kids will be more comfortable when the time comes
to visit their doctors. Medicine can often be scary, but we take away the mystery and make it fun! The organization goes to
various locations (schools, YMCAs, etc.) around the DeKalb area to educate kid about their health.
      Contact: Alexandra Caccamo, acaccam@emory.edu or Prianka Kandhal, pkandha@emory.ed

                                                               13
                               The Office of
                       Student Leadership and Service
                                                        Jumpstart
                                                                   )
                                          Jumpstart is a national early education organization that works toward the day every
                                      child in America enters school prepared to succeed. Through extraordinary attention in
                                      yearlong individualized relationships, Jumpstart inspires children to learn, adults to
                                      teach, families to get involved, and communities to progress together. In Atlanta,
                                      Jumpstart will serve 450 preschool children with individualized attention by engaging
                                      150 local college students. Nationally, Jumpstart is serving 13,000 children across 20
                                      states, in partnership with 300 early learning centers and nearly 70 universities and
colleges throughout the country during the 2007-2008 school year. Jumpstart’s national sponsors include American Eagle
Outfitters, AmeriCorps, Pearson, Sodexho and Starbucks. Jumpstart is the recipient of the Fast Company/Monitor Social
Capitalist Award (2004, 2005, 2006, and 2007) and the Committee to Encourage Corporate Philanthropy’s Directors Award.
For more information, visit the Jumpstart web site at www.jstart.org.

                                        Contact: Elise Albrecht, emalbre@emory.edu


                                      Volunteer Emory
                                                         )
Volunteer Emory was founded in 1980 by Emory undergraduates
Debbie Genzer and Wendy Rosenberg to serve as a centralized
vehicle for undergraduate service. Today, Volunteer Emory is a
program of the Office of Student Leadership & Service that
facilitates service opportunities and social justice work for Emory
students, faculty, staff and alumni.
VE works provide the Emory community with service
opportunities that promote learning about self and society, while striving to meet the needs identified by community
organizations. Volunteer student staff leaders take groups to various agencies in the Atlanta on a weekly basis. Throughout
the year, Volunteer Emory holds special events, such as Sports Camp, Gandhi Day, Emory Cares Day, and MLK Day where
large groups and organizations can bring their members out into the community for service. During Fall and Spring Breaks,
Volunteer Emory staff leaders also takes group on Alternative Break Trips, such as services trips to New Orleans, LA,
Savannah, GA, Americus, GA, and Leland, MS. For organizations and students on campus, Volunteer Emory serves as a
resource by providing service opportunities, creating connections to various non-profit agencies in Atlanta, and assisting in
setting up service opportunities for large groups.

                                      Contact: Harold McNaron, hmcnar2@emory.edu

This information was last updated on December 16, 2009.

For more questions regarding Emory service organizations and service initiatives on campus and in the Atlanta area, please contact the
Volunteer Emory coordinator, Harold McNaron, at hmcnar2@emory.edu.

If you would like to incorporate your organization or project into Volunteer Emory’s Guide to Service at Emory, please contact Jocelyn Shieh
at jshieh@emory.edu.

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