Troop 848

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					                Boy Scouts of America
               Sam Houston area Council
                   Bayshore District



              Troop 848
            Parent Manual
                      Edition April 2009




http://www.bsatroop848.org/
Short History of Troop 848 and Scoutmasters ........................................................................... 4
Scout Organization & Basic Troop Planning ............................................................................. 7
Scoutmaster Information / Bio – Mr. Steve Willis ..................................................................... 8
Troop Operating Structure & Policies (Ref :BSA / Council / Troop policies) ........................ 10
  Troop Committee.................................................................................................................. 10
  Opportunities for parents to help!......................................................................................... 10
  Troop Budget & Rechartering Fees ...................................................................................... 12
  Registration........................................................................................................................... 12
  Scout Credits / Fundraising .................................................................................................. 13
  Mulch Fundraiser.................................................................................................................. 13
  Audit Requirements .............................................................................................................. 13
  Adult Fund Raising............................................................................................................... 14
  Donations .............................................................................................................................. 14
Troop Campouts (including a ―typical‖ campout) ................................................................... 15
  Big TOW: Troop Operations Workshop – the Planning Workshop ................................... 16
  High Adventure Opportunties .............................................................................................. 17
  Troop 848 Venture Crew ...................................................................................................... 18
  Liquid Fuels .......................................................................................................................... 18
  Medication ............................................................................................................................ 18
  Medical Information – New Changes for 2009 and Beyond! .............................................. 19
  BSA’s new ―Annual Health and Medical Record‖ Q &A ................................................... 19
  The new BSA Medical Form:............................................................................................... 20
  Smoking Policy – scouts and adults ! ................................................................................... 21
  Disciplinary Procedures........................................................................................................ 21
  Uniform Policy – Class A and Class B – and info on new BSA uniform ............................ 21
  Complaint Procedure & Behavior Expectations ................................................................... 22
  Revision to Policy................................................................................................................. 23
General Information for Parents ............................................................................................... 24
  Troop 848 Basic Information ............................................................................................... 24
  Boy Scout Basic Information ............................................................................................... 24
  Advancement ........................................................................................................................ 24
  Scoutmaster’s Conference – (SM or any ASM) ................................................................... 25
  Boards of Review – we need parents! .................................................................................. 25
  Merit Badges , How to be a ―Merit Badge Counselor, and Courts of Honor‖ ..................... 25
  Order of the Arrow ............................................................................................................... 26
  High Adventure .................................................................................................................... 26
  The ―Patrol Method‖ ............................................................................................................ 26
  Monthly Campout (tips and tricks for new scouts / parents!) .............................................. 27
    Patrol Boxes...................................................................................................................... 27
    Loading ............................................................................................................................. 27
    Menus ............................................................................................................................... 28
    Shopping Responsibilities ................................................................................................ 28
    Duty Roster ....................................................................................................................... 28
    Sleeping Hours ................................................................................................................. 29
    Transportation................................................................................................................... 29
    Emergency Contact During Campouts ............................................................................. 29
    Sanitation and Water ........................................................................................................ 29
  Parents’ Meetings and Parent Info ....................................................................................... 29

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                                                               Page 2                                               Rev: March 2009
   Parent’s Role in Troop 848 – Here’s what you can do!!!................................................ 30
   Patrol Leaders’ Responsibilities: ...................................................................................... 30
   Assistant Patrol Leader’s Responsibility .......................................................................... 30
   What to Bring to the Monthly Campout ........................................................................... 31
   What NOT to Bring on a Monthly Campout .................................................................... 31
   Summer Camp .................................................................................................................. 32
   The Philmont Grace .......................................................................................................... 33
   Suggested References: ...................................................................................................... 34




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                                                         Page 3                                             Rev: March 2009
Short History of Troop 848 and Scoutmasters

Troop 848 has been chartered continuously for almost 45 years! The chartering organization
is Clear Lake United Methodist Church, and we are grateful to CLUMC and its members for
their kind support.


Troop 848 Scoutmasters:


       Mr. John Cornwell       1965 – 1968

       Mr. Dick Veth           1968 – 1970

       Mr. Robert Chilton      1970 – 1972

       Mr. Jim Story            1972 – 1974

       Mr. Tex Ward            ~1979 – 1981

       Mr. John Roberts        1981 – 1995

       Mr. Steve Willis        1995 – 2000

       Mr. Warren Snell        2000 – 2006

       Mr. Don Chilton         2006 – 2008

       Mr. Steve Willis         2008 –Present




The gentlemen listed above have unselfishly served our community and our Troop as Scoutmasters of
Troop 848. Many of them held other leadership positions within the Boy Scouts before becoming
Scoutmaster. They have all been supported by a talented list of Assistant Scoutmasters, Committee
Members, and other parents who continue to give back to the community through the Boys Scouts of
America. Please remember that these folks are all volunteers who generously give of themselves and
their time to help your boys continue to grow into mature and responsible adults.




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                                             Page 4                              Rev: March 2009
Troop Activities Through the Years

1961           John Cornwell moves from San Diego to Clear Lake City with the space program.
               Recognizing the need for a Boy Scout troop in Clear Lake City, he elects to form a new troop
               rather than join one of the established troops in the Bay Area.

1965           Troop 848 is formed and chartered at Clear Lake United Methodist Church. Meetings are
               held in portable buildings on the present site of CLUMC.

1966           Troop Summer Camp at Camp Strake every summer until 1970.


1971           Troop Summer Camp at El Rancho Cima. (71 & 72)
1981           Troop 951 (Clear Lake Baptist Church) merges with Troop 848. Clyde Morell joins as
               Assistant Scoutmaster
1983
               Troop summer camp at Bear Creek Scout Reservation, Kerrville TX.

1984           Troop 848 Crew attends Philmont

1986           Troop summer camp at Camp Garland, Shreveport LA

1988           Troop 848 Crew attends Philmont

1989           Troop 848 Crew attends Florida Seabase SCUBA Adventure

1990           Colorado trip. Summer Camp at San Isabel Scout Ranch, High Adventure Trek at Packard
               High Adventure Base.

1991           British Virgin Islands High Adventure Trip

1992           Two Troop 848 Crews attend Philmont Troop summer camp at Sid Richardson Scout Ranch
               Denton, TX. Troop 848 sends two crews to Philmont

1993           Troop 848 Crew attends Northern Tier/Charles Sommers Canoe Base. Minnesota / Canada

1994           Troop 848 Crew attends Philmont
               Troop 848 Crew attends Florida SCUBA Adventure
               Troop Summer Camp at Camp Orr Arkansas

1995           Troop 848 Crew attends Philmont
               Troop Summer Camp at Camp Rainey Mountain Georgia
               Troop Summer Camp El Rancho Cima

1996           Troop 848 Crew attends Philmont
               Troop Summer Camp at Sid Richardson Scout Ranch

1997           Troop High Adventure to Cozumel
               Troop Summer Camp at El Rancho Cima
               Contingent to National Jamboree – Fort AP Hill, Virginia
               3 Scouts to NJLIC
               4 JLTC Participants

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                                              Page 5                                    Rev: March 2009
1998              Troop Summer Camp at Camp Euchee in Florida Panhandle
                  Troop 848 sends 2 Crews to Philmont
                  Contingent to NOAC
                  3 JLTC Participants

1999
                  Troop Summer Camp at Camp Ben Delatour near Red Feather Lakes Colorado
                  6 JLTC Participants
                  2 Scouts to World Jamboree – Chile

2000
                  Troop Summer Camp at Camp Buck Toms near Knoxville, Tennessee
                  JLTC Participants
                  1 Scout to NJLIC

2001              Troop Summer Camp at Camp Alexander near Colorado Springs, CO
                  4 Scouts to National Jamboree – Fort AP Hill, Virginia

2002              Troop Summer Camp at Camp Frank Rand near Chimayo, New Mexico
                  Contingent to the National Order of the Arrow Conclave (NOAC)

2003              Troop Summer Camp at Camp Ben Delatour near Red Feather Lakes, Colorado

2004
                  Troop Summer Camp at Woodruff Scout Reservation near Blairsville, Georgia
                  Troop 848 sends crew to Philmont
                  Troop 848 sends contingent to Northern Tier/Charles Sommers Canoe Base near Ely
                  Minnesota

2005              Troop Summer Camp at Camp Buck Toms near Knoxville, Tennessee
                  Troop sends four crews to Sea Base Scuba program.
                  5 Scouts to National Jamboree – Ft AP Hill, Virginia
                  BSA National Youth Leadership Training (NYLT) is instituted as a requirement for
                  Leadership Staff Positions (except QM).

2006
                  Troop Summer Camp at Camp Alexander near Colorado Springs
                  Troop sends crew to Philmont
2007              Troop Summer Camp at Buffalo Trails Scout Ranch, Alpine Texas
                  Troop sends three crews to Florida Seabase SCUBA Program
2008              Troop Summer Camp at Camp H Roe Bartle in Missouri (Home of Tribe of Mic-O-Say)
                  Troop Sends one crew to Florida Sea Base SCUBA Program
                  Troop sends 10 Scouts and Leaders to Arrow Corps V, OA service project in Grand Teton
                  National Park
                  Venture Crew Established (D. Chilton Scoutmaster)
2009
                  Troop Summer Camp at Camp Frank Rand New Mexico
                  Troop sends four SCUBA Crews and one Live Aboard SCUBA Crew to Florida Sea Base



Currently, Troop 848 has 145 registered scouts and 128 adults! (The new venture crew accounts for 15 scouts /
13 adults.) Troop 848 is considered one of the most successful units in this area, and much of the success is
due to the involvement of dedicated parents. The almost one-to-one ratio of adults to scouts is quite
impressive. The Troop also has developed more than 100 Eagle Scouts to its credit over its past 45 year
history!
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                                                 Page 6                                   Rev: March 2009
Scout Organization & Basic Troop Planning
Troop 848 prides itself on being a scout-led troop. Allowing the scouts to make plans and decisions
(and occasional mistakes) provides them opportunities to develop leadership skills they will leverage
the rest of their lives.

Each October, the troop members select a Senior Patrol Leader or SPL (the boss). After consulting
with the Scoutmaster, the SPL selects his senior leadership staff. These scouts usually hold their
positions for 1 year. Gold scout patrol leader elections are held twice a year, and Green Scout patrol
leaders change approximately every three months.

Once a year in the month of January, the troop scout leaders hold the Troop Operations Workshop
(the ―Big TOW‖ as it’s called in the troop) to plan the upcoming year’s activities: this includes each
month’s theme, camping location, and programs for the weekly meetings. Adults are present to
provide support, answer questions, and provide assistance with the implementation of the scouts’
ideas. Adults also sometimes provide a sanity check to the monthly themes/campouts – for example
making sure the scouts don’t go too far planning that special weekend campout on the island of Fiji….

The senior staff consists of:

       JASM (Junior Assistant Scoutmaster) – these are older scouts who have held senior staff
        positions. They provide the SPL with preparation and implementation of troop activities.
       SPL (Senior Patrol Leader) – elected by the scouts of the troop, the SPL’s job is to insure
        the troop runs smoothly and has programs prepared which are of interest and value to his troop
        members.
       ASPLs (Assistant Senior Patrol Leaders) – scouts selected by the SPL to help with the
        running of the troop. These gentlemen are ―second in command‖ to the SPL.
       Quartermaster – selected by the SPL to insure that equipment needed for programs and
        campouts is available and in working order.

The Junior Staff Leadership Positions are as follows:

       Troop Guide – Scouts selected by the SPL to provide guidance and assistance to the green
        scouts. There are usually two troop guides for each green scout patrol.
       PL (Patrol Leader) – elected by his patrol, this scout is responsible for relaying meeting and
        activity information to his patrol members each week, sharing patrol concerns and ideas with
        senior staff and adult leadership, and ensuring that his patrol is prepared for all troop activities.
        The PL is also the one who collects campout food money for his patrol.
       APL (Assistant Patrol Leader) – elected by his patrol, this scout is responsible for assisting
        the PL and filling in for him when necessary.
       Scribe – selected by the SPL to handle any necessary correspondence and assist with campout
        reservation and check-in.

In addition to these leadership positions, the Scoutmaster may assign special temporary leadership
positions to other scouts for special activities. Advancing in rank requires that scouts hold bonafide
leadership positions within the troop.

The chain of command for troop 848 is:

Patrol member (scouts) Patrol Leader  Troop Guide (Green Patrols only) ASPL(s)  SPL 
JASMs Assistant Scoutmasters  Scoutmaster.


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                                                Page 7                                   Rev: March 2009
Scoutmaster Information / Bio – Mr. Steve Willis
We are fortunate to have one of the most decorated Scout Leaders in the district as our
Scoutmaster, again. Steve, an Eagle Scout with more than 40 years of scouting experience
was Scoutmaster of Troop 848 from 1995 – 2000, and he has agreed again to lead the troop as
Scoutmaster from 2008 to present.

Born: Fort Worth Texas

Education:
Southwest High School
University of Texas at Arlington: BS – Computer Science Engineering

Major Scouting Affiliations:
Pack 350: Bobcat, Wolf, Bear, Webelos – Arrow of Light - Longhorn Council Fort Worth Texas
Troop 600: Eagle Scout Dec 8 , 1975 – Longhorn Council Fort Worth Texas
Troop 848: July 1, 1982 – present
Summer camp staff: Sid Richardson Scout Reservation 1975 – 1980
Woodbadge: SC-194 - Longhorn Council Fort Worth
Scoutmaster Troop 848: 1995 – 2000
Scoutmaster Troop 848: current

Order of the Arrow:
Ordeal 1973 – Worth Ranch
Brotherhood 1982 – Worth Ranch
Vigil 1987 – Camp Strake
OA Founders Award
OA Lodge Numbered Certificate


Scouting Activities:
1977 National Jamboree – SPL Troop 443
1985 National Jamboree – ASM
1989 National Jamboree – Trap Shooting Staff
1993 National Jamboree – Trap Shooting Staff
1997 National Jamboree – Trap Shooting Staff
2001 National Jamboree – Trap Shooting Staff
2005 National Jamboree – Trap Shooting Staff

1986 National OA Conference Delegate
1988 National OA Conference Delegate
1990 National OA Conference Staff
1992 National OA Conference Staff
1994 National OA Conference Staff
1996 National OA Conference Staff
1998 National OA Conference Staff
1999 National OA Indian summer Staff
2000 National OA Conference Staff
2002 National OA Conference Staff
2003 National OA Leadership Summit Staff
2004 National OA Conference Staff
2006 National OA Conference Staff
2007 National OA Leadership and Conservation Summit Staff
2008 National OA ArrowCorp5 Lodge Contingent Leader
2009 National OA Conference Staff
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                                                Page 8                               Rev: March 2009
Seabase
Philmont (2)
Cozumel
British Virgin Island
Additional Scouting Awards:

District Training Award
District Award of Merit
Outstanding Assistant Scoutmaster
District Hall of Fame
Silver Beaver

Work:
Insight Networking – Senior Architect
Design and Build large Scale Internetwork Systems




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                                                Page 9        Rev: March 2009
Troop Operating Structure & Policies (Ref :BSA / Council / Troop policies)

Troop Committee

The Committee is the mechanism for approval of Troop plans and functions. A meeting of the
Committee will be scheduled, generally on a monthly basis, at a convenient time and announced via
the Troop email distribution list. Attendance at this meeting is open to all parents of scouts registered
in the Troop. For the purposes of conducting troop business a minimum of five registered members
must be represented. The meeting agenda will be developed by the Committee Chairperson with input
available from any parent or committee member. A simple majority vote of the Committee Member
attendees is required to approve any business before the Committee. The Secretary will take meeting
minutes.

                Elected officers of the Committee shall be:
                                       Committee Chairperson
                                       Vice Chairperson – Outdoor Activities
                                       Vice Chairperson – Administration
                                       Treasurer
                                       Advancement Chairperson
                                       Secretary

Committee Members are required to register as members of the committee with Boy Scouts.
Registration costs $11.00 per year and is prorated for partial years.

Nominations will be taken during the January committee meeting. Elections will be held during the
February committee meeting. Office terms last one year from April through March. Parents of
younger Scouts are encouraged to run for these offices in order to assure both adequate backup from
experienced Scout parents and continuity of committee leadership.


Opportunities for parents to help!

There are many important opportunities in the troop for parents to volunteer – even parents of first
year, or ―Green‖ Scouts. The support of committed volunteers is the reason this troop operates so
well. We really need you! Volunteers for Troop Subcommittees will be accepted for the tasks listed
below. Talk to any Assistant Scoutmaster or the Scoutmaster if you have any specific interests or are
able to help in the following areas:


                 Clothing                                      Court of Honor / Hospitality
                 Summer Camp                                   Scouting for Food
                 Membership                                    High Adventure
                 Training Promotion & Organization             Communications (Adult phone tree & email)
                 Den Chief Coordinator                         Transportation
                 Equipment                                     Health & Safety
                 Green Sales                                   Mulch Sales
                 Friends of Scouting Coordinator               Popcorn Sales




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                                                     Page 10                                    Rev: March 2009
Volunteer Coordinator / Subcommittee Heads are expected to use Troop resources from the approved
budget and committee members to accomplish the current objectives of their subcommittee.
Additional resources may be requested at the monthly committee meetings.




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                                          Page 11                              Rev: March 2009
Troop Budget & Rechartering Fees

The Troop executive committee consisting of the Scoutmaster, Committee Chairman, Vice Chairman
for Outdoor Activities & Administration, Advancement Chairman, Treasurer, and Secretary will meet
after the Troop Operations Workshop to prepare a proposed budget for the next scout year. The
executive committee will solicit budget requests from other committee members. The budget is to be
approved during the February committee meeting. This budget will be published and available for
review by the parents at the next parents’ meeting after the budget is approved.

The primary account in the troop treasury is the general fund for operating expenses. The majority of
yearly operating income comes from troop fees. Troop fees (annual scout fees) are set each year, but
they are generally less than $150 per year per scout. The recharter fee for 2009 year, for example,
was $120 for scouts $11 for adults. This fee covers all basic equipment needed for a scout to fully
participate in boy scouts for the year. Use of the troop’s tents, canoes, and cooking equipment as well
as general ―wear-and-tear‖ type repairs to troop equipment, park fees, and other basic scout items are
covered by this fee. The full fee is due at recharter time – February each year, but it can be paid in
two installments (January and February) if desired.

The second major account is the permanent fund account containing a base amount equal to
approximately one year of operating expenses. This base amount is to remain in the treasury at the
end of each budget year. This amount is to cover unplanned events or shortfalls that may occur during
the budget year. If the permanent fund balance falls below the base amount at the end of the budget
year, the troop committee will formulate and execute a plan to restore the account to the base amount.
The permanent fund account base amount is $8000.

Please know that we want your son to be able to participate in scouting. Therefore, the troop
committee, on a case-by-case basis, might be able to offer financial assistance for troop fees. See the
Committee Chairperson for more detail.

All general fund account overages at the end of the budget year will go into the permanent fund.
Shortfalls are to be paid from the permanent fund, and committee fund raisers may be performed to
finance specific projects.

Purchases outside of the proposed budget may be made from the permanent fund it is approved by the
troop committee and the permanent fund does not go under the base amount.

The scout year runs from the first day of March to the last day of February.


Registration

The Troop Secretary is responsible for coordinating the Registration and Re-chartering activities for
the Troop. This is an annual activity that every family must perform. It’s really simple though –
each family needs to fill out an application for each scout and each registered adult in the family and
get the applications to the Troop Secretary when requested. The fees are ―per person;‖ there are no
discounts for multiple kids / adults from the same family in the troop.

Please note that adults who are leaders (scoutmasters, committee members, etc), those who attend
campouts, or those who drive scouts to campouts must be registered with BSA. BSA requires this for
the protection of all.

Registration fees (dues) are collected at time of rechartering. The registration fee is determined by the
Scoutmaster, Committee Chairman, Secretary, and Treasurer in consultation and approved by a vote of
________________________________________________________________________
                                              Page 12                                 Rev: March 2009
the committee each year. Registration for active adult Scoutmasters and Assistant Scoutmasters with
no children in the Troop may be funded by the Troop.

Please note that the Troop Secretary (a parent volunteer!) has a couple hundred applications to
manage, so PLEASE, when you see the first e-mail requesting that you fill out your recharter
information, do so quickly. Try to accommodate the Secretary’s requests for timely information.



Scout Credits / Fundraising

The Troop provides fund raising opportunities to help Scouts earn money for their scouting activities.
While participation in these fund raisers is 100% voluntary, the vast majority of our scouts participate
in some way in at least one of these activities. Examples of these fundraisers are Christmas greenery,
Popcorn sales, and our annual Troop Mulch Sale.

This is the important point: Whatever money a scout earns goes directly into his own personal scout
account –to cover his own personal scout expenses. These activities give the scouts perspective on
real world cost -- and the personal benefit of working hard. Many scouts fund their entire recharter
fee! Examples of these fundraisers are Christmas greenery, Popcorn sales, and our annual Mulch Sale.
The Mulch fundraiser is, by far, the largest fundraiser in which the troop participates.

The Treasurer will hold the funds earned from these activities in escrow for the scout, and these Scout
credits may be applied to any scouting expense (e.g. registration fees, campout fees, summer camp,
special activities, uniform purchases, merit badge books, scout literature, etc). The Treasurer will
keep the account record and provide a list of account balance to the scouts and their parents as
necessary. Except as outlined below no money from individual Scout efforts go directly to the troop
as an entity. The harder the scouts work raising funds, the more they will have, individually, in their
own ―scout accounts‖ to fund their scout expenses.

Approximately twice per calendar year the Scoutmaster will review the attendance and activity records
for the purpose of classifying active and inactive Scouts. Accounts for Scouts deemed inactive are to
be held in escrow for one additional year after which time the funds will revert to the Troop’s general
account and are lost to the ex-Scout. Typically these funds will be used as Camperships to help Scouts
unable to meet the expense of attending summer camp.


Mulch Fundraiser

    Once a year (in January), the troop begins planning for its annual mulch fundraiser. We buy
mulch (many 18-wheeler loads of it) in 2 cu ft bags at wholesale, sell at retail and the scouts get to
spend the profits of their hard work on scout activities and costs. This has been an exceptionally
successful fundraiser. Details are provided separately by the volunteer coordinator of the mulch
fundraiser. Martin Yeager is the adult leader who has dedicated many many hours creating, defining,
refining, organizing, and coordinating this fundraiser that has benefitted so many families.


Audit Requirements

    The Treasurer is responsible for:

             A summary report on the Troop Finances at each scheduled Committee meeting and at
                 year end.
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                                              Page 13                                Rev: March 2009
             The preparation of original or revised budgets for distribution at the approval
                 meeting(s).
             Receipts and disbursements of funds through the Troop checking account(s).

The presentations of the Treasurer before the Committee are intended to replace formal audits of the
Troop accounts. The Treasurer therefore has the authority to require documentation in a format
designed to make the Treasurer’s work easier and to fulfill the accounting control requirements.
Additionally, the Treasurer will be prepared to explain and support account balances with said
documentation to the satisfaction of the Committee.

The Treasurer will be limited to two consecutive terms in this office.

The Committee Chairman, Scoutmaster or Charter Organization Representative may request an audit
of the accounts at any time.

Adult Fund Raising

Additional fund raising by Troop adult members as well as other fundraiser profits will go into the
troop’s general operating account. Fundraising profits may also go into the permanent fund if its
balance falls below the base amount. An example of this is the Christmas green sales and popcorn
sales as a service to the church members. Pancake breakfasts fall into this category also.

Donations

All monetary donations for the troop are to be given to the treasurer of the Clear Lake United
Methodist Church and earmarked for Troop 848. Donors will receive written acknowledgement of the
donation for monies or items donated.




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                                              Page 14                             Rev: March 2009
Troop Campouts (including a “typical” campout)
One troop campout is scheduled each month ~ except December. The program plan and campout
locations are selected for a 12-month period at the Troop Operations Workshop (the ―Big Tow‖) every
January.

Campout theme and location are published in the yearly calendar and posted on the Troop Web page
(www.bsatroop848.org). Changes to the plan may occur due to drought, flooding, inclement
weather, etc. Notification of plan changes will be given as early as possible.

A typical campout (if there is such a thing!) consists of the following:
    1. Meet at CLUMC on Friday evening
    2. Pack up Trailer with Chuck boxes and personal gear
    3. Take attendance of who is present
    4. Drive somewhere 2-5 hours away!
    5. SPL establishes the different patrol sites for camping (always very close to one another)
    6. Everyone unpacks the trailers
    7. Everyone sets up camp in limited light!
    8. Sleep (some) that first night.
    9. Wake up early Saturday – usually eat something tasty and warm for breakfast! (Each patrol
        cooks separately.)
    10. Fall in for the activity usually at 8:48 AM Saturday
    11. Go and do the monthly theme activity (canoeing, rock climbing, rafting, zipline, biking, field
        sports - shooting guns and using bows and arrows, etc.)
    12. Usually have a fast lunch (sandwiches, etc)
    13. Go and do more of the activity using as much daylight as possible!
    14. Return and cook a good dinner using Dutch ovens (most of the time, weather permiting)
    15. Campfire if time permits – and if there are no ―burn bans.‖ at the campsite
    16. Sleep well Saturday night
    17. Sunday wake up
    18. Pack up campsite and load trailers
    19. Eat a fast and easy to prepare breakfast (pop tarts are popular)
    20. Staff performs campsite inspections – Leave No Trace!
    21. Quick church service by Chaplain
    22. Drive home dirty, tired, and happy - returning by 1 PM to CLUMC!

It is troop policy to fully comply with safety requirements as stated in the latest issue of the Guide to
Safe Scouting on any campout or other outdoor activity. It is also troop policy to attempt to comply
with recommended practices given in the same publication.

At regular monthly campouts participation by parents is welcomed and encouraged! Note that parents
bring their own tents, chairs, and sleeping equipment, but share the use of the cooking and other basic
troop equipment used by the adult leaders & scoutmasters. Adults eat with the Troop Staff – the
senior leaders in the troop. However, adults are not allowed to do anything for their kids (i.e. help set
up their tent, help cook for them, etc).

Transportation to and from the campouts for all scouts is each parent’s responsibility. This
responsibility should be shared month to month to reduce the driving burden. The Transportation
Coordinator has one of the toughest jobs around. Please make his/her job easier and volunteer to drive
(and attend the campouts!) often. Should insufficient seats with safety belts or trailer towing be
unavailable, the campout may be cancelled or attendance cut by lot at the departure point. This will be
at the camp leader’s discretion.
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                                              Page 15                                 Rev: March 2009
Please note that we always leave from Clear Lake Methodist Church. Further, we must always leave
on time because many of the campouts we attend are several hours away, and it is critical to get
underway so that we can safely set up camp that evening. Unless otherwise notified by the SPL for
the campout we adhere to the following:

       Scouts – eat something for dinner before coming to the church for ―load out.‖ (Be prepared!)
       Staff, Patrol Leaders, and Adult Leaders / Scoutmasters arrive 5:15 PM on Friday at Clear
        Lake United Methodist Church.
       All other scouts arrive no later than 5:30 PM.
       Scouts should be ready at 5:30 to load troop trailers with gear.
       At 5:30 PM we take roll call, match scouts to drivers
       Depart for camp at 5:45 PM.
       We all leave together from this location! Note that _sometimes_ some drivers have come
        directly from work and have not had a chance to eat dinner. In those cases, they sometimes
        stop for a fast food dinner on the way to a campout. The kids always love to stop anyway!
        SO… before your son gets into a car, talk with the driver and ask if he/she is stopping for a
        bite to eat. In that case you might want to send a few bucks with your son to buy something to
        eat!
       We try to arrive back from every campout at CLUMC at 1:00 PM Sunday. Ask your son to
        call you on the ride home each campout with a more specific ETA, but we usually hit it pretty
        close! All drivers have cell phones your son can use.
       Scouts and Scoutmasters must travel to/from all campouts in full Class A uniform!

Parent Note : If your scout has previously indicated that he is going to the campout (and paid his $15
food money to his Patrol Leader the Tuesday before the campout), his patrol is expecting him to
attend. As a common courtesy, if there is a late change in plan and your son is NOT going to attend
after he had previously committed to attend, please make sure you or your son calls the SPL of the
campout (the Troop SPL or his designee for that campout) and his Patrol Leader and informs them
of the change. If you do not get in touch with them, please come to the ―load out‖ at the church on
Friday by 5:30 and notify the troop at roll call of the late change.

Overall, though, please note that it is up to you and your son to get to the church on time. If your son
is not at the church on time, we must leave without him – whether or not he has ―signed up‖ for the
campout. He will miss the campout … unless you drive him there personally.

Attendance of Troop 848 programs and campouts by non-scout siblings is not allowed. The Troop
848 program is designed by our scouts and for our scouts (and their registered parents & leaders.)
There can be exceptions, though. Please consult with the Scoutmaster as early as possible prior to the
campout date if you want to discuss an extenuating circumstance.

Scouts are expected to participate in campout for the entire weekend. Early departures must be
approved by the scoutmaster prior to the beginning of the campout. Scouts will be released to their
parents only, unless a written release note has been received by the scoutmaster naming the parent to
which the scout is to be released.

Big TOW: Troop Operations Workshop – the Planning Workshop

A Troop Operations Workshop (TOW) is held in January where the troop leadership meets over a
weekend to plan the scouting program for the next 12 months. The scouts in the Troop PLC and the
junior leader staff do the planning. The Scoutmaster and at least one Assistant Scoutmaster are
present as adult sponsorship. This plan is then taken to the Troop Committee for approval as an entire

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                                              Page 16                                Rev: March 2009
package. The Troop will finance this planning operation from the operating budget. Subsequent to
the TOW, the support necessary to implement the Scout’s plans will be outlined and approved at the
next troop committee meeting.

High Adventure Opportunties

Trips to the High Adventure Bases, Philmont, Seabase, Boundary Waters, and National or World
Jamboree will be scheduled to allow maximum opportunity for a Scout to experience these adventures.
Additional High Adventure trips may be scheduled with Scoutmaster concurrence provided there is
support for the crew. Reservations for the high adventure areas should be made by April of the year
prior to the year the trip is planned.

The Troop 848 Venture Crew participates in a variety of High Adventure experiences geared towards
older scouts!




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                                            Page 17                              Rev: March 2009
Troop 848 Venture Crew

Troop 848 established a Venture Crew in 2008, and it is already 15 scouts and 13 adults strong! The
Venture Crew is part of Troop 848, but is a separate entity within the troop for older scouts.
Venturing is a youth development program of the Boy Scouts of America for young men and women
who are 14 (and have completed the eighth grade) through 20 years of age. Venturing's purpose is to
provide positive experiences to help young people mature and to prepare them to become responsible
and caring adults.

The Troop 848 venture crew sometimes attends the same camps with the main troop, but sets up camp
separate from the main 848 campsite block. 2009 was a very successful first year for our Troop 848
Venture Crew! It is comprised of mainly ―Life‖ and ―Eagle‖ rank scouts.


Liquid Fuels

Liquid fuel (lighter fluids, camp fuels for lanterns or stoves, etc) is not to be used at any Troop 848
scout activity unless either approved in advance by the scoutmaster, or required during backpacking
trips. Liquid fuels are prohibited for use on Sam Houston Area Council property by Council rules.
Many other scout councils also prohibit the use of liquid fuels. If scouts are required to use liquid
fuels, they will receive training in the use and storage of liquid fuels before they leave for the trip.
This rule, of course applies to scouts as well as adults. Note that there are some very good propane-
fueled lanterns, etc that adults can purchase.

Medication

“The taking of prescription medication is the responsibility of the individual taking the medication
and/of that individual’s parent or guardian. A Scout leader, after obtaining all the necessary
information, can agree to accept the responsibility of making sure a Scout takes the necessary
medication at the appropriate time but BSA policy does not mandate nor necessarily encourage the
Scout leader to do so. Also, if your state laws are more limiting, they must be following.1
1
    Guide to Safe Scouting, Boy Scouts of America


For safety reasons, the adult in charge of the campout should know what medications are being sent
with scouts. Troop adult leadership should be notified and written instructions concerning that
medication should be provided per the following guidelines:

           A designated adult will be in possession of all medications for scouts, whether a weekend
            campout or long term camps such as summer camp. The adult will dispense the medications
            at the appropriate times as the scouts come for them. The medications can be returned to the
            scout at the end of the campout period, but it is appreciated if you provide ONLY the exact
            amount of medicine needed for the length of the campout so returning unused medication is
            not necessary.

           Write on a 3x5 index card (with waterproof ink) your son’s name, medication, how often or
            when to take it, what he is taking the medication for, and any special instructions. Indicate if
            your son is to take the medication only if needed. The card must be dated and signed by a
            parent. The medication needs to be provided in the original prescription bottle. Different
            medications should be in different containers.


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                                                    Page 18                              Rev: March 2009
       In addition to written instructions as above, place medication and signed instructions in double
        zip-locked bags. Write your scout’s name on the outside bag with a permanent marker
        (―Sharpie-type‖). The medication should be given to the Adult in Charge prior to departure
        for the campout. An adult will keep all medications. No medications will be kept in a scout’s
        tent at any time. The Scout is responsible for coming to the Adult Leadership to get their
        medication at the proper time. The Adult Leadership will administer the medication as
        directed in the instructions.

If you have any questions or special concerns, please call the Troop’s Health and Safety Officer or the
adult in charge of the campout.

The Troop maintains a general first aid kit for emergencies. If a parent desires that his scout should be
provided with such items as Tylenol, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, antacids, allergy tablets, or other non
emergency type care, the parent should provide written permission to administer such medications.
We will not medicate any boy whose parent is not present or has not provided such written permission.




Medical Information – New Changes for 2009 and Beyond!

The Boy Scouts of America recommends that all youth and adult members have annual medical
evaluations by certified and licensed health-care providers. In an effort to provide better care to those
who may become ill or injured and to provide youth members and adult leaders a better understanding
of their own physical capabilities, the Boy Scouts of America has established minimum standards for
providing medical information prior to participating in various activities. Those standards are offered
below in one three-part medical form.

Note that unit leaders must always respect the privacy of unit participants by protecting their medical
information.

Before 2009, the troop used medical forms called BSA ―Class 1, 2, and 3‖ medical forms. These old
BSA Class 1, 2, and 3 forms are no longer valid and should not be issued anymore. Note however,
that current Class 1, 2, and 3 forms are valid for no more than 12 months from date of issue. When
they expire, all scouts must begin using the new Annual Health and Medical Record, Parts A, B, and
C.

Of course ―New‖ scouts in 2009 and beyond– or those updating medical information in 2009 should
start using the new medical form immediately!

Here is some information from the Boys Scouts’ National Website: www.scouting.org. Also, the
following link will take you directly to the most current BSA Annual Health and Medical Record:
http://www.scouting.org/filestore/pdf/34605_Letter.pdf


BSA’s new “Annual Health and Medical Record” Q &A

Q. Why do we need a new health form?
A. Based on input from individual Scouters, the Order of the Arrow, local councils, health and safety and risk
management committees, and high-adventure bases, there was confusion on when to use any of more than 20
different health forms in use across the nation. There was also an immediate need to update a medical form
for the 2010 National Scout Jamboree. The Health and Safety Committee took on the challenge and the


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                                                  Page 19                                   Rev: March 2009
opportunity to establish one Annual Health and Medical Record for all ages and known risks. It is simple and yet
comprehensive enough to be used for both health and wellness evaluations as well as emergency situations.

Q. What are the major changes?
A. A health history is still sufficient for typical activities lasting less than 72 hours (Parts A and C of the new
form—similar to the old Class 1 form). For activities lasting longer than 72 hours, a medical evaluation by a
health-care provider is now required annually (Part B). For high-adventure activities for which medical care
may be delayed, restrictions based on standardized height/weight ratios are now mandatory.

Q. When does the Annual Health and Medical Record go into effect? I am used to the old form and would
rather use it.
A. Transition and change can be exciting and easy, especially if it positions the BSA for the future. Everyone
should begin using the Annual Health and Medical Record immediately. The existing stock of Class 1, 2, and 3
forms can continue to be used while supplies last in 2009. The only supported form effective January 1, 2010,
is the Annual Health and Medical Record. Its use will be mandatory for the 2010 National Scout Jamboree.

Q. Where can I find the Annual Health and Medical Record?
A. It can be found at your council’s Scout shop and is posted in a downloadable PDF format on Scouting Safely
on Scouting.org.

Q. Can I keep a record of my Annual Health and Medical Record somewhere at my council’s office or
online?
A. Districts and councils are discouraged from keeping any medical records, whether digital or paper, unless
required by local or state ordinances. However, the electronic version of the Annual Health and Medical Record
is intended to be filled out and saved by individual Scouts and Scouters. The electronic Annual Health and
Medical Record should not be transmitted via e-mail or stored by units, districts, or councils. Units are
encouraged to keep paper copies of their participants’ Annual Health and Medical Records in a confidential
medical file for quick access in an emergency and to be prepared for all adventures.

Q. The old Class 1, 2, and 3 forms were based on age. What about the Annual Health and Medical Record?
A. There is no longer a difference in the exam interval based on age. The Annual Health and Medical Record is
for everyone.

Q. There are three parts to the Annual Health and Medical Record, which part do I need to fill out?
A. All participants should fill out Parts A and C for any event. Part B (the physical examination) should be
completed if you are participating in an event that exceeds 72 consecutive hours, such as jamborees, summer
camps, and Wood Badge training courses. Part B also is required for participation in a resident camp setting or
when the nature of the activity is strenuous and demanding such as service projects, work weekends, or high-
adventure treks. It is important to note that if the event will take your unit beyond a radius wherein
emergency care is more than 30 minutes by ground transportation, the height/weight chart found at the
bottom of Part B should be strictly followed. Please note that individual units, districts, or councils may have
policies in place to exceed this standard based on their unique risks.

Q. How often will I need to renew/update my Annual Health and Medical Record?
A. This form will need to be updated annually, just as many schools or sporting leagues require an annual
update. Many changes can happen throughout a year, including changes in disease processes, medication,
address, and insurance.

Q. What is meant by “Annual” and “valid for 12 calendar months”?
A. If you complete your record on March 9, 2009, it will be valid through March 2010, but you must complete a
new Annual Health and Medical Record by April 1, 2010. Please note that the 2010 National Scout Jamboree
will have a specific window when the record must be submitted.



The new BSA Medical Form:

Again, the following link will take you directly to the most current BSA Annual Health and Medical
Record: http://www.scouting.org/filestore/pdf/34605_Letter.pdf


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                                                     Page 20                                      Rev: March 2009
Parts A and C are to be completed annually by all BSA unit members. Both parts are required for all events
that do not exceed 72 consecutive hours, where the level of activity is similar to that normally expended at home
or at school, such as day camp, day hikes, swimming parties, or an overnight camp, and where medical care is
readily available. Medical information required includes a current health history and list of medications.

Part C also includes the parental informed consent and hold harmless/release agreement (with an area for
notarization if required by your state) as well as a talent release statement. Adult unit leaders should review
participants’ health histories and become knowledgeable about the medical needs of the youth members in their
unit. This form is to be filled out by participants and parents or guardians and kept on file for easy reference.

Part B is required with parts A and C for any event that exceeds 72 consecutive hours , a resident camp
setting, or when the nature of the activity is strenuous and demanding, such as service projects, work
weekends, or high-adventure treks. It is to be completed and signed by a certified and licensed health-care
provider—physician (MD, DO), nurse practitioner, or physician’s assistant as appropriate for your state. The
level of activity ranges from what is normally expended at home or at school to strenuous activity such as hiking
and backpacking. Other examples include tour camping, jamborees, and Wood Badge training courses.

It is important to note that the height/weight chart must be strictly adhered to if the event will take the unit
beyond a radius wherein emergency evacuation is more than 30 minutes by ground transportation, such as
backpacking trips, high-adventure activities, and conservation projects in remote areas.

Parts A& C and consent to treat must be filed with the Troop Health and Safety Officer before a boy will be
allowed to camp. In addition, a copy of the scout’s medical insurance card, front and back card faces are to be
supplied. The social security number shall be included in the medical information.


Smoking Policy – scouts and adults !

    “The Boy Scouts of America prohibits the use of alcoholic beverages and controlled substances
at encampments or activities on property owned and/or operated by the Boy Scouts of America, or at
any activity involving participation of youth members. Adult leaders should support the attitude
that young adults are better off without tobacco and may not allow the use of tobacco products at
any BSA activity involving youth participants.”3

    In agreement with BSA policy, troop policy is to prohibit smoking. Adults on campouts are
requested not to smoke or smoke only out of sight of boys. Boys smoking will not be condoned. Boys
smoking will be subject to disciplinary processes.

Disciplinary Procedures

    It is our policy to use logical and appropriate consequences for disciplinary problems within the
troop. To the extent possible, we allow the boy-leaders to participate in determining appropriate
discipline. Further we do not report routine discipline to parents. Serious or habitual disciplinary
issues will be reported to parents. Continued disciplinary problems may lead to temporary suspension,
and eventually may lead to a request to continue scouting elsewhere.


Uniform Policy – Class A and Class B – and info on new BSA uniform

Unless otherwise stated, Troop 848 scouts wear a full Class A uniform for all formal scouting events,
including meetings. Scouts can never go wrong wearing a Class A uniform because they can always
just take off their outer BSA uniform shirt if Class A is not required and they have a scout shirt
underneath as an undershirt! Exceptions to the Class A rule for meetings are, of course if the boys are
meeting to do a service project or other event which might get the uniform dirty.

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                                                     Page 21                                      Rev: March 2009
Full ―Class A uniform‖ is defined as the BSA Scout uniform shirt, scout socks, scout pants, uniform
belt (any BSA belt – leather or web), and a scout T-shirt of any kind as an undershirt. The BSA
uniform shirt should have the appropriate patches. Troop 848 does not wear a scout neckerchief or hat
as part of the uniform. All these items can be purchased from the Scout Shop on Bay Area Blvd – in
the United Way building or any other local Boy Scout Shop. In addition the troop maintains a used
uniform ―pool.‖ A couple times each year, used uniform parts are made available for purchase at a
nominal fee. We ask that when your son outgrows his uniform, you recycle it through the troop!

Please note that late in 2008, the Boy Scouts of America has created a new Class A uniform with some
subtle differences to the current one (more greens, more earth tones, less reds, different fabric). You’ll
start seeing these new uniforms slowly being used in our Troop over the next few years. You may
use either the current uniform or new one as your son wishes! Both uniforms are valid, and once the
scout stores run out of their current stock, they will re-stock with the new uniforms. You can see
examples of the new uniform on the BSA national supply website, but remember to turn your speakers
down before you launch this website! http://www.scoutstuff.org/bsasupply/info.aspx?page=bsauniforms

Class B uniform consists of a scout T-shirt of any kind (webelos, Troop, BSA, camp-specific, etc) and
scout shorts or pants.

Class C uniform consists of a scout T-shirt of any kind and any type of shorts or pants. This is
generally what the scouts wear at the campouts and other informal scout activities or service projects.


Complaint Procedure & Behavior Expectations

Please note that our troop is a large troop with many different personalities at play. Because of the
size of the troop, we require scout-like behavior at all meetings and campouts from scouts, parents,
and leaders alike! If your son has special behavioral needs or issues, we request that you become a
very active parent in the troop to help his development. Our adult leaders are not able to monitor and
shadow any one scout on a constant one-on-one basis. Our intent is that the troop is a fun, safe place
for all the boys to develop. It is not fair to the rest of the troop if the leaders have to spend a majority
of precious time with just a couple boys who struggle to behave.

Again, we want you to be involved. If you have specific complaints or criticisms, let us know as
follows:

                 Complaint about adults action – Contact Committee Chairman
                 Complaint about program – Contact Scoutmaster
                 Complaint about boy’s action – Contact Scoutmaster
                 Complaint about Troop Policy – Contact Committee Chairman
                 Complaint about equipment – Contact Scoutmaster
                 Concern about program cost – Contact Committee Chairman

Please be aware that complaints are more effective if the person complaining is willing to help provide
solutions. Also note: boys should be encouraged to talk with their patrol leader or any Scoutmaster
about any interpersonal problems that they might have.



3
    Guide to Safe Scouting, Boy Scouts of America, 1996.




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                                                           Page 22                       Rev: March 2009
Revision to Policy

   Revision to these policies may be made by placing the item on the agenda for a Committee
meeting and discussing the changes desired. The policy will be amended and become effective
immediately after an approval vote by the troop committee and scoutmaster.




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                                        Page 23                            Rev: March 2009
General Information for Parents
Troop 848 Basic Information

       Meetings are held every Tuesday night at 7:00 p.m. in the Great Hall of Clear Lake United
        Methodist Church. Changes in meeting place or time will be announced via email or
        communicated by patrol leader.
       Troop campouts are scheduled to occur monthly. This may change due to program events or
        holiday conflict. The exact date of campouts will be announced at troop meetings and via
        email.
       Troop 848 has an open membership policy. We accept boys from any Pack and of any ethnic
        or religious background.
       Scouts plan and run the program of the Troop.
       Adults are needed to support the scout-run program. Adults provide logistics support,
        financial support and ensure the protection and safety of the scouts.

Boy Scout Basic Information

       Scouting is a world-wide youth movement. It was started by Lord Baden-Powell in England
        around 1906. Scouting spread to the U.S. in 1910.
       Scouting has objectives of building character, fostering citizenship, and developing fitness of
        scouts. To develop these characteristics Scouting uses 8 methods:
                    1. Ideals
                    2. Patrols
                    3. Outdoors
                    4. Advancement
                    5. Personal Growth
                    6. Adult Association
                    7. Leadership development
                    8. Uniform
       A few of these methods will be discussed in relation to Troop 848.

Advancement

    Advancement in Boy Scouts is different than in Cubs. Self motivation and independent action
is necessary for your Scout to advance through the ranks. If a Scout applies himself and works
hard the goal of obtaining First Class in the first year is attainable, however many Scouts do take
longer. Campouts, Summer Camp, and specially scheduled advancement programs and events are
good places to get requirements signed off. Remember Troop meetings are not always devoted to
advancement activities. Teach your son the phrases ―Please sign my book‖ and ―I need help on this,‖
and the make sure he uses them frequently. Any Scout Star rank or above or any adult leader can sign
off requirements for first class and below, and requirements for Tenderfoot, Second and First Class
can be signed off concurrently! All the Troop Guides are Star or above so they can sign off the books.
Your son might want them to sign off most of the requirements when they are green scouts because
they will get to know their Troop Guide and they will feel comfortable talking to them. Get your son
involved in understanding what has to be done to advance and make him responsible for it! It is
possible to get Second and First Class completed almost at the same time. In Boy Scouts (unlike Cub
Scouts), parents cannot sign off on any requirement! However you can help by talking with your son
and providing some direction in the advancement.

Hint: Tenderfoot Requirement #10 usually takes some cajoling and nagging on the parent’s part
to complete!
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                                             Page 24                                Rev: March 2009
Scoutmaster’s Conference – (SM or any ASM)

A Scoutmaster’s conference is required for rank advancement prior to a Board of Review. After
completing all requirements for a rank, it is the scout’s (not his parent’s) responsibility to contact one
of the scoutmasters to schedule his conference. The Scoutmaster or Eagle Scout Assistant
Scoutmaster conducts all conferences for Eagle rank; Star and Life conferences should be done by an
Assistant Scoutmaster with at least one year of experience as Assistant Scoutmaster, other conferences
may be scheduled with any Assistant Scoutmaster. Requirement, goals, personal feeling and
problems, suggestions for improving the program and almost anything else may be discussed at the
Scoutmaster’s conference. After passing the Scoutmaster’s conference the scout must contact the
Advancement Chairman and schedule a Board of Review.


Boards of Review – we need parents!

    Parents are expected to serve on Boards of Review. Boards of Review are the final test before
rank is achieved and are usually held the third Tuesday of each month. A board is made up of at least
three non-Scoutmaster adults. Parents are encouraged to volunteer to the Advancement Chairperson to
serve. You will not sit on a Board of Review with your scout, and these boards are lots of fun for the
parents! You may sit on a Board or two just to familiarize yourself with the procedure prior to
actually taking part in a review. Consensus of the Board is the basis for the Scout advancing or
staying at the same rank. Scouts may re-take the Board in the next month, if they do not advance.
Typical questions, provided by the advancement volunteer, are about rank requirements, merit badges,
Scout Oath, Scout Law, Scout Motto, Scout Slogan, Outdoor Code, are you enjoying Scouting, any
problems with the program, and what are your goals in Scouting. There are some written questions
and aids that have been developed for parents conducting boards. Please help us with this very
important part of your son’s Scouting experience. Parents, you really need no experience to hit the
ground running on this!

Hint: Make sure your Scout has reviewed the requirements and what he did to complete them
before he attends the Board of Review!


Merit Badges , How to be a “Merit Badge Counselor, and Courts of Honor”

Merit Badges are required for each rank above First Class. To earn a merit badge the Scout must see
the Scoutmaster or an Assistant Scoutmaster to obtain a signed merit badge application card. The
Scout must then make contact with a registered merit badge Counselor for his chosen badge and make
arrangements to complete the requirements. The scout must purchase a copy of the merit badge
booklet from the troop librarian or from the scout shop. These merit badge books may be repurchased
by the troop at the completion of the merit badge by the scout. Merit badge counselor lists are
published on the troop web page (www.bsatroop848.org). After completion of the merit badge
requirements, the card must be signed by the merit badge counselor and the scout must present the
merit badge card to the Advancement Chairperson for recording. He should detach the portion of the
card designated for his records and keep it in case there is any confusion about your scout’s
advancement records. Upon completion of a badge, the scout will receive a merit badge and card at
the next Court of Honor. It is extremely important to keep these cards – they are the official record


________________________________________________________________________
                                               Page 25                                 Rev: March 2009
for earning the badges and may be needed should there be confusion about your scout’s advancement
records.

Hint: Most New Green Scouts can complete two to three MB’s or more at summer or winter
camp!

Any parent can be a Merit Badge Counselor. There is NO cost involved, however you must fill out an
adult registration form (registration code 42) and a district counselor’s application and return it to the
Troop Secretary. Once you have been approved and registered with the council, you may serve as a
counselor for up to 8 badges. ONLY registered counselor may sign the merit badge cards for the merit
badges for which they are registered. Check the merit badge requirement book (the troop has some)
and see where you would like to help. Additionally, parents are discouraged from being the merit
badge counselor for their scout.

Badges of Rank are given to the Scouts at several Courts of Honor during the year.

Hint: Attend every Court of Honor with your Scout!


Order of the Arrow

Order of the Arrow is not a step in scout advancement; it is actually a scout honor organization based
on service to others. Most of the ceremonies and traditions are restricted to members and candidates,
and admission is by election once per year. An eligible scout must receive votes from more than half
the scouts present at the voting to be a candidate. Adults may be elected provided there is specific
justification. Eligibility requirements are announced each year before the elections.


High Adventure

―High Adventure‖ is a Boy Scout term used for programs generally reserved for more experienced
scouts. Some summer camps offer ―High Adventure‖ programs and sometimes you’ll hear the troop
leaders refer to a specific camping or leadership opportunity that way. The demands are more
challenging physically, mentally, and require more specialized equipment and maturity. The programs
are for scouts who are 14 years or older and have achieved the rank of at least First Class. These
programs are usually longer term than normal summer camps and are typically expensive - with costs
ranging from $500 to $1500, plus additional equipment and preparation time. These programs are to
provide the older Scouts with the incentive to stay in Scouting and provide ―ultimate Scouting
experiences‖ to those who attend.

Hint: Scout credits are a good way to offset the cost factor


The “Patrol Method”

Scouts are divided into Patrols for camping and other activities. New scouts will be grouped into
―Green Patrols‖ and assigned a Troop Guide, an ―older‖ more experienced scout, as a mentor and
advisor. After one year or as the individuals reach the First Class rank, the green scouts will blend
into the existing ―Gold Patrols.‖

Patrols are usually groups of eight to twelve Scouts including a Patrol Leader and an Assistant PL who
lead the patrol. These duties include creating menus, filling out a duty roster for each camp, taking
care of the Patrol Box, reserving equipment from the Troop Quartermaster, attending the Patrol
________________________________________________________________________
                                               Page 26                                 Rev: March 2009
Leaders Council meeting, and communicating with the other members in their Patrol. Help is
available from the Troop Guide and or the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader or Senior Patrol Leader.
Remember Scouting is a scout-managed organization and adults should not intervene to take control
except for health or safety matters.

Hint: Read your Scout’s Boy Scout Handbook for troop organization explanation!

Monthly Campout (tips and tricks for new scouts / parents!)

      Money collection – Each scout is responsible for paying $15.00 CASH, for food to the Patrol
       Leader the Tuesday night before that weekend’s campout.
      Adults planning to attend the campout should also pay $15.00 cash for your food at this time.
       Money for adults is given to the Camping Activities Coordinator.
      The amount will only change for special campouts, such as the District Camporee. This
       money is NON-refundable if the Scout changes his mind and decides not to go camping or if
       the outing is cancelled due to weather, etc. Scouts must notify the Campout SPL (SPL or
       his designee) and his patrol leader if he is unable to attend a campout.
      Reservations should be made for scouts and adults going on the campout by signing up on a
       troop provided internet ―Jot form‖ by Sunday Midnight before the camp out. A ―link‖ to the
       jot form will be sent out via email or posted on the website a couple weeks prior to the
       deadline to sign up.
      Scouts should be in Class A (full uniform) for the trip to the campout and also on the return
       trip from the campout.
      Each scout generally needs $5-8 for lunch on the way home (and sometimes money for a
       snack on the trip to the campout if the driver wants to stop.)

Hint: Button the money inside the class A shirt pocket so the scout will have it on his person on
the trip home!

Patrol Boxes

       Patrol boxes (chuck boxes) will be assigned to each Assistant Patrol Leader. If it is kept clean
       and empty of perishable items, it may be kept in the troop trailer between campouts. If the
       Patrol Box needs maintenance or cleaning it is the responsibility of the Assistant Patrol Leader
       to make the necessary arrangements. If necessary the Assistant Patrol Leader will store it at
       his house and arrange to transport it to the gear drop-off at the church Friday during the ―load
       out‖. Supplies included in the Patrol boxes are: cooking utensils, pots and pans, grill, plates,
       cups, utensils, etc. Each Patrol should supply foil, powdered drink mix, and extra plates.
       These staple items should be purchased as required from the food money.

Loading

       5:30 on campout Friday. Bring all your personal camping gear and equipment to the
       CLUMC when you come to loadout Friday by 5:30 PM. It will be loaded into one of the
       troop trailers for transport to the camp site. Chuck boxes and coolers need to be loaded by
       5:15.

       Note: if your son is riding with another parent to the campout, make sure he asks the driver if
       he/she is going to stop for dinner on the way up, or lunch on the way home. He will want to
       have money to pay for his meal!      And… with the increasing cost of fuel you might want to
       force the driver to accept some money from you to cover the cost of gasoline.


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                                             Page 27                                Rev: March 2009
Menus

        Each Patrol plans and cooks 2 breakfasts, 1 lunch, and 1 dinner meal for the people assigned
        to their Patrol for each campout. On occasion, the whole Troop will plan one menu and
        everyone will eat the same thing. A cold, easy breakfast is especially recommended for
        Sunday morning as the boys have to pack gear for the trip home. The Patrols should plan to
        cook simple, easy to prepare foods for the first few campouts. The Scouts might plan to
        include a jar of peanut butter and a loaf of bread in the Patrol box, as a backup for finicky
        eaters or outright cooking disasters. Prepared foods such as pizza are not allowed on the
        menus.

        Scouts are expected to cook – really cook – their meals at campouts. If they are making Chili,
        for example, they must not just simply open a can of Hormel Chili and dump it in a pan and
        call it a meal. They are expected to work together as a unit to prepare a meal from basic
        ingredients. Prepared / canned meals are simply not acceptable on campouts. It’s a blast for
        the scouts to learn to cook their meals ―from scratch,‖ and they learn a valuable life skill doing
        so. They learn to be excellent cooks! Please encourage your son to understand the value of
        this!

        Sample menus are available in the Patrol Leaders Handbook and the Scout Handbook
        and Field book.


Shopping Responsibilities

        Each Patrol Leader is responsible for the grocery shopping for the weekend meals. He may
        opt to delegate this responsibility to his assistant or the assigned cooks for the weekend.
        Patrols plan the menus for the weekend then the Patrol Leader makes a grocery list and sets up
        a time to go, with an adult, to the store using the cash collected at the Tuesday meeting.
        Remember to buy foil, matches, or any other extras needed for the campout. The scouts will
        need to budget their money, but will usually have plenty. The cooks or Patrol Leader is
        responsible for putting the COLD items in a cooler, with ice, to be packed in the trailer on
        Friday night. The troop will provide coolers for the patrols. The New Scout ―Green‖ Patrols
        should arrange to have their Troop Guide with them on shopping trips.


Duty Roster

        Each Patrol Leader will create a duty roster of jobs to be done during the campout. The jobs
        include Water (filling the Patrol water containers as required), Fire (starting and maintaining
        the cooking fire, and putting it out safely), Cooks (cooking the meal, setting out the
        ingredients, and serving a completed meal to the Patrol etc.), KP (cleaning up after the
        cooking is complete, policing the area for trash). All responsibility is shared and will rotate.
        The three bucket method is used for appropriate cleanup. The Duty Roster and Menu
        Planner forms are available in the Patrol Leaders Handbook.

       Patrols are expected to eat together and say grace prior to eating. Parents are not allowed to
        bring their son food.




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                                               Page 28                                 Rev: March 2009
Sleeping Hours

       Lights out on Friday night is after camp has been set up and depends on the distance traveled
       to the camp. Saturday night lights out is usually between 10-11 p.m. after the Campfire
       program. Morning wake-up for fire starters is 6-7:00 a.m. Scouts are responsible for getting
       to bed themselves. The program hours will accommodate a full night’s sleep if the scouts take
       advantage of it.


Transportation

       Parents provide the transportation for scouts for all camp outs. Please volunteer to drive
       scouts to the camps. You are welcome to stay the weekend or return to pick up scouts on
       Sunday. See the Troop Transportation Coordinator to Volunteer. This is a great opportunity
       to meet the scouts and adult leaders and see the Troop in action. You may volunteer to drive
       only one way. We try to time our departure from camp to get the scouts back to the church
       right at 1:00 PM. We don’t want to get there too early or we interfere with the folks attending
       the church services at CLUMC. There are a couple campouts which are far from Houston
       (E-Rock is one) where the scouts will return to the church after 1PM but these are exceptions.
       You should always remind your son to borrow the driver’s cell phone on the way home from
       each campout and call you with a more accurate return ETA!

Emergency Contact During Campouts

       A contact person will typically be designated for each outing. If not on the campout, the
       contact person will be the Camping Coordinator. Parents MUST leave a phone number where
       they can be reached if an emergency arises during a campout. This should be given to the
       Camping Coordinator by entering this info on the jot form for the campout.


Sanitation and Water

       The locations of Troop camps almost always have potable water and some type of restroom
       facilities. Unless you are specifically told to, do not bring water from home. High adventure
       activities can pack water or treat natural water and use field sanitation methods approved for
       the particular area. All camps including high adventure will set up dishwashing areas using
       BSA approved sterilization methods. Typically this is a three bucket system consisting of
       wash water, rinse water, and bleach water to sterilize dishes. The Quartermaster will provide
       heated water for the patrols.


Parents’ Meetings and Parent Info

These are scheduled on occasion during a regular Troop meeting 7-8:30 p.m., at CLUMC (Please
check your email.) The room assignment changes due to availability. One parent from each family is
ENCOURAGED to attend. Troop finances and programs are discussed.




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                                            Page 29                                Rev: March 2009
Parent’s Role in Troop 848 – Here’s what you can do!!!
    Take an active interest in your son’s scouting experience
    Sign up for the Mail Distribution Group on the Troop website. This is THE primary way the
       troop communicates. Parents must sign up! Most scouts also sign up with their own e-mail
       accounts so they can manage the troop information, but it is essential that the parents know
       what is going on!
    Volunteer to drive
    Volunteer to help on the subcommittees
    Volunteer as a leader
    Volunteer as a Committee Member
    Volunteer as a Merit Badge Counselor
    Support the program’s objectives by letting your son do his own packing so he can learn to be
       responsible
    Encourage the Adult Leadership. They’re giving a lot of their time, money, and energy into
       providing a program for your son. They deserve your support.
    Come to Parents’ meetings
    Come to campouts
    Encourage your son to do what he is supposed to do (but don’t do it for him!) If he’s a patrol
       leader, for example, ask questions about whether he’s made his phone calls. If he needs to call
       another boy or read an e-mail again to get details about the campout, let him do it! Encourage
       him but resist the temptation to call another parent to find out what he is supposed to know!
       Let him develop as a scout and a leader. It will pay off.

Patrol Leaders’ Responsibilities:
    Attend Patrol Leaders’ Meeting (held every other month) – call and arrange for the Assistant
        Patrol Leader to attend the meeting if you can’t.
    Call all members of your Patrol before Troop meetings to give them necessary information for
        the upcoming meeting; i.e. camping reservations are due, your Patrol has the opening, closing,
        or game, etc. (If your scout’s patrol leader does not call, have your scout contact his patrol
        leader to find out why. Please remember that communication is every scout’s responsibility.)
    Prepare a Duty Roster. He should keep these as a list of who did what, so the same people
        don’t always end up doing the same jobs. At camp, he should check to see that each person
        assigned to a job shows up for the job, and carries it out in a timely manner. Sample duty
        rosters can be found in the Patrol Leader’s Handbook.
    Collect money to buy the food and cooking supplies for the campout. The menu is usually
        decided upon by the Patrol members at the Troop meeting. The Patrol Leader should stay
        within his budget when shopping for food. Any excess money should be put in an envelope
        and used for patrol supplies and/or to reduce the cost of future campouts.

Assistant Patrol Leader’s Responsibility
The Assistant Patrol Leader assumes all PL leadership duties if the PL is absent. If the PL is present,
the Assistant PL assists and shares the PL responsibilities as requested by the PL.

       Maintain the Patrol’s chuck box. He should check it before each campout to make sure all
        cooking equipment and supplies are there and equipment is clean. Non-refrigerated food
        items for the campout may be placed in the chuck box. The Patrol Leader is responsible for
        making sure that the patrol box gets to CLUMC for loading into the trailer at 5:15 on the
        Friday of a campout. The Assistant Patrol Leader should take the chuck box home between
        campouts. If he cannot make a campout, he should make sure that it is picked up by another
        member of the patrol who is going.
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                                              Page 30                               Rev: March 2009
       Patrol gear is normally kept in large black boxes in a troop trailer between campouts. The
        Assistant Patrol Leader is responsible for making sure that the patrol gear is properly
        maintained and all of the gear returns to the box when the campout is over.
       Bring all refrigerated items in a cooler to CLUMC on Friday evening to the campout. He
        makes sure he has enough ice for the weekend. Ice can be obtained from the icemaker in the
        kitchen of the church or several fast food restaurants will donate if you’re in uniform.



What to Bring to the Monthly Campout

Always have your son check the weather forecast for the weekend and camp city so that he can pack
accordingly! Encourage him to create a list – his own camping list and have him use that list as a
checklist and update it every time he camps. After a few campouts, it will be perfect, just for him!
There are a few things he will want to have in his backpack, separate from the rest of his gear:

           Flashlight
           Poncho or rain gear
           Light jacket or heavy jacket if appropriate for weather forecast
           Entertainment for the trip to camp. (Book, MP-3, Game Boy etc)

Scouts should pack the remainder of their gear in a water resistant duffel bag unless program
specifically calls for a backpack. A complete packing list can be found in the Boy Scout Handbook or
on the internet. Please feel free to modify this list as appropriate for the program and weather forecast.
This list is very extensive list and many items can be left out. If there are any questions feel free to
ask the Scoutmaster of an Assistant Scoutmaster. Note that scouts must earn their Totin’ chip – and
have it with them- before they are allowed to bring a pocket knife to a campout. Blades must be less
than 3‖ long.

    Hints:
        Pack sleeping bag in a waterproof trash bag with a label prominently located on the bag.
        Foam mat or self inflating air mattress should be used rather than a cot for weekend
           camping.
        The Scout Handbook should be carried to every campout. (Campouts usually count for
           several requirements especially Tenderfoot, First Class. The requirements can be signed
           off at camps. The scout must ASK the Troop Guide or other Star Scout to sign off
           requirements earned during a campout.)
        Don’t include candy or other sweets in scout personal gear. Raccoons like to get into
           personal gear to eat those treats.
        Have your Scout do his own packing. It’s a great way for him to learn. If he forgets
           something he wants, you can be sure he will pack it next time! (If it’s something critical,
           he can always ask any scoutmaster for help.)
        Pack each day’s clothes in a large zip-lock bag – they will stay dry and be easy to find.
        Bring an extra pair of tennis shoes.
        Put the Scout’s name or initials on EVERYTHING he takes to camp!
        A mess kit (plate, cup, knife, fork, spoon, etc.) is not required. These are supplied in the
           patrol box.

What NOT to Bring on a Monthly Campout

    BSA Prohibited Items:
        No fixed blade, sheath knives, or switch blades allowed.
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                                               Page 31                                 Rev: March 2009
           No fireworks, ammunition, firearms, or airguns.
           No aerosols, or lighter fluids are allowed.
           No cell phones

    Troop Requirements:
        Gameboys, Walkmen, iPods, Zens, Zunes, etc. may be used on the trip to and from camp
          but are prohibited while at the camp. (Leave them in the car.)

Note: Neither Troop 848 nor the drivers are responsible for any damage or loss that might occur to
electronic equipment during a campout.
         Hand axes (hatchets) are not needed for any program. Don’t bring one to a campout
            unless specifically requested.
         Propane stoves for Scouts must have Scoutmaster’s permission for dinner. Charcoal is the
            preferred fuel for dinner.




Summer Camp

Summer camp is a great way for your son to have a lot of fun, travel to great locations, grow up a lot,
and earn a pile of merit badges in a short period! The summer camp location is chosen soon after the
previous year’s campout. There are many details and logistics to surround and therefore, there is
always one adult leader in charge of this event. You will receive many e-mails and other
communications about Summer Camp as time draws near!           PLEASE support this volunteer adult
leader as he/she organizes summer camp. Bend over backwards to help this person. This is a tough
job!

Money at camp? Yes, the scouts need some… to manage. A Troop 848 adult will act as Banker for
the camp. Scout spending money can be deposited with the Banker and drawn out as directed by the
parents. You will provide the money in a business size envelope with the name and amount written
on the outside. Your son can withdraw $5 at a time from the banker and manage his own money if
you choose to use this service.

Because summer camps have different requirements, the summer camp list varies from year to year.
Specific lists will be provided before summer camp.

In general, it is helpful to have a spare uniform for summer camp since uniforms tend to get heavy use
during the week.

Unlike weekend camps, we usually encourage scouts to bring a cot. Camp program offerings will also
affect the packing list. A tentative schedule for each scout will be prepared prior to camp. Most
summer camps have websites packed with all kinds of interesting and important camp-specific info.
Make use of these websites to help your planning.

Green Scouts! Don’t miss your first summer camp. Many scouts later say that this first summer camp
provided them a great foundation to go on to the higher ranks in Scouting, even Eagle!

Parents: One final note. Please let your son enjoy his summer camp. Build up his experience for him.
Do not call him at camp. Do not hide a cell phone in his stuff so he can call you. Do not give him a
calling card so he can call you ―when he’s lonely.‖ Believe it or not, your kids grow up a lot if you let
them alone for one week. They are so busy with activities and merit badge classes anyway that they
don’t have much time to miss you! (Sorry!) We’ve seen perfectly adjusted kids get destroyed on the
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                                              Page 32                                 Rev: March 2009
phone when mommy and daddy tells him how lonely they are without him at home and how they can’t
wait to see him in a week. Crocodile tears from mom on the phone produce the same at camp for
your son. Tell him how boring it is at home – that he’s not missing anything. Save really bad news
(like his pet rabbit died) for when your son gets home. It won’t do him any good to know it at camp a
couple days early anyway! Read the article below from Scouting Magazine if you are a first time
summer camp parent!

http://www.scoutingmagazine.org/issues/0805/a-nothappy.html




The Philmont Grace

This blessing of the food is used at many BSA camps and events.



          For Food

          For Raiment

          For Life

          For Opportunity

          For Friendship

          For Fellowship

          We thank Thee, O Lord.

          Amen.
Philmont Scout Ranch, B.S.A.




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                                             Page 33                               Rev: March 2009
Suggested References:

The Troop maintains a library with various Handbooks, Guides and Pamphlets. These can be
checkout (see one of the Troop Leaders of the Troop librarian). Other books of interest can be found
in the Clear Lake Scout Shop for purchase.

       The Boy Scout Handbook

       The Boy Scout Fieldbook

       Advancement Policy Guide

       Committee Guidebook

       Advancement Policies and Procedures Committee Guidebook

       The Guide to Safe Scouting

       The Patrol Leaders’ Handbook

       Junior Leader’s Handbook

       Troop Committee Guide

       Den Chief’s Handbook

       The Scoutmaster’s Handbook

       The Philmont PEAKS Book

       Philmont Guide to Adventure

       Various Quick Start Pamphlets




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                                            Page 34                               Rev: March 2009

				
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