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					       Human Resource
State Employment Law Summary




                         IDAHO
                                                       Table of Contents
                                                                                                                                                  Page

Appearance and Grooming.................................................................................................................... 4
   Uniforms ..................................................................................................................................... 4
Arrest and Conviction Records ............................................................................................................. 4
At-Will Employment ............................................................................................................................. 4
Breaks and Rest Periods ........................................................................................................................ 5
Child Labor ............................................................................................................................................ 5
   Federal Law ................................................................................................................................ 5
   Types of Work ............................................................................................................................ 5
     Minors Under Age 21 ............................................................................................................. 5
     Minors Under Age 18 ............................................................................................................. 5
     Minors Under Age 16 ............................................................................................................. 6
     Minors Under Age 14 ............................................................................................................. 6
   Hours of Work ............................................................................................................................ 6
   Permits and Postings ................................................................................................................... 6
COBRA ................................................................................................................................................. 6
   Insurance Continuation ............................................................................................................... 6
Employee Conduct and Work Rules ..................................................................................................... 7
   Guns in the Workplace: .............................................................................................................. 7
Equal Employment Opportunity and Equal Pay ................................................................................... 7
Family and Medical Leave .................................................................................................................... 8
Files and Access .................................................................................................................................... 9
   Employee Review of Files .......................................................................................................... 9
   Employee Assistance Program Records ..................................................................................... 9
Hiring Procedures .................................................................................................................................. 9
   Credit and Investigative Checks ................................................................................................. 9
   New Hire and Rehire Reporting ............................................................................................... 10
   Mandatory Background Checks ................................................................................................ 10
Holidays ............................................................................................................................................... 10
Jury, Witness, and Voting Leave......................................................................................................... 10
   Jury Leave ................................................................................................................................. 10
   Witness Leave ........................................................................................................................... 10
   Voting Leave ............................................................................................................................. 10
Labor-Management Relations ............................................................................................................. 11
Layoff and Reduction in Force............................................................................................................ 11
Loyalty Duties ..................................................................................................................................... 11
Medical Testing and Examination....................................................................................................... 11
   Drug Testing ............................................................................................................................. 11
     Overview ............................................................................................................................... 11
     Written Policy Required ....................................................................................................... 11
     Testing Requirements ........................................................................................................... 12
   Medical Examinations .............................................................................................................. 12
   Genetic Testing ......................................................................................................................... 13
  HIV Testing .............................................................................................................................. 13
Military Leave ..................................................................................................................................... 13
Noncompetition Agreements............................................................................................................... 14
Overtime .............................................................................................................................................. 14
Political Activities ............................................................................................................................... 14
Polygraph/Lie Detector Tests .............................................................................................................. 14
Reference Requests ............................................................................................................................. 14
  Protection for Employers .......................................................................................................... 14
Sick Leave ........................................................................................................................................... 15
Smoking ............................................................................................................................................... 15
  Clean Indoor Air Act ................................................................................................................ 15
Termination Procedures....................................................................................................................... 15
  Paychecks .................................................................................................................................. 15
  Discharge Notices ..................................................................................................................... 15
Unemployment Compensation ............................................................................................................ 15
Vacations ............................................................................................................................................. 15
  Payment at Termination ............................................................................................................ 15
Wage and Hours .................................................................................................................................. 16
  Paydays ..................................................................................................................................... 16
  Minimum Wage ........................................................................................................................ 16
  Withholding or Docking Pay .................................................................................................... 16
  Notice of Pay Rate .................................................................................................................... 16
  Garnishment .............................................................................................................................. 16
      Child Support Orders ............................................................................................................ 16
  Direct Deposit ........................................................................................................................... 16
  Living Wage.............................................................................................................................. 17
Worker’s Compensation ...................................................................................................................... 17
Pre-Employment Inquiry Guide .......................................................................................................... 17
Required Posters .................................................................................................................................. 17
  Required Federal Posters .......................................................................................................... 17
  Required Idaho Posters and Contacts ....................................................................................... 17
______________________
                          STATE LAW SUMMARY


Appearance and Grooming


  Uniforms

  No Idaho law requires that employers who require employees to wear uniforms must also pay
  for those uniforms. However, there are restrictions regarding "docking" employee wages to pay
  for the uniforms.

Arrest and Conviction Records


  Under certain circumstances, state law permits employers to access criminal history records
  maintained by Idaho government agencies. Employers should not inquire into an applicant’s
  arrest record, absent a showing of a legitimate business reason for the inquiry. Additionally,
  conviction records should not function as a complete bar to employment unless the number,
  nature, and recentness of the convictions make the applicant unsuitable.

  Generally a written request is required for access. In some circumstances, Idaho law permits
  expungement of juvenile records. After expungement, a juvenile’s case proceedings are deemed
  to never have occurred and the individual may reply accordingly to any inquiry. Review the
  state law or contact your attorney for further information.

  Caution: Private employers considering using arrest or conviction records should do so with
  caution, even in states that allow the use of arrest or conviction records for employment
  purposes. An arrest might never result in a criminal guilty plea or conviction and it is always
  possible that a person has been arrested for something he or she did not do. Moreover, the
  federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has stated that use of conviction records
  might be discriminatory given that, according to the EEOC, minorities are often more likely to
  have such a record. The EEOC cautions that employers should only inquire about felony
  convictions, should state that a criminal record is not an automatic bar to employment and
  should ensure that there is a legitimate business reason for requesting such information.
  Employers should consult with their attorneys for more information and guidance on this issue.

At-Will Employment


  Idaho law provides that, unless shown otherwise, an employment relationship is an at-will
  relationship and can be terminated without cause. At-will status can be modified by oral or
  written statements. Adequate contract disclaimers and at-will statements in documents given to
  employees (handbooks, policies, etc.) can minimize the risk that such documents may be alleged
  to have created express or implied employment contracts. Idaho law also recognizes that
  discharges may occur in violation of public policy. This type of claim is typically one brought
  by a whistleblower or some other person asserting a legally protected right, or by a person who
  has refused to commit an illegal act or who has reported one. These include claims based on
  statutes (e.g., you cannot fire someone for filing a worker’s compensation claim), constitutional
  provisions or regulations.

Breaks and Rest Periods


  Idaho has enacted no statute that requires private employers to provide breaks and rest periods
  for employees.

Child Labor


  Federal Law

  Minors may be limited in the hours they work and may not be employed in occupations
  considered hazardous by federal law or by the U.S. Department of Labor’s rules and regulations.
  When school is in session, federal law requires work of minors age 14 and 15 to be limited to
  three (3) hours per day and eighteen (18) hours per week. When school is not in session, minors
  age 14 and 15 may work up to eight (8) hours per day and forty (40) hours per week between
  7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. (or 9:00 p.m. June 1 through Labor Day). Federal law does not limit
  work hours for minors age 16 and 17, regardless of whether or not school is in session. Except
  in limited circumstances, employers are generally prohibited from hiring minors under age 14.
  In addition to these federal restrictions, the following provisions address employment of minors
  in Idaho. Additional Idaho provisions regulate both the type and hours of work in which minors
  can engage. Note that the stricter law, the one that most benefits employees, prevails.

  Types of Work

     Minors Under Age 21

     Minors under age 21 may not work in selling, serving or dispensing wine (except in
     making deliveries); except minors 19 or older may do so during the course of
     employment.

     Minors Under Age 18

     Minors under age 18 may not work serving intoxicating liquors, bottling, in saloons, in
     houses of prostitution or immoral places, or as school bus drivers.
       Minors Under Age 16

       Minors under age 16 may not work as a singer, musician, rope or wire walker, dancer,
       beggar, peddler, gymnast, contortionist, rider, mendicant, or in any wandering or obscene
       exhibition.

       Minors under age 16 may, however, sing, teach, study music or act as musicians in
       church or school.

       Minors Under Age 14

       Minors under age 14 may not work in underground mines or in any mine, factory,
       workshop, mercantile establishment, store, telegraph or telephone office, laundry,
       restaurant, hotel, apartment house, or as a messenger.

   Hours of Work

   Minors under 16 cannot be made to work before 6:00 a.m. or after 9:00 p.m. or more than a nine
   hour day, or 54 hour week. Minors under 14 may not be employed during school hours while
   school is in session.

   Permits and Postings

   Employers of minors under age 16 must keep records on file including the name, age, and place
   of residence for all minors employed.

Child labor law can be both challenging and confusing. Employers of minors should
closely review federal and state child labor law differences and contact their attorneys or
the Department of Labor to ensure they are in full compliance.

COBRA


   Insurance Continuation

   Many states have legislation requiring small employers (those not subject to COBRA) to
   provide insurance continuation if an employee becomes ineligible for group coverage (such as
   through a termination). Such provisions are complex and very technical. You may want to
   contact your attorney or insurance broker to determine if you are meeting all applicable federal
   and state requirements.
Employee Conduct and Work Rules


  Guns in the Workplace:

  Workplace violence continues to be a concern for employers. Many organizations adopt
  policies (such as the one found in the HRN manual) banning guns and other weapons on
  company property. However state law differs widely regarding employees’ weapons rights.
  You may want to contact the state employment agency or an attorney for further information
  regarding your specific policy and any possible liability that may result.

Equal Employment Opportunity and Equal Pay


  Similar to federal law, Idaho state law prohibits discrimination in employment or terms and
  conditions of employment based on race, color, religion, sex, age (40 and over), national origin,
  and/or disability. Included in the definition of unlawful discrimination is wage discrimination
  based on gender. Idaho law also prohibits aiding or compelling discrimination and retaliation.
  Impermissible disability discrimination may also prohibit inquiries into the AIDS status of an
  applicant or employee. Idaho law also prohibits discrimination based on “Vietnam era veteran
  status.”

  Idaho human rights laws apply to private employers with five or more employees. Complaints
  of discrimination are filed with the Idaho Human Rights Commission and can be remedied with
  injunctive relief (e.g., required hiring, reinstatement, cease and desist orders), civil penalties,
  damages, punitive damages up to $1000 per willful violation and awards of attorney’s fees and
  costs. Certain notices must be posted. Idaho classifies the following as high risk pre-
  employment inquiries:

   Religion

   Height

   Weight

   Pregnancy

   Marital status

   Number of children

   Worker’s compensation claim history

   Child care arrangements

   English proficiency (where not job-related)
   Education (where degree is not related to job success)

   Friend or relatives working for the company (e.g., where nepotism policies impact only one
    gender)

   Arrest records (without proof of business need for information)

   Conviction records (conviction should not be an absolute bar to hiring but rather, employers
    should consider nature, number and recentness of convictions)

   Type of military discharge (military service record may be obtained)

   Age

   Citizenship (except legal eligibility to work in United States)

   Economic status (e.g., home or care ownership, credit ratings)

   Availability to work weekend or holidays (employers must remember their obligation to
    accommodate employee religious beliefs)

   Handicaps and disabilities

  Further information on Idaho’s equal employment laws can be found on the Idaho Human
  Rights Home Page at www.state.id.us/ihrc. Also see the Idaho Guide to Pre-Employment
  Inquiries for more information.

  Caution: Some municipalities may have adopted city ordinances expanding EEO protections.
  Please check local laws for more details.

Family and Medical Leave


  No Idaho family and medical leave statute affecting private employers has been enacted which
  imposes greater requirements than the federal FMLA.

  Caution: Complying with the federal FMLA (and state law, if applicable) can be both
  challenging and confusing. You will likely want to contact your attorney, the Federal
  Department of Labor, or the appropriate state agency for further information and clarification.
Files and Access


   Employee Review of Files

   Neither federal nor Idaho law requires that employees who work for private companies be
   permitted to review their personnel files. However, Idaho law does provide that a person may
   inspect and copy his/her own medical records.

   Employee Assistance Program Records

   Idaho law protects the confidentiality of information communicated between employee
   assistance program (EAP) participants and providers of counseling or other services for
   personnel or work-related problems. The law also provides some protection to employers from
   liability based on information communicated during an EAP session.

Hiring Procedures


   Credit and Investigative Checks

   No Idaho credit or investigative check requirements have been adopted that exceed those
   required by the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act and Consumer Credit Reform Act of 1996.
   Under federal law, employers may not obtain a consumer report, (which includes checks on an
   employee's or applicant's credit standing, and which is obtained through a consumer reporting
   agency), unless a clear and conspicuous written disclosure has been made to the applicant or
   employee before the report is performed and the employer obtains written authorization from
   the applicant or employee. The disclosure must be made in a separate written document (not as
   part of a job application or other form) and must consist solely of the disclosure. Credit checks
   must be used for employment purposes only and may not be used discriminatorily in violation
   of any applicable federal or state law or regulation. Employers must also make written
   disclosures of investigative reports where personal information such as the applicant's or
   employee's character, reputation, etc is obtained through interviews with neighbors, friends, and
   others.

   Before an adverse employment action (such as refusal to hire) is taken based in whole or in part
   on information reported in a consumer or investigative report, the employer must inform the
   applicant or employee, and provide a copy of the report and a summary of consumer rights
   under the law. A post adverse action notice is also required under federal law. You may want
   to consult your legal counsel for detailed information.

   Caution: While not always required by law, it is generally a good practice to get releases from
   applicants for any background checks undertaken. You may want to contact your attorney for
   release requirements and related details.
  New Hire and Rehire Reporting

  In an effort to improve child support enforcement efforts, the Federal Personal Responsibility
  and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 requires employers to report their new
  employees, rehires, or recalls to the state new hire registry.

  Under Idaho law, employers must report new hires to the Idaho New Hire Registry in care of the
  Idaho department of Labor within 20 calendar days of the employee’s first day of work.
  Employers must provide the following information: employee name, social security number and
  address and employer name, federal employer identification number and mailing address. The
  W-4 is the only acceptable means of reporting New Hire information, except for magnetic
  media. Penalties are possible for failures to provide the required reports.

  Mandatory Background Checks

  Many states require mandatory background checks of applicants in certain highly sensitive areas
  such as in teaching, childcare, healthcare and security positions. Such checks may include
  criminal history and fingerprint checks, various reporting requirements, and requiring job
  references. Contact your local state agency or attorney for further information.

Holidays


  No Idaho statute has been enacted requiring private employers to give employees paid holiday
  time off or to pay premium pay for time actually worked on holidays.

Jury, Witness, and Voting Leave


  Jury Leave

  An Idaho employer cannot deprive an employee of employment or otherwise threaten or coerce
  an employee because of jury duty. No Idaho statute requires payment for jury duty, however
  the federal Fair Labor Standards Act restricts deductions from the pay of salaried, exempt
  employees.

  Caution: Employers should consider contacting their attorneys before denying pay for jury
  leave.

  Witness Leave

  No Idaho law has been enacted regarding witness leave.

  Voting Leave

  No Idaho law has been enacted regarding voting leave.
Labor-Management Relations
  Various labor relations laws allow and/or regulate the rights of employees to unionize, bargain
  collectively, file grievances, picket, strike, and wear union insignia and govern the resolution of
  labor disputes. Contact the Idaho Department of Labor for more information. Note also that
  federal law governs, and in fact pre-empts, many aspects of this area of law.

Layoff and Reduction in Force


  No applicable Idaho statute exists. Idaho has not enacted a state "WARN" law or other
  legislation regarding layoffs. However, employers must still comply with the federal WARN
  Act.

Loyalty Duties
  Idaho court decisions recognize that all employees owe a duty of loyalty to their employers
  while employed.

Medical Testing and Examination


  Drug Testing

     Overview

     Idaho law allows private employers to engage in drug and alcohol testing, but regulates
     how such testing may occur. Idaho employers may use drug testing in a variety of
     circumstances, including but not limited to: pre-employment testing, post-accident
     testing, random testing, and testing upon reasonable suspicion of drug use. However, an
     employer must list the types of tests an employee may be subject to in its written policy.
     Employers must bear all costs of employee testing, and time spent on testing should be
     considered as work time. Employees, including management, should be equally subject
     to testing.

     Discipline is permissible for positive test results, alteration or deception during the testing
     process, or refusals to test. Such discipline can include enrollment in an employer-
     approved rehabilitation program, refusal to hire, suspension or termination of
     employment.

     Written Policy Required

     Testing must be done pursuant to a written policy that has been distributed to all
     employees and is available for review by prospective employees. Such information
     should also be posted or summarized in handbooks. Such policies must:
    Identify all persons subject to testing,

    Outline circumstances when testing will occur (e.g., baseline, pre-employment, post-
     accident, random, return to duty, follow-up, reasonable suspicion),

    List substances as to which testing will be required,

    State testing and collection methods,

    Describe adverse actions (including possible termination for misconduct) resulting from
     positive tests or refusals to test,

    Explain the right of the employee to explain results, and

    Contain a general statement regarding the confidentiality of test results.

   Testing Requirements

   Testing must be done under reasonable and sanitary conditions. Collection techniques
   must adhere to the following guidelines:

    Respect for the privacy of the person tested,

    Labeling and documentation to avoid misidentification of samples,

    Written notice of positive test and opportunity of tested person to provide any
     information relevant to the test and request a retest by a mutually agreeable lab (if
     second test is negative, the private employer will reimburse costs of retest and return
     employee to position he or she would have been in without discipline),

    Collection and storing designed to preclude tampering or misidentification,

    Testing by certified labs,

    Confirmation of positive drug test results by gas chromatography, mass spectrometry or
     another comparably reliable method,

    Confirmation of positive alcohol saliva tests by a different testing method with a higher
     degree of reliability, and

    Confirmation of positive alcohol breath tests with another test no later than 15 minutes
     after the first test or with any other confirmatory test meant to demonstrate a higher
     degree of reliability.

Medical Examinations

No Idaho law requires that employers pay for medical exams of applicants or employees.
However, federal law may require such payment.         Employers should ensure that
   applicants/employees are aware of the requirement before an exam is required. Additionally, all
   medical exams must be conducted in accordance with ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act)
   requirements.

   Employers may wish to contact the Department of Labor to ensure that their policies comply
   with state law.

   Genetic Testing

   Many states have implemented laws prohibiting genetic testing and/or discrimination on the
   basis of genetic conditions or carrier status. An employer planning to implement a genetic
   testing program may wish to contact an attorney or the Department of Labor for further
   information.

   HIV Testing

   As a general rule, an employer may not require another person to undergo a medical procedure
   or test designed to determine if a person has AIDS or HIV infection or antibodies, or any related
   conditions. However, a person may be required to undergo such a procedure or test if the
   procedure or test is necessary as a bonafide occupational qualification and there is no less
   discriminatory means of satisfying the occupational qualification.

   Employees or applicants may be tested for HIV or its antigen or antibody only as a bona fide
   occupational qualification, and only if they have (1) given their informed consent or (2) signed a
   general consent form for the performance of medical tests or procedures. Employers should
   closely review state and federal ADA law to ensure they are in compliance.

   Caution: In addition to state law, employers should also ensure that any testing undertaken
   conforms with federal law (e.g., the ADA and FMLA). Contact your attorney if you propose to
   undertake such testing.

Military Leave
(Policy Manual Section 8050, Handbook Section 7040)
   In some instances involving military leave, federal law is stricter (requiring more of employers
   than applicable Idaho law). Therefore, federal law (as summarized in the HRN manual) should
   generally be followed.

   Under Idaho law, on release from ordered duty, a member of the Idaho National Guard must be
   reinstated to employment if: the position was not temporary, the former Guard member was
   honorably discharged, the employee remains qualified for the job, the period of duty did not
   exceed one year and an application for reemployment is made within 30 days of release from
   duty. If the former Guard member is no longer qualified due to disability incurred during the
   period of duty, he or she must be placed in a job they can perform. Reinstated employees can
   only be discharged for cause for a period of one year after reinstatement.
   Caution: Military leave legislation is complicated and technical. In addition to any applicable
   state law requirements, employers should ensure that they are in compliance with federal laws.

Noncompetition Agreements
   Idaho court decisions govern this area of the law. Generally, noncompetition agreements will
   be enforced if not entered into in bad faith, if narrowly tailored in terms of scope of activity,
   time and geographic restrictions and, rather than just limiting competition, have the purpose of
   protecting other legitimate business interests such as trade secrets, confidential information or
   goodwill. Idaho courts review noncompetition agreements with careful judicial scrutiny.
   Therefore, an employer should rely on an attorney to draft such agreements.

Overtime


   No Idaho statute has been enacted that exceeds federal requirements requiring overtime
   payment of one and one-half times regular pay after 40 hours worked/week. Idaho law does not
   require premium rates for weekends or holidays worked.

Political Activities


   Idaho law precludes any person from attempting to influence votes by threats or violence or by
   discharge or threats of discharge from employment.

Polygraph/Lie Detector Tests
   Under Idaho law, an employer cannot require that an employee take a polygraph as a condition
   of employment or continued employment.

   Caution: Polygraph legislation is complex. In addition to any applicable state law
   requirements, employers should ensure they are in compliance with federal law.

Reference Requests

Protection for Employers
   Idaho law prohibits any action taken by an employer to “blacklist” an employee or former
   employee. However, employers who act in good faith and provide references involving a past
   or present employee's job performance, professional conduct, or evaluation may not be held
   civilly liable for the disclosure or consequences of providing the information. Such information
   must be provided at the request of a prospective employer or a former or current employee.
   However, it is recommended that only documented "facts" not opinions be shared.
Sick Leave


  No Idaho statute requires employers to provide paid sick leave or to pay for accrued paid sick
  leave at termination.

  Caution: If sick leave is provided, employers should ensure that it is provided on a non-
  discriminatory basis and in accordance with established policy and practice.

Smoking


  Clean Indoor Air Act

  Idaho law prohibits or restricts smoking in designated public places including: public meetings,
  large restaurants, retail and grocery stores; educational facilities; hospitals and nursing homes;
  and elevators. Where smoking areas are designated, a "good faith" effort must be made to
  minimize smoke drifting into adjacent no-smoking areas.

Termination Procedures


  Paychecks

  On discharge or termination of employment by either the employee or employer, the employee
  must be paid within the earlier of ten days or the next regular pay period. However, upon the
  employee’s written request, wages must be paid within 48 hours, excluding weekends and
  holidays.

  Discharge Notices

  Idaho law does not require discharge notice or reason to be given for discharge.

Unemployment Compensation
  Extensive laws cover this area in Idaho. Contact the Idaho Department of Labor for further
  information.

Vacations


  Payment at Termination

  No Idaho statute requires employers to provide paid vacation or to pay for accrued vacation at
  termination. However, the state may so require by case law or regulatory interpretation.
  Caution: If paid vacation leave is provided, employers should ensure that it is provided on a
  non-discriminatory basis and in accordance with established policy and practice.

Wage and Hours


  Paydays

  Employees in Idaho must be paid at regular intervals at least once per month and within 15 days
  of the close of the pay period at issue.

  Minimum Wage

  The Idaho minimum wage parallels the federal law. The current federal minimum wage is
  $5.15. However, Idaho law exempts some workers from minimum wage laws. For example,
  Idaho exempts agricultural workers principally engaged in range production from the minimum
  wage laws.

  Withholding or Docking Pay

  Idaho employers may not withhold or "dock" wages unless required to do so by court order,
  state or federal law, or unless an employee has authorized a deduction in writing and the
  deduction is permissible under Idaho law.

  Notice of Pay Rate

  Employers are required to notify employees at the time of hire of their pay rates and regularly
  scheduled paydays. Employers must also notify employees of any reduction in pay rates prior
  to such reduction.

  Garnishment

  An Idaho employer cannot discharge an employee because his or her unpaid earnings have been
  subjected to garnishment. The maximum amount that can be garnished is the lesser of: 25% of
  disposable earnings or the amount by which weekly earnings exceed 40 times the minimum
  wage rate.

     Child Support Orders

     Court support orders are subject to a maximum of 50% of disposable earnings if a person
     is supporting another child or spouse, 60% if not.

  Direct Deposit

  An employer may directly deposit wages due in a bank, credit union, etc. provided that an
  employee has voluntarily authorized such a deposit.
  Living Wage

  A number of local governments (e.g. cities, towns, counties, school districts, etc.) have enacted
  laws known as “Living Wage” ordinances. These laws, although not always imposing the same
  types of requirements, typically mandate that any entity contracting or doing business with the
  local government or getting a tax abatement from the local government must pay its employees
  a set wage. The ordinances are typically called Living Wage ordinances because the set wage
  rate is typically much higher than the applicable minimum wage, thus better allowing the
  employees to live on the wage.

  No local governments in Idaho have adopted living wage ordinances as of January 1, 2003.
  However, this area of law is developing rapidly. For more information, including recent
  developments, see www.livingwage.com.

Worker’s Compensation
  Extensive laws cover this area in Idaho. Contact the Idaho Department of Labor for further
  information.




Pre-Employment Inquiry Guide
  To access this guide, go to www.state.id.us/ihrc.

Required Posters
  Listed below are the current listings for government agencies from which required posters can
  be obtained. Posters frequently can be obtained free of charge. Poster requirements may change
  from time to time, and employers should check to assure up to date compliance.

  Required Federal Posters

        Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) Minimum Wage
        Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA)
        Job Safety and Health Protection – Occupational Safety and Health
        Equal Employment Opportunity Act
        Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act (MSPA)
        Notice to Work with Disabilities (FLSA, SCA, and Walsh-Healey Act)
        Employee Polygraph Protection Act (EPPA)

  These posters can be accessed at the                     Department      of   Labor     website:
  http://www.dol.gov/osbp/sbrefa/poster/main.htm
  Required Idaho Posters and Contacts
   Minimum Wage Law                     Idaho Dept. of Labor
   Unemployment Compensation            317 Main St.
                                         Boise, ID 83735-0910
                                         208-334-6100
                                         www.labor.state.id.us



                                         Idaho Human Rights Commission
 Idaho Equal Employment Opportunity
                                         1109 Main Street, Fourth Floor
                                         PO Box 83720
                                         Boise, ID 83720-0040
                                         (208) 334-2873
                                         www.state.id.us/ihrc

                                         Idaho Industrial Commission
 Idaho Workers Compensation Insurance
                                         317 Main Street
                                         P.O. Box 83720
                                         Boise, Idaho 83720-0041
                                         208-334-6000 / 800-950-2110
                                         www2.state.id.us/iic

				
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