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					NORWOOD SCHOOL
 Technology Plan
  (Public Copy)


 September, 2004
                    Norwood School Technology Plan
                                   Executive Summary

I. Mission
Our mission is to empower students as independent, innovative, and ethical users of technology
in support of lifelong learning. Information and communication technology is used in support of
the School‟s educational objectives and administrative functions. We work towards the seamless
integration of technology into the Norwood curriculum and the school community to meet the
needs of students, teachers, administrators, and parents, as well as alumni and prospective
families. The School‟s trustees, administrators, faculty, staff, and students are all working
together to achieve this goal.

II. Vision
Norwood‟s use of technology is a strategic asset to the School. Information and communication
technologies support the School's organizational functioning, institutional memory, and
knowledge management. The educational technology program provides personal computing
devices for all students and faculty that are available and functional at a moment‟s notice, so
there is no separation between traditional and digital teaching modes. One-to-one computing in
middle school classrooms promotes student engagement and innovative teaching. It helps build
basic skills and also extends learning through unique multimedia capabilities. It enables
differentiated instruction and self-paced learning. It increases collaboration and the efficiencies
of electronic research, analysis, writing, and presentation.


III.   Priorities
Over 40 action items are included in the appendix of the Technology Plan. Six top priorities to
help chart the course for the future of technology at Norwood are as follows:

      Strive to match the home and school environments so faculty and students have the same
       tools, as well as the same look and feel, available in both places.
      Coordinate data in all administrative databases.
      Identify ways to increase the efficiency of School communications with the Norwood
       community using various technologies to facilitate the process of organizational learning
       and knowledge management.
      Find ways to provide time for middle and lower school faculties to discuss and plan for
       technology integration at Norwood
      Rededicate the School‟s commitment to technology professional development,
       facilitating the development of expectations for faculty and staff technology proficiency,
       curricular integration, and web presence.
        Facilitate the development of expectations for departments‟ and grade level teams‟
             involvement in evaluating and adopting software which supports their curricula.
                                                                  Table of Contents
I.    Mission.................................................................................................................................... i
II.   Vision ...................................................................................................................................... i
III.  Priorities .................................................................................................................................. i
IV.   Technology Department......................................................................................................... 4
      A. Overview ....................................................................................................................... 4
      B. Structure ........................................................................................................................ 4
V. Infrastructure .......................................................................................................................... 5
      A. Overview ....................................................................................................................... 5
      B. Backup .......................................................................................................................... 5
      C. Telecommunications ..................................................................................................... 6
      D. Network Security .......................................................................................................... 6
      E. Security ......................................................................................................................... 6
VI. Educational Technology ........................................................................................................ 7
      A. Goals ............................................................................................................................. 7
      B. Educational Software Applications............................................................................... 8
      C. Hardware ....................................................................................................................... 8
      D. Web Site & Email Communication .............................................................................. 8
      E. Library........................................................................................................................... 9
      F. Assistive Technologies (Students with Special Needs) ................................................ 9
      G. Diversity/Equity Issues ................................................................................................. 9
      H. Professional Development and Training ....................................................................... 9
      I. Program Evaluation ............................................................................................................ 9
VII. Administrative Technology ................................................................................................. 10
      A. Overview ..................................................................................................................... 10
      B. Administrative Systems .............................................................................................. 10
      C. Professional Development and Training ..................................................................... 11
VIII. Communication .................................................................................................................... 11
      A. Overview ..................................................................................................................... 11
      B. Regular Communication ............................................................................................. 11
      C. Emergency Communications ...................................................................................... 12
IX. Conclusion ........................................................................................................................... 12
X. Priorities ............................................................................................................................... 13
Appendices ....................................................................................................................................... i
      A. Norwood Infrastructure and Technology Resources .................................................... 1
      B. Acceptable Use and Technology Policies ..................................................................... ii
      C. Research on Impact of Educational Technology .......................................................... ii
      D. Software in the Classroom ............................................................................................ v
      E. Hardware Issues in the Classroom ............................................................................... vi
      F. Educational Technology Skills Matrix ....................................................................... vii
      G. Faculty Professional Development ............................................................................. vii
      H. Administrative Systems ............................................................................................... ix
      I. Financing Issues .................................................................................................................. x
      J. Action Items ....................................................................................................................... xi
            1. Infrastructure .......................................................................................................... xi
            2. Educational Technology ........................................................................................ xi
            3. Administrative Technology .................................................................................. xii
            4. Communication ..................................................................................................... xii
                  Educational Technology in the Life of a Norwood Student
Educational technology at Norwood encompasses more than the notebook program and
computer labs  it includes an impressive array of academic and productivity software, digital
imaging and printing devices, display and presentation devices, handheld devices, audio/video
devices, and science probes. It includes wireless access to the intranet and internet, the email
system, voice messaging, web site, security systems, and the backbone infrastructure which
supports all of these. The following scenario is intended to describe various ways that technology
is being used at Norwood both now and in the future.


                 Morning Carpool: Jason, Sheila, and Karen carpool together and pull into Norwood around
       8:15. They hadn‟t been sure if there would be school because of the snow last night, but parents had
       received an email from the school saying that school was open. On the way to school, traffic had been
       terrible. Sheila and Karen had looked on enviously when Jason pulled out his notebook to make a few
       more changes on the project that his history group was doing. Since he is in 7th grade, Jason has his own
       leased notebook that he takes home every night. Sheila, a 5th grader, uses the notebook assigned to her
       from the homeroom notebook cart. She can borrow one overnight if needed, but last night she didn‟t
       know she‟d be sitting in traffic this morning. Karen, in 3rd grade, uses computers in the classroom and
       computer lab. She is learning how to touch-type. As they pull up in the carpool line, Jason‟s notebook
       picks up the school‟s wireless network and he‟s able to grab a few images off the web before he has to
       close the notebook lid and get out of the car.
                 After shaking hands with Mrs. Rosenbaum, Jason goes up to his locker and puts away his
       trumpet, soccer gear, and books. There are still 10 minutes left before morning chapel so he opens his
       notebook back up, wakes it up, brings up his English paper and prints it out to the color laser in the
       multimedia lab. On his way downstairs to pick up his paper, Jason passes Lisa, a 6th grader who is getting
       ready to do her chapel presentation about her father‟s hip replacement. Her PowerPoint has facts about
       her father and the actual x-ray images of the arthritic hip and the new replacement hip. Jason notices that
       Lisa is wearing a Norwood sweatshirt with a new hawk logo, “Hey, where‟d you get that sweatshirt,” he
       asked her.
                 “My father ordered it off the web site last week.” Lisa replied
                 “Cool.”

                 First period: English. Back upstairs, it‟s time for Jason to go to first period. As Jason turns in
       his paper, the teacher asks, “Did you incorporate the changes that your peer reviewers suggested?”
                  “Yeah, I used most of them, but there were a couple I didn‟t agree with.” Jason‟s English class
       had circulated their papers to their reviewing groups electronically last week. The reviewing students
       used Word‟s commenting feature to insert suggestions or comments, color-coded by reviewer. Jason was
       looking forward to getting his paper posted to the class web site. Most of the kids in the class like doing
       it that way, but it did make you work harder, because you knew that classmates, teachers, and family
       members might read your paper; it wasn‟t just for the teacher anymore. After he‟d posted his last paper
       about the poems of e.e. cummings, he‟d gotten an email from his grandparents in Pennsylvania saying
       how proud they were of his work.
                 Jason was lucky; he still had a tutor to help him with English class. The previous afternoon his
       tutor had helped him with the revisions. Since she was able to check the curriculum map on the teacher‟s
       web site, she knew exactly what the goals were for the paper that Jason was working on. She also knew
       which texts the class was reading, and when the next assignment was due. The educational technology


                                                         1
specialist had also checked the class‟s web site to find out what novels they were reading so that he could
create links to the authors‟ official web sites.

          Second period: Math. Jason enjoyed math. Last year they‟d done that stock market project,
gathering and analyzing data using Excel, generating graphs and data sets for their presentations. The
oral part hadn‟t gone all that well, but Jason had done his research and was able to tell why he thought
Coca-Cola should be a strong buy based on the analysis his group had done. It was nice to have the visual
aids in the PowerPoint to prompt his memory of what he was supposed to talk about and to illustrate his
points.
          “Good morning everyone,” the teacher said, “Please log into the class web site and go to the
resources area, we‟re going to be using another Java applet this morning.” Jason and his classmates woke
up their computers and got to the web site. Jason noticed his battery was at 40% so he plugged into the
desk outlet. The teacher had a low tolerance for students‟ notebooks beeping for power, since it
interrupted the flow of teaching. The Java applet they were using let the students type in algebraic
equations, and then it would show the graph of that equation. After the lesson, Jason told his teacher,
“Cool applet! Now I see what you mean about the parabola‟s being thinner if the exponent is higher.” As
class finished up, the teacher reminded them that the exam would be on Friday, and that he would be
hosting a chat room that evening for students who wanted to review the material.
          As the students left the classroom, the teacher sent the weekly email home to parents that
included their child‟s current progress in the class, and notes on upcoming assignments. It was a simple
mail merge out of the student grading database. Several parents had commented how much they
appreciated receiving the updates.

           Third period: Art. In digital photography Jason‟s class was working on their digital self-
portraits under the teacher‟s watchful eye. The students loved using PhotoShop to apply effects to the
images. The teacher was encouraging them to save their work at various stages so that they could revert
to an earlier version if something went awry in their experimentation. Jason also realized it would be
great for his electronic portfolio – he could include the finished piece with some of the intermediate
stages, just like he had done with his English paper and drafts on The Call of the Wild that he‟d written
last year.
           The teacher locked all the student computer screens because she wanted their full attention. “I‟d
like to show you how to use the new drawing tablets we just installed. They‟ll give you much finer
control over the strokes. They even sense how much pressure you‟re exerting.”
           “Neat!” said Jason, “Where did the school get these?”
            “The development office told me that an alum made a donation on the web site, after she saw
some of the artwork on the site that last year‟s class had done!”

           Fourth period: History. In history class the teacehr was giving the students more time to work
on their projects. Jason was working in a group of four students to create a documentary on the decade of
the 1930s. There were five groups and each had chosen a decade from the first half of the twentieth
century to document. Jason‟s group had chosen to make a video about their decade. At the end of the
week each group would be presenting their project, and would be responsible for teaching that decade‟s
history to the rest of the class. Jason‟s group had gathered images and primary source documents from
the web, and was now working on a storyboard before moving into editing the video. Jason would be
responsible for the audio track to accompany the video so he spent some time in class searching the audio
files at the National Archives web site. The teacher suggested that he also record some of the interviews
the group had been doing with Jason‟s grandfather, so that they could use the material as a voice-over
track in their documentary. The teacher also reminded the class that each of them needed to post a
response to the questions he had posted on the class bulletin board.
           On his way to lunch Jason stopped by the multimedia lab to send an mail to Ulrich, his e-pal in
Germany. He was hoping to add a German perspective to their documentary.
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          Fifth Period: Science. Science class was studying the effects of pollution on the Chesapeake
Bay. At the beginning of class the teacher had the projector running, and started showing everyone how
to use Inspiration concept mapping software to create a diagram illustrating the various environmental
threats to the Bay, but Jason interrupted her, saying, “We learned how to use this software in 4th grade.”
so she gave the class 15 minutes to create their diagrams. Then she started getting the video-conferencing
link ready for their interview with the scientist at the Chesapeake Bay Institute on the Eastern Shore.
“Don‟t forget,” she reminded her students, “if you‟re answering questions during our videoconference,
back it up with the probe data from your experiments! Oh, and we need a stenographer for today‟s
session. Who‟s a good typist?” Several hands shot up. “Alright, Taylor, you can be the typist for today.
There were three students home sick today who would appreciate getting the minutes of today‟s session.
Since Taylor would be typing them in the class‟s chat room, it was also possible that the sick kids would
participate in real time and ask their own questions via the chat room. Either way, they would be
responsible for reviewing the material. The teacher would also capture the drawings from the dry-erase
board to include on the class web site.

          Sixth Period: Spanish. This was Jason‟s fifth year of Spanish at Norwood. As he walked into
class he told the teacher about the video conference they‟d just had with the Chesapeake Bay scientist.
“Wow, that sound‟s neat Jason,” The teacher made a mental note to contact Norwood‟s sister school in
Mexico to arrange a similar video linkup between their 7th grade English class and her Level 3 Spanish
class. She‟d also seen a virtual reality web server at a recent conference that would let her students join
others conversing with text and audio in a virtual Spanish environment. She knew the students would
love using the program, and it would let them take a virtual field trip to Spain.
          During class the students used their headsets with their notebooks to practice listening and
responding to the conversation on the Bienvenidos CD. The teacher could access the teacher control
module to see where in the lesson each student was working, and their scores on all the assessments. It
saved her a lot of time in grading, so that she could spend more time helping students with issues of
pronunciation and vocabulary.

          Seventh Period: Music. Today in music class, Jason‟s group would be back in the multimedia
lab to finish working on their electronic compositions. He liked this week at the end of the semester when
they got a break from chorus. The teacher had given them practice with the Cakewalk software, and now
they were each composing their own melodies. Jason had chosen to use trumpets and violins, because he
liked the contrast, and was now writing a piece in D-minor. As he listened to it through the headphones,
he decided he might throw in a cello to add a lower register.

          After School: Athletics. The basketball team was working on their 3-point shooting in
preparation for the tournament finals next week. Since their center had a sprained wrist and couldn‟t
play, the coach had him running the video camera again. After each player took a shot, s/he could see the
replay on the video screen, and coach would point out ways to improve technique.

         At Home That Night: After dinner, Jason pulled out his notebook and dialed into AOL. He
knew that his history teacher would be checking the bulletin board soon, so he posted his comments in
response to the questions on the causes of WWII. After working on his soundtrack storyboard for awhile,
Jason saw that Laura was online so he instant-messaged her to see if she had time to look at the
storyboard. She said ok, so he sent her the file. When he checked his email, he saw a reminder from his
math teacher that the review session in the class chat room would start at 8:00, so Jason pulled out his
Algebra textbook and popped it into the notebook‟s CD-tray. He wanted to look at the section on
quadratics before the review session started. Just then he got an instant message from Alex: “did u hear?”
         : we're going to be getting tablet PCs next year!
         : no way.
                                                  3
              : yeah, my mom just told me!

IV.    Technology Department

       A. Overview
Technology Department responsibilities cover the following four areas which make up the bulk
of this Technology Plan:
     Infrastructure
           o Manage technology infrastructure and resources
           o Manage telecommunication systems
           o Oversee School electronic security door system
           o Assist with other School security issues
           o Provide technical hardware and software support
     Educational Technology
           o Work with Academic Dean and Educational Technology Specialist
           o Oversee technology program studies and reviews
     Administrative Technology
           o Coordinate administrative technology
           o Support administrative systems
     Communications
           o Oversee and support management of School web site
           o Manage oversight of School emergency communications
           o Manage and maintain parent email addresses
           o Support the use of technology to streamline communications within the Norwood
               community


       B. Structure
In addition to supporting the academic mission of the School, the Technology Department also
supports administrative functions and departments in their use of technology. The School strives
to maintain systems that allow staff and administrators to function and communicate efficiently
and effectively.

The Technology Department has grown to support the academic and administrative needs of the
School, while seeking to alleviate the long hours previously worked by the technology staff. The
Technology Department is structured as follows:

                                             Director of
                                             Technology
                                                                   Reports to Academic Dean



   Network           Network and                                Database and              Ed Tech
                                            Technical
   Manager            Technical                                 Applications          Specialist, Web
                                         Support Specialist
                      Specialist                              Support Specialist     Site Coordinator


The Technology Department continues to utilize hourly workers and volunteer interns to


                                                    4
supplement the staff and to help configure notebooks during the busy summer months and during
the school year as necessary.

V. Infrastructure

       A. Overview
Norwood has a sophisticated network infrastructure that supports academic and administrative
users of technology both on and off campus. The School‟s nerve center is housed in the network
closet in the Middle School building. Fourteen servers running Windows 2003, keep the School‟s
systems running 24 hours a day. The Lower School and Murray buildings are connected to the
network closet in the Middle School by fiber. The Middle School building has been wireless since
2001. Recently the rest of the campus has become part of the School‟s wireless network.

The original network used a series of 32 hubs to handle traffic for the network‟s 850 network
drops. Increased network traffic has slowed the network, even with the School‟s T-1 data
connection. (The School has a DSL line for backup Internet access.) The School has started
replacing the hubs with managed switches to improve network performance and speed. The
School has also implemented 811.1g wireless protocol enabling higher wireless speeds.

Some school computers have gigabit connections to the desktop. As more switches are added
and gigabit Ethernet cards are used throughout the school, more users will have access to this
higher speed network.

Remote access is provided to network files via web folders, and email access is available via the
School‟s web site. Virtual Private Network (VPN) access is available to all students and faculty
members. The goal is to match the home and school environments so faculty and students have
the same tools, as well as the same look and feel, available in both places.

Norwood‟s infrastructure includes the School‟s telecommunications system, dedicated voice and
data T-1 lines, electronic security doors, and an overhead emergency paging system, and has
grown to accommodate the academic and administrative needs of the School. The Technology
Office maintains the infrastructure, a comprehensive backup system, and support for individual
users. See the Appendix for a detailed list of items making up the School‟s infrastructure and
technology resources.

       B. Backup
Norwood has a comprehensive backup system in place to back up the School‟s network and data.
Once a week, a full backup is performed, with an incremental backup being done every other
night of the week. The tapes are stored in a fire-proof safe in the network closet, and
periodically a complete set of backup tapes is taken off site to another fire-proof safe.

Procedures for recovering files from the backup tapes can be found in the technology binder in
the network closet. This set of procedures for all network tasks is in the process of being
reviewed and updated. The School has a backup power generator in order to maintain critical
systems during electric utility failures.




                                                5
       C. Telecommunications
Norwood has a Panasonic Digital Business Phone System that was purchased in 1994. The
School‟s phone use has grown dramatically over the years as the School has expanded, and with
the renovation of the Murray building, the system is at maximum capacity. Every analog and
every digital port is being used, thus, we must take away a phone before a new one can be added.

Norwood‟s phone system is serviced by a T-1 line and includes 200 Direct Inward Dial (DID)
numbers which allow callers to bypass the receptionist. The School has 120 phones and has a
dedicated voice mail server that provides 24/7 access to over 150 voice mailboxes. The phone
outlets in the Middle School building and renovated Murray building are modular and easily
maintained. However, the wiring in the Lower School is much older and requires a phone
contractor to perform any adds, moves, or changes.

The School will need to replace the current phone system if additional phones are needed.
However, even without expansion, the School should be prepared to purchase a new system, as
replacement parts and maintenance on the old system become increasingly difficult. The
Technology Department is following new Internet Protocol (IP) technologies as a possible
replacement when we invest in a new telecommunications system.

The Technology Department also oversees the School‟s 13 cell phone accounts, including
support for Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) for members of the Administrative Team.
Maintaining the School‟s telecommunication system, including all individual phones, phone
lines, and voice mailboxes is a significant part of the Technology Department‟s responsibilities.

       D. Network Security
In recent years the Technology Department implemented network security at various points of
the school network. This initiative was adapted to secure both infrastructure and users in or
outside of the School network using various software and hardware technologies such as an
Internet firewall, Local Internet firewalls on each Notebook to secure remote users, Digital
Certificates on all Web access from the Internet, stronger password and account policy, Secure
remote access to the network for faculty and staff, and periodic site security audits. These steps
were taken while considering the balance between needs of the users verses industry standard
security practices. The balance between the two continues to be reviewed.

       E. Security
The Technology Department maintains email lists, phone lists, and the web site, thus allowing
the Administration to communicate with parents and the community during an emergency. The
Technology Department also oversees and maintains other security systems including walkie-
talkies, the Datawatch electronic doors, and an overhead emergency communication system. In
addition, the Department created electronic floor plans and room numbers for the School that
were provided to the fire and police departments.

The Technology Department continues to work with members of the Administrative Team to
improve the School‟s security. The School is reviewing additional security measures such as
perimeter door alarms, door buzzers, and security cameras, and this is being coordinated by the
Technology Department. One major security component, the fire alarm system, is not
maintained by the Technology Department, although the staff tries to be familiar with the system
to provide backup to the Plant Manager and maintenance staff as necessary.
                                                 6
VI.    Educational Technology

       A. Goals
Norwood uses technology to support the instructional objectives of the curriculum. With proper
forethought and planning, technology-infused lessons engage students, create innovative learning
experiences, and help students learn. From the teacher‟s perspective, technology enables unique
instructional capabilities and efficiencies. The following taxonomy of goals speaks to one
fundamental mission: that technology should extend, enrich, and illuminate learning.

      Individualized Learning: Support and accommodate the individual needs and diverse
       learning styles of Norwood‟s student body with personalized instruction and assessment. Help
       learners visualize problems and solutions. Provide supplementary or primary means to acquire,
       practice, and reinforce course content, with evaluation and feedback through tutorial software and
       supplementary electronic materials.
      Information Management: Teach students to create, manage, and organize information, thereby
       enabling meaningful interpretation and presentation of facts, concepts, and ideas. Link learners to
       learning tools including: word-processing, spreadsheet, and database applications; tutorials, and
       computer-assisted-instruction. Provide teachers with fast and versatile methods for gathering,
       sharing, and manipulating information, and for tracking student learning progress. Provide tools for
       students to create maps, timelines, diagrams, graphs, and images in support of their writing and
       research. Improve students‟ organizational skills for file and information management.
      Inquiry: Facilitate student exploration and discovery, and improve the means by which they
       access, analyze, and evaluate information. Link learners to digital information and education
       sources including primary source documents, real-time data, and global visual / audio sources.
       Use simulation software for experiments and places not otherwise available to students.
      Writing, Research, and Presentation: Support and improve the writing process: brainstorming,
       outlining, note-taking, drafting, revising, editing, reviewing, and publishing. Improve the consistency
       of how the research process is taught and conducted through all nine grades and within each of the
       grade level homerooms. Improve students‟ oral and electronic presentation skills.
      Engagement and Motivation: Gain students‟ attention and increase perception of being in
       control of their learning. Engage students through creative production work using multimedia or
       multisensory experiences. Allow students to pursue more than one path in learning. Enable
       students to take risks. Enable interactivity and immediate feedback/assessment.
      Communication: Increase use of synchronous and asynchronous communication technologies
       to interact and share knowledge with others as a means of learning more about the world, thus
       preparing students for life outside the classroom, in an increasingly connected world.
       Communicate with experts, foreign language speakers, and other audiences.
      Collaboration: Provide tools for cooperative and collaborative learning experiences, both local
       and distant, facilitating students working in teams to solve problems.
      Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making: Promote student use of
       technology to evaluate information, test ideas, and increase knowledge for solving real-world
       problems using higher level thinking skills.
      Appropriate and Ethical use: Teach students to use technology tools and digital resources in
       an ethical manner. (See the appendix for the School‟s Acceptable Use Policies.)
      Lifelong Learning in the Information Era: Encourage students to take an active role in
       their own learning by choosing tools which aide them in problem solving and which facilitate
       their own pursuit of knowledge. Required skills for the information age include technology
       literacy, information literacy, visual literacy, and team work.




                                                    7
         B. Educational Software Applications
Norwood School computers are configured with a robust suite of application software to support
the goals of the curriculum, but there may be a need to purchase more tutorial and tracking
software and further application software to support certain learning objectives. These
purchasing decisions should be made by departments and grade levels, based on instructional
objectives. Teachers should familiarize themselves with our current software, some of which
could be used more actively. Departments or grade level teams may wish to consider training in
certain software applications. Please see the software appendix for details on applications in each
instructional area, and on currently installed software.

         C. Hardware
The model of the digital classroom first piloted through the Enhancement Fund has become a
standard vision for Norwood classrooms. These tools provide a classroom with the ability to
display and manipulate virtually any electronic or print medium. This model includes:

        Notebooks for students and teacher.
        Ceiling-installed projector.
        Classroom workstation with wireless mouse/keyboard, and scanner.
        Electronic capture device for dry-erase board.
        Podium with document camera.
        VCR/DVD and speakers.
        Digital camera, CD burner, hallway printers.
        Access to course materials from home via the web.
        Windows XP roaming profiles and file synchronization.
        USB Drives for carrying files.
        Teacher monitoring and control software.

Issues relating to educational hardware are detailed in the hardware appendix.

         D. Web Site & Email Communication
Norwood should focus on the use of class web sites and email communication between teachers,
students, and parents as virtual extensions of the classroom. Posting of homework by middle
school faculty has been very successful. Consideration should be given to including lower school
assignments on the web site. August, 2003, saw the adoption of “web presence” as a goal for all
faculty. Institutional commitment and expectations should now be outlined. Possible uses for
class or grade level web sites include the following:
     News announcements, calendar items, and reminders.
     Course information such as syllabus, expectations, grading policies, meeting times, etc.
     Teacher info (info, picture, phone extension, email address, etc.)
     Course documents such as hand-outs, help sheets, PowerPoints, photos, etc.
     Assignments including homework, major projects, rubrics, etc.
     Books and other resources used in the class
     Communication (bulletin boards, email lists, chat rooms for that class only, etc)
     Internet links and resources.
     Online tests or surveys that are automatically scored.



                                                  8
       E. Library
The library provides resources for research at all grade levels. Technology resources are part of this
process. The faculty should discuss the research process in order to provide a consistent approach
including a framework for note-taking and paper-writing. The faculty should consider adopting a
standard framework such as the Montgomery County AGOPP model, or the “Big 6” model so that
students are exposed to a consistent set of vocabulary, and a consistent approach to the steps
involved.

The library‟s subscription web sites are an important resource. These include Grolier‟s Online
Deluxe, eLibrary Elementary, and the AP Photo Archive. Consideration needs to be given to
these choices; perhaps other sites should also be considered.

       F. Assistive Technologies (Students with Special Needs)
The learning specialist has been facilitating this aspect of educational technology at Norwood.
Some students in 4th grade have benefited from the availability of a personal notebook or alpha-
smart. Dictation software (Dragon Naturally Speaking) has been explored for students without
efficient keyboarding skill. Remedial software has been considered, but in general, students
needing remediation usually work one-on-one with tutors. Supporting tutors technology use
should be advanced.

       G. Diversity/Equity Issues
Access to computers and the Internet at home for all families must continue to be ensured. The
financial aid office should include this item in their planning. In addition, the School should
continue to select educational software which reflects the goals of the school‟s diversity
program.

       H. Professional Development and Training
Faculty professional development for technology integration is the most important area to
support in order to achieve our stated objective of “the seamless integration of technology into
the Norwood curriculum.” Now that the network infrastructure and software upgrades have
reached a successful plateau, energy and focus should turn to achieving educational objectives.
In order to truly achieve seamless integration it is necessary for all teachers (within the structures
of academic departments or grade levels) to be involved in a number of areas related to
educational software and technology implementations which support curricular goals. See the
appendix for specific recommendations.

       I. Program Evaluation
               1. Student Skills
In order to evaluate student acquisition of technology skills, the National Educational
Technology Standards (NETS) Performance Indicators have been linked to applications and
projects by grade level in our Matrix of Technology Skills (see appendix). The products which
students produce in each grade indicate their level of success with these skills. It is recommended
that a consistent set of rubrics, such as those available at http://rubistar.4teachers.org/ be
provided to students for technology projects. Consideration should also be given to a consistent
approach to collecting and saving students‟ work during their years at Norwood. Portfolio


                                                  9
assessment can be done electronically and can provide both assessment and reflection/insight
during the learning process.

               2. Faculty Skills
In order to ensure faculty acquisition of technology skills it is recommended that the
administration continue to adopt skills checklists for faculty recognizing three levels of
competencies. The primary level (which all faculty are currently competent with) includes word
processing, email, and Internet skills. A second level of competency includes educational use of
Office software, instructional software, and class web pages. A third tier of competency would
include creating electronic educational materials, and advanced functions of Office and other
applications.

               3. Seamless Integration
In order to evaluate our stated goal of “seamless integration,” support should be given to the
curriculum-mapping process as it moves forward over the next two years, especially as it relates
to technology. A detailed curriculum map for the school will allow a more thorough review of
how and where technology is integrated.

To view examples of how technology is currently being integrated into everyday lessons at
Norwood, please access: http://library.norwoodschool.org/dmo/examples.htm



VII. Administrative Technology

       A. Overview
Norwood‟s educational mission is supported by efficient and effective administrative offices and
professional staff. To that end, the Technology Department strives to provide not only technical
support, but leadership and vision in the area of administrative systems.

The School uses Microsoft Office, FileMaker, and Blackbaud databases to perform most of the
School‟s business. Support for these applications in provided by the Technology Office, whose
goal it is to make the individual users more proficient and self supportive in their use of the
applications. The more efficient the offices are at using available software, the better for the
overall operation of the school. In addition to using technology to run the operations of the
School, it is important for the Principals and other administrators to continue to lead by example.

       B. Administrative Systems
The School‟s administrative systems are maintained in Blackbaud and FileMaker. Blackbaud
produces sophisticated databases for use by non-profit institutions. They are, for the most part, not
modifiable by the user. For a substantial maintenance fee, Blackbaud provides comprehensive
technical support. The School‟s FileMaker databases have been created in-house and are typically
modified by the Technology Department.

With the exception of performing manual exports and imports, FileMaker and Blackbaud
databases do not share data. The School‟s individual Blackbaud databases used by the various
offices share data through the use of Academy, a comprehensive product from Blackbaud.

                                                10
       C. Professional Development and Training
Several years ago Norwood placed a heavy emphasis on professional development in the area of
technology for faculty members. Teachers were compensated for attending conferences and
training classes to promote their use of technology in the classroom. This focus on professional
development is a major reason for the successful use of technology at Norwood. Like the
teaching faculty, professional development and training for administrative staff is key to helping
people perform and manage the School‟s business.

The offices have realized that training for users of major Blackbaud systems is critical and, while
expensive, an effort is made to send new Blackbaud users to formal Blackbaud classes. In-house
training has been provided to members of the administrative staff, and training classes in
Microsoft applications, as well as FileMaker, have also been available. In addition, the School
has taken a major step towards promoting administrative skills by adding a section on technology
to all administrative evaluations. This important step should be continued.

The School could make better use of its resources if it hired administrative employees with
technical skills and/or the ability to learn new skills quickly and effectively. It would benefit the
School to place an emphasis on training, and perhaps even core competencies, for administrative
users of technology. Much of this training can be provided in-house by the technology staff, and
past experience has shown that an investment in training is time and money well spent.


VIII. Communication

       A. Overview
Technology plays a pivotal role in the School‟s ability to communicate with all of its
constituents, parents, students, alumni, etc. The Technology Department, working with the
Administration, is working to help facilitate both regular and emergency communications.

       B. Regular Communication
The School‟s web site, norwoodschool.org, is a powerful tool for communicating with members
of the Norwood community and the outside world. Separate passwords for Board members,
faculty, parents, and students enable the School to communicate sensitive information when
necessary.

In addition to the web site, the Technology Department maintains email addresses for all parents,
thus allowing administrators to communicate instantly with parents at work or at home. Email
addresses for parents are available to teachers and administrators, allowing them to communicate
with parents of a particular student, a home room, or section without having to worry about
maintaining individual email addresses. Principals have the ability to email an entire grade or all
parents in the school.

Communication via email and the web site can result in considerable savings to Norwood by
allowing the School to save on postage and printing costs. The School should continue to work
to identify ways to reduce mailing, including allowing parents and Trustees to opt out of certain
mailings and instead receive an email with attachments or a link to the web site.
One example of using technology to save paper and staff time is with the Thursday Memo.
Previously sent home via students‟ backpacks, the Memo required substantial copying and
                                                 11
assembling each week. This proved to be a costly and inefficient way of communicating
important information to parents, and more often than not, particularly in the Middle School, the
Memo did not reach parents in a timely manner. In September of 2000 the Memo started being
posted on the web site. It is no longer distributed via backpack mail, and is now posted on the
web site, along with all flyer attachments (attachments must be submitted electronically to the
School). An email with the contents of the memo is now sent each Thursday to all parents and
Board members.

The School should continue to grow the web site and rely more on it to disseminate information.
The hiring of a faculty member as News and Events Editor for the homepage has greatly
increased the number and quality of items posted to the web site and has generated many positive
comments throughout the community. Likewise, the Parents Association is also making good
use of the web site and has appointed a volunteer to coordinate all postings for the Parent
Association.

The School is moving in the right direction with the use of electronic forms, electronic credit
card posting, and downloadable data from the Directory. The School should continue to support
and exploit the web site and take care to provide it the necessary resources to support its mission.

       C. Emergency Communications
The methods in place for daily communications can also be used to communicate in the event of
an emergency. In addition to regular parent email addresses, the School also maintains separate
emergency email addresses for parents. This list can be used to send an email from a School
administrator at any time. In addition to emergency emails, emergency messages can also be
posted on the School‟s web site and phone system. The School also has access to a system that
allows it to instantly send a voice mail message to all parent home and/or work phone numbers
from a School administrator.


IX.    Conclusion
Norwood is a leader among independent schools in the use of information and communication
technologies. These technologies bolster the School's educational mission, and support its
administrative functions. Creative applications of technology at Norwood enhance the learning
experience of all students by equipping them with the tools and skills necessary for participation
in a global community of information resources. Early experiences in use of technology focus on
mastering basic skills. These skills provide the foundation for later experiences in which students
choose to employ various tools and techniques to access, manipulate, and integrate information
central to classroom studies and real life problems. As students become more sophisticated in
their use of technology, they are encouraged to assume the role of creator and designer of
projects which engage them in construction of their own knowledge and understanding.

Seamless integration of technology comes from teachers being invested in a process of
professional development to support this goal. Norwood is a leader in this area, but there is
room for improvement in the consistency and acceptance of technology implementations.
Therefore, it is recommended that department-heads examine ways to improve technology
integration at Norwood, with particular emphasis on the notebook program, professional
development for departments, and the scope & sequence of curriculum with respect to
technology implementations.

                                                12
Essential questions for faculty, students, parents: [from LaptopsforLearning.com]
    Faculty: Are you willing to continue examining your teaching practices to allow for more
       effective integration of educational technology to improve student learning?
    Students: Are you willing to become more active agents in your own education by
       harnessing the new learning opportunities made possible by educational technology?
    Parents: Are you willing to continue being supportive financially, and supportive of new
       approaches to teaching and learning?




X. Priorities
Over 40 action items are included in the appendix of the Technology Plan. The top priorities to
help chart the course for the future of technology at Norwood are as follows:

      Strive to match the home and school environments so faculty and students have the same
       tools, as well as the same look and feel, available in both places.
      Coordinate data in all administrative databases.
      Identify ways to increase the efficiency of School communications within the Norwood
       community using various technologies to facilitate the process of organizational learning
       and knowledge management.
      Find ways to provide time for middle and lower school faculties to discuss and plan for
       technology integration at Norwood
      Rededicate the School‟s commitment to technology professional development,
       facilitating the development of expectations for faculty and staff technology proficiency,
       curricular integration, and web presence.
      Facilitate the development of expectations for departments‟ and grade level teams‟
       involvement in evaluating and adopting software which supports their curricula.




                                               13
Appendices


      A. Norwood Infrastructure and Technology Resources

     485 computers
         o 135 desktops                         Telephone System
         o 250 school owned notebooks               o 120 phones
         o 75 student or faculty owned              o 150 voice mail accounts
            notebooks                               o 200 DID lines
                                                    o 7 fax lines
     14 servers                                    o 13 Cell phones
                                                    o Emergency POTS line
     55 printers                                   o Conference bridge

     Peripherals                               Emergency Communications
         o Scanners                                o 50 radios
         o White board capture devices             o 1500 parent email addresses
         o Document cameras                        o 120 speakers for overhead
         o Digital video cameras                      paging system
         o Digital cameras
         o Mounted projectors                   Security
         o USB drives                               o 4 electronic access doors
         o PDAs                                     o 175 access cards
                                                    o Wireless access points
     Administrative Systems                        o Network drops
        o Business Office                           o T-1 lines
        o Development Office                        o DSL
        o Admissions Office
        o Student Records                       Weather Station
        o Progress Reports and                     o Part of Homeland Security
           Transcripts                                Weather Network
        o Summer Camp and Auxiliary
           Programs                             Web Site
                                                   o Verio web server (off site)
     Network                                      o Charlotte web server (local)
         o Servers                                          Faculty web sites
         o Router                                           Library catalog web
         o Hubs                                                server
         o Switches                                o Blackboard class web site
         o Tape back up unit                           server (local)
         o Off site back up
         o Firewall
         o Battery backup units




                                         i
       B. Acceptable Use and Technology Policies
Available online at: http://www.norwoodschool.org/data/site/acceptableusepolicy.asp

       C. Research on Impact of Educational Technology
There is not much research documenting integrated notebook programs in k-12 schools;
however, there are a variety of studies showing positive quantitative effects of individual uses of
technology such as computer-assisted-instruction, hypermedia, discussion boards, distance
learning, simulation programs, etc. These individual studies have been aggregated in several
meta-analyses. Schacter (1999) summarizes the results of five meta-analyses. Positive findings
include the following:
Kulik (1994)
     On average, students who used computer based instruction scored at the 64th percentile of
       achievement compared to students in the control conditions without computers who
       scored at the 50th percentile.
     Students learn more in less time when they receive computer-based instruction.
     Students like their classes more and develop more positive attitudes when their classes
       include computer-based instruction.
Sivin-Kachala (1998)
     Students in technology rich environments experienced positive effects on achievement in
       all major subject areas.
     Students in technology rich environments showed increased achievement in preschool
       through higher education for both regular and special needs children.
     Students attitudes toward learning and their own self-concept improved consistently
       when computers were used for instruction.
Baker, Gearhart, and Herman (1994)
     The ACOT experience appeared to result in new learning experiences requiring higher
       level reasoning and problem solving, although the authors claim this finding was not
       conclusive.
     The ACOT experience did have a positive impact on student attitudes and did have an
       impact on changing teacher practices toward more cooperative group work and less
       teacher stand-up lecturing.
Mann, Shakeshaft, Becker, and Kottkamp (1999)
     The more students participated [in a program using an Integrated Learning System], the
       more their test scores rose on the Stanford 9.
     Consistent student access to the technology, positive attitudes towards the technology (by
       both teachers and students), and teacher training in the technology led to the greatest
       student achievement gains.
Wenglinsky (1998)
     Eighth-grade students who used simulation and higher order thinking software showed
       gains in math scores of up to 15 weeks above grade level as measured by NAEP.
     Eighth-grade students whose teachers received professional development on computers
       showed gains in math scores of up to 13 weeks above grade level.
     Higher order uses of computers and professional development were positively related to
       students‟ academic achievement in mathematics for both fourth- and eighth-grade
       students.


                                                ii
There is quantitative evidence showing positive gains on writing skills. For example, see
Goldberg, Russell, and Cook (2002). “The results of the meta-analyses suggest that on average
students who use computers when learning to write are not only more engaged and motivated in
their writing, but they produce written work that is of greater length and higher quality.”

There is also evidence supporting the use of computers for reading instruction. A Milken
Foundation report by Schacter (1999), examines the various software programs currently
available and notes the positive research findings. Another study by Soe, Koki, and Chang
(2000) conclude, “The overall finding of this meta-analysis is that computer-assisted instruction
has a positive impact on reading achievement.”

Fleming and Raptis‟ (2000) analysis of research studies is based on research from 1990-1999. It
notes some positive outcomes for math problem solving, reading comprehension and word study.

Many valuable and up-to-date research report abstracts are available from the Journal of
Research on Technology in Education. For example, “In comparisons across subject areas,
statistically significant differences were noted when teachers used computers [with their
students] as a research tool or as a problem-solving/decision-making tool.” 35 (4)

Many of the above-noted finding may not directly pertain to the model of Norwood notebook
integration, but they do indicate the potential for positive outcomes with specific applications of
technology.


                                             Sources

Baker, E., Gearhart, M. Herman, J. (1994). Evaluating the apple classrooms of tomorrow
     (ACOT). In E.L. Baker, and H.F. O‟Neil, Jr. (Eds.). Technology assessment in education
     and training. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, in Schacter, J. (1999). The impact of
     education technology on student achievement: What the most current research has to say.
     Retrieved 11/1/03 from the Milkin Family Foundation web site:
     http://www.mff.org/pubs/ME161.pdf

Fleming, T., Raptis H. (2000). A topographical analysis of research, 1990-99. Teacher Librarian,
     27(5), 9.

Goldberg, A., Russell, M, Cook, A. (2002). The Effect of Computers on Student Writing: A
     Meta-analysis of Studies from 1992 to 2002. Journal of Technology, Learning, and
     Assessment, 2(1). Retrieved 11/1/03 from the Journal of Technology, Learning, and
     Assessment web site: http://www.bc.edu/research/intasc/jtla/journal/v2n1.shtml

Kulik, J.A. (1994). Meta-analytic studies of findings on computer-based instruction. Retrieved
     11/1/03 from the Center for Applied Research in Educational Technology web site:
     http://caret.iste.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=studySummary&StudyID=275

Mann, D., Shakeshaft, C., Becker, J., Kottkamp, R. (1999). West Virginia’s basic skills/computer
    education program: An analysis of student achievement. Santa Monica, CA: Milken Family
    Foundation, in Schacter, J. (1999). The impact of education technology on student


                                                 iii
     achievement: What the most current research has to say. Retrieved 11/1/03 from the
     Milkin Family Foundation web site: http://www.mff.org/pubs/ME161.pdf

Schacter, J. (1999). The impact of education technology on student achievement: What the most
     current research has to say. Retrieved 11/1/03 from the Milkin Family Foundation web site:
     http://www.mff.org/pubs/ME161.pdf

Schacter, J. (1999). Reading programs that work. Retrieved 11/1/03 from the Milken Family
     Foundation web site: http://www.mff.org/publications/publications.taf?page=279

Sivin-Kachala (1998). Report on the effectiveness of technology in schools, 1990-1997. Software
     Publisher‟s Association, in Schacter, J. (1999) The impact of education technology on
     student achievement: What the most current research has to say. Retrieved 11/1/03 from
     the Milkin Family Foundation web site: http://www.mff.org/pubs/ME161.pdf

Soe, K., Koki, S., Chang, J. (2000). Effect of Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) on Reading
     Achievement: A Meta-Analysis. Retrieved 11/1/03 from:
     http://www.prel.org/products/Products/effect-cai.htm

Wenglinsky, H. (1998) Does it compute? The relationship between educational technology and
    student achievement in mathematics. Educational Testing Service Policy Information
    Center, in Schacter, J. (1999) The impact of education technology on student achievement:
    What the most current research has to say. Retrieved 11/1/03 from the Milkin Family
    Foundation web site: http://www.mff.org/pubs/ME161.pdf




                                              iv
        D. Software in the Classroom
A list of School software is available online at: http://library.norwoodschool.org/dmo/software.htm
Goals                Instructional Objective                     Current Status - Software Owned      Software to
                                                                                                      Consider
Individualized       Improve students‟ basic skills in           JumpStart Phonics, StoryBook         Clicker
Instruction          reading.                                    Weaver, EasyBook Deluxe, KidPix,
                                                                 ReadingBlaster, electronic
                                                                 storybooks.
Individualized       Ensure that all students are competent                                           Accelerated
Instruction          readers by the end of second grade.                                              Reader
                     Monitor student status regularly and
                     gather data efficiently.
Writing Process      Improve students‟ writing process           Kidspiration, Type to Learn,         DraftBuilder
                     skills.                                     Inspiration, Word, Grammar for the
                                                                 Real World
Communication,       Improve students‟ oral presentation         PowerPoint                           Video-
Presentation,        skills.                                                                          conferencing
Critical Thinking
Individualized       Improve students‟ skills in mathematics.    ClockShop, GraphClub,                GraphClub 2.0,
Instruction,                                                     GraphMaster, MathBlaster, Green      Geometer‟s
Problem Solving,                                                 Globs, Tesselation Exploration,      Sketchpad,
Engagement,                                                      Math Arena, Tabletop Math,           Pearson
Inquiry,                                                         SplishSplash Math, Numbers           SuccessMaker
Collaboration                                                    Recovered, Clue Finders, Excel,
                                                                 Algebra Classmate, PrimeTime
                                                                 Math, Fizz & Martina, Math
                                                                 Mysteries.
Individualized       Ensure that all students are competent      (no assessment software currently    KeySkills, Math
Instruction          with addition, subtraction,                 owned)                               Essentials
                     multiplication, and division facts by the
                     end of fourth grade.

Information          Improve students‟ basic skills in           Contraptions, Zap, Roswell Labs,     Sammy‟s
Management,          science.                                    Way Things Work, Plate Tectonics,    Science House
Inquiry, Problem                                                 Color Mixer, Gears, Learn About
Solving,                                                         Plants, Learn About Human Body,
Engagement,                                                      Kaleidagraph, Geographic
Collaboration                                                    Information Systems, PowerPoint.

Information          Improve students‟ basic skills in           MapMakers Toolkit, TimeLiner,
Management,          history/social studies.                     Community Construction Kit,
Inquiry,                                                         Evolution of Man, Nile Passage to
Engagement,                                                      Egypt, RainForest Designer,
Critical Thinking,                                               PowerPoint, Tom Snyder‟s:
Collaboration,                                                   Decisions Decisions series.
Lifelong Learning
Individualized       Improve students‟ skills in foreign         Atajo, Bienvenue, Systeme D,         Rosetta Stone
Instruction,         language.                                   ZingoLingo, Day of the Dead,
Communication,                                                   Eurotalk French & Spanish,
Engagement                                                       PowerPoint.
Engagement,          Improve students‟ skills in the arts.       KidPix, Paint, PhotoShop Elements    Painter
Inquiry
Research Process,    Improve the consistency of how the          Word, Internet Explorer,             DraftBuilder
Information          research process is approached and          PowerPoint, Inspiration.
Management           undertaken.
                                                         v
         E. Hardware Issues in the Classroom
Objective                      Current Status                                      Ideas to be Considered
Enable one-to-one              1:1 ratio in 6th, 7th & 8th grade.                  Expanding 5th to a 1:1 ratio.
computing in grades 5-8.       3:2 ratio in 5th grade, but classes borrow from
                               another room to make a 1:1 ratio.
Foster high level of           The 2002 transition to Windows XP,                  The teacher‟s workstation should be as robust as
confidence & ability in        Outlook, roaming profiles, and file                 possible since the teacher‟s confidence with
teacher perception of          synchronization was successful, but placed          technology is based on their own experience of
hardware infrastructure.       strain on our older workstations.                   computing at Norwood.
Enable every teacher to        9/03: Projectors, mimios, and document              Discuss with other 7th & 8th grade teachers
project electronic and         cameras in all six 5th/6th homerooms, one           whether they would use a projector.
print media, and record        projector per grade in 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 7th, & 8th;
dry-erase notes.               Three projectors in science, two in foreign         Also consider 1st grade, math classrooms, and 3rd
                               language, two in computer labs, two in art,         & 4th grade.
                               one in music, one in drama two in common
                               areas, two on carts.
Have a computing device        It takes 5-10 minutes in 7th & 8th grade to         Raise the expectation for students to carry their
that is instantly              retrieve notebooks from the hallway carts           notebooks with them?
accessible (physically) to     and get them set up. In 5th grade some              Install computers in desks.
all students in all classes.   students needs to borrow from another               Base computers in classrooms.
                               classroom since it‟s not 1:1.                       Require that students bring their notebooks to
                                                                                   school every day.
Enable a computing             The amount of time it takes a class of              Improve wireless network speed, profile, and
environment in which the       students to power up, log in to the network,        synchronization issues.
devices are instantly          and get to a ready state can be upwards of 5        Enable computers to „stand-by‟ instead of
ready to be used.              minutes.                                            shutting down. Alternatively, have a device that
                                                                                   is “instant-on” like current palm and tablet
                                                                                   devices.
Ensure a computing             It is not uncommon to have technical issues         Increase pro-active tech support systems.
environment in which all       (ranging from mild to severe) with 10-20%           Increase expectations on students to report
computers are working          of the notebooks in a classroom.                    problems and actively seek support.
properly 99% of the
time.
Enable a computing             Older notebooks do not hold enough battery          Install notebook power supplies in students
environment in which           charge to make it through a school day              desks. If carts had power supplies, we could
teacher and students           without needing to be plugged in. Some can‟t        redistribute the power supplies to student desks.
don‟t lose any time to         make it through a single period. The new
power supply issues.           fleet of 5th & 6th notebooks will greatly           A thin-client architecture would have built in
                               improve the 5th/6th environment.                    power.
Enable the teacher             9/03 NetOp School application installed in          Discuss with 7th & 8th grade faculty to determine
workstation to monitor,        40 computer lab workstations, all 60 5th/6th        need of installing NetOp on remaining 80 7th/8th
control, and lock student      notebooks, 40 Briar & Hollander notebooks.          notebooks.
workstations in each                                                               Install on 3rd/4th grade notebook cart.
classroom.
Enable the adoption of         Notebooks in 7th & 8th that travel freely           Terminal Services or Citrix would provide a
software which can be          between home & school support this. In 5th &        way for home computers to access and run our
used both in school and        6th grades notebooks may be borrowed                educational software.
at home.                       overnight. In K-4th grade there is no support
                               for school software use at home.




                                                              vi
       F. Educational Technology Skills Matrix
Available online at: http://library.norwoodschool.org/dmo/edtechmatrix.htm


       G. Faculty Professional Development
   1. Facilitate departments, grade level teams, and all faculty in discussing and evaluating
      hardware and software which supports the curriculum. Teachers need to know the
      capabilities of current technology and software. By involving more stakeholders in the
      development of integration strategies, there will be a greater likelihood of implementation
         a. Department chairs (or their delegates) should explore subject-area software in
              conjunction with the ed-tech specialist.
         b. In order to maintain a leading-edge approach to educating our students, teams of
              teachers, departments, or grade level teams should consider training seminars in
              subject-area software.
         c. Faculty committees (such as department heads) need time to discuss educational
              technology. Goals include: strategizing ways to improve the notebook program,
              continuing to develop guidelines for Internet filtering, and providing input and
              suggestions for the technology department to maximize productivity.

   2. Focus on faculty achieving proficiency with a limited suite of office and educational
      productivity applications. Windows XP, Word, Outlook, Internet Explorer, PowerPoint,
      Excel, FileMaker, Inspiration/Kidspiration, TimeLiner, and MapMaker's Toolkit are our
      standard applications. Consider adopting proficiency rubrics for faculty for these
      applications. In addition, offer rubrics for FrontPage, Publisher, PhotoShop Elements,
      etc., for faculty wishing to extend their proficiency ratings. Consider ways of
      recognizing, compensating, or stipulating that faculty meet proficiency rubrics.

   3. Consider ways to support faculty developing instructional lessons which integrate
      technology. In order to maintain Norwood‟s state-of-the-art approach to integrating
      technology, faculty planning and preparation time are critical.

   4. Find ways to publicize and recognize the technology knowledge of teachers, so that these
      teachers can be used as a resource by other teachers. Teacher-to-teacher sharing is a
      valuable strategy for professional development. Teacher projects could be written up in
      school publications. Successes could also be highlighted at faculty meetings. By fostering
      an atmosphere which celebrates successful projects, momentum is increased.

   5. Use the faculty professional development database for educational technology. This data
      can be used to identify strengths and weaknesses among the faculty, and plan for future
      workshops.

   6. Encourage faculty to visit other schools with strong technology programs. A team of
      teachers, such as a department might visit another school to meet with faculty of the
      school and observe technology-integrated lessons in action. Norwood faculty members
      have also hosted several visiting teams from other schools. Meeting with colleagues at
      other schools is a good form of professional development since it provides a reflective


                                              vii
   means of considering our own level of technology integration and possibilities for
   improvement.

7. Continue to offer workshops on productivity and educational applications. Although
   teachers rarely feel they have time to participate in non-compensated workshops that are
   offered, there may be an occasional offering which catches people‟s interest.

8. The technology sessions which are conducted during faculty orientation week prior to
   each school year continue to be valuable. These training sessions should continue to
   occur, since this is one of the few times we can have everyone in attendance. The
   professional development afternoon which occurs annually at the end of each September
   is another such time slot.

9. Continue having a technology goal as part of the process of employee evaluation .

10. Continue to support faculty wishing to attend educational conferences and seminars since
    they provide the opportunity for teachers to be exposed to a variety of new technologies.




                                           viii
       H. Administrative Systems

                      Table 3: Status of School Offices and Use of Databases


       Office                                Status                                Action Items
Main Office              Uses Microsoft Office; Registrar, Raiser‟s     Train users to access and use
                         Edge, Accounting Packages and FileMaker        Blackbaud and FileMaker databases
                         installed but not used
Middle School Office     Uses FileMaker for progress reports and next   Train users to use more features in
                         school placement databases; Excel is used to   Registrar, such as attendance,
                         do scheduling; Registrar used to track         detention, and discipline notices;
                         student biographical information               study the potential use of producing
                                                                        progress reports, transcripts, and
                                                                        schedules in Registrar
Lower School Office      Uses FileMaker for progress reports;           Train users to use more features in
                         Registrar used to track some student           Registrar, such as attendance: study
                         biographical data and notes from Principal     the potential use of producing
                                                                        progress reports in Registrar
Development Office       Extensive use of Raiser‟s Edge                 Train new employees and upgrade
                                                                        to most recent version of Raiser‟s
                                                                        Edge
Admissions Office        Uses FileMaker database developed in-house     Purchase and install Blackbaud
                                                                        Admissions database
Business Office          Uses the suite of accounting packages from     Train new employees and upgrade
                         Blackbaud                                      to the most recent versions of the
                                                                        accounting and student billing
                                                                        packages
Technology Office        Uses FileMaker to track al school hardware     Test and install Blackbaud‟s
                         and software; maintains data in Registrar;     Academy to coordinate and
                         supports all school databases                  synchronize Blackbaud databases
                                                                        throughout the school
Auxiliary Programs       Uses FileMaker for the Camp, Camp              Continue to support the databases;
                         Employee, AfterCare, and Funtastic Friday      evaluate possible alternatives from
                         databases                                      Blackbaud
Health Office            Currently maintains manual log in binder       Train users to track all health data
                                                                        in Registrar




                                                  ix
       I. Financing Issues
Equipment Purchases: Until the 03-04 school year, Norwood had always purchased its major
computer equipment via the School‟s capital budget. With the start of the Middle School, and
the distribution of notebooks to students and faculty, the purchase and subsequent replacement of
equipment has been uneven, resulting in significant budget variations from year to year.

To help stabilize the budget, the School has begun leasing its notebooks. The three year, zero-
down, zero-interest loan, has reduced the capital budget, while increasing, yet stabilizing, the
operating budget. The purchase of desktops and printers has also moved to the operating budget.

Student Fees: All Norwood students pay a $350 educational technology fee. This fee is billed
as an activity fee in addition to the base tuition. The fee was initiated in 1994 with the advent of
the educational technology program. Educational technology is ubiquitous at Norwood, and the
educational technology fee should be rolled into overall tuition and be eliminated as a separate
user fee.

Notebook fees for seventh and eighth grade students have been increased from $200 to their
current level of $350. This represents a good value to students who choose to lease. The School
should consider increasing the fee to cover the School‟s yearly cost of financing each notebook.
The Technology Office has worked hard to obtain very good deals for Norwood students who
choose to purchase their notebook. Students may purchase School-approved notebooks and have
their notebook fee waived. Students receive technical support from the school for such
notebooks. The School should consider, as has been recommended by members of the faculty,
having students purchase their notebooks, perhaps starting in 6th grade.

Replacement Cycle: Technology equipment is on a three year replacement cycle, depending on
the type of equipment. Typically, new desktops are placed in the labs, and the lab machines are
redistributed to the classrooms or other users. In addition to the regular replacement cycle, close
attention is paid to administrative users of Blackbaud, as they typically require powerful
machines with more memory.

The leased notebooks are on a three year lease, thus, we will have the option to replace them
after three years. The reasonable lifetime of a notebook is three years, however, because of
budget restrictions, some school notebooks have been used for four years. The fourth year
requires the purchase of an extended warranty, and the machines are slow and require a
disproportionate level of technical support.




                                                 x
J. Action Items
       1. Infrastructure
1. Continue to maintain the School‟s infrastructure to accommodate all academic and
    administrative needs.
2. Continually review academic needs and how the network can better facilitate teaching
    and learning.
3. Review the School‟s telecommunications needs and options for replacing the phone
    system.
4. Consider requiring students to purchase notebooks, along with other options for using
    technology in the classroom.
5. Include the educational technology fee as part of the regular tuition number so it is no
    longer a separate fee.
6. Continue to be vigilant in backing up the network and network data.
7. Continue to review the school‟s network security, including the security of the
    wireless network.
8. Continue to review the balance between the needs of users and the need for network
    security.
9. Maintain a comprehensive set of procedures and instructions for all network tasks.
10. Continue to monitor, and adjust if necessary, the replacement cycle of technology
    equipment.
11. Continue to evaluate the best method for financing equipment purchases.
12. Continue to make use of temporary workers to help with summer and other
    technology needs.
13. Continue to pursue relationships with local universities to foster the technology intern
    program.
14. Obtain a reliable source of backup power for the network.
15. Continue to work with the Administrative Team in maintaining and improving School
    security.

       2. Educational Technology

1. Review the 2002 Educational Technology study recommendations:
       a. Basing computers in classrooms rather than hallways
       b. Consider best way for file access from home - if families have Windows
           computers at home and if web folders were reliable, assess the need to carry a
           personal notebook.
       c. Consider the “compu-desk” model implemented by St. Paul‟s School – each
           desk in every middle school classroom has a built-in (thin client) computer.
       d. Consider a one-to-one ration for 5th grade.
2. Provide teachers with robust workstations so that their computing experience fosters
   the utmost confidence in the infrastructure systems.
3. Promote faculty professional development as noted in the previous appendix.
4. Consider alpha-smart type device for 3rd and 4th grades.
5. As the use of technology to extend the classroom to a virtual space/time increases, so
   to does the need for technical support in after-school hours. Consider the need to
   provide after hours tech support.
6. Consider the need to enable school educational software use at home.
                                         xi
7. Efforts should be made to support class or grade level web sites.
8. Encourage development of consistent approach to research throughout the school
    with the library as the locus.
9. Provide software and systems training for tutors.
10. Continue to educate parents through evening classes.
11. Ensure that consistent rubrics are provided for projects involving technology.

       3. Administrative Technology
1. Continue to have the School‟s administrators lead by example in their use of
    technology.
2. Capitalize on features in Registrar by using it for attendance, discipline notices,
    locker numbers, etc.
3. Continue to evaluate using Registrar to produce progress reports and transcripts.
4. Continue to evaluate using Registrar to track student, faculty, and room schedules.
5. Consider piloting the use of Blackbaud‟s Faculty Access Interface with selected
    faculty members.
6. Implement using Registrar to manage all records in the health office.
7. Continue to upgrade Registrar databases as necessary.
8. Continue to invest in Blackbaud training for all Blackbaud users.
9. Continue to promote the importance of administrative technology skills by tracking
    such skills in employee evaluations.
10. Seriously evaluate and consider technology proficiency and skills when hiring new
    administrative employees.

       4. Communication
1. Continue to maintain email addresses for all parents for use by administrators and
   teachers.
2. Investigate additional ways that traditional paper mailings can be reduced or
   eliminated in order to save time and money and increase efficiency.
3. Continue to develop the web site as a means of communicating with the Norwood
   community and other audiences.
4. Continue to maintain emergency email lists.
5. Continue to maintain emergency phone lists and explore messaging systems as a way
   to enhance the phone tree.




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