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					  BEHIND THE EIGHTH
A Publication of the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary     District 8 Coastal Region   Volume XLVI, No. 1    Winter 2010




Kick-Off the Season
             Spring Boat Events Just Ahead
                          Are you and your Flotilla Ready?
    Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                        www.d8cr.org                                       Page 1
Inside This Issue:                                                From the Editor:
2010 District Officers & Board ………………….Page 3

So Far This Year
                                                                  As I write this I am reminded of all who have gone before
    COMO Larry W. Richmond…………………..Page 5
                                                                  and have contributed much to this organization. I am also
                                                                  reminded of our commitment to serve our nation and our
Woulda, Coulda, Shoulda                                           USCG Guardians as they work to preserve our freedom
    Capt. James Montgomery, DIRAUX………..Page 6                     and protect us from harm. I am sure that I am not alone in
                                                                  gratitude for our many blessings. As your incoming editor
USCG Auxiliary Play An Important Role                             I’d like to exercise some “editorial license” to express our
   Capt. Steven Poulin, Sector Mobile………...Page 7                 profound and distinct honor of serving as part of Team
                                                                  Coast Guard and to call upon all of us to pledge anew our
The Road Ahead: Pretty Smooth ... Potholes                        dedication to the Guardian Ethos.
    Richard A. “Doc” Clinchy, DCOS…………….Page 9
                                                                  Recent events close to our shores have once again shown
Vessel Examinations                                               us how fragile life can be and how tenuous circumstances
     Giles Farmer, DSO-VE……………………...Page 11                       are. The need for quick response to the Haitian earthquake
2010 Goals and Challengers                                        reminds us of the true meaning of Semper Paratus, always
    Jan Harding, DSO-PE ………………………Page 11                          ready. The call for help went out and the USCG was the
                                                                  first vessel on scene. Days later a second call went out and
Communication: Back to the Basics                                 many in the Auxiliary answered and stood ready to support
   Larry King, District Captain East…………...Page 12                the USCG in any way needed.

Prevention-An Important Component of RBS                          This is what we do and what other Auxiliarist have done
    Woody Simpson, DSO-VE …………………Page 14                          since 1939 and yet, how many times have you heard from
                                                                  someone you know or have just met, “I never knew there
Coxswain Academy Demonstrates Flexibility                         was an Auxiliary.” Let’s fight that battle by writing, publish-
    TJ DelBello, DSO-OP……………………...Page 15                         ing and telling our story and that of our USCG shipmates.
                                                                  Set a goal for 2010 to make sure that each of us will tell at
Honesty Is the Best Policy                                        least10 new people all about the USCG and Auxiliary’s
    Jon Raden, DSO-HR………………………..Page 17                           missions.
                                                                  Respectfully,
Telling the Story: One Auxiliarist’s Tale                         Patti Fritchie
      Patti Fritchie, DSO-PB …………………....Page 18

Where the District Begins                                                         Behind the Eighth Editor
    Jeff Brooks, Commander Div 1…………...Page 20
                                                                                       Patti Fritchie
Thunderbird SAREX Division 2                                                           8809 Georgette St
     Woody Simpson, Commander Div 2 …….Page 23                                         Panama City Beach, FL 32407

CAN Launches in Division Four                                                          850-230-0684 (H)
     Judy Darby, CAN Coordinator……………Page 25                                           850-896-0444 (cell)
                                                                                       Email: live2saildestiny@aol.com
Dynamic Convergence
     Dave Cooley, District Capt. Central …….Page 28             Behind the Eighth is a copyrighted publication of the United States
                                                                Coast Guard Auxiliary, Eighth Coastal Region. All rights are
First in the Nation: UPV Program Begins In Div 1                reserved. Reprints of articles appearing in Behind the Eighth may
        Joe Reichel, SO-VE ……………………….Page 30                    be made by other publications providing proper credit is given and
                                                                a copy forwarded to the editor of Behind the Eighth.



                                         YOUR DIRAUX SUPPORT STAFF

             CWO ASHLEY GORDON                          JACK GRANGER                                  PARLEE HARPER
             Assistant Director                         DIRAUX Personnel Officer                      DIRAUX Admin Assistant
             Operations Training Officer                Travel Manager
                                                        Auxiliary Facility Data
                                                        Manager
                                                        Auxiliary Injury Claims
                                                        Coordinator

Operations, Training & Qualifications,      Enrollments/Disenrollment's, Transfers,      Correspondence, All Awards, Mail
POMS Coordinator, QE & TCT                  PSI Program Manager/Coordinator, Travel      Processing, NAVRULES, Proctor
Coordinator and Damage Claims.              Orders/Claims, Facility Data Management,     Coordination, Death Notification and
Assistant Policy Management                 Injury Claims Coordination                   Special Correspondence

Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                          www.d8cr.org                                                      Page 2
                                                                                District Executive Committee
                                                District Commodore (DCO) ............................... COMO Larry R. Richmond
                                                District Chief of Staff (DCOS) .............................. Richard A. “Doc” Clinchy
                                                District Captain - East (DCAPT-E) ............................................... Larry King
                                                District Captain - Central (DCAPT-C).................................. David K. Cooley
                                                District Captain - West (DCAPT-W) ......................... Michael A. Vandermate
                                                Immediate Past Commodore (IPDCO)........ COMO William E. “Bill” Crouch
                                                Director of Auxiliary (DIRAUX)....................... CAPT James R. Montgomery

                                                                                                 Division Commanders
                DIV 1.......................R. Jeffrey Brooks                           DIV 4 ............ James A. “Jim” Liverett, Jr.                       DIV 7 ....................................... Judith Hair

                DIV 2........... V. W. “Woody” Simpson                                  DIV 5 ................................. Allen Harding                 DIV 8 .................................... Alan R. Glas

                DIV 3.............Theodore A. Rehwinker                                 DIV 6 ................ Richard D. Cunningham                          DIV 10 .......................... Bobby G. Loggins



                     Auxiliary Sector Coordinators                                                                                                                     Appointed Officers
Corpus Christi ...............John Brough                Mobile .................... John S. “Jeff” Davis                   CRC ............................ Kelly Johnson              PPCA ……………Ward W. McFarland

Houston-Galveston .. Gary Schroeder                      New Orleans ...... Edward J. “Ned” Peak                            DIVERSITY .......... George C. Gaynor                       VPPC ………. William “Bill” Pritchard
                                                                                                                            NSBW …………………...Patti Fritchie

            District Directorate Chief - Logistics                                                                                    District Directorate Chief - Response
                     Stan Smith (DDC-L)                                                                                                         David Ihle (DDC-R)

                        District Staff Officers - Logistics                                                                                     District Staff Officers - Response
DSO-IS ...................................................................................... Byron Trotter                 DSO-OP .................................................................. Thomas J. “TJ” Del Bello
ADSO-IS ..................................................................................... Jack Clymer                   DSO-CM ............................................................................... Chuck Avanzato
DSO-PS ............................................................................... Jonathan Raden                       ADSO-CM (Mobile)……………………………………………….Gene McKenzie
DSO-MA ........................................................................Raymond “Ray” Paul                           ADSO-CM (NOLA)………………………………………………….Cedric Walker
ADSO-MA ................................................................................... Brenda Paul                     ADSO-CM (Hou-Gal) ……………………………………………...Walter Evanyk
DSO-FN .................................................................................... Ed Livingston                   ADSO-CM (Corpus Chr)…………………………………………..Robert Krangle
DSO-GW …………………………………………………………...Janet Lachman                                                                               DSO-IM......................................................................................... Bill Stinson
                                                                                                                            DSO-AV ........................................................................................ Mike Baker
                                                                                                                            ADSO-AVM…………………………………………………………...Duke Dupuy
                                                                                                                            ADSO-AAC (Corpus) ....................................................................... Dan King
              District Directorate Chief - Prevention                                                                       ADSO-AAC (Houston) ............................................................... John G. Edel
                                                                                                                            ADSO-AAC (New Orleans) ........................................................ Jim Coleman
                    Anne Lockwood (DDC-P)                                                                                   ADSO-AVT ................................................................................ Jim Coleman
                                                                                                                            Chief QEC ………………………………………………………… Gary Schroder
                     District Staff Officers - Prevention
DSO-PE ...................................................................................... Jan Harding
DSO-VE ...................................................................... Como Giles S. Farmer                                                               District Staff Officers
DSO-MS ..................................................................................... Dick Frenzel                                                              (Direct Reports to DCO)
ADSO-MS ................................................................. Kristoffer A. “Kris” Diehl
ADSO-MS ………………………………………………………………..Ed Tomko                                                                                  PPCA ……………………………………………………………..Ward McFarland
ADSO-MS …………………………………………………………...Dean Dorothy                                                                               VC-PCA ……………………………………………………………….Bill Pritchard
DSO-MT ............................................................................. ….Chuck Accurso                        D-AA .......................................................... …………….………..Dean Dorothy
ADSO-MT-S ................................................................................. John Steele                     D-AA-H ................................................................................... Dallas Cochran
ADSO-MT-Q ................................................................................ Paul Shurte                      AD-AA-H …………………………………………………………..Gordon Schmidt
DSO-NS ............................................................................ Robert B. Gotthard                      D-AD ............................................................................................. Billy Liddell
                                                                                                                            DFSO ………………………………………………………………..Landon Studer
                                                                                                                            DSO-LP ......................................................................................... Tim Brown
District Directorate Chief - Public &                                                                                       DSO-SR.......................................................................................Kay Pugsley
                            Governmental Affairs
                    Robert Nelson (DDC-PG)
   District Staff Officers - Public & Governmental Affairs
                                                                                                                                                                Past Commanders Association
DSO-CS …………………………… ………………………………...Bill Pritchard
DSO-PB…………………………………………………….Patricia “Patti” Fritchie
DSO-PA…………………………….……………………………………Jake Shaw                                                                                                   President ........................................Ward McFarland
DSO-SL ………………………….. ……………………………….Charles Maricle
NSBW ……………………………………………………...Patricia “Patti” Fritchie                                                                                       Vice President ...................................... Bill Pritchard




  Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                                                                             www.d8cr.org                                                                                                            Page 3
                                           2010 DISTRICT BOARD




                                        District Commodore                       District Chief of Staff
                                          Larry Richmond                         Richard “Doc” Clinchy




         DIRAUX                      DCAPT-WEST                   DCAPT-CENTRAL                DCAPT-EAST                      Immediate Past
  CAPT James Montgomery            Michael Vandermate               David Cooley                Larry King                       Commodore
                                                                                                                              William E. Crouch



 Division             Division                           Division          Division Vice                     Division                Division
Commander               Vice                            Commander          Commander                        Commander                  Vice
                     Commander                                                                                                      Commander




     DIV 1                DIV 1                            DIV 4               DIV 4                            DIV 7                  Div 7
R. Jeffry Brooks    Morris “Mo” Davis                   Jim Liverett      Edie Wellemeyer                     Judy Hair            Raymond Reeves




                                                                                                                                      No Photo
                                                                                                                                      Available

   DIV 2                 DIV 2
                                                                               DIV 5                        DIV 8                       DIV 8
V.W. Simpson          Robert Elliott                      DIV 5
                                                                           Brian Kennedy                    Alan R. Glas            George Gordan




    DIV 3                 DIV 3                          DIV 6                DIV 6                        Div 10                      DIV 10
Ted Rehwinkel         Jim Patterson               Richard Cunningham       Chuck Maricle                   Bobby G. Loggins         Robert W. Capt



 Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                                  www.d8cr.org                                                            Page 4
                                  So Far This Year...
                                  BY COMO Larry Richmond
                                  District Commodore


                                  At  N Train, we learned that there would be no NSAR for 2010.
                                  Due to this, the District will not try to sponsor a DSAR exercise.
                                  As the budget reductions increase, it will greatly impact our extra
                                  activities. The funding for 2011 and 2012 looks even slimmer.

  The Commandant has directed the efforts of the Auxiliary to return to the traditional areas of
  RBS. In conjunction with this, we will have new Marine Dealer literature holders and new de-
  cals for the dealers.

  The weather for our February Conference was cold, with lots of rain. That drove the partici-
  pants of the Coxswain / Crew Academy indoors, for their shore side training, with no ‘on the
  water’ time. In spite of the inclement weather, our SO-PA’s from across the District met for a
  two day workshop and prepared for the District wide push in the Public Affairs area. At the
  conference last September, the District conducted a Photo workshop which was well at-
  tended. Now that they know how to photograph people and events, I hope our PA officers will
  work with them to get articles and pictures published at the local and national level. If you do
  not have a contact at your local newspaper - GET ONE. We need this contact for our PE
  classes, VE ramp days, and recruiting.

  Since we are going to tell the public more about us, PLEASE, PLEASE wear the uniform cor-
  rectly.

  I just got back from attending the 50th Anniversary ceremony for Flotilla 6-8 in Houston.
  “CONGRATULATIONS” to all their members and “THANKS for your dedication to the
  Auxiliary”.

  Don’t forget to have some fun at your local Flotilla and Division level. It is the fun and cama-
  raderie that helps hold us together. ‘THANKS TO EACH OF YOU,
  FOR ALL YOU DO FOR THE AUXILIARY’!!!!!!!




  The overarching mission of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary is to contribute to the
  safety and security of our citizens, ports, waterways and coastal regions.

  We will balance our missions of Recreational Boating Safety and Coast Guard
  Support with Maritime Homeland Security and other challenges that emerge as
  a result of our growing understanding of changes required in the post-9/11 era.




Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                       www.d8cr.org                                      Page 5
              Woulda, Coulda, Shoulda
                                      by Capt. James Montgomery


      If you are like me, there are often times that you have a “Duh” moment
      and wonder how something so obvious could be overlooked for so long.
      Or, for others, wondering why we stopped doing something that worked
      so well. Anyway, when I have these moments, I generally make a note
      for later. I think I will share a few of these thoughts with you.

       We have four Cornerstones. For Coast Guard support and operations, we have a set of awards. For
       member training we have awards. For public education we have awards. That leaves another Cor-
       nerstone, Fellowship. What awards do you have for those in your flotilla/division that make fellowship
       happen?

       At your flotilla/division, you have a great group of volunteers. Whenever they are needed, they are
       there. Many have families. When is the last time you thanked the family for sharing your member’s
       time with the flotilla/division? Okay, there are some family members that would thank us for getting
       the auxiliarist out of the house, but for the most part, time with us is time away from the family. Let’s
       show families we appreciate it. Believe it. It works.

       Colleges  are  not  good  recruiting  grounds.  Don’t let them know at Auburn University where the Detach-
       ment is going full steam. Volunteer  firemen  are  too  busy  to  join. Don’t tell them that in Division 4
       where it works well. No matter what group you identify as inappropriate for recruiting, someone is do-
       ing well with it. Encourage ideas for recruiting and don’t say, “Been there, done that, it doesn’t work.”
       It only didn’t work for you.

       Scared to recruit? Afraid to run for office and lead a meeting? Do some role-playing at meetings. It
       serves as member training, lets people practice and learn by watching/participating, and builds confi-
       dence in a non-threatening setting.

       Make the youngest member of the flotilla/division the training officer. We have to have appeal to a
       younger generation and while our oldest and most seasoned members know the most, they probably
       will use traditional teaching methods that will not capture the minds of a younger, target audience.

       Invest in your leaders. The District and DIRAUX think enough of them to bring them to Elected Lead-
       ership Academy. A flotilla that sends its FC and/or FVC to a conference will find them returning with a
       higher level of enthusiasm and new ideas. (Not enough money you say? Maybe (send) them to just
       the one closest to you. Maybe (the flotilla) just (gives) a stipend to help, like $200 or $300. A perk like
                                         that just might get more members interested in running for office. Con-
                                         sider it an investment in the flotilla’s business.
    The Four Cornerstones                Jot down your ideas as you have them and share them with all of us.
                                         Through the sharing of ideas, we will be a stronger organization.
•   Member Services 
•   Recreational Boating Safety                                Send comments to: James.R.Montgomery@uscg.mil
•   Operations and Marine 
    Safety 
•   Fellowship 


    Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                      www.d8cr.org                                            Page 6
                                                       US Coast Guard Auxiliary Plays an
                                                        Important Role in Sector Mobile
                                                                By Captain Steven D. Poulin
                                                                 with Jake Shaw, DSO-PA




    In a recent visit to Sector Mobile with a group of college students from the US Coast Guard Auxiliary’s
    Flotilla 081-08-09 Eagle Detachment at Auburn University, we had the honor and privilege of meeting
    the Sector Commander, Captain Steven D. Poulin. Captain Poulin greeted the group at a briefing
    shortly after our arrival, and quickly made us feel welcome and very much a part of Team Coast Guard.

    During the briefing, CAPT Poulin shared with us his Command Philosophy and told us of the important
    role the Coast Guard Auxiliary plays in the success of the missions of Sector Mobile. Below you will
    find his command philosophy, as well as comments from him on his perspective of the Auxiliary’s role
    in the missions of the US Coast Guard.

                                  U.S. COAST GUARD SECTOR MOBILE

                                           Command Philosophy

    It is my great privilege to command you as we work to ensure that the ports and waterways of Sector
    Mobile remain safe, secure, and environmentally sound. Each member of Sector Mobile – Active Duty,
    Civilian, Reserve, and Auxiliarist – must understand this command philosophy as we serve the citizens
    of the Gulf Coast. We must always be mindful that what we do every day is critical for the security,
    prosperity, and welfare of our Nation. My command philosophy is simple – to strive daily to be the best
    Guardians we can be in our unwavering commitment to operational success across the spectrum of
    Sector Mobile’s missions:
            Excellence will be our hallmark and standard;
            We will remain vigilant and agile in responding to emerging challenges;
            We will practice sound risk management and promote a safety culture;
            We will provide world class support to our units, personnel, and families;
            We will be Semper Paratus.



                                             Guiding Principles

    The following four “Ships” are the foundation of this command philosophy:
            CRAFTSMANSHIP – We each must do our jobs well. This requires that we understand and
               execute fully our primary and collateral duties, which include constant learning. We must
               train beyond basic skills to enhance capabilities. We must be technically and professionally
               proficient, never tolerating mediocrity. We must also adhere to the customs and courtesies
               befitting our traditions as a military, maritime, and multi-mission service.
            STEWARDSHIP – We must not only take good care of the resources, budgets, and equipment
               entrusted to us, we also must be worthy of the legacy passed to us as Guardians. It is up to
               each of us to protect and promote the legacy. In this regard, we must be constant examples
               of the Guardian Ethos and live the Core Values of Honor, Respect, and Devotion to Duty.



Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                  www.d8cr.org                                           Page 7
                PARTNERSHIP – We must build and nurture partnerships with industry and other Federal,
                   state and local agencies to advance our common interests in a safe, secure and envi-
                   ronmentally sound marine transportation system. We must build partnerships to succeed
                   in the “all hazards, all threats” response environment that is the cornerstone of the Na-
                   tional Response Framework. Our mission profile is too large for us to complete alone – it
                   requires and “all hands” approach that can only be assured by committed partnerships.
                CITIZENSHIP – We must be good citizens in the communities in which we live and work,
                   whether on or off duty. We must understand that our actions at all times reflect on the
                   Coast Guard. Importantly, we must be good citizens to one another. We must be ac-
                   countable to one another for our behavior, and must never let a shipmate sail into shoal
                   water with alcohol abuse, financial problems, depression, inappropriate relationships, or
                   any problem that may degrade readiness. We must be bold to exercise proactive leader-
                   ship to prevent problems before they arise and to get shipmates the help they need. We
                   must foster an environment of trust, mutual respect, and dignity.

      In a personal statement made by Captain Poulin he stated, “I have had the good fortune throughout
      my career to work closely with the Coast Guard Auxiliary, especially here in the Eighth District. I
      see daily the deep commitment and dedication of our Auxiliarists and the tremendous service they
      provide to our Nation. As a LTJG, at then Group Mobile in the mid-1980s, I served as the Auxiliary
      Liaison Officer. That duty was my first extensive experience with the Auxiliary and I quickly became
      convinced that the Coast Guard is only limited by its imagination in using the Auxiliary to support
      our broad spectrum of missions – both operationally and administratively. I was very pleased when
      I was later given the opportunity to be part of the team that developed the 1996 legislation that re-
      cast and expanded the Auxiliary’s authority to assist the Coast Guard in any mission, except direct
      law enforcement and military operations, authorized by the Commandant. In subsequent tours, I
      endeavored to put this statutory authority into action. The key ingredient I found is to ensure that
      the Auxiliary is integrated as much as possible into local operational units. As one example, in addi-
      tion to the many functions that the Auxiliary already performs at Sector Mobile – some of which are
      truly unique – we are cataloging our resource and activity gaps that could be filled by Auxiliary sup-
      port. Concurrently, the Auxiliary leadership is polling its members to see what untapped talent and
      capacity is available. The desired end state is to more closely match talent with need to broadly im-
      prove mission effectiveness.

      I admire the Coast Guard Auxiliary’s volunteer spirit and dedication to service. I consider it one of
      my greatest privileges as Sector Commander to work with the Auxiliary as we together improve the
      safety, security, and environmental protection on America’s waterways.”

      Captain Poulin's Command Philosophy was sent to all Guardians of Sector Mobile. It is evident
      from the start that Captain Poulin considers the Auxiliary a vital part of the sector's force. Thank you
      Captain. The United States Coast Guard Auxiliarists of Sector Mobile are honored to serve under
      your command.




                                                   Jake Shaw - Public Affairs
                                         USCGAUX District Eight Coastal Region
                                                   jakeshaw76@hotmail.com




Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                     www.d8cr.org                                             Page 8
                                  The Road Ahead … Pretty Smooth
                                  But A Few Potholes!
                                    By Richard A. “Doc” Clinchy
                                    District Chief of Staff


An old adage tells us that the only thing that is constant in life is change!
                                                                            For those of you with
any significant “history” in the Auxiliary, you know how true that is in our organization and at
times almost seems that it should be our motto. Most of the potholes referenced in this article title
are encountered as change is implemented and too often we react negatively.

Let’s see what is happening in the Coast Guard and the Auxiliary that will impact us at the local
level, where the rubber meets the road. First, the Coast Guard itself has hit a financial pothole
and it appears that it will be a while before a “paving crew” will be able to make repairs. Signifi-
cant changes have had to be made in Coast Guard plans and staffing as a result of diminishing
budget approvals. Our Active Duty colleagues are seeing personnel cut-backs, cancellation of cer-
tain new vessel and helicopter contracts, and are being asked to do even more with less…nothing
new in the Coast Guard. The trickle-down to the Auxiliary is the fact that financial support to the
Director’s Office is going to be, at best, static for FY11 and likely will be reduced in the future.
Even if it remains static, how those dollars will be allocated will be carefully reassessed so that our
members at the Flotilla level garner the greatest benefits.

COMO Richmond, as you all know, has emphasized the need for expanded public relations. We
need to do a better job letting the public know who we are. In addition, by expanding public
awareness of the Auxiliary, our numbers will grow if anyone with an interest in the Auxiliary can
join us and be valued. We must learn to value any member’s contribution to the Auxiliary and rec-
ognize that there will be those who join our ranks but due to family and financial obligations can-
not give us hundreds of hours per year…right now. Maybe that new member, who is scarce at
your meetings or operations training events, can provide writing, computer, or hospitality skill sets
that will benefit the organization. All we need to do is identify what members can give to the Aux-
iliary and VALUE that contribution…great or small. An effective team has members who contribute
in their own way to the team’s success and that’s how all of us need to look at our Auxiliary and its
success.

So, it appears that financial constraints may be the biggest potholes that we will encounter as we
go down the highway over the next few years. Another old adage tells us that when one door
closes another opens. As financial constraints impact the Coast Guard, the need for Auxiliary in-
volvement become greater and greater. In the 8th Coastal Region there has been a huge surge in
the Auxiliary involvement in the Marine Safety activities of the Coast Guard, we are seeing a tre-
mendous growth in our involvement in radio communications in support of the Active Duty as they
realize we have the ability to serve as a back-stop in times of emergency.

Continued on page 10



Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                       www.d8cr.org                                 Page 9
   More and more, our members are working with Active Duty aviation resources to help keep their
   skills honed. The AUXCHEF program that will soon reemerge is another example of the use of
   Auxiliary personnel to better the conditions for our Active Duty Guardian colleagues.

   If you simply look at the paragraph above, you will see that it is replete with opportunities for
   our members to bring tremendous return-on-investment to the US Coast Guard. We are
   blessed in this Region to have relations with the four Sectors that we serve, our primary organ-
   izational customers, that are second to none anywhere in the Auxiliary. The Sector Command-
   ers see value in utilization of Auxiliary personnel and resources and wholeheartedly support us
   to the maximum extent they can with their recognizably limited resources. In return, our mem-
   bers recognize that we are performing valuable services to the Sectors and to the nation.

   For some other bumps in the road…maybe not as deep as potholes…we all need to be patient
   as new programs are rolled-out. There will always be hiccups. While elected and appointed
   leaders do their very best to minimize such hiccups, they sometimes occur when a new program
   is being introduced and, in the early stages, the rules may actually change in a matter of days
   or weeks. At the National Training Conference held in St. Louis in January, nearly 20 new Per-
   sonal Qualification Standards were released for the Marine Safety programs. Does everyone up-
   and-down the chain have all the details down pat? Doubtful! Remember that every member of
   the leadership team, elected or appointed, is just the same as every Auxiliary member reading
   this article… someone who has agreed to freely give of their otherwise disposable time to the
   United States Coast Guard…no different than the newest of our members in that regard but
   simply having been a member longer and willing to give hundreds, and sometimes thousands,
   of hours each year. Those are contributed hours that might be otherwise devoted to the mem-
   ber’s “day-job” if still employed, their family, or other pursuits in which one might be engaged
   during discretionary time. I mention this so that anyone of our members who are quick to criti-
   cize ought to exhibit a bit more patience with their leaders and recognize that each and every
   one of those people trying to serve you are doing so to the best of their ability. So, when you
   encounter the hiccups I mentioned above, please take a deep breath and exhibit some patience
   before complaining.

   Your District leadership is investing a lot of time and thought relative to much of what we do in
   the District with but one thought in mind…making your Auxiliary experience as rewarding as
   possible and ensuring that we don’t ask too much of you. Join us in the years ahead as we
   drive along and help us maintain an outlook so that we avoid, as often as we possibly can, the
   potholes along the way.

                                        Social Media is Here!
                             Are you and your flotilla taking advantage of it
                          Do you have a Facebook, MySpace or YouTube page?
               Check this out see how many flotillas are already using these recruiting tools

        http://www.facebook.com/#!/search/?ref=search&q=USCG%20Auxiliary%20&init=quick

  To See ADM Thad Allen, Commandant of US Coast Guard’s take on Social Media and
                                the USCG see below
           www.youtube.com/atch?v=vdEAY1XLapQ&feature=player_embedded#

Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                www.d8cr.org                                     Page 10
                                    Vessel Examinations
                                     By Giles Farmer, DSO-VE

  The mission of the Coast Guard Recreational Boating Safety program is
  to minimize the loss of life, personal injury, property damage and envi-
  ronmental impact associated with the use of recreational boats. The
  Auxiliary’s Vessel Safety Check program is a very important to the
  Coast Guard’s, prevention program and a very big part of the Auxiliary’s
  Auxiliary’s Prevention Directorate. As with The Public Education and Program Visitor programs it
  comes under prevention. The best way to reduce the number of boating accidents and causalities is to
  prevent them from happening.

  The Vessel Safety Check program is not just checking the vessel for life jackets, running lights and the
  other items on the check list, it is an opportunity for the Vessel Examiner to talk one-on-one with boat-
  ers about the reasons for the required items and other things related to boating safety. It is also an op-
  portunity to tell the boater about the Boater Education courses that the Auxiliary offers.

  It is a great program. Every Auxiliarist should learn what it is about with the idea of becoming qualified if
  it appeals to him or her. This year we plan to make qualification easier by bringing instruction to the Flo-
  tilla level and incorporate information from the manual with hands on experience. Every FSO-MT or
  FSO-VE will have the instruction materials and testing available. Try it, you will find it to be rewarding.

  Performing Vessel Checks has its advantages. You set your time schedule. Instead of full uniform, you
  can wear the authorized Vessel Examiner “golf style” shirt. You are not “law enforcement” and do not
  report infractions in equipment requirements. And you will meet a lot of appreciative people.




                       2010 Public Education Goals and Challenge
                        By Jan Harding, DSO-PE



At N-Train this year, we made a Tactical Plan for Recreational Boating Safety. The plan calls for PE, VE, PV and PS
working together to meet goals set out in this plan. The PE department has set as our goal a 10% increase in the number
of students attending our classes. We did extremely well last year so this is a big increase. It is believed that we can
achieve this goal if we work together. The first step will be for the PA, VE and PV to get the word out to the boating public.
Currently we may only be reaching a very few boaters.

Try adding the “Suddenly In Command” to your Public Education schedule this year. Many boat dealers would like to have
you come to their business and give this class to new boat owners. This is the hook to get them in the About Boating
Safely, ABS course. Have the books and registration for ABS at the Suddenly In Command class and be ready to sign
them up.

A new course has been added to the Public Education line up. This new “Paddlesports” class will bring in a whole group of
boaters that we have not reached before. Contact paddle clubs in your area and offer the class to their members.

Think outside the box. Have you considered offering the ABS to middle or high schools in your area? They may let you use
school buildings for a Saturday class. How about Police and Fire Department? We have given the ABS to the local Fire
Station and they want us to come back and teach the rest of their crews. They let us use their Training Center for the class.

Is the 2010 goal of 10% increase in public education enrollments achievable? Yes, we can do it if we all work together.


Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                          www.d8cr.org                                                 Page 11
                                     Communications:
                            Getting Back to the Basics
                                  By Larry King, District Captain East


    The Rescue 21 system has been demonstrated to have
    great capability to assist Mariners in trouble. It can expedite
    assistance by quickly locating the position of an 'in distress'
    caller. Consequently, the time loss factor can be dramati-
    cally reduced. Rescue 21 has had growing pains just like
    most technologically advanced methodologies and these
    are being rapidly addressed. However, there exists one
    glaring shortcoming in this system. Loss of even one tall
    relay tower, from damage or due to maintenance, will result
    in partial or complete loss of VHF coverage in a large geo-
    graphic area. No backup system was planned in the design
    of Rescue 21.
    Recognizing this problem, Lt Matt Mitchell, Sector Mobile Control Center Supervisor re-
    quested help from Division 3. The request was to try and develop a simple, 'do the best you
    can', emergency VHF net with little or no cost for new materials. Gene McKenzie, Div 3 SO-
    CM took the lead in this effort. The first order of business was to get an accurate inventory
    of VHF equipment throughout the Division and where the equipment was located. This in-
    cluded all fixed and mobile Communication facilities and portable VHF radios. An explana-
    tion of the goal was offered to all Div 3 members along with a request for participation in de-
    veloping a grid to ensure we could offer Division wide coverage to assist the Sector. Re-
    sponse was very positive.

    Using Navigation charts and highway maps, the location of all fixed VHF sites was plotted
    and an estimate was made relative to reliable operational range. Gaps were filled with mo-
    bile VHF Facilities. On paper it appeared Div 3 had coverage from Pensacola, FL, west to
    Gulfport, MS. From Gulfport to the Louisiana state line there was a gap in coverage. The
    next step was an operational test of "The Plan".
                                                                   On 30 May, 2009, Div 3 personnel, along
                                                                   with Chuck Avanzanto, DSO-CM con-
                                                                   ducted an operational test. Once partici-
                                                                   pants were on site the Aux personnel
                                                                   were instructed to establish VHF contact
                                                                   to the East and West of their assigned
                                                                   location. That was successful. The next
                                                                   step was for them to make contact via
                                                                   land line or cell phone with the monitor-
                                                                   ing location at Sector Mobile. This was to
                                                                   prove messages could be relayed by
                                                                   more than one methodology and to en-
    Auxiliarist Jack Peavy, monitors Rescue 21 communica-          sure the coverage was nearly complete
    tions. Photo by Patti Fritchie                                 throughout the Div 3 geographic AOR.

  Continued on page 13


Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                     www.d8cr.org                                          Page 12
Continued from page 12, Rescue 21 ….

During the remainder of the "Operational test period" the Aux personnel were asked to monitor and
record marine traffic on channel 16 at their established sites. These written records were com-
pared to channel 16 transmissions received at Sector Mobile to verify nothing was missed.

The test plan was to include water borne OPFAC's strung out along the barrier Islands but six foot
seas and a steady 30 knot Easterly wind off Petit Bois Island precluded that part of the test. Use of
water borne OPFAC's is not considered to be of paramount importance in the emergency VHF net.
The obvious limitations of qualified personnel availability, food, fuel, time on station, weather, etc.
seriously limits the reliability of a plan that counts on water borne assets. That does not mean they
can't nor won't be used. The river systems in south Mississippi and Alabama offer numerous dock
areas where a boat could be moored and be manned only by a radio operator for relay of informa-
tion if necessary. To fill the gap in coverage in SW Mississippi, mobile Communication facilities can
be dispatched from areas that already have extensive coverage. Of course there's always the fea-
sibility of requesting assistance from neighboring Divisions.

Sector Mobile includes Auxiliary Divisions 1, 3 and 8. The Mobile Sector Commander, Capt Steve
Poulin is very pleased with this back up system approach and has asked that it be expanded.
Consequently this effort is migrating outside the Division 3 AOR. To assist in this expansion Gene
McKenzie has been promoted to the position of ADSO-CM so he can work throughout the District
along with the DSO-CM. Division 1 is currently working on a grid system that will integrate with the
Division 3 grid. Division 8 is geographically removed from the coast so loss of Rescue 21 coverage
is not something that would impact them as seriously as it would the coastal Divisions. However,
Division 8 has mobile Communications facilities that could be used to augment this effort if the
need arose. This of course means they will become a part of the plan as reserve assets.

In any endeavor such as this, new ideas constantly pop up. One Flotilla member in Division 3 had
a friend offer 'free antenna space' on some 300 ft communications towers he had access to. Locat-
ing a VHF antenna on a few 300 foot tall towers would offer long rage relay but pursuit of this idea
ran completely against the grain of what was trying to being accomplished. There are several legal
hurdles established by the FCC and the equipment cost to connect to a tall tower was prohibitive.
Fine idea but not realistic so the low tech approach that has already been proven to work will re-
main the system for now.

This VHF grid is not considered a reliable backup system in case of need for Hurricane support.
The Division 3 Contingency Plan addresses that subject and it is necessarily fluid since Auxiliary
members have their own personal and family safety at the top of their priority list.




                                          Want to know more about Rescue 21?
                                          www.uscg.mil/Acquisition/rescue21

                                           DSC Radio information & video

                                          www.boatsafe.com/nauticalknowhow/dig0101.htm

                                          www.youtube.com/watch?v=ga6WdGkaeNM


       File photo

Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                www.d8cr.org                                       Page 13
    Prevention - An important Component
                             By Woody Simpson, DSO-VE




Having just returned from NTRAIN 2010 in St. Louis, MO,           Take the opportunity to visit the national web site for RBS
I would like to update everyone on some important events          Program Visitation and Vessel Examinations at http://
in the Recreational Boating Safety (RBS) Program                  safetyseal.net/index3. It has a number of links to guide
Visitation Program. First, it was an information-filled week      the program visitor and also has the 2010 PV workshop
with 192 attending the annual event. Every district was           to help keep program visitors up to date on relevant
represented and this allowed a lot of networking with my          information in the PV program. The separate modules
counterparts as well as meeting the national staff and our        located on the web may also be used as topics for a short
Coast Guard and Coast Guard Auxiliary leaders. RBS is a           training sessions at your flotilla meetings. Another tool for
major initiative for the Coast Guard and the Auxiliary is         program visitors is the “For Safety Sake” official V
instrumental in accomplishing the goals for RBS.                  Department newsletter. The newsletter archives are
Attending the training conference with me was Giles               valuable for new and experienced program visitors.
Farmer, DSO-VE, Jan Harding, DSO-PE, and Jake Shaw,               Everyone is encouraged to take the time to review those
DSO-PA. Our team was tasked with updating the district            publications.
plan to support the national efforts.
                                                                  In 2009, the Eighth District Coastal Region conducted
The National Recreational Boating Safety Program                  8,500 program visits spreading the message about safe
Strategic Plan spells out a methods for increasing                boating. This is a significant accomplishment and in the
recreational boating safety efforts. The signatories of the       top percentile compared with the other Districts. This was
2007-2011 Plan represent eighteen RBS organizations               a record number for program visits in our district. I am
including the Coast Guard and the Auxiliary. The first            confident that we can continue to build on that for 2010.
paragraph of the National Plan states that the primary            We will have lots of challenges this year as the Coast
mission is to ensure that the public has a safe, secure,          Guard Modernization and the Auxiliary is a work in
and enjoyable boating experience by implementing                  progress that will require all of us to remain flexible as we
programs that minimize the loss of life, personal injury,         adapt to the needs of the Coast Guard. It is very evident
and property damage. Throughout the Strategic Plan,               that we will be reinforcing our core mission of
states are referred to as implementing partners.                  Recreational Boating safety in order to meet the needs of
                                                                  our customers, the American public. The Auxiliary is
The Eighth District Coastal Region also has a strategic           being trained and energized to support the mission. I’m
plan. A significant portion of the plan has to do with RBS        ready to have some fun in RBS. Are you? Join me in our
efforts in our district and contributes to the national plan      venture!
efforts. Contributing to the RBS goals involves program
visits, public education, Vessel Safety Checks, and public
affairs. Each function relies on the others to contribute to
the RBS goals by establishing objectives for each of those
areas. That was a major task of our team while at
NTRAIN. Those efforts are currently being done and
shortly will be briefed to our D8CR leadership and
EXCOM. We will then present it to the membership
throughout our organization. Our District Captains also
were briefed during their training and will contribute to our
RBS efforts for our district. It was great training for our
DSOs and our plan will be a model for others to copy.

The AuxBWiki website provides additional support for the
Auxiliary’s RBS efforts in the Program Visitation program.
The site is supported by the collaborative efforts of the
RBS affairs, education, Vessel Exam and Public affairs
Departments, and provides easy access to proven ideas                                          Photo by Patti Fritchie,
that promote RBS.        Users are able to share their            Vessel Safety Checks are an important part of the Auxiliary’s Mission.
experiences, knowledge, and ideas. A whole session on             Become a VE share the task.
social media and it’s potential use was presented to the
DSOs at NTRAIN.

Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                         www.d8cr.org                                                           Page 14
                                                                            Coxswain Training Academy
                                                                             Demonstrates Flexibility in
                                                                               Operations and Missions
                                                                                                By T. J. Del Bello,
                                                                                        DSO-OP, D-1 AQEC, D8CR

                                                           Wednesday       afternoon 10FEB2010, 15 coxswain
                                                              candidates gathered in the Senator room at the Ra-
                                                              mada Inn on the beach at Destin FL. Divisions 1, 3,
  TJ DelBello and John LuLue set up “rocking the baby. “      6,7 and 8 were members from New Mexico
  Photo by C. Dekle
                                                         through Texas, Alabama and to Panama City FL were
 present for training. T.J. Del Bello DSO-OP for D8CR opened the District 8CR Winter Conference Cox-
 swain Training Academy, CTA, “Meet and Greet” with a welcome and list of goals to be met. The candi-
 dates were also welcomed by Doc Clinchy District Chief of Staff D8CR. They then met their Training Man-
 agers BM1 Chris Whittington, Anne Del Bello Flotilla Commander Flotilla 14 and Division 1 SO-OP Ed
 Bultmann to receive their training agenda review and field questions. DIRAUX , Operations Training Offi-
 cer, Mr. Gordon BOSN2 reviewed current policy and the CTA was underway. The candidates were now un-
 der the guidance of the United States Coast Guard Training Team led by Mr. Chuck Bush BOSN4 and OIC,
 Officer in Charge of Panama City Life Boat Station.

 Thursday sessions began with a cold front intruding which surprised everyone as water temperatures slipped
 below 50 degrees and air temperatures plummeted. The training agenda included underway training which
 was lost as the cold front deepened. By Saturday morning, ice was found on cars parked at the beach! Our
 CTA Coast Guard Instructors adapted smoothly, with outstanding Recertification and Proficiency coxswain
 seamanship, TCT and SAR organization training. Navigation and Piloting including Search Patterns was
 well covered including the neat charting short cuts used so effectively. Deck work was accomplished at the
 docks with the facilities moored.

 By Saturday evening our lead Instructor asked the coxswain candidates if they desired more class time to
 cover “any” questions on Sunday. “You are important to us and we need you to be ready to perform at peak
 efficiency and safely so we are here for you if you need us.” The class responded to Mr. Chuck Bush BOSN4
 and his team with a Bravo Zulu. The Coast Guard Training Team completed a terrific three day training pro-
 gram and a group of trained coxswain candidates packed up to return home and hopefully share their knowl-


 The Coxswain Training Academy named by its designer
 Mr. Chuck Bush BOSN4 as the Coxswain Recertification
 and Proficiency Academy is developed to train auxiliary
 coxswains due for their third year check rides and new
 coxswains very close to requesting their initial qualifica-
 tion.

 Candidates have demanding standards that need to be met
 prior to being accepted into the class. All of the candidates
 committed out of pocket to take the class and all finished
 smarter at the end of the class. District 8CR is hopeful that
                                                                  Mr. Bush talks with CTA students at recent FEBCON training.
                                                                  Photo by Charles Deckle

Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                    www.d8cr.org                                                       Page 15
  Continued from page 15: Coxswain’s Academy

  this first conference endeavor will prove to be a motivating influence for programs of this type to be devel-
  oped within its divisions.

  The USCG Auxiliary operations program both Surface and Air are very important to the Coast Guard.
  When under orders the surface and Air facilities are prepared to respond to SAR missions and at other
  times monitor regatta functions or act as station stand by teams. The men and women that crew the Auxil-
  iary platforms on surface and in the air constantly train as do their Coast Guard counterparts. They qualify
  to work as operations underway teams with pride. The coxswain Training Academy presented by District
  8CR and the Coast guard worked hard to meet their expectations. Semper Paratus!

                                  Training is a constant; Complacency may cause a Mishap!




                                   Practice session at CTA, FEBCON USCG Station Destin, FL
                                   Photo by Charles Dekle


                                                  Awards Dinner FEBCON 2010




                                                         Photos by Charles Dekle
Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                               www.d8cr.org                                Page 16
                                     Honesty is the Best Policy
                                         By Jon Raden, DSO-HR

                         When dealing with the public we are often viewed as experts in boat operation,
      marine safety and environmental protection. Because the uniforms are so similar, the vast majority
      of the public does not know the difference between the active duty Coast Guard and the Auxil-
      iary. Because of this, we may be asked questions beyond our training or expertise.

      When you are asked a question and you are unsure of the answer:
      • Do not guess or make up an answer.
      • Be truthful with the individual asking the question. Explain that you do not know or that you are
          unsure.
      • You may say that the information they are seeking is outside your training or expertise.
      • Refer the individual to the Auxiliary website.
      • Get the individual's email or phone number, find the information they are seeking and forward it
          to them.
      • Pass the individual's information to the staff officer best able to answer the question.
      • Do not react poorly to the individual's question. What may seem like a "stupid" question to you,
          may be an important question to them.

      People are curious and may use a question to approach you. This is your opportunity to show what a
      great organization the Auxiliary is and what fine people are members. Don't pass up this chance to
      refer the individual to our Public Education Classes or see if they are interested in joining the Auxil-
      iary.



                 FEBCON 2010 Ceremonies, Meetings and Fun: Photos by Noel Brumfield




Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                    www.d8cr.org                                            Page 17
                                              Telling the Story, One Auxiliarist’s Tale
                                                                                   By Patti Fritchie, DSO-PB
                                                                                    with Esmeralda Valague




                                                         As we look over the list of officers in our flo-
                                                         tillas, divisions and District we might tend to
                                                         engage in thinking in a “compartmentalize”
                                                         manner. We have all heard a statement
                                                         such as “Oh yes, that’s the VE’s job, or the
                                                         PB’s job. In this year when our District’s em-
                                                         phasis is on Public Affairs, we must all give
                                                         up this “cube” thinking and realize that each
                                                         one of us is a public affairs representative. It
                                                         is every Auxiliarist’s job to “tell the story.”
                                                         While reading newsletters submitted by our
                                                         various divisions, I was struck by one Auxil-
                                                         iarist’s understanding of this concept and the
                                                         action she took as a result. Allow me to in-
                                                         troduce you to Esmeralda Valague.
      Photo by Josefina Valague - Esmeralda’s mother

    Valague who lives in Houston, TX joined the Auxiliary in 2008, receiving her acceptance letter
    the same week that Hurricane Ike hit her area. As a new auxiliary member, she sought train-
    ing and completed ICS courses through 300, qualified as an instructor, received a sustained
    service award and a Unit Commendation for her service during Hurricane Ike and the subse-
    quent recovery period. While this is impressive, it is not the reason for this story.

    Active in her community Esmeralda Valague attended an event hosted by Houston World Af-
    fairs Council of which she is a member. Four star Army General Martin Dempsey, Com-
    mander of United States Army Training and Doctrine Command, Fort Monroe, VA spoke on
    the future of our military at this meeting. Various branches of the armed forces attended
    along with ROTC units and all were wearing uniforms. Valague wore her USCG Auxiliary uni-
    form to represent Team Coast Guard and sat at a table where key aides to General Dempsey
    also sat.

    At some point, a couple was also seated at the table and quickly noted Valague’s uniform.
    Having returned from a boating vacation in Columbia, South America they made their dislike
    of the USCG known stating, “You are paid to harass innocent recreational boaters.” The cou-
    ple revealed that their boat had been boarded and searched for illegal drugs. Undaunted
    Valague answered the couple’s retorts by stating, “Ma’am, I do not get paid at all.” During the
    ensuing conversation, Valague informed the couple of the Auxiliary’s role in supporting the

    Continued on Page 19




Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                  www.d8cr.org                                          Page 18
    Telling the Story continued from page 17…

    U S Coast Guard’s missions and outlined the many responsibilities that the USCG has to keep
    our borders safe from intrusion of illegal drugs or persons. She also informed them of the vari-
    ety of ways that the USCG Auxiliary assist recreational boaters in safety missions, public edu-
    cation, vessel exams and search and rescues. Valague reports that in the end the couple con-
    ceded that they needed to rethink their perception of the USCG and while they had never
    known about the auxiliary before they now had information about the all-volunteer service of the
    USCG Auxiliary. Members of the General’s staff seated with Valague also heard this conversa-
    tion and were duly impressed with the selfless contributions made by Auxiliary Volunteers.
    They introduced Esmeralda to General Dempsey and told him how Valague had defended the
    US Coast Guard, USCG Auxiliary and the roles they serve.

    Because of Valague’s choosing to “tell the
    story,” General Dempsey awarded her with the
    Army Training Command Challenge Coin. It is
    considered quite an honor to be awarded this
    coin which traditionally is given to members of
    a unit, to improve morale, reward a job well
    done and prove membership in a unit .

    When asked about this event Valague re-
    sponded, “It is amazing how many people in-
    cluding those in the military do not know that
    there are un-paid volunteers in the USCG Aux-                US Army’s Training Command
    iliary.” She reported that General Dempsey’s                  Challenge Coin Awarded to
    staff said of auxiliary members, these are true               US Coast Guard Auxiliarist
                                                                     Esmeralda Valague
    patriots – they serve their country without ask-
    ing anything in return.
    Her impression was that both the couple she talked with and those who heard the conversation
    were favorably impressed with what America’s All Volunteer Life Savers do every day. She told
    the story and it was heard.

    We should all take a lesson from Auxiliarist Valague. It is not just the people we are talking to
    that gain more information about us; it is those that are also listening that carry away more infor-
    mation about our missions and service. Please be inspired by this “story” and go out and start
    telling the Auxiliary story to all who will listen. Carry business cards with contact information so
    they can get in touch with you when they want or need more of the “story.” Always have bro-
    chures, pamphlets or other printed materials that inform about the auxiliary, your flotilla, the mis-
    sions and recruit members. Invite those you talk to come to a meeting. Sure, they may not join,
    but they will have a greater understanding of the work we do and the value it has to marine
    safety and security.

    We challenge you to be the next Auxiliarist to demonstrate, “Honor, Respect and Devotion to
    Duty.” Esmeralda Valague has shown those characteristics and we thank her for being a great
    member of the Auxiliary’s Public Affairs and Team Coast Guard.




Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                 www.d8cr.org                                       Page 19
       Around the District:
        Where the District Begins
        By Jeff Brooks, Commander Division 1

                                                      Division  1, one of the smallest units geo-
                                                      graphically, has seven Flotilla’s serving a
                                                      population base of approximately 1.33 million
                                                      people in the Florida panhandle, the four
                                                      southernmost counties in Alabama, and seven
                                                      counties in southwest Georgia. Five flotilla’s,
                                                      Pensacola, Ft Walton Beach, Panama City
                                                      Beach, St Marks, and Shell Point focus pre-
                                                      dominantly on coastal and bay waters, while
                                                      the other two Milton, on the Blackwater River,
                                                      and Sneads, on Lake Seminole are inland
                                                      units.
         Six of the seven flotillas achieved their Silver Oar goals last year, and the Division was se-
         lected as Most Outstanding Division in the district for 2009. Most Flotillas are active in all
         nine of the Silver Oar program areas.

         Two additional programs are somewhat unique to the Division and may be exportable to
         other parts of the district. The first, implemented prior to hurricane season last year, is the
         Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Liaison program. Auxiliarists serve as the liaison of-
         ficer to Sector Mobile in the five most populated
         counties of the eight counties along the coast of
         the panhandle, and a sixth county will be added
         this year. Under the Incident Command System
         (ICS) structure, they operate as the communi-
         cations conduit between the Sector Incident
         Management command center and the local
         emergency managers, relaying support re-
         quests and situational reports to Mobile, and
         advising local authorities on Coast Guard capa-
         bilities and plans.

         The Division also pioneered the Uninspected
         Passenger Vessel (AUX-UPV) examination pro-
         gram for the district. Members of the Panama
         City Beach and Ft Walton Beach flotillas
         worked with the Marine Safety Detachment –
         Panama City (MSD-PC) to develop all examina-
         tion procedures and forms, designed and pro-
         cured examination decals, and developed and
         implemented a marketing program to publicize
         the availability of the service.
                                                                Auxiliary UPV inspectors conduct first charter boat
                                                                safety inspections


Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                  www.d8cr.org                                                Page 20
     Continued from page 20
                                                 They also developed all of the administrative procedures used in
                                                 the MSD-PC office, developed the training requirements for new
                                                 examiners, and staff the office several days each week. Aimed
                                                 at the commercial boats carrying passengers for hire (typically,
                                                 six passenger or 6-Pak boats) beneath the mandatory USCG
                                                 inspection criteria, the goal of the program is to minimize the
                                                 loss of life and personal injury by helping achieve voluntary com-
                                                 pliance with federal and state boating laws. Implemented in Sep-
                                                 tember, 2009, the program will soon be expanded to other flotil-
                                                 las at the east and west ends of our area of operations (AOR).
                                                 The program is also expected to be expanded to include Unin-
                                                 spected Towing Vessels (UTV).

                                                 Division 1 is home of one of the largest rescue demonstrations
                                                 in the district, conducted in St Andrews Bay (Panama City) for
                                                 the past three years. The exercise is designed as generate pub-
                                                 licity on the capabilities and effectiveness of the Coast Guard
                                                 and the Auxiliary, serve as a training tool, and demonstrate the
                                                 ability of multiple response units to work together. Hosted by the
                                                 Panama City Beach flotilla, members from most of the other
                                                 units in the Division participate in one or more of the activities
                                                 taking place. The most recent exercise involved five (5) Auxiliary
                                                 facilities, a 41’ utility boat from CG Station Panama City, an HH-
                                                 65 Dolphin helicopter from Aviation Training Center (ATC) Mo-
                                                 bile, marine units from the Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission
                                                 (FWC) and Bay County Sherriff’s Marine Patrol, the Panama
                                                 City Fire Department’s (PCFD) fire boat, and an ambulance from
                                                 the Bay Medical Hospital’s Emergency Medical Services (EMS)
                                                 department.

Simulated boating
accident helps to
train multiple
agencies to re-
spond to emergen-
cies on the water.




                      US Coast Guard, USCG Auxiliary, local marine
                      law enforcement and Emergency First responders
                      work together in this simulated boating accident.


                                                                          Multiple agencies participate in SAREX
  Continued on page 22                                                    photos by Patti Fritchie

   Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                         www.d8cr.org                                        Page 21
       Continued from page 21 Division 1…

       The complex scenario simulated a collision between
       a high speed powerboat and an anchored yacht, with
       resultant injuries aboard the vessels and in the wa-
       ter, and a subsequent fire aboard the yacht. Realism
       was enhanced with the use of a high volume smoke
       generator aboard the yacht, and OSCAR, a dummy
       tossed overboard with a compound leg fracture pro-
       truding through a tear in his jeans. The demonstra-
       tion showed the arrival of Auxiliary vessels in re-
       sponse to the incident, and the extraction of an in-
       jured boater from the water and transportation to the
       arriving EMS unit. The PCFD’s fire boat was de-
       ployed to fight the onboard fire, spraying high vol-
       umes of water at (actually, over) the smoke, and put-
       ting a firefighter aboard to ensure the fire was se-
       cured. Simulated burn victims were then passed over
       to the CG utility boat for initial treatment and air ex-
       traction by the ATC helicopter. The complex scenario
       simulated a collision between a high speed power-          A press boat carried print and TV media as
       boat and an anchored yacht, with resultant injuries        well observers from city government and
       aboard the vessels and in the water, and a subse-          USCG public affairs offices in New Orleans
       quent fire aboard the yacht. Realism was enhanced          Photo by Patti Fritchie

      with the use of a high volume smoke generator aboard the yacht, and OSCAR, a dummy
      tossed overboard with a compound leg fracture protruding through a tear in his jeans. The
      demonstration showed the arrival of Auxiliary vessels in response to the incident, and the ex-
      traction of an injured boater from the water and transportation to the arriving EMS unit. The
      PCFD’s fire boat was deployed to fight the onboard fire, spraying high volumes of water at
      (actually, over) the smoke, and putting a firefighter aboard to ensure the fire was secured.
      Simulated burn victims were then passed over to the CG utility boat for initial treatment and air
      extraction by the ATC helicopter. The damaged vessels were then taken into tow by the Auxil-
      iary boats, and transported to the nearby marina. A number of spectators viewed the demon-
      stration from the marina where a narrator described the action, and the viewers heard the VHF
      radio traffic as the event progressed. Both local network TV channels carried footage of the
      demonstration on their 5:00, 6:00, and 10:00 PM newscasts, and the local newspaper featured
      the event on the front page of the Saturday edition with a story and multiple photographs.
      It was a highly successful event!

      Our 250+ members are proud to be the “First Division”, and strive to always remain number 1!



                                  National Safe Boating Week
                                  May 22-28, 2010
                                  Celebrate This Week
                                  Boat Safely ALL YEAR!
                                  www.uscgboating.org

Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                  www.d8cr.org                                         Page 22
       Around the District:
      Thunderbird SAREX Division Two
                                                                     By Woody Simpson, Division Commander

        Division 2 is a small division and covers a large geographical area consisting of the entire State of
        New Mexico and part of far West Texas. The division has four flotillas located in Farmington, Albu-
        querque, and Elephant Butte, NM and one in El Paso, TX. The flotillas are active in all cornerstones
        of the auxiliary; operations, vessel safety checks, RBS program visits, and PE. Recreational Boating
        Safety is a function of all flotillas all year long. But a majority of our members are qualified in opera-
        tions. Now, more than ever, our State Parks and Army Corp of Engineers need us because of funding
        issues necessary to ensure the public has an enjoyable boating experience.
        Every member of Division 2 has skills that are as widely varied as their geographic location. We have
        members in all four corners of New Mexico and West Texas and together bring a diverse background
        in which to work together as a team. Although the specific talents may not necessarily apply directly
        to every one of our Coast Guard Auxiliary activities, the diversity sure makes our get-togethers inter-
        esting and fun! Recreational Boating Safety consumes most of an Auxiliarist’s time and efforts.




      One of our major initiatives this year is our bi-annual THUNDERBIRD SAREX. This is a division
      activity that brings operational facilities together from all the flotillas. This event will be held at Ele-
      phant Butte Lake, halfway between Albuquerque, NM and El Paso, TX along Interstate 25. The
      overarching goal of the exercise is to improve the abilities of the Coast Guard Auxiliary to serve the
      recreational boating public on all the lakes in our Area of Responsibility. We have four objectives to
      achieve this goal.
      • Enhance the search and rescue skills of our members.
      •   Partner with other agencies that include the Civil Air Patrol, New Mexico State Parks, Sierra
          County Sheriff’s Department and other local first responders in order to promote additional co-
          operative and effective mutual aid and response capabilities.
      •   Allow the opportunity to work with Coast Guard operational units from Sector Corpus Christi us-
          ing helos and active duty boat crew members.
      •   Provide networking and fellowship for the auxiliary members with all participants and the public
          resulting in a better public image of our organization.


   Continued on page 24


Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                      www.d8cr.org                                              Page 23
    Exercises do not just happen. The degree of success depends on the planning, coordination execution
    and evaluation of such an activity. Teamwork is absolutely crucial for everyone to understand the roles
    and responsibilities of each participant and the agencies that are supporting the exercise. The exercise
    offers a way of sharpening existing skills and learning new skills by means of simulated emergencies,
    employing scenarios devised to incorporate “routine and normal” activities while on patrol as well as
    introducing situations which call for decision-making and use of judgment and specialized skills. Too
    many times, exercises are conducted that have scenarios that are artificial and not realistic. The exer-
    cise must be flexible in scope and content yet follow a organized outline to accomplish the objectives.
    A secondary outcome of this type of exercise can be to offer the opportunity to train for auxiliarists
    seeking to practice their qualification tasks as a crew member or coxswain. This practice should also
    routinely be accomplished while on safety and regatta patrols.

    I’d like to outline some areas that we accomplish when we conduct an exercise. Three phases of an
    exercise are the Initial actions, organization of the exercise, and conducting the exercise. For initial
    actions, a planning committee is formed who are participants from all the flotillas and organizations that
    support the exercise. A chairperson is designated who provides the Division Commander a status of
    all activities being undertaken during the planning phase. Organizing the exercise consists of members
    from operations, communications, materials, pubic affairs. Conducting the exercise involves all the
    participants and the most important aspect; safety. A safety officer is designated with the sole respon-
    sibility for safety. A refresher Team Coordination Training (TCT) briefing is conducted prior to kickoff of
    the operational activity. SAFE BOATING is paramount. After the exercise is completed, an after-action
    evaluation is conducted with all the participants. This allows for formal documentation of what occurred
    and a path established for “lessons learned” of the exercise.

    Prior to the exercise a “”Sadie Night” or “Meet and Greet” activity is held. Because there are members
    from all the flotillas involved, this is a great networking opportunity and new members are introduced to
    promote the team effort. A celebration activity is also planned upon the conclusion of the exercise and
    recognizes everyone who participated in the exercise. Recognition for achieving the exercise objec-
    tives is also important in the success of any major undertaking such as Thunderbird. In addition to the
    training benefits, all participants should find this event fun and an enjoyable and beneficial experience.
    That’s what planned for this year in addition to the normal RBS activities. Semper Paratus!



Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                    www.d8cr.org                                            Page 24
       Around the District:

       CAN Launches in Division Four
           By Judy Darby, D8CR Coordinator CAN,
              Citizens Action Network, Flotilla 42


         A core committee of Auxiliarists in the
         Eighth District Coastal Region
         launched Citizen's Action Network in
         Division 4 in the fall of 2009. The area
         includes the New Orleans metropolitan
         area, north to the Red River and west
         to Lafayette, all within the state of Lou-
         isiana. Much of Division 4 is sparsely
         populated marshland and swamp.                  CAN members might be called upon to report on abandoned or
                                                         grounded vessels. Photo by Judy Darby
         However, eighty-eight percent of offshore oil rigs are within the state's ownership of the Gulf of
         Mexico's Outer Continental Shelf. Louisiana is the number one producer of crude oil and num-
         ber two producer of the country's natural gas. Louisiana is also the number one producer in
         liquefied natural gas terminal capacity.* Thousands of businesses, large and small, service the
         area's petroleum industry and are located on the edge of the marsh in such cities as New Or-
         leans, Baton Rouge, Port Fouchon, Lafayette, Morgan City, and New Iberia. The threat of an
         attack in which a small boat could be used against infrastructure in this energy and petrochemi-
         cal producing area is a legitimate and on-going concern of the Coast Guard. A network of vigi-
         lant, well-trained volunteer observers armed with nothing more than cell phones and binoculars
         may be a low-tech approach to homeland security, but it has recent and long-term proven suc-
         cess on Puget Sound and other waterways of District 13 where CAN originally took root.

         Citizen's Action Network is a Coast Guard program, administered by the Auxiliary, that oper-
         ates much like a neighborhood watch aids law enforcement, but on a much larger scale. Its
         members are never asked to use their boats, put themselves in harm's way or investigate be-
         yond their own property. Rather, a member's contribution lies in his familiarity with what is nor-
         mal on the waterway within his view, his skill in observation and his ability to report his findings
         to a Coast Guard investigator when called upon. There is no cost to join CAN.

         Recruiting by all available means

         Division 4's committee focused its early recruiting efforts first on Auxiliarists who live, work and
         relax on the water and, second, on large entities with a permanent water presence and an in-
         terest in helping the Coast Guard while adding another layer of security to their own arsenal.

         CAN recruiters reach the commercial fishermen, port managers and non-Auxiliary recreational
         boaters, fishermen, and waterfront homeowners through mainstream and social media, per-
         sonal contacts and vendors who agree to make available at checkout counters a tri-fold bro-
         chure that explains CAN and has a tear-off application form.

         Continued on page 26



Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                      www.d8cr.org                                                Page 25
   Continued from page 25.. CAN Launches in Division Four


    Membership in Citizen's Action Network is pro-
    moted online at www.d8cr.org/CAN and when-
    ever someone visits a flotilla's website. Auxil-
    iary Director of Information Technology, Bill
    Pritchard, who is a member of the Division 4
    core committee, created a dynamic link to the
    district's website where an electronic version of
    the CAN application form is located. A poten-
    tial CAN member is able to fill out the form
    online and send it directly to the Coast Guard's
    database where, once the applicant's member-
    ship is approved, the Coast Guard watch-
    stander is able to access it on mapping soft-
    ware and contact the members nearest the lo-
    cation of an incident being investigated. The
    contact information of applicants is verified and
                                                                      Individuals need only a cell phone and a waterfront
    applicant are vetted for their understanding of                   view to be a valuable asset to the Coast Guard.
    the commitment being made and willingness to                      Sometimes a good pair of binoculars might come in
    take complete a self-directed, online training                    handy. Photo by Judy Darby
    manual.
    Clearly, the better trained CAN members are, the better their observation skills are and the
    more useful the information will be that they give to Coast Guard watchstanders. CAN mem-
    bers are called upon to report incidents such as search and rescue, boaters in distress, radio
    calls, flare sightings, false alarm verification, unsafe vessel operation, aids to navigation equip-
    ment outages/abnormalities, suspicious activity, and marine pollution. Using the watchstand-
    ers' incident report form as a guide, members learn the order in which the watchstander will ask
    for pertinent information, the questions he will ask and how to estimate conditions, direction,
    distances and such. CAN reporting is based on the acronym L – A – S – T, for Location (of the
    incident), Activity (the nature of the incident being reported), Size (of an incident such as an oil
    spill, or the size and identification information of the vessel involved in the incident), and Time
    (time, date and conditions at the scene of the incident). After training, a member receives the
    sector communications emergency number to be used for reporting only.

    Early Success

    Aggressive recruiting Division-wide through a mailing campaign and direct contact has led to
    early success in adding Auxiliarists and individual non-Auxiliary members, a large non-profit
    and several businesses to the network.

    The Greater New Orleans Expressway Commission (GNOEC) became the first business mem-
    ber of CAN in late 2009. With 100 employees on watch 24 hours a day, seven days a week,
    the GNOEC manages the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, a 24-mile double span entirely over
    open water that connects the north and south shores of Lake Pontchartrain north of New Or-
    leans. General Manager Carlton Dufrechou said of the initiative, “We are very happy to be able
    to have this new opportunity for cooperation with the Coast Guard. The Lake Pontchartrain
    Causeway is a major hurricane evacuation route that also carries 42,000 commuter vehicles a
    day between the north and south shores.”
    Continued on page 27


Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                        www.d8cr.org                                                Page 26
Continued from page 24 CAN Launches in Division Four

Jacobs Engineering, Inc., the civilian contractor that manages the NASA/Michoud Assembly Facility,
is another important CAN partner of the Coast Guard. The Michoud complex is located on an 800-
acre tract in East New Orleans with direct access to the Intracoastal Waterway. It is the site where
the external fuel tanks for the space shuttle program are assembled and shipped by barge to Flor-
ida. Jacobs' Director of Business Development, Ray Vogel, explained that NASA is actively recruit-
ing private enterprise to locate on several sites that are ready to develop and the enhanced security
provided by Citizen's Action Network is expected to be a benefit in recruiting new businesses. While
many employees at each company have a water view, there is a single point of contact at each
company responsible for reporting to the Coast Guard.

The success of Citizen's Action Network in its mission is proportional to the number of members in
the network, the extent of their training and their familiarity with their particular waterway view.
The coordinator, working with the Auxiliary's Eighth District-Coastal leadership and Coast Guard
Sector New Orleans, expects to rollout Citizen's Action Network to the rest of the district by Decem-
ber 31, 2010.

                   Editor’s note: For more information on CAN projects see, http://www.uscg.mil/d13/can/


                                                 Sadie’s Night Out FEBCON 2010
                                                       Photos by Maria Madison




 Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                         www.d8cr.org                                      Page 27
                                      DYNAMIC CONVERGENCE
                                        By Dave Cooley, District Captain, Central
    Dynamic Convergence is the process of multiple events coming together creating a new event or opportu-
    nity. Will Federal budget constraints that have resulted in reduction of Coast Guard billets coupled with
    current or increased Federal regulatory responsibilities result in a dynamic convergence of new opportuni-
    ties for Auxiliarists? If so, what might some of these “new” opportunities be? What will the requirements
    be for participation? Finally, as new activities become available, how should or will they be integrated into
    the Auxiliary work plan?

    Will there be additional opportunities?
    The answer to this question generally would originate from the Sector or above. While it may be too early
    in the process to have an absolute concrete answer early indications, based on the Commandant’s
    Budget Message (FY 2011) dated 4 February 2010, is that the answer is indeed positive.

    What could some of these new opportunities be?
    Possible “new” opportunities could include broader opportunities in the arenas of Search and Rescue
    (SAR Standby), Courtesy Vessel Examinations of Uninspected Passenger Vessels throughout the
    Coastal Region. Additional opportunities may include Commercial Fishing Vessel Safety Examinations,
    and various “Assistant” opportunities with the Prevention Department as outlined by the new Trident Per-
    sonal Qualifications Standards (PQS) list. The recently expanded PQS list now includes 27 possible op-
    portunities for Auxiliarists to provide direct augmentation assistance to the Sector or Sector Units. Other
    volunteer opportunities may also exist to provide various Administrative Support activities such as data
    entry and data file management as well as participating with possible special projects.

    What are the requirements?
    Auxiliarists may be presented with unique opportunities. However, these opportunities will come with a
    “cost” with two components. The first component is learning. The Auxiliarist may be required to join train-
    ing programs suited to the task. The second component is COMMITMENT. The common thread of both
    is time. The Auxiliarist must devote time to learn as well as time to perform these newly learned tasks.

    All of these potential opportunities will require additional learning or training, whether formal or informal.
    Formal training usually follows a process based on a Personal Qualification Standard. Pursuing a PQS
    uses a study-guide process leading a student through a particular subject and related skills, which may
    result in a new qualification. The PQS learning process may be accomplished individually as self-study or
    use the assistance of a mentor. Alternatively, the learning may also be conducted as a group in a class-
    room setting. Informal training is “on-the-job” learning where the student learns while performing the task.

    In addition, Auxiliarists will need to understand that participating in any of these new opportunities will re-
    quire a time commitment. This time commitment and carry through is the benefit the Coast Guard derives
    for making the initial investment to this specific Auxiliary training. The key is determining the fair return to
    the Coast Guard of the necessary time and effort invested to train auxiliarists. As an organization of vol-
    unteers, it is difficult to define the parameters of the fair return standard. The best response is similar to
    that of Justice Potter Stewart’s assessment of possible violations to the first amendment rights of free
    speech when he wrote, “I’ll know it when I see it.” To give that concept context however, a commitment
    time frame of between one and two years for each PQS is suggested.

    Auxiliary training. The key is determining the fair return to the Coast Guard of the necessary time and
    effort invested to train auxiliarists. As an organization of volunteers, it is difficult to define the parameters
    of the fair return standard. The best response is similar to that of Justice Potter Stewart’s assessment of
    possible violations to the first amendment rights of free speech when he wrote, “I’ll know it when I see it.”
    To give that concept context however, a commitment time frame of between one and two years for each
    PQS is suggested.



   Continued on page 29

Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                      www.d8cr.org                                              Page 28
Continued from page 28…
How will these new opportunities be integrated?
Auxiliary leadership will need to balance the activities of the unit between the new and the old. Generally any
“new” activity has a certain appeal and attracts member participation. If these anticipated opportunities do be-
come available and members are attracted as anticipated, balancing these new opportunities with the activities
of the Auxiliary’s core charter of Recreational Boating Safety can be a leadership challenge. Or will it?

District Eight Coastal Region has a unique program that supports the focus on Recreational Boating Safety. It
is called Silver Oar. This Awards program includes basic elements of Recreational Boating Safety and Coast
Guard Support Activities. Completing the Award criteria are elements that encourage member growth and
learning and activity.

Recreational Boating Safety activities include:
1. Public Education Class Hours
2. Operations Hours
3. Vessel Safety Checks
4. Program Visitors Visits
Public Affairs Missions

Coast Guard Support Activity may include hours auxiliarists spend in watchstanding, SAR missions, ATONs, or
administrative assistance.

Member Growth and Learning includes,
6. Member Training Hours
7. Qualifications + SC
Year End BQ+IQ+AX

Utilizing the Silver Oar criteria District, Division, and Flotilla Leadership can plan, direct, and monitor unit activi-
ties to achieve a balance between the new and the old activities thereby maintaining an even keel.

Dynamic convergence, the blending of multiple events has the potential to create new opportunities for Auxil-
iarists. These opportunities will augment force capability and ultimately benefit Recreational Boating Safety.
D8CR has a fine history of supporting the Coast Guard and RBS activities. Continuing to integrate the Silver
Oar into the process provides a great tool to monitor and motivate Member activity and progress.
As these new opportunities become available, D8CR is ready and well poised to accept these new challenges.
It is part of our Guardian Ethos!

                                                      "THE GUARDIAN ETHOS"

  I AM AMERICA'S MARITIME GUARDIAN. 

   I SERVE THE CITIZENS OF THE UNITED  
     STATES. 

   I WILL PROTECT THEM. 

   I WILL DEFEND THEM. 

   I WILL SAVE THEM.                               

   I AM THEIR SHIELD. 

   FOR THEM I AM SEMPER PARATUS. 

   I LIVE THE COAST GUARD CORE VALUES. 

   I AM A GUARDIAN.                           www.youtube.com/watch?v=J1K7zDImxjk

Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                             www.d8cr.org                                       Page 29
                                                        First in the Nation: Uninspected
                                                        Passenger Vessel (UPV)
                                                        Program Begins in Div 1
                                                        By Joe Reichel, SO-VE Div 1



                                                        The difference between survival and a tragedy may come
                                                        down to being prepared for the unexpected. A little over a
                                                        year ago, Division 1, District 8 Coastal Region decided to
                                                        improve safety in local area unregulated passenger ves-
                                                        sels. Included were the numerous vessels that make up the
         Bill Petriz, Joe Reichel and Lt. Caskey dis-   fishing, sport and scuba diving, sightseeing, water taxi,
         cuss UPV requirements                          parasailing fleets that carry six or less passengers for hire.
         Ensuring these vessels, commonly known as “6 Packs,” met the safety requirements in 46 Code of
         Federal Regulations (CFR), Subchapter C the safety of locals who work on these vessels and the
         tourist who charter them will be improved. Flotillas 1-4 and1- 9, in cooperation with the Marine Safety
         Detachment (MSD) in Panama City, Florida, planned a volunteer examination program and imple-
         mented training and procedures needed for the first Uninspected Passenger Vessel (UPV) program
         in the nation.

         The objective of the program was to train an initial cadre of Auxiliarists who would become fully certi-
         fied UPV examiners capable of conducting examinations. They in turn would train additional, inter-
         ested Auxiliary personnel in other District Flotillas. The key element to the program would be a volun-
         tary, “no-fault,” and “non-adversarial”, dockside vessel examinations. The plan was for Division 1
         Auxiliary personnel to assume most aspects of the program. UPV examiners after training received a
         Letter of Designation issued by the Sector Commander.

         The selection of the initial cadre began with an interview with Lieutenant Doug Olson, the Coast
         Guard MSD officer at Panama City. LT Olson conveyed to Auxiliary Examiner candidates, the high
         level of professional knowledge and responsibility associated with the examiner qualification, and the
         stringent standards that must be met to attain and retain the status of a UPV examiner. The MSD offi-
         cer discussed the mission, prerequisites, man-hour commitment and the training requirements neces-
         sary to become a UPV examiner. In addition, the MSD officer reviewed the physical demands on an
         examiner and the required oral board. It was determined the Auxiliarists were committed to the pro-
         gram and the initial cadre was formed.
         With the cadre formed, the actual training began.
         The candidate was assigned a Coast Guard mentor
         to assist and supervise them in their training activi-
         ties. The initial training consisted of a briefing that
         introduced the UPV task elements and provided an
         overview of the UPV requirements. Auxiliarists
         working individually, in groups and with their mentor
         researched applicable 46 CFR requirements and
         became familiar with the UPV task requirements.
         With the assignment of Lieutenant Steve Caskey to
         the MSD Panama City, a second group of candi-
         dates was selected. Cadre members and other             USCG Lt. Caskey and Auxiliarist Akins review checklist
                                                                       before UPV supervised inspection. Photo by Patti Fritchie
         Continued on page 31



Behind                                                               the Eighth / Winter 2010   www.d8cr.org     Page 30
  Flotilla personnel formed a committee to develop program management procedures, examination check-
  lists, documentation records, and a distinctive UPV decal. When this was accomplished, LT Caskey briefed
  the entire program to the Sector Mobile Commander, Captain Steven Poulin who approved the program to
  move forward.

  The Coast Guard supervised examinations of actual UPVs to familiarize the candidates with the examina-
  tion process began in spring of 2009. Auxiliarist John Gibson, Flotilla 14, was the first of the initial cadre to
  complete all the required supervised examinations and demonstrate the required knowledge base to satisfy
  all Performance Qualifications Standard tasks. Auxiliarist Gibson then stood the mandatory certification
  board and displayed competency in all required areas. His training package was then forwarded to Captain
  Poulin and within weeks Auxiliarist Gibson was designated a certified UPV examiner.

                                                                             Shortly after, other Auxiliarists some from
                                                                             Flotilla 14 and some from Flotilla 19, became
                                                                             certified UPV examiners. With certification
                                                                             these Auxiliarists will conduct examinations,
                                                                             as well as, train and supervise other auxiliary
                                                                             members as the program assumes the safe
                                                                             boating mission envisioned by the initial
                                                                             cadre.

                                                                             Today, through a variety of publicity meas-
                                                                             ures, the Division 1 UPV examiners and ad-
                                                                             ministrative staff, work to familiarize the UPV
                                                                             boat owners and operators of the benefits of
                                                                             obtaining the complementary, no-fault UPV
  Auxiliarists Scott, Low, and Akins discuss requirements with boat owner.   examination.
  Photo by Patti Fritchie
                                                               Early in the program Industry Days were held
   in both Panama City and Destin. Owner/Operators and boat captains were invited to hear about the new
   program and its advantages to them. Flyers have been created and placed in marine businesses, mailed
   and or hand carried to docks and piers. Perhaps the most effective publicity measure to date has been the
   Dock Walker Program. This program brings
   the examiner face-to-face with the UPV cap-
   tain and allows the examiner to discuss the
   program and answer questions. It also is a
   prime method to recruit vessels for dockside
   examinations.

   Now that the UPV program at Flotillas 1-4
   and 1-9 is underway, the next step is to ex-
   pand to all interested flotillas in Division 1
   and District 8 Coastal Region. The imple-
   mentation of the UPV program in Division 1
   has placed focus on improving safety within
   UPV operations with the ultimate objective
   of improving safety within the UPV fleet and
                                                                First Marine Safety Industry Day held in Division 1 by USCG
   thus saving lives.
                                                                MSD personnel, Lt. Caskey, Photo by Patti Fritchie



Behind the Eighth / Winter 2010                            www.d8cr.org                                              Page 31

				
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