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					                   The C ity o f Ja n es v i l l e ' s OF F I C I A L N ews l e t t e r

                                                        PARK PLACE

                                                               FA L L 2 0 0 1

            Do You Feel Safe in Janesville?
          feel safe walking alone at
Do you in Janesville? Theseabout
    night
in your neighborhood?
                        How
                              ques-
                                                                                                                             It's not a
                                                                                                                             glamorous job…
                                                                                                                             Wisconsin Department
tions were asked in the City's 1997                                                                                          of Natural Resource
and 2000 telephone surveys of                                                                                                wildlife specialists vis-
Janesville residents. When compar-                                                                                           ited Traxler park on
ing respondents’ answers, feelings                                                                                           June 27 to round geese
of safety decreased from 1997 to                                                                                             up and band them with
2000. Therefore in March 2001, two                                                                                           age and sex tags.
focus groups were conducted of                                                                                               Banding helps collect
                                                                                                                             information about
Janesville residents selected at ran-
                                                    INSIDE
                                                                                                                             migration and geese
dom to represent a mix of ages and
                                                                                                                             mortality rates.
genders. The purpose was to gather
some ideas behind the perceptions.                                               • Patrol neighborhoods more frequently.
Why do residents feel less safe? What could the City try                         • Provide targeted/neighborhood level information,
to do to improve feelings of safety within Janesville?                             using a variety of media (including this newsletter).
    When asked about what they liked about Janesville                            • Improve outreach programs to problem juveniles
in general, before the participants even knew what they                            and neighborhoods.
were assembled to discuss, many people offered that                              • Promote ethnic diversity.
they liked Janesville because they felt it was safe.                             • Sponsor events that foster a sense of community.
However, they felt that feeling safe in general is on the                        • Also mentioned were address vacant and poorly
decline and were bothered by minor incidences like                                 maintained properties and emphasize beautification.
vandalism. Participants said regional and national news                        In summary, participants said they still feel safe here,
coverage of crime, and societal issues like breakdown in                       but are concerned about societal ills and changes.
family values, morals and respect for people and prop-                         People feel safer when they know their neighbors, feel a
erty were contributing factors. Other factors were feel-                       part of the community, see officers and know what is
ing less informed about what is going on in their neigh-                       happening in their neighborhoods. Participants were
borhoods and having less time to meet and chat with                            also concerned with keeping youths busy and out of
neighbors. Many said Janesville has good, responsive                           trouble.
and supportive police and fire departments, however.                               The full report was presented to City Council on
    Participants gave suggestions on how City govern-                          July 9 and can be found at the City’s Web site at
ment could improve safety, which include the following:                        www.ci.janesville.wi.us. A group including firefighters
  • Address juvenile offenders, who they felt were                             and police officers made further suggestions for improv-
    responsible for many petty incidents like vandalism.                       ing safety that will be studied in the coming months.
“I live on my own. ...I feel very safe here.”
“We’ve had some vandalism at our house, but at the same time, it’s not the level of fear of violent attacks that you have in your larger cities.”
“Even though everybody feels safe in Janesville, everybody takes precautions in Janesville that we never used to take.”
“We certainly never leave our doors unlocked now. And probably part of that is that national media attention to crime and so our level of awareness, even
though it may not be in our back yard, is that it is closer than it used to feel.”
“Get to know your neighbors. Take care of each other. Because you can’t really count on the police department - only to a certain point.”
                                                                                                  - Some comments from focus group participants
                                                                      Janesville City Council (Front row, L to R):
                                                                      Russ Steeber, Craig DeGarmo, Harry O’Leary, Paul
                                                                      Williams. (Back row): Assistant City Manager Tom Rogers,
                                                                      Tom Brien, Victoria Damron, Paul Murphy, City Manager
                                                                      Steve Sheiffer.
                                                                         If you would like to send a letter to one or all of the
                                                                      Council members, you may send it to the attention of the
                                                                      City Council, Municipal Building, P.O. Box 5005,
                                                                      Janesville WI 53547-5005.
                                                                         Except holidays, the Council meets the second and fourth
                                                                      Monday of each month at 7 p.m. Their meetings are tele-
                                                                      vised live on cable television channel 20, and are held in the
                                                                      Council Chambers on the fourth floor of the Municipal
                                                                      Building (18 N. Jackson Street). The public is welcome to
                                                                      attend or view the broadcast on channel 20.


                                                             Victoria Damron
Tom Brien                                                    When my husband, Duan, and I moved to Janesville
I have lived in Janesville over 30 years. My wife’s          nearly 30 years ago, we immediately fell in love with
name is Fran, and we have a son, Todd. I work at GM          the city's parks, river, recreational opportunities and
as a dynamic vehicle testing driver (i.e.: quality con-      neat appearance. It's been a wonderful place to raise
trol). I enjoy peaceful camping in Adams County.             our sons, Dack and Duke, who now attend college. As
Before running for council, I attended Council meet-         a family, we like to camp, travel, bike, and fish. In the
ings for three years as a UAW assignment. I was              past I have served as a citizen representative on the
concerned about treatment of the public who came             Community Development Authority, Zoning Board of
to speak at these meetings. I graduated from Adams-          Appeals, TIF Joint Review Board and the Business
Friendship High School, and have taken classes at            Improvement District. I am a graduate of UW-Madison
Blackhawk Tech and UW-Rock County. Term                      and own Damron Communications, a marketing com-
Expires - 2003; First Elected - 1991                         pany. Term Expires - 2003; First Elected - 2001
Telephone: 756-1393 E-mail: Brient53546@aol.com              Telephone: 752-0916 E-mail: damron@inwave.com

Craig DeGarmo                                                Paul Murphy
I am a lifelong resident of Janesville. My wife, Jennifer,   I work at Westphal Electric. My wife’s name is Julie
and I had our first child in Fall 2000. Since 1994, I have   and we have a son, Zachary, and two daughters,
owned and operated my own plumbing business,                 Abbie and Alison. After watching Janesville City
DeGarmo Plumbing, Inc. I am also a member of the             Council meetings on television, I became interested in
Local Union 75, Forward Janesville, Inc. and serve on        serving on the Council and learning about city govern-
the City’s Commercial Contractors Committee. I have          ment. I wondered about why past Council members
been interested in serving the City of Janesville as a       answered and addressed issues the way they did. I
council member and learning more about city govern-          am a lifelong Janesville resident. My interests are fit-
ment for several years. I look forward to maintaining the    ness, family and tinkering. I have a Bachelor’s degree
high standard of living that Janesville residents enjoy      in Speech from UW-Whitewater. Term Expires - 2002;
and helping to continue the growth and development of
                                                             First Elected - 1998
this area. Term Expires - 2002; First Elected- 2000
Telephone: 752-1391 (after 4 p.m.)                           Telephone: 752-4697           E-mail: pmurphy@ticon.net

Harry C. O'Leary
I am an attorney at O’Leary Law Office, and a graduate of Parker High School, UW-Madison with a B.B.A. in
Accounting, and Marquette Law School. My wife’s name is Connie and I am a Janesville native. I spend a lot
of time enjoying our children, Catherine and John. I also like to camp, travel, and exercise. I saw serving on
the City Council as a means of becoming closely involved in the direction in which Janesville would grow and
develop. Term Expires - 2003; First Elected - 1991                                         Telephone: 755-1394
                              Meet City Council                                                                      3
Russ Steeber                                                  Paul Williams
Originally from Manitowoc County, I moved to the              I am a life-long resident of Janesville. I graduated from
Janesville area in 1978 when I accepted a position with       Craig High School in 1970 and attended UW-La
the Rock County Sheriff's Department. I presently hold        Crosse. My wife's name is Mary, and I have two sons,
the rank of Lieutenant. I hold an Associate's Degree in       Joshua and Nicholas, and two stepsons, Jake and
Police Science through Blackhawk Technical College and        Freddie. Since 1991, I have been office manager of
am a graduate from Northwestern University's Traffic          Mary B. Williams Law Office, S.C., in downtown
Institute's School of Police Staff and Command. I am          Janesville. I enjoy fishing, NASCAR racing, Packer foot-
presently attending Upper Iowa University working toward      ball, and long drives to interesting places. I am vice-
my Bachelor's degree in Public Administration and should      president of Friends of the Saxonia House, Inc. I am
graduate this fall. My wife Lauri and I have a combined       also a member of the Janesville Downtown Business
family of three daughters (Aimee, Molly and Bethany) and      Assoc., Forward Janesville, the Wisconsin Assoc. of
a son (Sean). We have one grandson (Carter). My wife          Historic Preservation Commissions, and several histori-
and I are very active in Wisconsin Special Olympics and       cal societies. As a City Council member, I want to
both serve as board members to the Wisconsin Law              encourage citizen participation and try to facilitate city-
Enforcement Memorial. We enjoy traveling and spending         citizen communications on the important issues we are
time with family. Term Expires - 2003; First Elected - 2001   facing together. Term Expires- 2002; First Elected - 2000
Telephone: 758-1631            E-mail: RS1398@aol.com         Telephone: 757-2452        E-mail: pmwilli@inwave.com


                     Get Rid of Junk Cars!
                      Get rid of junk cars! City of Janes-    in Wisconsin who are diagnosed with kidney disease,
                      ville Council members and officials     are awaiting a kidney transplant or need dialysis (an
                      heard this complaint loud and clear     "artificial kidney" machine) to live. Therefore any vehi-
                      at the neighborhood meetings of         cle owner who holds a clear title could take advantage
Janesville residents they hosted recently. But getting rid    of this program to clean up property, stop paying fees,
of junk cars was not so easy as it sounded. Many junk         insurance or repairs for the vehicle. Owners can avoid
cars went unreported, disposing of them was costly, and       the hassle of selling the car, and it could be a
it could take many months to resolve complaints. All of       potential tax deduction.
these factors discouraged the disposal of junk and aban-      2. Instead of waiting for someone to complain,
doned cars.                                                   selected City employees will report properties with
     Last fall the Council approved a new approach to         junk cars that they observe during the course of
nuisance enforcement, including changes that should           their normal work responsibilities.
make it speedier to remove junk cars in Janesville. In        3. Code Administration officials now have citation
addition, the City investigated ways to help residents        authority. Therefore, people who possess junk cars
dispose of their junk cars in a fast, convenient, and inex-   will be encouraged to properly dispose of them to
pensive way, which should help everyone come out a            avoid receiving a fine.
winner. The program will also beautify neighborhoods          4. The City will ask landlords to play a more active
and help out a worthy cause.                                  role in reporting junk and abandoned cars on their
     "Junk" and "abandoned" vehicles are two different        properties. At least one Janesville salvage dealer will
things and are handled differently. A "junk car" is a         then remove the vehicle at no cost to the property
motor vehicle on private property that is not operable        owner. Previously, the financial burden of removing
or not licensed. A vehicle is considered abandoned if the     a vehicle discouraged landlords from authorizing
titleholder could not be found for a vehicle left on public   removal of abandoned cars.
property more than one hour. Here are the changes:
                                                              The City plans to fully implement this program this
1. When a junk car is reported, information about the         fall, after another employee is hired and trained in
National Kidney Foundation of Wisconsin's car donation        the Code Administration department to help inv-
program will be affixed to the vehicle. The Kidney Cars       estigate the large number of complaints expected.
program offers free pick-up service of vehicles. They do      For more information or to report a junk car, please
not have to be running, but they must be whole and the        call Code Administration at 755-3060. For more infor-
donor must hold clear title to the vehicle. Kidney cars       mation about the Kidney Cars program, please call
are then sold at dealer-only auctions or to a licensed        1-800-488-CARS.
recycler. Proceeds will benefit thousands of people
4
        Wanted: A Few Good Landlords
                                                          of the inspection standards are easily met. If the unit
    he City of Janesville Housing and Neighborhood
T   Services Department administers a federal (HUD)
program that assists elderly, disabled persons and
                                                          is found to be decent, safe and clean, the tenant and
                                                          landlord must sign a lease. The first lease must be for
                                                          at least one year.
families of one or more in need of a helping hand              Housing and Neighborhood Services then will
with rent payments. The Housing Choice Voucher            make a monthly payment for rent directly to the
Program, also known as Section 8, assists households      landlord on the household's behalf. The amount of
with their monthly rent and utilities. Under this pro-    the rent the client pays can be anywhere from 30 to
gram, a monthly rent payment is made to the client's      40 percent of the household's monthly income.
landlord on behalf of his or her household.                    Many landlords may be unaware of the program,
    However, it can be difficult at times for clients     or may have misconceptions about it. If you have
of the program to find a decent place to rent. It can     worked with the rent assistance program in the past,
also be difficult for landlords to find good tenants.     the federal government has changed some of the
Most of these potential tenants are no different than     requirements that may have discouraged your con-
any unassisted renter. They are often hard-working        tinued participation. Following are some changes:
people in a low-income job or have special circum-
stances - they may be going to school, disabled,          1. The lease is between the landlord and tenant. The
elderly or have a special needs child and can't find      Section 8 program does not supply the lease.
day care. The department is seeking people who
may have a unit(s) to rent to participate in this         2. The landlord is not required to stay within the City
program; it can be a house, duplex or apartment.          of Janesville's "fair market rents." If the unit is afford-
                                                          able, based on the tenant's income and comparable to
How the Program Works                                     similar units in Janesville, the tenant may rent the
To be eligible for assistance, program clients must       unit after it passes the inspection.
have a total household income at or below 50% of          3. The landlord may now collect the full security
the Rock County median income, and must live or           deposit from the tenant. The landlord should not
work within Janesville city limits. The income limit      treat Section 8 tenants any differently than unassisted
depends on size of the household. The department          tenants. The landlord is responsible for enforcing
will verify the client's income, assets and expenses      lease terms and must follow state law regarding non-
and also do a criminal background check.                  payment of rent or any other violation of the lease.
    Eligible clients will receive a voucher and must      4. The Section 8 program does not reimburse for
find a rental unit that is decent, safe and clean. The    damages or unpaid rent by the tenant. The landlord
landlord must agree to work with Housing and              must collect for damages from the tenant directly.
Neighborhood Services and complete a Request
for Lease Approval form. The department will then         Please call (608) 755-3065 for more information about
contact the owner of the property and schedule an         participating in the rent assistance program, either as
inspection of the unit the client wants to rent. Most     a landlord or as a tenant.

Are You Interested in Purchasing a Home?
The Home Buyer's Workshop may be a place to start.
The City of Janesville offers these eight-hour courses
six times per year. They will teach you what you need     Next sessions:
to know to purchase a new home - absolutely free of       Thursdays - September 13, 20, 27 and October 4
charge.Topics include establishing good credit, devel-       6:30 PM - 8:30 PM. Please register by Sept. 6.
oping a household budget, deciding how much house         Saturdays - November 3 and 10
you can afford, learning what to look for in a home,         9 AM - 1 PM. Please register by October 26.
negotiating the best price, identifying needed repairs,
and the loan process. This program may also give you      All workshops will be held at the Janesville Municipal
a greater opportunity to own your own home by:            Building at 18 N. Jackson Street, Janesville.
                                                          Call 755-3078 (755-3190 TDD) or stop by Housing
    • Possibly lowering the down payment requirement.     and Neighborhood Services, 200 W. Milwaukee
    • Possibly eliminating a savings reserve.             Street, weekdays from 7:30 AM to 4:30 PM to regis-
    • Possibly lowering the amount of income you          ter. The City Web site has more information and a
        need to qualify for a home loan.                  printable registration form to complete and return.
            Safety News: Back-to-School                                                                             5
                month,        will start again. Parents
In less than awalking; schoolwill be riding bikes.
  will be driving many of their children to school.
Some will be           some
                                                            • Where the curbs are painted yellow.
                                                            • Where a sign designates "no parking".
With all those people, bicycles and cars moving             • No parking stopping or standing if a sign is
every morning and afternoon, the need for safety is           posted, or 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. on school days on
paramount. But every year people of all ages break            the near side of a through street next to an
the rules of the road. So all of us could use a refresh-      elementary or middle school.
er course as the new school year draws near to help         • No parking in school parking lots unless
keep children safe.                                           authorized to do so.
    Adult crossing guards and school safety patrols         • No driving into school parking lots to drop off
work to get children safely across the street. Please         or pick up children.
be on the lookout for children crossing and work
with the guards and safety patrols -not against them.       Safety for students walking or riding bikes
    Speed can be a problem in school zones. Drivers         Parents should walk their children to school the first
should slow down and be observant in the 15 miles           few days until they are comfortable going by them-
per hour school zones. "15 miles per hour school            selves. Use the safe walk route found in each
zones" means drive no faster than 15 miles per hour.        school's handbook. Children should use the same
Be alert to what is going on around you.                    exact route to and from school every day so parents
    Pick up and drop off at schools can also cause          can find them if the need arises. Teach children to
confusion. Parents should never stop in the middle          cross the street at intersections and crosswalks only.
of the street in a traffic lane to let their children get   When available, cross at intersections with adult
out of the vehicle, or motion for their children to run     crossing guards and school safety patrols. Never
across the street to get in. For the safety of the chil-    attempt to cross the street from between parked cars.
dren, parents should park only where they can legal-            Some schools have safe house programs to help
ly do so. Sometimes it is easier to pick a spot a block     children who are bullied, attacked, injured or who
or two away to park and let the children out to walk        have other emergencies, including friendly stranger
the rest of the way.                                        situations. The programs have a number of names,
                                                            such as McGruff House, Helping Hand or Block
You may not park in the following areas:                    House. All use some type of sign displayed in the
• Within 15 feet of an intersection or crosswalk.           house windows and are there to help children. For
• Within 4 feet of a driveway.                              more information about school safety, call police at
• Within 5 feet of a curbside mailbox.                      (608) 755-3100.

  National Night Out Against Crime is August 7
 The 18th Annual National Night Out (NNO), a unique         will fight back against crime. Most importantly, it's a
 crime and drug prevention event sponsored by the           chance to meet your neighbors and perhaps a police
 Janesville Police Department and nationally by the         officer who is assigned to help protect and serve your
 National Association of Town Watch (NATW), has been        neighborhood. Crime prevention is much more effective
 scheduled for Tuesday, August 7. We cordially invite       when citizens and police work together, and where
 you to be a part of Janesville's NIGHT OUT 2001. The       neighbors know and look out for one another.
 City, along with the Janesville Area CrimeStoppers, will
 sponser an event at Traxler Park 6-7:30 on that even-      How can you be a part of it?
 ing. McGruff will be on hand, the Fire Department will     To show your support, display an outdoor light and hold
 have equipment on display, and possibly some live          front porch vigil, block party, or cookout. Police officers
 music. Also, free hot dogs and soda.                       may stop by to say hello and hand out T-shirts and
     What is National Night Out? It's a community event     other fun things. The goal is to have an enjoyable time
 held in your own neighborhood to (1) Heighten crime        to promote neighborhood spirit and police-community
 and drug prevention awareness; (2) Generate support        partnerships in our fight for a safer nation. For more
 for, and participation in, local anticrime programs; (3)   information, call Janesville Police Department Crime
 Strengthen neighborhood spirit and police/community        Prevention at (608) 755-3077. They also have
 partnerships; and (4) Send a message to criminals let-     brochures on crime prevention, or look for them on
 ting them know that neighborhoods are organized and        the City of Janesville Web site.
6            Rediscover the Janesville Senior Center
               be nice have
Wouldn't itJanesvilletowhere a comfortable, attractive
     place in
as you please, do enjoyable
                             you could come and go
                                                         the day. The facility has long been a resource for com-
                                                         munity meetings and now has more meeting space and
                                                                                      a large multi-purpose room
things and meet interesting                                                           with a commercial quality
people? It wouldn't cost a                                                            kitchen for community
thing and nothing is expect-                                                          events. Other new amenities
ed of you, yet opportunities                                                          include a fireplace, a com-
to share are plentiful. There                                                         puter room, a new billiards
is such a place - the                                                                 room and a volunteer recep-
Janesville Senior Center.                                                             tionist station to greet you
After an extensive renova-                                                            when you come to visit.
tion and expansion of this                                                               The center has no rules
historic jewel at 69 S. Water                                                         regarding participation, but
Street, the center will soon                                                          those who come must func-
have an open house to show- View of the                                               tion independently, as it is
case all that it has to offer      new reception area in progress                     not staffed to provide day-
the community.                                                                        care services. There is no
     The Janesville Senior                                                            membership fee. You may
Center is not just about playing bingo and sitting       come just to socialize, one day or every day. You may
around. It offers activities for seniors and adults who  come just to take a class or attend a special event. Or
may not yet perceive themselves as "seniors," such as    you can be a volunteer or teach a class or serve on the
opportunities for travel, learning, dancing, socializing center's board. Volunteers may greet visitors, organize
and helping the community. For example, the center       the library, work in the office or do support activities
has two bands and two choirs, as well as several         such as mailings or special events decorating. So, you
dance groups that perform regionally. The center is      can socialize, participate, volunteer or lead - whatever
sponsoring a trip to Ireland in October, open to adults. your talents or interests. Do you have a talent to share?
It also sponsors many services for seniors, such as tax  The wonderful offerings of the Janesville Senior Center
preparation, monthly benefit specialist, and preventa-   exist because of the shared time and talents of the par-
tive health services. Entertaining special events are    ticipants.
held, like a recent beach party (with actual sand!).          So come visit the center anytime you feel like it!
     Leisure Services is hoping to offer even more       Normal hours are: Monday through Friday 8 AM-4
enriching activities for adults, possibly even ballroom  PM. To find out about activities offered now, see the
and salsa dancing and more arts classes, at more con-    City's Web site, pick up a summer activities brochure or
venient times to accommodate those who work during       call 755-3040 to receive a newsletter for only $3 a year.

Rediscover Ice Skating
Ice skating - it's a great way to have fun, keep cool,
                                                             available for groups of 15 or more. In addition, the Ice
socialize and exercise even if you're not especially ath-
                                                             Arena offers private ice rentals for skating or hockey.
letic. Watching skating exhibitions and hockey matches
                                                               The City of Janesville resumed operational respon-
is also quite entertaining. Children and adults can
                                                             sibilities for the ice skating center in March. Leisure
experience ice skating at the Janesville Ice Skating
                                                             Services has expanded public skating times and is
Center open house September 16 from noon until 5:30
                                                             exploring offering Rec. Nites on ice and creative
p.m. Skate for free or watch figure skating and hockey
                                                             leagues such as broom ball. For more information
exhibitions and guest appearances.
                                                             about lessons, times and private ice availability and
   Don't know how to skate, or haven't skated in a mil-
                                                             prices call the center at (608) 754-7840 or visit the
lion years? No problem. Lessons are available for all
                                                             City's web site at www.ci.janesville.wi.us.
ages. Once you get the hang of it, you can participate
in figure skating groups or hockey leagues sponsored         Summer public skating hours:
by the city and local clubs.                                 Mon. 1:45-3:45 PM & 6:30-8:30 PM.; Wed. 1:45-3:45
   The center also accommodates groups of all ages           PM; Friday 6-8 p.m.; Sat.1-3 PM & 5:30-7:30 PM
and sizes, and it is a great location for birthday parties   Summer open hockey hours:
too. A birthday party package for 10 includes pizza,         Mon. 8:45-10:45 PM women only; Wed. 8-10 PM
soda, party room and skating for $75. Affordable group       Ages 14 & up; Thurs. 5:45-7:15 PM ages 13 &
packages include admission and skate rental, and are         under; Friday 1-3 PM all ages
           Adopt-A-Trail & Adopt-A-Park                                                                       7
    ecause of tighter budgets and Janesville's expan-      community pride and meet people with common
B   sion, the City is continually challenged to maintain
and enhance the 60 parks (40 of which have play-
                                                           interests.
                                                               Currently, 23 sections of the trail are ready to
grounds) and nine miles of paved bike trail that we all    adopt. Future sections will be added to the program
love. Each employee of the Parks Department main-          as the trail expands. The shortest section is 289 feet
tains about 30 locations weekly, which includes mow-       and the longest is about one mile. Adopters may
ing and maintaining public buildings and grounds,          choose to provide a cash donation in lieu of perform-
parks, trails and all street right-of-ways.                ing maintenance responsibilities. The annual cost to
    Therefore, volunteer service, cash, or material        adopt a trail ranges from $100 to $2,000, depending
donations to maintain and enhance our park system          on length. Adopters will be recognized with a sign
are most welcome. The two main programs are                on the trail identifying who adopted that section.
Adopt-A-Trail and Adopt-A-Park. Volunteers or                  Adopt-A-Park is a similar program that permits
adopters provide creative ideas or help accomplish         groups and organizations to provide their time and
projects that the department may not have the time or      talents to our parks. We welcome projects of any
money to accomplish. We rely on these volunteers           duration and encourage ongoing park commitments.
because they have been so helpful, and it saves tax-       Only about half of the parks are currently adopted.
payer dollars by avoiding the need to hire more staff.         Residents may question whether the city has too
Only about 7 percent of taxpayer dollars is used for       many parks. But the number allows balanced recre-
parks and recreation programs.                             ation opportunities for all sections of Janesville. New
    The new Adopt-A-Trail program allows families or       sections need parks and trails too because the resi-
organizations to be a partner with the Parks               dents who live there are also taxpayers, and all resi-
Department to enhance and help maintain a section of       dents should be within walking distance of a park
trail. Parks crews would continue to patch potholes,       where they can enjoy free, safe and healthy recre-
trim trees, mow and replace signs; the adopters could      ation. Trails are intended to serve the entire commu-
collect litter, plant trees and flowers, donate benches    nity, so this year trails will be paved on the far west
and help monitor and keep the trail attractive and         and northwest to Rockport and Riverside parks.
safe. Each section has unique features and opportuni-          For more information, please contact Leisure
ties for enhancements. Participants in turn receive        Services at 755-3030 or leisure@ci.janesville.wi.us.

      How Many Geese is “Too Many” Geese?
              geese   we want in Janesville parks,
How manydoawe dopopulation number?-Sometheir
    and how
park areas have high
                    maintain that
                                  of geese and
                                                           Solutions are difficult because park visitors can be
                                                           very emotional about waterfowl - they like to see
droppings make it unpleasant to set down a picnic          birds and feed them in the parks. And deciding how
blanket or walk barefoot in the grass. The local giant     many birds is "too many birds" needs to be decided
Canada geese population skyrocketed in the 1990s           before implementing solutions. The problem didn't
statewide in urban areas, although numbers are             happen overnight, and a solution will not either.
somewhat down here this year. In Janesville, popula-           Simplest measures involve making the geese
tions are concentrated in Traxler, Monterey, Kiwanis       uncomfortable by not feeding them and not mowing
and Riverside parks and the Lions Beach area.              where they like to visit. Geese prefer short-cut grass
    The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resource           so they can spot any potential predators. The City
(DNR) and the Parks Department are cooperating to          has already tried a few things to discourage the
understand the nature of the geese and of the popu-        geese congregation including "no feeding" signs and
lation problem. Ducks are not as much of a problem         brochures, and a costly spray repellent (that worked
because duck droppings are much smaller than the           for only a week). Other techniques are available to
cigar-sized geese droppings, which also do not dissi-      repel, reduce or eradicate the geese population. The
pate as quickly. DNR wildlife specialists visited parks    Parks Department would consult with the commu-
on June 27 to round geese up and band them with            nity before taking any further measures.
age and sex tags. Tagging helps specialists collect            Ultimately, all the public can do for now is avoid
information about migration and geese mortality            feeding geese and ducks to help scatter the popula-
rates, such as whether some are hunted and where           tion. We welcome your opinion now or during any
they went during last winter's heavy snow.                 future public meetings on this topic.
8                                  Announcements
Labor Day Schedule                                           Trick or Treat!
City services will not be provided and all facilities will   Janesville trick-or-treat hours will be on Halloween,
be closed Labor Day, Monday, September 3, including          Wednesday, October 31, 5:30 - 7:30 PM.
the Municipal Building, Leisure Services, Hedberg            Please leave a front porch light on if you wish to be
Library, landfills and compost site. Janesville Transit      visited by trick-or-treaters.
System and Beloit-Janesville Express buses will not
operate on Labor Day. If your trash or recycling collec-
tion day falls on Labor Day, please place your trash
                                                             Annual Fall Yard Waste Collection
and recyclables out for collection the next day,             Loose Leaf Collection - This fall, the City will collect
Tuesday, September 4 by 7 AM.                                loose leaves November 5-16. Exact leaf collection
     Also please note that the library resumes Sunday        days are not predetermined, so watch the Janesville
hours after Labor Day. Effective September 4, the            Gazette or City web site to find out when your exact
library is open 9 AM - 9 PM Monday through Friday,           collection day will be. Rake leaves loosely into the
9 AM - 5:30 PM Saturday, and 1-5 PM Sunday.                  street gutter, but please try to avoid blocking storm
                                                             sewers because it may cause street flooding.
Back to School with JTS                                         Tips - Please do not park your vehicle over dry
The Janesville Transit System is ready to take you              leaves. When a vehicle's catalytic converter
back to school! In addition to the JTS regular routes,          gets hot, it can ignite leaves. City Code pro-
Extra Service Routes operate every school day. Route            hibits burning of trash, grass, or leaves within
maps and schedules will be available at school orien-           Janesville city limits. And please watch out for
tation and registration sessions in August, and on all          children who may be playing in raked leaves.
JTS buses and facilities. For information on how to
make your trips to and from school easy, call JTS at         Bagged Collection - The City will collect grass,
755-3150 or see “transportation” on the City Web site.       leaves, and garden debris placed in containers and
                                                             bundled brush on the same day your regular trash is
Compost Site/Demolition Landfill Hours                       collected the week following Thanksgiving, which is
Now through October                                          November 26 - 30. Bundle brush no larger than 4 feet
Mondays & Thursdays 8 AM - 7 PM                              in length, 12 inches in diameter and no heavier than
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, & Fridays 8 AM - 3 PM                  50 pounds. Set bags a few feet apart from trash at the
Saturdays 8 AM - 5 PM                                        curb by 7 AM. For information, please call City
November                                                     Services Center at 755-3110.
Mondays, Thursdays & Saturdays 8 AM - 5 PM
Tuesdays, Wednesdays & Fridays 8 AM - 3 PM                   Don’t Forget!
                                                             Most City of Janesville facility hours are now 7:30 AM
Watch for announcements to find out when the site            - 4:30 PM weekdays, including the Municipal Building.
closes for the season, usually around November 30.           The City’s Web site address is www.ci.janesville.wi.us


City of Janesville
18 N. Jackson Street
PO Box 5005
Janesville WI 53547-5005

                                                             ECR WSS

                                         Postal Customer
Next issue:       November 2001
Published by:     City of Janesville, Wisconsin’s Park Place
Web Site Address: www.ci.janesville.wi.us
                                                                                                                                                                          AUGUST 2001


      Back-to-School News
                School District of Janesville
War Veterans Get Diplomas                                                               Teachers Bring Global
                                                                                        Perspectives to Classroom
                                                                                        In December 1999 the Janesville                         fostering sister school partnerships,
                                                                                        Foundation made a three-year grant                      improving foreign language
                                                                                        of $75,000 to the School District of                    proficiency, providing international
                                                                                        Janesville for the Thompson                             contacts for business classes,
                                                                                        International Education Scholarship                     obtaining materials and using
                                                                                        program. This program helps offset                      observations to develop units on
                                                                                        expenses for teachers to travel and                     various countries and cultures for the
                                                                                        study abroad, as well as bring back a                   curriculum.




World War II Navy veteran, Paul Swenson, was one of eight veterans receiving his high
school diploma this year (pictured with Superintendent Tom Evert and Board President
Virginia Wyss.)

Thanks to a new state law, eight Janesville veterans have received
their high school diplomas. The new law permits school boards to
award diplomas to veterans who are at least 65 years old, attended
high school in that district, left before graduation to join the armed
forces during a war and served on active duty. They were: Don                           Governor McCallum discusses the merits of a global education through the Thompson Scholarships at a
Conaway, Clayton Davies, Dan Gehri, James Hemming, John                                 Janesville press conference last April. Pictured (seated L to R), Roger Axtell, Vice Chairman, Governor’s
Leong (posthumously), Theodore Schiefelbein, Paul Swenson and                           International Education Task Force; Bonnie Robinson, President, Janesville Foundation; and 2001
George Tiffany.                                                                         Thompson Scholar recipient Linda Miller, a Craig German Teacher.

World War II Navy veteran Paul Swenson should have graduated in                         world vision for their students —                       The twelve teachers who received
the Class of 1947 and says, “I always felt like something was                           which ultimately better prepares                        scholarships traveled this summer to
missing in my life. I was never able to go to prom, so last year I                      them for their future careers.                          Northern Ireland, South Africa, New
attended with my twin grandsons. Now that I have my diploma, I
                                                                                        “Students with an international                         Zealand, England, Finland and
feel I have closure to this portion of my life. The importance of a
                                                                                        perspective are at an advantage, a                      Russia.
diploma never leaves you. In today’s world, it is even more
                                                                                        plus to the businesses that hire them                   Both our district and the Janesville
important to graduate - not just from high school, but also from a
                                                                                        in later years,” notes Superintendent                   Foundation hope local businesses or
college or trade school.”
                                                                                        Tom Evert.                                              other foundations will consider
                                                                                        The scholarships also provide                           funding the program – now in its
  Look for These Initiatives                                                            students with significant cultural and
                                                                                        international education
                                                                                                                                                final year – which has provided
                                                                                                                                                experiences of a lifetime for these
  New Elementary School Progress Reports Debut                                          opportunities. These include                            teachers and their classrooms.
  This year, parents with elementary school children will see
  their child’s progress through a new, larger progress report
  card. Piloted last year, it provides for more detail on
  students’ progress and an improved method of indicating the
  level of student achievement. The report is also easier to read
                                                                                                                          INSIDE NEWS
  and has ample room for teacher comments about individual                                                                           ◆ Fall Registration and Fees
  student’s strengths and areas needing improvement.                                                                                 ◆ New School Safety Measures
  Student progress is also reported to parents through midterm                                                                       ◆ School Calendar and Conference
  reports, conferences, state and district level testing, IEP
                                                                                                                                       Schedules
  meetings and informal communication between home and
  school.                                                                                                                            ◆ District Lobbying Efforts and More!
                                                         continued on back page
Respecting Diversity in our Schools                                     Third Grade Reading Scores Rise
                                                                        This year, third graders tested                         writing while increasing their
                                                                        above the state average with                            skills. When students practice
                                                                        85% of our students testing as                          written expression on a
                                                                        “proficient” or “advanced” on                           consistent and daily basis, they
                                                                        the 2001 Wisconsin Reading                              develop reading skills and
                                                                        Comprehension Test. This is an                          increase both vocabulary usage
                                                                        increase of 3%, up from 82%                             and reading comprehension.
                                                                        last year, and 8% above the state                       The “Writing Across the
                                                                        average. In addition, students                          Curriculum” initiative culminates
                                                                        have shown significant gains in                         this year as the teachers
                                                                        each of the past four years in the                      emphasize the six characteristics
                                                                        total “proficient” and “advanced”                       of effective writing—ideas,
                                                                        categories (see chart below).                           organization, voice, word choice,
                                                                        Our students are reaping the                            sentence fluency and
                                                                        rewards of the district’s initiative                    conventions (spelling, grammar,
                                                                        of “Writing Across the                                  usage, capitalization and
                                                                        Curriculum,” a K-12 goal to                             punctuation).
                                                                        develop a standardized writing
                                                                        process to help students enjoy

During the last several years,         ongoing communications,
our district has taken proactive       joint projects and visits.
steps to promote human               ◆ Increasing the use of
relations awareness as a key           literature and other art by
component in school, district          artists-of-color in the
and community initiatives.             curriculum from kindergarten
                                       through grade 12.
These steps led to the
development of a five-year           ◆ Acknowledging contributions
Human Relations Plan prepared          of the disabled and senior
                                       citizens.
by our district along with
consultant, Dr. John Odom of         ◆ Increasing the number of
Odom & Associates, LLC.                student, teacher and             Reading is encouraged for our youngest learners through materials such as Discovery Packs which
                                       administrative exchanges that    include educational games, books and activities to promote reading, and are available for take home
The plan includes various              promote multicultural            enjoyment with families.
partnerships with other districts.     understanding.
It also outlines 47 specific
actions our schools can take to
                                     The plan was approved by the                         Wisconsin Third Grade Reading
increase the ways students learn
                                     Board of Education last May.                             Comprehension Test
                                     Funding sources for the plan are
to embrace the differences of                                                                                Total “Proficient” and “Advanced”
                                     under consideration in the final
those around them. These                                                  School                             1998           1999        2000                           2001
                                     budget adoption, which will
include:                                                                  Adams                              71%            77%         79%                            89%
                                     occur at the August 14 regular
◆ Connecting elementary              school board meeting.                Harrison                           81%            85%         83%                            88%
  school students in Beloit,                                              Jackson                            54%            62%         75%                            77%
  Delavan and Janesville with                                             Jefferson                          80%            95%         97%                            89%
                                                                          Kennedy                              *              *         72%                            76%
                                                                          Lincoln                            66%            82%         89%                            82%
Talented and Gifted Program (TAG) Initiatives                             Madison
                                                                          Monroe
                                                                                                             80%
                                                                                                             76%
                                                                                                                            75%
                                                                                                                            83%
                                                                                                                                        83%
                                                                                                                                        81%
                                                                                                                                                                       94%
                                                                                                                                                                       93%
As part of our district’s TAG Long-Range Plan, a new                      Roosevelt                          79%            94%         92%                            95%
TAG/Assessment Coordinator position was added this year. This             Van Buren                          71%            91%         83%                            85%
position will coordinate TAG Programs at each school and the              Washington                         91%            74%         76%                            78%
Challenge Program at Roosevelt Elementary and Edison Middle               Wilson                             63%            56%         66%                            66%
Schools, as well as monitor the District’s assessment program. In         DISTRICT                           74%            79%         82%                            85%
addition, TAG Resource Teachers will provide additional services to       STATE                              65%            70%         74%                            77%
students at Adams, Kennedy, Madison, Monroe, Van Buren and                *Kennedy Elementary opened in August, 2000.
Wilson elementary schools.
Safety Improvements Approach $300,000
Following the large number of false bomb threats at some of our
schools last year, our district enhanced preventative safety efforts.
Since student and staff safety remains the utmost concern, the Board
of Education has a zero tolerance policy for threats, weapons and
dangerous behaviors. This policy resulted in serious consequences for
bomb threat offenders last year, including expulsions and strict
penalties by the judicial system.
Our district has also had a Comprehensive Crisis Plan in effect since
1993. Each crisis situation is addressed individually, with measures
imposed to best meet specific crisis situations. Since spring of 2000,
approximately $300,000 in additional safety improvements have been
made including: lockdown/intruder safety drills at all our schools,         Superintendent Tom Evert and Board President Virginia Wyss congratulate our 2001 Valedictorians.
                                                                            Pictured (L to R) Evert, Erin Steenblock (Parker), Robyn Konkel (Craig) and Wyss. Erin will major in
door lock improvements, walkie-talkies, front entry camera security         Biomedical engineering and German at the University of Iowa with aspirations of becoming a
systems at seven schools and new lockers at Parker High School.             biomedical engineer. Robyn will attend Washington and Lee University in Lexington, VA majoring in
                                                                            public policy, with a goal of becoming a criminal prosecutor and having a political career.


NEW: Mesh Backpacks for High Schoolers                                      High School Students Recognized for
This year, a new safety initiative requires mesh backpacks for high         Making the Grade
school students who want to use backpacks during the day. Following
                                                                            The School District of                                 Approximately 400 students
two public forums regarding backpacks, a school-community
                                                                            Janesville joins the Milton                            are expected to participate this
committee recommended mesh backpacks be used during the course
                                                                            School District and the                                year. Students in attendance
of the school day. Students may carry regular backpacks to and from
                                                                            Janesville Noon Rotary Club in                         receive a Parker Pen bearing
lockers as they enter and exit school. However, during the school day,
only the district-approved mesh backpacks will be acceptable. These         hosting its sixth annual                               their school name and are
backpacks are being selected and will be sold at cost by each high          “Making the Grade”                                     eligible to win a drawing for
school. A letter from the principals was sent home identifying cost         recognition ceremony at                                one of fifteen $100 U.S.
and purpose. Backpacks will be available for purchase at our high           Traxler Park on Saturday,                              Savings Bonds. In addition,
schools during registration.                                                August 18, 2001 from 11:30                             three $250 scholarships will be
                                                                            a.m. - 12:15 p.m. “Making the                          given–one to a student from
                                                                            Grade” is part of the Rotary                           each high school. The
Helping with Drug and Alcohol Problems                                      Corn Roast/Mud Volleyball                              scholarship can be used for
                                                                                                                                   college or a school-to-work
A goal of our Board of Education is to take a stand against drug and        festivities which draws
                                                                                                                                   program. Parents receive a
alcohol abuse for all students. A pre-K-12 long-range plan to address       approximately 5,000 attendees
                                                                                                                                   window decal which recognizes
student abuse needs has been developed through a school-community           annually.
                                                                                                                                   the academic achievement.
ATODA (Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Abuse) Committee to                  The event recognizes Craig,                            The “Making the Grade”
identify prevention, intervention and additional support services for       Parker and Milton students                             festivities are yet another way
our students. For more information on the plan, call 743-5071 or visit      entering 10th, 11th and 12th                           in which the Rotarians support
our district’s Web site: www.inwave.com/schools/jps.                        grade who have earned a 3.0                            student achievement in our
Last school year, 53 students were expelled, with approximately 60%         grade point average and above.                         community.
of those expulsions due to possession of drugs and alcohol. To
combat this problem, our district is increasing efforts to teach students
about drugs and alcohol, including restructuring of the Drug Abuse
Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) program to reach the elementary
grades. In addition, we are offering a new program for students with
first time drug and alcohol violations—Prime for Life Under 21. This
program will give some violators an opportunity to remain in school
by completing a strict program with student and parent education
components. A Hearing Officer, under the guidance of the Board of
Education, will determine whether a student qualifies for the program
or be expelled.
We encourage all parents to address the issues and consequences of
school safety, conduct and our zero tolerance policy with their             Parker Principal Dale Carlson (foreground) and Craig Principal Glenn Disrude (background, right) award
children prior to the start of school. (Also see student conduct code       students at last year’s “Making the Grade” Recognition.
information, opposite page.)
District Supports Increased Local                                                                      2001-2002 Board of Education
Control and State Funding
Retired Social Studies Teacher and Washington Seminar Director, John
Eyster, was hired last school year to serve as our district’s Legislative
Liaison. His responsibilities include serving as a registered lobbyist at
the state level and keeping the district abreast of grant opportunities
from state and federal sources. Eyster’s role helps our district address
funding issues; the state has limited the money public school district’s
can raise. This limiting is known as revenue “caps.” Revenue caps,
2/3 state aid and capping teacher and administrator salaries all
significantly affect local programs and services.
“One of our major goals is to provide the public with updated and
accurate information on our district’s stance for quality public
education. The lobbying section of our school district’s Web site:
                                                                                                 Standing L to R: Mark Flottum; Ted Kinnaman; Nancy Sonntag, Clerk; Mike Rundle; Virginia
www.inwave.com/schools/jps/lobbying.html provides our district’s                                 Wyss, President; Tom Wolfe, Vice-President; Deb Kolste; Steve Engelbert and Dennis
official position and information on pending bills,” says Eyster.                                Vechinsky, Treasurer.

                                                                                                 COMMISSIONER                                     HOME                            PHONE
                                                                                                 Virginia Wyss, President                         2202 N. Tradition Lane          752-3911
Look for These Initiatives
continued from front page                                                                        Thomas Wolfe, Vice President                     501 Stafford Road               752-1242

More Technology Training at                       Apprenticeship programs this                   Nancy Sonntag, Clerk                             1420 St. Lawrence Ave.          752-0420
Middle Schools                                    fall. Through the program,                     Dennis Vechinsky, Treasurer                      3220 Crabapple Lane             752-7341
Thanks to the efforts of a middle                 students work in advanced level                Theodore Kinnaman                                1213 Columbus Circle            754-2490
school design team, this year’s                   jobs and obtain training for                   Mark Flottum                                     3729 Skyview Drive              756-2379
middle school students will have                  future work opportunities.
an increased exposure to                          Students acquire skills such as                Debra Kolste                                     4105 Park View Drive            756-4311
computers. Under the new                          creating resumes, developing                   Steven Engelbert                                 209 Forest Park Blvd.           756-9027
system, the computer teachers at                  portfolios and preparing for                   Mike Rundle                                      2219 N. Huron                   755-0712
each school will work with                        interviews. Teachers Gail


                                                                                                     2001–2002 Board of Education Goals
                                                                                                     The School District of Janesville is committed to creating more
                                                                                                     rigorous standards of discipline, attendance and achievement.

                                                                                                 ◆ The School District of Janesville recognizes Beyond 2005 – A
                                                                                                   Continuous Growth Plan for Educational Excellence – as the
                                                                                                   adopted long-range plan. Emphasis will be on the Continuous Growth
                                                                                                   Plans at each school and within each ESC department, and on
                                                                                                   differentiated instruction, plus implementation of teaching and learning
                                                                                                   goals, and resources and support goals.
                                                                                                 ◆ The School District of Janesville is committed to continuing our efforts in
                                                                                                   human relations. We will continue to expand diversity initiatives beyond
Teacher Gail Ellenberger works with Craig Business Co-op students as they build resumes on the     racial and cultural differences and begin implementation of a five-year
computer to prepare for interviews (background, left). Teacher Greg Tanko assists Youth
Apprenticeship students from Parker as they prepare portfolios for job interviews in the           plan.
architectural and engineering fields.
                                                                                                 ◆ The School District of Janesville’s primary focus is to provide an
teachers in the core subjects of                  Ellenberger and Greg Tanko                       appropriate and safe learning environment for all students, reflecting the
math, English, social studies and                 utilized business partnerships
                                                                                                   community adopted core values of caring, cooperation, honesty, respect
science to integrate computer                     from HUFCOR; Ryan Central,
                                                                                                   and responsibility. We will continue to address student discipline
applications into those classes.                  Inc.; Mercy Clinic East; Utzig
                                                  Carstar, Inc.; Feingold and Bates                through the reconvening of the Discipline Committee to review the Code
High School Students Prepare                                                                       of Conduct, address security and pursue solutions to drug and alcohol
for the World of Work                             Law Firm and Lloyd’s Plumbing
                                                  and Heating to bring real world                  problems as presented through the ATODA Long Range Plan.
A week-long course was held
this summer for students                          expertise to the course for                    ◆ The School District of Janesville will continue to implement the Talented
entering the Business Education,                  students.
                                                                                                   and Gifted Long-Range Plan.
Industrial Co-op and Youth
                          SPECIAL PULLOUT SECTION!

         Education is Our Investment
         in the Future!
         Changing demographic, economic, technological and global
         trends present unique opportunities and challenges to public
         education. Our district has developed a new long-range plan,
         Beyond 2005, to address these issues and provide direction for
         meeting the needs of all our students. However, our success
         rests on a collaborative effort between educators, parents and
         community. We invite you, as community members, to partner
         with us in this important task. There are many ways to
         become involved—through our parent/teacher associations,
         business partnerships or as a school volunteer. To our
                                                                                                           TOM EVERT
         students, parents and community, welcome back and thank you
         for your interest and investment in our future.


         Tom Evert, Superintendent


                    Main District Phone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 743-5000
                    Superintendent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thomas Evert
District Snapshot




                    School Board President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Virginia Wyss — 752-3911
                    Janesville Area Council-
                    PTA President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pam Schmoldt — 752-9421
                    Janesville Talented and Gifted Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
                    of Parents and Teachers (J-TAG) . . . . . . . . Betsy Swenson — 741-6351
                    Special Education Parent Liaison . . . . . . Roberta Sample — 743-5135
                    Estimated 2001–2002 Enrollment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10,472 students
                    Full-time Staff (District FTE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,654.5
                    Elementary Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
                    Middle Schools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
                    High Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
                    Charter School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1



   Want to Learn More About Our Schools?
   ✔ Watch Cable Channel 13 — our education channel.
   ✔ Join the parent/teacher organization at your child’s school.
   ✔ Attend school board meetings — held the second and fourth Tuesday of each
     month at the Educational Services Center. (Also broadcast on Cable Channel 13.)
   ✔ Read the “School Briefs” section of The Janesville Gazette, Saturdays.
   ✔ Listen to WCLO AM 1230 radio on weekday mornings:
      • “School House Block” between 6:45 - 7:00 a.m. for “News and Views,” our daily
        school newsbreak, and hot lunch menus, read by students.
      • “Learning Time,” 11:15 - 11:45 a.m. every Thursday for live interviews with
        Superintendent Tom Evert, board members or directors.
   ✔ Visit our district Web site: www.inwave.com/schools/jps.
   ✔ Call 743-5000 for a copy of our 20-page School Performance Report (also
     available on our Web site).


           For comments/questions regarding this newsletter, contact
          Manager of Public Information Jackie Olson Kold at 743-5137.
2001–2002 Enrollment Fees
KINDERGARTEN                                                                                                    $12.00
ELEMENTARY (1-5)                                                                                                $20.00
MIDDLE SCHOOLS                                                                                                  $25.00
                                           Optional: Yearbook                                                    $8.00
HIGH SCHOOLS                                       General Fee (both high schools)                              $29.00
 . . . . . . . . . . .CRAIG . . . . . . . . .Class Dues:
                                                     Freshman/Sophomores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1.00
  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Juniors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.00
  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seniors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.00
  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Locker Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4.00
 . . . . . . . . . . .PARKER . . . . . . . .Physical Education Lock Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00
 . . . . . . . . . . .Optional . . . . . . . .Craig Yearbook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$30.00
  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Parker Yearbook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$28.00
  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (If ordered after December 1st) . . . . . . . . .$33.00
  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Athletic Pass Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20.00
  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Parking Pass Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00
  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Driver Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$175.00*
All fees are due on the first day of school. In the elementary schools, checks should be made payable to the
“School District of Janesville.” Checks for the middle/high schools should be made payable to the individual school.

*DO NOT SEND DRIVER EDUCATION FEE AT REGISTRATION; it will be collected later.


2001–2002 Registration/Orientation
ELEMENTARY (New students and transferring students only)
Tuesday and Wednesday, August 7 and 8:                                                     7:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
MIDDLE
EDISON
Tuesday, August 14:                                              9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
          Student/Parent Registration & Student Pictures
FRANKLIN
Thursday, August 16:                    10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. & 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
          Student/Parent Registration
MARSHALL
Thursday, August 16: New Student Orientation/Registration       9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
HIGH SCHOOL
CRAIG
Thursday, August 16: Registration
          Freshmen and new students                                       9:00 a.m. (A-K) (Large Auditorium)
                                                                          9:45 a.m. (L-Z) (Large Auditorium)
          Sophomores                                                        1:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. (Cafeteria)
          Juniors                                                         12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. (Cafeteria)
          Seniors                                                         8:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. (Cafeteria)
Wednesday, August 22: First Day of School
          Freshmen and new students                         8:00 a.m. (Large Auditorium)
          Sophomore, Juniors & Seniors report to advisory                     12:30 p.m.
PARKER
Wednesday, August 15: Registration
          Freshmen                                         10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. (A-K)
                                                             and 11:00 a.m. - noon (L-Z)
          Sophomores, Juniors & Seniors                       1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. (A-K)
                                                         and 2:45 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. (L-Z)
Wednesday, August 22: First Day of School
          Freshmen and new students                               7:55 a.m. (Auditorium)
          Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors report to advisory                  12:30 p.m.
Note: Students should be prepared to provide schools with an EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBER.
2001–2002 Janesville School District Calendar
Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Day of Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Date
Teachers Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .August 20
Students Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .August 22
Labor Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monday (No School) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .September 3
Teacher Inservice/Work Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monday (No School) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .October 1
W.E.A. Convention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thursday (No School) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .October 25
Fall Break Day. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Friday (No School) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .October 26
Thanksgiving Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wednesday-Friday (No School) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .November 21-23
Winter Break Begins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Friday (No School) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .December 21
School Resumes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .January 3
End of First Semester . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Friday (No School) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .January 18
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monday (No School) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .January 21
S.W.E.I.O. Convention. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Friday (No School) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .February 22
Spring Break Begins. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monday (No School) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .March 25
School Resumes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .April 1
Teacher Inservice/Work Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Friday (No School) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .April 8
Memorial Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monday (No School) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .May 27
School Year Ends-Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .June 5
School Year Ends-Teachers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .June 6
On the second* Monday of each month during the 2001-02 school year, elementary students will be dismissed
at 1:30 p.m. and middle and high school students will be dismissed at 1:40 p.m. Teachers will attend staff
development sessions from 2:00 - 5:00 p.m. on these days.
*Due to April 8 being a teacher work day, the April Early Release Date is Monday, April 15.


Janesville School District Parent/Teacher Conference Dates
Elementary School Conferences
School during regular hours                                            Wednesday, 3:20-8:00 p.m.                                   Oct. 3
No School for Students                                                 Thursday, 7:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m.                               Oct. 4
No School for Students/Teachers                                        Friday                                                      Oct. 5
School during regular hours                                            Tuesday, 3:20-8:00 p.m.                                    Feb. 19
No School for Students                                                 Wednesday, 7:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m.                             Feb. 20
No School for Students/Teachers                                        Thursday                                                   Feb. 21
Middle School Conferences
School during regular hours                                            Wednesday, 4:00-7:00 p.m.                                  Nov. 14
No School for Students                                                 Thursday, 8:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.                              Nov. 15
No School for Students/Teachers                                        Friday                                                     Nov. 16
School during regular hours                                            Tuesday, 4:00-7:00 p.m.                                    Feb. 19
No School for Students                                                 Wednesday, 8:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.                             Feb. 20
No School for Students/Teachers                                        Thursday                                                   Feb. 21
High School Conferences
School during regular hours                                            Wednesday, 4:00-7:00 p.m.                                  Nov. 14
No School for Students                                                 Thursday, 8:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.                              Nov. 15
No School for Students/Teachers                                        Friday                                                     Nov. 16
School during regular hours                                            Tuesday, 4:00-7:00 p.m.                                    Feb. 19
No School for Students                                                 Wednesday, 8:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.                             Feb. 20
No School for Students/Teachers                                        Thursday                                                   Feb. 21


                                                   School Hours
                 KINDERGARTEN & GRADES 1 THROUGH 5 • 8:20 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
                          MIDDLE SCHOOLS • 8:00 a.m. - 3:15 p.m.
                           HIGH SCHOOLS • 8:00 a.m. - 3:20 p.m.
Immunization Records
All Wisconsin public school students are required to present written evidence of
immunization against measles, mumps, rubella, polio, tetanus and whooping cough within
30 days after admission to school. Students in kindergarten, first, second, third, fourth,
seventh, eighth, ninth, tenth and eleventh grades will be required to have hepatitis B
immunization. This year a chicken pox vaccine is also required for early childhood and
kindergarten students, unless the date of the students case of the chicken pox is provided.
Records are carried over year to year, but should be updated as boosters are administered.
Parents who do not provide proof of vaccinations to the school may be subject to a fine of
up to $25 per day, and students may be suspended up to 10 school days. Immunization
requirements can be waived only if a properly signed health, religious or personal
conviction exemption is presented to the school.

School Hot Lunch Prices
 Elementary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1.50
 Middle Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1.70
 High Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1.75
 Reduced - students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ .40
 Adults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.25
 Milk is included with all hot lunches, but may be purchased separately for . . . . . .$ .25
Hot lunches will be served the first day of school. Applications for free and reduced lunches
will be given to students the first day of class. Meals may be paid in advance by purchasing
tickets on a weekly, bi-weekly or monthly basis at all schools. Pre-paid tickets may be used
to obtain a meal on any day. Tickets may NOT be used for a la carte purchases.


Student Attendance
Regular school attendance is important to the educational success of students. Only
through regular attendance will students be able to take full advantage of their
learning opportunities, thus our district has strict truancy rules. Elementary students
who are tardy for more than 15 minutes will be recorded as absent for the half day.
Middle and high school students who are tardy in excess of 5 minutes will be recorded
as absent for that class. Under state law, a student who is absent from school without
an excused absence part or all of five or more days during the school semester is
considered a habitual truant. The responsibility for student attendance rests upon the
student and parent. Please notify your school within 48 hours of an absence with the
reason for the absence. There are serious consequences to parents and students for
habitual truancy. For more information, please contact your school’s office.


Student Conduct Code, Athletic Code and
Co-Curricular Code
The student conduct code is explained in a booklet for elementary students. For
middle and high school students, it is included at the beginning of their assignment
notebooks. It is also available on our district Web site at www.inwave.com/schools/jps.
Our students are held accountable to the ban on alcohol, drug and tobacco use,
weapons on school property, threats, failing grades and truancy. These may result in a
request for expulsion. Parents are encouraged to talk with their children about the
negative consequences of their actions. For more information about the code, contact
your child’s school office or visit our Web site: www.inwave.com/schools/jps.
(Please also see the section on “Safety Improvements” in this issue for important code
and safety information.)

				
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