Howard County_ Maryland

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					             DRAFT
Howard County,
  Maryland



     Consolidated Plan
    FFY 2006 - FFY 2010




                   Prepared by:
                  Howard County
Department of Housing and Community Development
          Leonard S. Vaughan, Director
         Neil J. Gaffney, Deputy Director

       6751 Columbia Gateway Dr., 3rd Floor
              Columbia, MD 21046


                March 17, 2006
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Table of Contents MUST UPDATE PAGE NUMBERS
   I. Executive Summary......................................................................................................................1
          Overview..............................................................................................................................1
          Community Profile...............................................................................................................1
          Housing and Community Development Needs....................................................................2
          Housing and Community Development Goals ....................................................................3

   II. Introduction .................................................................................................................................6
            Purpose of the Consolidated Plan ........................................................................................6
            Organization and Content ....................................................................................................6
            The Collaborative Planning Process ....................................................................................6
            Institutional Structure...........................................................................................................8

   III. Community Profile...................................................................................................................10
          Location .............................................................................................................................10
          Development Trends (from the 2000 General Plan)..........................................................10
          Population Growth .............................................................................................................12
          Demographics ....................................................................................................................12

   IV. Housing Market Analysis ........................................................................................................24
         Background ........................................................................................................................24
         Rental Housing...................................................................................................................25
         Home ownership ................................................................................................................30
         Assisted Housing ...............................................................................................................37

   V. Housing, Homeless and Special Needs.....................................................................................38
         Cost of Housing .................................................................................................................38
         Community Development Needs.......................................................................................40
         Barriers to Affordable Housing .........................................................................................43
         Poverty ...............................................................................................................................44
         Homeless Needs.................................................................................................................46
         Homeless Strategy .............................................................................................................48
         Special Needs.....................................................................................................................61


   VI. Strategic Plan ...........................................................................................................................67
           Priority Needs ....................................................................................................................68
           Specific Strategies and Objectives.....................................................................................69
           Housing ..............................................................................................................................70
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          Special Needs.....................................................................................................................74
          Planning and Administration .............................................................................................75
          Infrastructure......................................................................................................................76
          Economic Development.....................................................................................................77
          Youth Programs .................................................................................................................78
          Anti-Crime Programs.........................................................................................................80
          Barriers to Affordable Housing........................................................................................ 80
          Lead Based Paint Hazard.................................................................................................. 81
          Anti-Poverty Strategy....................................................................................................... 82
          Institutional Structure....................................................................................................... .83
          Coordination..................................................................................................................... 83
          Public Housing.................................................................................................................. 83

The Action Plan is published in a separate file on the Web page
VII. FY 2006 Action Plan..............................................................................................................85
     Executive Summary................................................................................................................ 85
I. Sources of Funds ........................................................................................................................86
         A. Federal Resources .........................................................................................................86
         B. Plan for leveraging Private and Non-Federal Funds ...................................................87
II. Activity Descriptions of Proposed Projects ..............................................................................89
III. Geographic Distribution........................................................................................................110
IV. Homeless and Other Special Needs .......................................................................................121
         A. Programs to address Priority Homeless Needs...........................................................121
         B. Programs to Address Special Needs............................................................................123
V. Other Actions...........................................................................................................................123
         A. Addressing Obstacles to Meeting Under Served .........................................................123
         B. Affordable Housing .....................................................................................................124
         C. Reducing Lead Based Paint Hazards..........................................................................126
         D. Develop Institutional Structure...................................................................................130
         E. Enhance Coordination between Public and Private Housing and Social Service
                 Agencies ...............................................................................................................131
         F. Foster Public Housing Improvements and Resident Initiatives ..................................132
         G. Anti-Poverty Strategy..................................................................................................133
         H. Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing.......................................................................134
VI. Monitoring..............................................................................................................................139
VII. HOME and American Dream Downpayment Initiative (ADDI) ..........................................140
         ADDI Program Specific Requirements............................................................................140
         HOME Program Design.................................................................................................141
         A. Resale/Recapture Guidelines.......................................................................................142
         B. Value Limits.................................................................................................................142
         C. Planned Use of ADDI and Targeted Outreach ..........................................................143
         D. ADDI Actions Taken to Ensure Suitability of Families .............................................144
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      E. HOME Assisted Tenant Based Rental Assistance (TBRA) .........................................145
          1. Consolidated Plan Essential Element...................................................................145
          2. Local market Conditions.......................................................................................146
          3. Specific Client Group............................................................................................147
      F. Federal Match Requirement........................................................................................147
      G. Leveraging Private and Non-Federal Funds ..............................................................148
Appendix A. List of Proposed FY 2005 Projects.........................................................................149
       Table 3C - CPD Consolidated Plan Listing of Proposed Projects................................152
Appendix B. Certifications ...........................................................................................................178
Appendix C. Citizen Participation ...............................................................................................186


                                     Howard County DUNS # 102547127
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   I. Executive Summary
Overview
           The Consolidated Plan is required by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
   Development for entitlement jurisdictions to receive Community Development Block Grant
   (CDBG) and Home Investment Partnerships Program (HOME) funds. Howard County’s
   Consolidated Plan for Federal Fiscal Years 2006 through 2010 is a comprehensive document that
   serves as a planning document that guides the housing and community development efforts in
   County for the next five years. A review of the needs of the residents is provided and the plan
   identifies specific goals, strategies, objectives and outcomes that will be used to address those
   needs over the next five years. The document also serves as a management tool for assessing
   performance and tracking results. It is the overall goal of this plan to improve the quality of life
   for all County residents by providing a range of housing choices that will serve all incomes, all
   persons with special needs and which will enable all residents to maintain their independence.

           As the lead agency for the development of this plan, the Howard County Department of
   Housing and Community Development (DHCD) utilized the resources and built on insights
   gained and findings from a variety of agencies that serve low/moderate income persons, the
   foreign born and special needs populations within the County. Central to the needs identified in
   this strategic plan are the Community Action Council’s Needs Assessment and the Howard
   County Human Services Master Plan. Additionally, this Consolidated Plan has considered the
   employment issues identified in a study conducted by FIRN, Inc. titled: Howard County’s
   Foreign-Born Community: Dimensions, Growth and Implications.             Citizen input and the
   collaborative efforts of the human services network in Howard County. Citizen input has been
   obtained through public hearings, public forum, focus groups, community and public agency
   surveys and document review. Information gathered through these hearings, meetings and
   reviews was used in the development of this document.


Community Profile
           Howard County is located between Baltimore, MD and Washington, D.C. The County is
   a mixture of old and new, rural and urban. Ellicott City celebrated its bicentennial in 1972, four
   years before the United States; while Columbia, the metropolitan center, began to be carved out
   of rolling Howard County farmland almost forty years ago. Howard County is the only county
   in the state that does not boarder on another state or a body of water.

          The region’s population is increasing and continues to become older and more racially
   diverse. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the population of Howard County was 187,328 in
   1990, and 247,842 in 2000. The County grew by 60,514 residents during the decade, a 32
   percent increase. The Baltimore Metropolitan Council of Government’s estimates that the 2005




                                         1                           Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
  population of the County is 270,200, an increase of 9 percent during the last five years. The
  County’s population is expected to grow to 294,000 in 2010 and 308,900 in 2015.

          The characteristics of the population have changed over the past few years. The
  population is getting older. Baby boomers 35 to 54 year-olds make up more than 35 percent of
  the countywide population, almost 87,000 residents. Over the next 10 to 20 years large numbers
  will retire and move into the 65 plus category. The number of children aged 5 to 19 has grown
  significantly over the last 10 years and now make up more than 22 percent        of        the
  population. Small children under 5 has also grown from 15,200 in 1990 to 18,248 in 2000 a 20
  percent increase. Although the County is predominantly white, minorities are an increasing
  percentage of the population with African-Americans as the largest minority population.

          The median income continues to rise dramatically. Although Howard County is one of
  the richest counties in the State and the Nation, there are still a significant number of people who
  the economic boom has not favored. The higher incomes in turn increase the price of housing
  both sales and rental. The need for affordable housing for low/moderate-income and middle-
  income (workforce) families in the County is great. The number of people on the waiting list for
  public and assisted housing is increasing and the available affordable rental units are declining.

         Howard County has a rich, dynamic and diverse economy. The County has led the State
  over the past decade in new jobs created. However, many studies indicate that the greatest job
  growth in the next decade will occur in the service sector. These lower paying jobs will increase
  the need for affordable housing and social services.

Housing and Community Development Needs
          Affordable housing continues to be one of the greatest needs. It is estimated that about
  23% of households pay in excess of 30% of their total household income on housing rental costs.
  Of those almost about 7.2% pay in excess of 50% toward housing costs. Seniors have
  experienced a cost burden problem trying to live on a fixed income as housing and other costs
  rise. Low-income renter households are constantly challenged with locating affordable housing
  in a very tight rental market. New multifamily housing is difficult to build due to the availability
  of land. The lack of available land to build on drives up the cost of land and construction. In
  addition, the resident opposition to building also is an issue. Therefore, the preservation of
  existing affordable housing stock for rental or home ownership is very important.

          Multifamily housing is difficult to build due to the availability of land. The lack of
  available land to build on drives up the cost of land and construction. In addition, the resident
  opposition to building also is an issue. Therefore, the preservation of existing affordable housing
  stock for or home ownership is very important.
          The needs of the Homeless are also the availability of housing. Service providers are
  continuing to report the emergency and transitional shelter programs are full. The turn-a-ways
  are also rising. The clients are in need of more services. The clients are younger and suffer from



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  mental illness and substance abuse.
          Populations with special needs include the elderly and persons with physical, mental and
  developmental disabilities. Waiting lists for residential units and services for people with
  disabilities suggests the County needs additional housing and support services for this
  population. The increase in the senior population and the expected life spans suggest we need
  additional housing and services for seniors in all income categories. Additionally, we need some
  level of affordable supportive or assisted living facilities for the lower income seniors.
          The non Housing Community Development needs include transportation, affordable
  childcare, crisis intervention programs and employment opportunities. With the continued
  emphasis on “aging in place” and assisting persons with disabilities to live as independently as
  possible programs to support these initiatives will continue into the third five-year strategic plan.
  The foreign born population has increased from 6.1% in 1990 to 11.3% in 2000. Not only are
  English as a Second Language programs necessary to assist this population, but resources are
  needed to assist the foreign born to be successful in the workplace and too overcome cultural
  barriers. The Route One Corridor revitalization continues as we prepare the County’s third
  Consolidated Plan. Revitalization of the Route 40 Enhancement is also underway.


Housing and Community Development Goals
  Summary of Objectives and Outcomes

  As part of its five-year strategic plan the County has developed a set of goals that address
  housing and community needs. The goals were developed as a result of the needs assessment.
  The County’s priority for financial assistance for housing, supportive services and community
  development needs for low/moderate income residents is based on the goals. The majority of
  activities will be implemented countywide. The new Outcome Performance Measurement
  System developed by HUD has been incorporated into this plan. Objectives and Outcomes are
  also identified at the project level in the annual Action Plan.

  Affordable Housing – The objective is decent affordable housing and the anticipated outcome is
  Affordability and Availability/Accessibility

     •   Preservation and rehabilitation of existing housing stock
     •   Homeownership Assistance to include shared equity and middle income housing (work
         force) units
     •   Expansion of affordable rental housing to include middle income (work force housing)
     •   Continued support of the County’s pubic and assisted housing programs

  Homeless- The objective is suitable Living Environment and Decent Affordable Housing. The
  outcome is Availability/Accessibility and Affordability




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   •   Using a continuum of care model provide assistance to the homeless through prevention,
       outreach, assessment and supportive, transitional and permanent housing

Special Needs – The objective is suitable living environment and Decent Affordable Housing.
The outcomes will be Availability/Accessibility and Affordability.

   •   In conjunction with supportive services provide a variety of housing options to assist
       seniors to age in place and assist the disabled to live as self-sufficiently and
       independently as possible within the community

Planning and Administration – The objective is a Suitable Living Environment and the
outcomes might include Availability/Accessibility and Sustainability

   •   Affirmatively further fair housing on a regional level and through various County
       programs
   •   Manage the daily activities of the CDBG and HOME Programs and oversee the
       Consolidated Plan requirements

Crisis Intervention Programs – The objective is suitable Living Environment and the
   anticipated outcome is Availability/Accessibility.

   •   Support the enhancement and development of crisis intervention programs to assist the
       working poor and others in need
Infrastructure – The objectives are Suitable Living Environment and Creating Economic
Opportunities and the anticipated outcomes are Availability/Accessibility and Affordability

   •   Support efforts to improve transportation services to provide economic opportunities for
       low/moderate income persons and persons with disabilities
   •   Revitalization of the Route 40 Enhancement Area and continued revitalization of the
       Route 1 Corridor

Economic Development – The objective is Creating Economic Opportunities and the expected
outcome is Availability/Accessibility

   •   Create new businesses and jobs through low interest financing
   •   Provide job training and support efforts to develop employment and training programs
       and micro-enterprises for low and moderate persons, including the disabled and foreign
       born
Youth Programs – The objectives are Suitable Living Environment and Creating Economic
Opportunities.     It is anticipated that the outcomes will be Affordability and
Availability/Accessibility.




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   •   Affordable child chare
   •   Opportunities for children and youth that increase health behaviors and improve
       academic success
   •   Life skills and parenting training program
   •   Reduce the hazards to children and support the Health Departments efforts to monitor
       children with elevated blood levels of lead

Lead-based Paint Monitoring – The objectives are a Suitable Living Environment and Decent
Affordable Housing. The expected outcomes are Availability/Accessibility and Affordability.

   •   Perform assessments on residential properties that receive federal and state funds
   •   Provide information to the public on the hazards and abatement techniques

Anti-Crime Programs – The objective is a Suitable Living Environment and the anticipated
outcome is Sustainability.

   •   Continued support of anti-crime efforts
Anti-displacement and Relocation Assistance – The objective is a suitable living environment
and decent affordable housing. The anticipated outcomes are availability/accessibility and
affordability
   •   Relocation assistance for displaced persons




                                     5                          Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
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II. Introduction

Purpose of the Consolidated Plan
  Howard County has been designated an Urban County by the U.S. Department of Housing and
  Urban Development (HUD). This designation entitles the County to an annual grant of funds
  under the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program and the HOME Investment
  Partnerships (HOME). To be eligible for these funds, the County must submit a new
  Consolidated Plan at least every five years. This is the County’s third Consolidated Plan. The
  first Consolidated Plan was approved in July 1996.

  The Consolidated Plan FY2006-FY2010 is a comprehensive document that serves as a
  federally required planning document that guides community development efforts in Howard
  County for the next five years.

  In accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, 24 CFR 91, the overall goal of HUD’s
  Community Planning and Development Programs is to develop viable urban communities by
  providing decent housing, a suitable living environment and expanding economic opportunities
  principally for low- and moderate-income persons.

  The Consolidated Plan provides a single document, which represents the sole planning document
  and application for all housing and community development activities funded by federal
  entitlement programs. An approved Consolidated Plan is an application requirement for the
  CDBG and HOME programs. When the County submits its annual grant application (Annual
  Action Plan) for each of the five years covered by this plan, it must certify that the activities to
  be funded are in accordance with the priorities and strategies set forth in the Plan.

Organization and Content
  The content of this plan generally follows the Consolidated Plan regulations and guidelines
  published by HUD. New requirements of the Consolidated Plan Final Rule, effective March
  13, 2006 have been incorporate into this Consolidated Plan. Based on the data obtained in the
  collaborative planning process, the Consolidated Plan provides the strategies for reaching the
  goals identified in the Plan. Objectives and Outcomes based on HUD’s Outcome Performance
  Measurement System are also included in this Plan; both at the Goal level and at the project level
  as seen in the FFY2006 Action Plan Section of this Plan. The Howard County Department of
  Housing and Community Development is the lead agency for this plan.


The Collaborative Planning Process
  As the lead agency for the development of this plan, the Howard County Department of Housing




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and Community Development (DHCD) involved a myriad of entities that might affect or be
affected by this plan. The plan has also been guided by citizen input and the collaborative
thinking of the human service network in Howard County.

In the planning process, DHCD incorporated appropriate data from existing public plans and
documents. DHHCD has maintained a dialog with agency and department heads to secure
program specific data and recommendations regarding priority needs and gaps in service. Must
of the statistical information in the plan was compiled by the Howard County Department of
Planning and Zoning, Division of Research. The draft plan was also made available for public
comment via paper copies at the various County libraries and at the Office of Housing and
Community Development.

Use of Existing Data and Public Plans

The Consolidated Plan is one of several major public plans that determine the physical, social
and economic structure of Howard County. Listed below are descriptions of several significant
documents, recently published, that have provided guidance and background data for the
development of this plan. All plans are public documents and were developed in consultation
with persons and organizations within and outside local government. All are available from the
implementing agency identified.

       Howard County Maryland 2000 General Plan prepared for Howard County Government,
       Office of the County Executive.

       Howard County Maryland 2005 Agency Plan (PHA PLAN) prepared by the Department
       of Housing and Community Development and the Howard County Housing Commission
       and submitted to US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

       Strategic Economic Development Plan 2001 prepared by the Howard County Economic
       Development Authority (currently being updated)

       2005 Howard County Rental Survey prepared by RF&S Realty Advisors, Inc. for the
       Howard County Department of Housing and Community Development

       Howard County Human Services Master Plan 2005-2010, September 2005, prepared by
       the Association of Community Services Of Howard County for the Department of Citizen
       Services

       1999 Comprehensive Recreation, Parks and Open Space Plan prepared by the
       Department of Recreation and Parks

       Needs Assessment Report, March 24, 2004 prepared by the Institute for Community




                                    7                         Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
                                        DRAFT
          Health for the Community Action Council of Howard County

         Howard County’s Foreign-Born Community: Dimensions, Growth and Implications,
         October 2005, A Study Conducted by the Association for the Study and Development of
         Community for FIRN, Inc. and the Howard County Department of Citizen Services.
   Consultation with Public and Private Agencies

   Preparation for the Consolidated Plan began in 2003 when the Howard County Community
   Action Council, in partnership with the Howard County Department of Social Services and the
   Howard County Department of Housing and Community Development, developed the 2004
   Community Needs Assessment. The plan is the bases for the Consolidated Plan needs
   assessment. It is also used by the Community Action Council to meet planning requirements for
   the Community Services Block Grant. The process involved a Community Planning and
   Evaluation Forum, a Community Survey and an Agency Survey.

   The Public Forum was held on Saturday, November 22, 2003, and was attended by 55 persons.
   At the beginning of the public forum, the Community Development Block Grant Administrator
   provided an overview of the community’s accomplishments in addressing the needs indicated in
   the 1999 Community Needs Assessment. The attendees then formed 4 workgroups to consider
   the issues facing low-income persons in the County. The Workshop concluded with each group
   presenting their list of needs in priority order. The highest needs were affordable housing,
   transportation, and day care.

   The majority of the 118 heads of households who responded to the Community Survey indicated
   employment as their major source of income. A large number report incomes above $21,000.
   However, most indicated a need for supportive and/or crisis services to meet their basic needs.
   The survey showed that employed workers are having an increasingly difficult time achieving
   self-sufficiency. Housing, childcare and other fundamental services continue to be unaffordable
   to these families. The 14 agencies that responded to the Public Agency Survey indicated that
   emergency/crisis services was the highest need.

   In summary, the key findings collected at the public forum, and in the community survey and the
   agency survey indicates that affordable housing, accessible transportation, daycare/child care
   services and emergency/crisis services are the greatest needs in the community.

Institutional Structure
   The Howard County Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) is one of
   seventeen departments within the County reporting to the County Executive. The Housing and
   Community Development Board provides advice to the County Executive on housing policy and
   community development activities. It also recommends policy for County owned housing and
   makes recommendations for approval on County Housing and Community Development loan




                                       8                         Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
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and grant programs.

The Howard County Housing Commission is a separate legal entity that serves as a Public
Housing Authority for the purposes of developing and managing housing resources for low and
moderate-income residents. There is a close working relationship between the DHCD and the
Housing Commission, the primary public agencies responsible for developing affordable housing
options.

As the Lead Agency in developing this Consolidated Plan, DHCD will assume the responsibility
for oversight, administration and distribution of CDBG and HOME funds. Funds for supportive
services for special populations such as homeless, frail elderly and the disabled will be channeled
to the County’s Department of Citizen Services. This Department is responsible for the
disbursement and oversight of the County’s Community Services Partnership Program and can
better insure the non-duplication of funding for similar projects. The Department of Citizen
Services works closely with the human service community and is the most appropriate entity to
manage supportive services funding.




                                      9                          Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
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III. Community Profile
Location
   Howard County is located between Baltimore, MD and Washington, D.C. The County is a
   mixture of old and new, rural and urban. Ellicott City celebrated its bicentennial in 1972, four
   years before the United States; while Columbia, the metropolitan center, was carved out of
   rolling Howard County farmland only thirty years ago. The County has no incorporated towns
   or cities. The distance from Columbia, the most urban area in the




                  Regional Map

   County, to Baltimore is 22 miles and the distance from Columbia to Washington, D.C. is only 33
   miles. The neighboring jurisdictions are Baltimore County to the north and west, Anne Arundel
   County on the East, Prince George’s County on the south, Montgomery County on the south and
   west and Carroll County on the North and East.

Development Trends (from the 2000 General Plan)
   Howard County is part of a dynamic regional economy, transportation network, agricultural land
   base and natural resource system. The County is affected by regional trends and conditions that
   do not heed political boundaries. The County is influenced by the decisions of neighboring
   jurisdictions and, in turn, influences its neighbors and the region.

   After the Second World War, the counties immediately surrounding Washington and Baltimore
   saw a great surge of outward growth. Jobs followed people and soon the beltway communities




                                       10                         Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
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rivaled their downtowns as employment centers. In the mid-to-late 1970's, when the effects of
the massive growth were clearly apparent in the newly congested roads and development of
farmland, some of the counties took the first steps toward growth management. These steps took
the form of more restrictive zoning, the development of adequate public facilities ordinances
(which typically required that schools and roads have capacity to accommodate development)
and the adoption of master plans to guide growth.

Improvements to the regional highway system from the 1960's through the 1990's have been key
to the movement of population and job growth from Baltimore and Washington into the
surrounding jurisdictions. The Washington and Baltimore beltways were constructed in the
1960's. I-95 had replaced US 1 and the Baltimore/Washington parkway as the major North-
South through highway by 1970. The extension of I-270 and I-70 to Frederick created a “golden
triangle”. Those regional highway improvements meant Howard County workers could easily
commute to jobs in nearby jurisdictions. Conversely, the regional workforce had convenient
access to employment centers that were developing in Columbia and along US 1 and I-95. .

Howard County was squarely in the path of the growth from both the Baltimore and Washington
areas. When Jim Rouse envisioned and founded Columbia in 1965, he created amidst a rural
setting, a sharply defined urban place meant to absorb growth within a planned framework.
Howard County, astride these merging regions, assumed through the 1970's that Columbia would
absorb most of the growth pressures and that its rural area would be insulated from development
pressure. Nevertheless, in 1977 the County rezoned the West from one acre per dwelling unit to
three acres per dwelling unit.
The 1982 General Plan identified some areas north, south and east of Columbia for higher
density housing and expanded employment corridors along I-95, US 1, US 29 and the proposed
MD 100. In addition, the State expanded its program for highways essential to through
movement and, to a lesser extent, local growth. Thus, the MD 32 expansion, MD 100 and US 29
improvements were all approved during the 1980's. The approaches to growth management
reflected in the 1982 General Plan were inadequate in the face of the strong pressures for
development. Howard County became the development frontier of the 1980's.

The 1990 General Plan responded to the rapid growth by recommending annual housing and
employment growth targets, adequate public facilities legislation, a development monitoring
system and rural cluster and density exchange zoning in the Rural West. The 1990 General Plan
also recommended creation of several major mixed use centers to absorb growth on the largest
remaining parcels having good highway access. The Plan also established the boundary of the
Planned Service Area for public water and sewerage. This identification was strengthened by
Maryland’s 1997 Smart Growth initiatives under which most categories of State spending for
infrastructure and services must be targeted to “Priority Funding Areas” in each County.
Howard County’s Priority Funding Area is the eastern 40% of the County that lies within the
Planned Service Area for public water and sewerage.




                                    11                        Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
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  Directing growth to the Priority Funding Areas in Howard County and adjacent counties is
  important to the Statewide growth management goals articulated in the 1992 Planning Act and
  the Smart Growth Initiatives. These goals are protecting natural resources, preserving valuable
  resource and open space lands, discouraging sprawl and strengthening older communities.

  Howard County succeeded in directing most residential growth to the East. During the 1990's,
  86% of new housing was within the Planned Service Area, a proportion similar to that of other
  counties in the Baltimore region. However, during the 1990's, the proportion of units built in the
  sewerage service area gradually decreased, while the proportion of new housing built in the
  Rural West increased. Continuing growth pressures and the decreasing supply of land in eastern
  Howard County will reinforce this trend. Howard County must seek to reverse this trend by
  encouraging infill development, revitalization and development of the areas zoned for mixed-use
  development in the East, while purchasing additional preservation easements in western Howard
  County.

Population Growth
  The region’s population is increasing and becoming older and more racially diverse.
  International migration accounted for a larger share of the population growth in the more urban
  jurisdictions (Montgomery, Prince George’s and Baltimore Counties and Baltimore City), while
  domestic migration from other areas of the United States contributed to more population growth
  in the less urban jurisdictions such as Howard County. However, international migration
  continues to grow in Howard County.

  According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the population of Howard County was 187,328 in 1990,
  and 247,842 in 2000. The County grew by 60,514 residents during the decade, a 32 percent
  increase. The Baltimore Metropolitan Council of Government’s estimates that the 2005
  population of the County is 270,200, an increase of 9 percent during the last five years. The
  County’s population is expected to grow to 294,000 in 2010 and 308,900 in 2015.

  As discussed above, as the result of County growth policies, the majority of the population
  growth, between 1990 and 2000, occurred in the eastern part of the County including Columbia,
  Elkridge, Ellicott City and Laurel. Significant growth has also occurred in western Howard
  County.

Demographics
  Population by Age
  The table on the following page summarizes the age breakdown of Howard residents in 1990 and
  2000. Similar to national trends, it is apparent the baby boomers and their children make up the
  largest age cohorts in the County. The number of children aged 5 to 19 has grown significantly
  over the last 10 years and now make up more than 22 percent of the population. Small children




                                       12                         Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
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under 5 has also grown from 15,200 in 1990 to 18,248 in 2000 a 20 percent increase. This
means that schools will continue to have large enrollments and suggests a need for programs
directed at children and youth.

There has been much discussion, both nationally and locally, regarding the aging of the
population. Howard County is no exception. As indicated in the table below, baby boomers 35
to 54 year-olds make up more than 35 percent of the countywide population, almost 87,000
residents. Over the next 10 to 20 years large numbers will retire and move into the 65 plus
category. This suggests that more affordable independent housing for seniors, more
affordable assisted living facilities, personal care assistance and recreational programs for
seniors and disabled persons will be needed. Conversations with the Office on Aging also
suggest that many seniors are moving to the area to be nearer their children.




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14      Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
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Household Characteristics

The number of households in Howard County was 68,337 in 1990 and 90,043 in 2000. This is
an increase of 21,706 households or 31.8 percent during the decade. Overall household size in
Howard County has not changed since 1990 remaining at 2.71 persons per household. This
compares to a slight decrease in the Statewide average household size during the decade.

Racial and Ethnic Diversity

The 2000 Census shows that Howard County is about 74 percent White, 14 percent Black and 8
percent Asian. The overall racial diversity of the County continues to grow. In 1990, the
County was about 17 percent minority. By 2000, that percentage increased to about 25 percent.

The number of Asian and Pacific Islanders increased a significant 136 percent from 1990 to
2000, or about 11,000 people. This was followed by the Black population with a 62 percent
growth rate, or about 13,700 residents. The Hispanic population, which can be of any race, more
than doubled from 3,699 residents in 1990 to 7,490 residents in 2000. By comparison, the White
population grew by 18 percent, or 28,316 residents, less than half the total Countywide
population increase of 60,504. The table below shows the change in population and the racial
mix in Howard County in 1990 and 2000.

                                  Howard County Racial Mix1990 vs. 2000
                                           1990                    2000                 Growth
Population of One Race Alone               187,328     100.0%      242,407     97.8%
White                                      155,899      83.2%       184,215    74.3%    28,316   18.2%
Black                                       22,019      11.8%      35,730      14.4%    13,711   62.3%
American Indian & Alaska Native             402         0.2%         583        0.2%     181     45.0%
Asian & Pacific Islander                    8,098       4.3%       19,124       7.7%    11,026   136.2%
Some Other Race                             910         0.5%       2,755        1.1%    1,845    202.7%
Population of Two or More Races (1)                                5,435        2.2%

TOTAL POPULATION                           187,328     100.0%      247,842     100.0%   60,514   32.3%

Total Hispanic Population (2)              3,699       2.0%        7,490       3.0%     3,791    102%
        (1) This option was available for the first time in the 2000 Census.
        (2) Hispanic Origin can be from any race.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Income
The 2000 Census revealed that Howard County has the highest median household income in
Maryland and 10th highest in the United States. The median household income in Howard




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County reported in 2000 for the year 1999 was $74,167, 40 percent more than the $52,868
statewide median, and 77 percent more than the $44,194 United States median. In constant 1999
dollars, not counting for inflation, the median household income in Howard County increased 5.1
percent, from $70.536 as reported in the 1990 Census for 1989. These results, in addition to the
numbers of households in individual income brackets, are shown in the table and chart below.




            Household Income - Howard County, 1990 and 2000 (in 1999 constant dollars) (1)

       Household             1990                   2000                  Growth
       Income                Number     Percent     Number     Percent    Number     Percent
       Less than $10,000     1,839      2.7%        2,802      3.1%       963 138    52.4%
       $10,000 to $14,999    1,460      2.1%        1,598      1.8%       1,482      9.4%
       $15,000 to $24,999    3,112      4.5%        4,594      5.1%       1,595      47.6%
       $25,000 to $34,999    4,809      7.0%        6,404      7.1%       1,394      33.2%
       $35,000 to $49,999    9,362      13.6%       10,756     11.9%      2,901      14.9%
       $50,000 to $74,999    16,496     24.0%       19,397     21.5%      2,668      17.6%
       $75,000 to $99,999    13,153     19.2%       15,821     17.6%      4,585      20.3%
       $100,000        to    13,076     19.0%       17,661     19.6%      5,718      35.1%
       149,999 $150,000      5,351      7.8%        11,069     12.3%                 106.8%
       or more
       Total Households      68,657     100.0%      90,102     100.0%     21,445     31.2%

        Median household income $70,536             $74,167             $3,631     5.1%
  (1) Based on income reported on Census forms for the previous year (1999 and 1989).
  Source: U.S. Census Bureau




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The above chart clearly indicates that the percentage of households in the upper and lower
income brackets have increased in the County, while the percentage of those in the middle
brackets have decreased. Modest increases are seen in three of the four lowest income brackets.
There is a widening income gap in the County, with greater proportions of upper and lower
income households and a decline in the proportion of moderate-income households. Although
one of the richest counties in the nation, the County has an increasing need for housing and
services for low-and moderate- income households. The chart below clearly illustrates this
trend by showing both the absolute and percentage growth in households for each income
bracket over the ten-year period.




                                    17                        Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
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Poverty
Poverty in Howard County is relative low. An estimated 3.9 percent of all residents live in
poverty according to the 2000 Census. Despite the low rate in Howard County, there was an
increase in poverty compared to 1990, when the poverty rate was a lower 3.1 percent.

The chart on the following page illustrates the status of poverty in Howard County between 1990
and 2000. Of the 12 groups reported by the Census, the rate went up for 7 and down for 5. The
family poverty rate went up from 2.2 percent to 2.5 percent. Families with related children under
18 also went up from 2.2 percent to 2.5 percent. The greatest increase was the rate for unrelated
individuals 15 and over which went up from 8.7 percent to 11.3 percent. There was a significant
decrease for single mother households with children under 5, which dropped from a 33.2 percent
poverty rate 20.2 percent.

The figures show that the poverty picture in Howard County is mixed. There is improvement on
some fronts, particularly single mother households, yet the percentage of individuals in poverty
has increased. In all cases except one, the absolute numbers in poverty have risen.




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Employment    (formerly titled Economy )

Between 1990 and 2000, close to 54,000 jobs were created in Howard County. This represents
about a 50 percent growth rate and is an average of 5,400 new fobs per year.
About half of the Countywide jobs are located in Columbia, one quarter in the I-95 Corridor, 15
percent in Ellicott City and the remaining 10 percent in western part of the County. Over the
decade, Columbia received about 30,9000 new jobs and the I-95 Corridor had an additional
14,400 jobs. This is followed by Ellicott City and the western part of the County with about
4,800 and 3,600 new jobs, respectively. The most significant growth occurred in the Columbia
Gateway Business Park located southwest of the I-95 and MD 175 interchange. About 25
percent, or 13,300 of the total new jobs in Howard County over the decade, were located in
Columbia Gateway.




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Consistent with national trends, the greatest numbers of jobs in Howard County are service jobs.
In 2000, there were an estimated 46,300 service jobs in the County with a significant majority of
them located in Columbia. The service category includes hotels, personal and business services,
auto and other repair services, legal and engineering services, among other jobs. The extensive
industrial category includes the next greatest number with about 39,500 jobs. Most of these are
located in the I-05 Corridor. This category includes construction, transportation and public
utilities, warehousing, agricultural, forestry and mining jobs. There were about 25,300
government and institutional jobs and 24,500 retail jobs. The last two categories, manufacturing
and finance, insurance and real estate, make up the remaining jobs in the County. In 2000, there
were an estimated 13,500 manufacturing jobs and 10, 900 finance, insurance, and real estate
jobs. The chart on the following page illustrates the 2000 employment in Howard County by job
category.




                                     20                         Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
DRAFT




21      Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
                                       DRAFT
Commuting Patterns

As discussed above, Howard County’s central location as an employment center, particularly the
eastern portion of the County including Columbia and the I-95 corridor, offers ample job
opportunities for residents throughout the Baltimore-Washington region. Conversely, Howard
residents have good career opportunities not only within Howard County, but also in Baltimore
and Washington. The County’s central location has created interesting commuting patterns.

Where Howard County workers live is indicated in the 2000 Journey to work data, 119,993
persons commuted to their jobs in Howard County. Of these, about 42.7 percent (51,255) lived
in Howard County, 41.7 percent (50,057) lived in other parts of the Baltimore region and 13.2
percent (15,868) lived in the Washington region, which includes Virginia. The remaining 2.3
percent (2,813) lived in other parts of Maryland or other states. The chart below illustrates these
commuting patterns.




Howard County has the lowest percentage of residents working in their own jurisdiction than any
other County in Maryland. During the last four decades there have been more Howard County
residents commuting out of the County for work then commuting in. However, by 2000, the




                                      22                         Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
                                      DRAFT
number of net out commuters shrank. Beginning in the 1990’s, as job opportunities expanded in
the County, significantly larger number of workers commuted into the County, particularly
residents from the Baltimore region. In 2000 there were close to 9000 more workers commuting
into Howard County from the Baltimore region than there were Howard County residents
commuting to the Baltimore region. On the other hand, many more Howard County residents
commute to the Washington region than Washington region residents commuted to Howard
County. In 2000, 25,221 more Howard County residents commuted to the Washington region
than Washington region residents commuted to Howard County.

Summary
In summary, Howard County has experience large serge in growth sense 1960. This growth has
created greater racial and income diversity. The County’s central location led to the development
of Columbia and other residential developments. In the 1980’s Columbia was manly a
residential community with most residents commuting to the Baltimore region or the Washington
region to work. Beginning in the 1990’s with the creation of a large number of jobs in Columbia
and along the I-95 corridor, a larger percentage of Howard County workers both live and work in
Howard County. In addition a large number of workers are commuting into the County,
particularly from the Baltimore region. Because the largest percentage of jobs being created in
the County are service and manufacturing jobs there is an increased need for housing that is
affordable to middle income and low-and moderate-income workers. There is also a need for
additional social services for a growing and more diverse population.




                                     23                         Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
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IV. Housing Market Analysis

Background

  Howard County, Maryland is 252 square miles in area, making it the second smallest county in
  the state. It began experiencing rapid growth during the 1960's with the development of the new
  town of Columbia. As Columbia has matured over the past decade, this rate of growth has
  slowed. The county's population density has increased from 144 persons per square mile in 1960
  to 987 per square mile in 2000. Total population in the County according to the 2000 Census was
  247,842.00 and the estimated 2004 population numbers 266,738. By 2010 it is estimated that
  there will be 297,950 Howard County citizens.

  Land cost in Howard County is extremely high driving up the cost of housing. According to the
  Maryland Association of Realtors Consumer statistics for September 2005, the average cost of a
  single family home in the county was $432,661 and the median price was $379,900. The
  median price was probably a townhouse. Therefore, if the median income for Howard County
  according to the Census is $82,065 based on 2004 data, and the rule of thumb used to determine
  the amount of house a person can afford is three times the annual income, the median house is
  beyond the reach of most low and moderate-income households without some type of home
  ownership assistance.


  According to the Maryland Department of Planning, within the Baltimore Region, besides the
  relatively high totals of Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties, Howard County continued to
  expand, although at slower pace than in previous years. The nearly 2,554 jobs gain in Howard
  County in 2002 was the sixth largest in the State but was less than one-half the 5,787 gain of the
  previous year, and was the lowest increase since 1992. Just over one-half of the latest gain came
  from the growth in proprietors. Despite the recent slowdown, however, over the last five years
  jobs in Howard County grew over 29,000-fourth highest in the State. In percentage terms, its
  20.7 percent increase was the second largest in Maryland.


  The second largest increase of foreign born is in Howard County where the share of these
  residents doubled from 5.3 percent in 1990 to 11.3 percent in 2000. Howard County, which has
  the third highest concentration of foreign-born residents, also had the third highest proportion of
  residents, which speak English less than well (4.8%).


  Projections from the Maryland Department of Planning, Planning Data Services, indicate that




                                        24                         Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
                                         DRAFT
jobs in services and retail trade will continue to increase at a higher rate (2.5 % and 3.5 % per
year, respectively) while other occupations remain stable. The majority of these jobs fall within
the salary range of low to moderate income. The average entry level salary for Howard County
teachers in 2005, as per the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation, Office of
Labor Market Analysis & Information, was $48,325 or under 80% of median income. The
average salary for the director of a day care center in 2005 was $37,550, also under 80% of
median income.

Rental Housing
Howard County’s housing stock currently includes over 22,000 rental units, according to the
“2005 Howard County Rental Housing Survey,” conducted by RF&S Realty Advisors. Some of
those rental units are multifamily communities, while others are private homes available for rent.
Some units receive various forms of governmental housing subsidies while others charge what
the market will bear.

Multifamily Rental Housing

15,892 units are market-rate multifamily housing with a vacancy rate for those not undergoing
initial lease up is 3.3 percent with 465 vacant units at the time of the survey. Comparing the
number of units in this survey to the 2000 Survey, represents an increase of 1.5% in the stock of
market-rate multifamily units. The vacancy rate in the 2000 survey was 0.26% vacancy rate.
Even though the number of market-rate multifamily housing showed a slight increase, it is a very
tight rental housing market.
The table below shows the various costs for various sized market rate rental units in Howard
County.

Table 4-1 Average Rents by # of Bedrooms
Bedrooms                   % of market               Average rent            Average size (sq ft)
One-bedroom                37%                       $961                    769
Two-bedrooms               55%                       $1,167                  1022
Three-bedrooms             7%                        $1,500                  1289
Source “2005 Howard County Rental Housing Survey,” RF&S Realty Advisors.

Two bedroom units inside Columbia average rent is $1,217 ($1.18sq. ft.) while similar units
outside Columbia rent for an average of $1,111 ($1.10/sq. ft.)

The average age of a market rate multifamily rental unit in Howard County is 20 years old. In
Columbia, 70% of the market-rate units were built since 1980. Outside Columbia, more than 65
percent of the units were built before 1980. Only four percent of the market-rate multifamily




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                                         DRAFT
housing stock outside of Columbia was built since 1990. See Table 4-2.

Table 4-2. Market-rate Multifamily Units; Year of Construction
Year                 Columbia                                  Non-Columbia
1960-1969            607                  7.8%                 568               8.0%
1970-1979            1,870                24.0%                4,034             57.2%
1980-1989            3,817                49.1%                2,156             30.6%
1990-1999            1,483                19.1%                299               4.2%
2000-2005            1,495                17.6%                2,750             37.1%
Total units          7,777                100.0%               7,057             100.0%
Source “2005 Howard County Rental Housing Survey,” RF&S Realty Advisors.

Subsidized Multifamily Units

Twenty-five multifamily communities offer 2,470 housing units assisted through either federal,
state or county programs. The majority of assisted units in multifamily communities are one- or
two- bedroom units. Only 12.2 percent of the multifamily assisted units are three bedroom and
only 3 percent have four or more bedrooms. The average age of assisted multifamily units is
approximately 24 years.

One subsidized senior rental apartment buildings consisting in 100 affordable units, Park View at
Snowden River, was built in year 2004. Port Capital Apartments, 84-unit multifamily rental
building, is expected to start operations at the end of year 2006 or beginning of 2007. Tiber
Hudson will add 24 units for seniors to the affordable housing stock. North Laurel Hill Street
complex, will include 80 apartments and almost 15,000 square feet of commercial space.

In addition, two multifamily communities from the existing affordable housing stock, Hickory
Ridge Place and Hilltop Apartments, had undergone significant rehabilitation.

Moderate Income Housing Units (MIHU) and Age Restricted Units.

Under the MIHU program, new developments in several different zoning must provide 5-15% of
the total units as moderate housing.


The Development Monitoring System Report shows that as of September of 2005, the total
Moderate Income Housing Units (MIHU) in process were 587 from which the majority are
concentrated in Elkridge and the Southeast. Site development plans have been approved for




                                        26                           Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
                                      DRAFT
Waverly Woods Gardens will contribute102 MIHU/Age Restricted units at the end of 2006.
There have been signs of measurable progress in Rt.1 by the creation of zoning districts to foster
residential, retail and commercial redevelopment.


As per the county’s US 1 Corridor Revitalization Committee, more than 1000 apartment units
have been proposed along the corridor and are in various stages of review by the county as part
of the zoning permits processes.

Those developments include Elkridge Town Center, which is planned to contain 19 MIHU units
and Elkridge Crossing at the former drive-in theater, which proposes 362 apartments (56
MIHUs) and more than 122,000 square feet for commercial use.

Scattered Site Rental Housing
The survey identified 4,717 market rate rental units. The median rent of scattered site units is
$1,380. Townhouse units rent for an average of $1,392. Single-family dwellings rent for an
average of $1,563. Scattered site apartment units rent for an average $992. The average rent for
scattered site units in Columbia is $1,425 and the average rent for units outside of Columbia is
$1,418.

The vacancy rate from the study revealed that 99 market rate units were vacant for a vacancy rate
of 6.5 percent. The average tenure of scattered site units in Howard County is 2.7 years. In
Columbia it is slightly shorter at 2.2 years. Outside of Columbia the average tenure is 3.3 years.

Housing Stock Available to Special Needs Persons

The number of ADA accessible units in the County is low due to the age of the majority of the
existent stock of rental housing. Currently, the Department of Housing maintains a mainstream
housing list of 635 families with at least one member with special needs.

New affordable rental developments, mentioned on the Subsidized Multifamily Rental Units and
under the MIHU and Age Restricted section of this report, and particularly those with local, state
or federal subsidy, will contain the required percentage of ADA accessible units estimated upon
the total amount of units built.

Non-profits organizations such as Supported Living, Inc., the Arc of Howard County, and
Richcroft, Inc., contribute to serving special needs population with the creation of group homes.
Most of these group homes are single- family units acquired at low cost but with extensive need
of repairs and rehabilitation to meet the needs and safety of persons with disabilities.

These homes need to be frequently repaired, brought up to code and modified to meet the ADA
requirements. These organizations often apply for funds to help them with the rehabilitation




                                     27                         Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
                                        DRAFT
expenses. During fiscal years 2001-2005 nine group homes has been assisted with CDBG and
HOME grants.

Conclusion
Overall, this points to a very tight rental market for market rate units as well as assisted units.
According to a report released by the National Low Income Housing Coalition, Maryland is the
sixth least affordable state for rental housing in the entire Country. The gap in Maryland
between what rental housing costs and what people earn is one of the most severe in the Country.

Currently, the waiting list for Section 8 is six to eight years. The list has been closed for new
applicants since November of 2003. When an individual gets a voucher, they are thrust into this
tight housing market and many do not find a place to live during the allotted time period. This is
a major barrier in the road toward self-sufficiency for low-income families.

Funding for direct rent assistance, rehabilitation and modifications of existing rental units as well
as for to develop new rental projects is needed.




                                      28                          Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
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           29             Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
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   Home ownership
        Howard County, according to the 2000 Census, had a 73.8 percent homeownership rate. The chart below shows the percentage of
        different housing types that exist and are forecast for the County.

        Table 4-3. Housing Forecast in Howard County by Unit Type


Housing Type            Number of Units                                          Percentage of Total


                        2000                   2005         2010                 2000                  2005            2010


Single         Family 49,510                   53,690       56,960               54.4%                 54.4%           54.3%
Detached

Single         Family 18,650                   20,310       21,610               20.5%                 20.6%           20.6%
Attached

Apartment               21,050                 22,780       24,370               23.1%                 23.1%           23.2%


Mobile Homes            1,740                  1,920        2,010                1.9%                  1.9%            1.9%


Total                   90,950                 98,700       104,950              100.0%                100.0%          100.0%


        Source: Howard County General Plan, 2000.




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The 2000 General plan noted a strong trend toward single-family detached housing.
To establish a greater mix of housing in the future, the 2000 General plan set new
growth targets whereby slightly more than half of the new units would be single
family detached, almost one-third would be single family attached housing and 16%
would be apartments. Since 1990, the mix of homes built has been close to this
target; with slightly more single-family detached units and slightly less single family
attached units being built. As reported in the Development Monitoring Systems
Report, over the last five years, there has been an average of 1850 new housing
units built in the County each year. About 62% of these have been single family
detached, 19% single family attached, and 19% apartment units (including both
rental and condo).


Table 4-4 Comparison of Sales by Housing type, mean and median price.
Unit Type                  # Of Sales                Mean                  Median
10/02-9/03
Condo                      792                       $137,905              $129,000
Mobile Home                5                         $83,860               $88,900
SFA                        1943                      $203,347              $195,000
SFD                        3019                      $396,678              $373,650
Total                      5759                      $295,592
10/03-9/04
Condo                      1009                      $190,140              $170,000
Mobile Home                6                         $108,717              $ 96,000
SFA                        2339                      $252,498              $240,100
SFD                        3095                      $467,352              $435,000
Total                      6449                      $345,720
10/04-9/05
Condo                      1052                      $245,472              $232,270
Mobile Home                8                         $97,000               $76,000
SFA                        2589                      $327,308              $310,000
SFD                        3,278                     $544,994              $505,128
Total                      6927                      $417,627
Source: Development Monitoring System Report, DPZ January 2006
According to the latest data of the Maryland Association of Realtors, the average
sales price of a house in Howard County is over $432,661 and the median price is
$379,900. The opportunity to purchase this median priced house is near impossible


                                        31                        Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
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for a county citizen whose income is below 80 percent of median. The average sales
price and median sales price has risen each year. In 2001 the average sales price
was $227,105 and the median price was $192,450. The demand for bigger more
expensive housing across the region is a reflection of the economic conditions we
have experienced.
Although interest rates reached historic lows (5.38 percent for a fixed mortgage
loan on 03/19/2004) in the past three years, the tremendous increase in housing
prices continues to burden low/moderate and middle-income families.


The lack of affordable homes prevents many citizens of moderate means from
becoming homeowners. Through programs like MIHU and Share Equity, the
County has been able to ease the home buying process particularly to first time
homebuyers. However, funds to fill the gaps between the sales price and the portion
that the homebuyer can afford are needed.
Two housing lotteries, part of the Commission’s initiative to make homeownership
accessible to income eligible county residents, consist on townhouses included on
the MIHU units located in Laurel and Elkridge. The event is scheduled for the
spring of 2006.

Homebuyer Assistance is needed to allow home ownership opportunities to low
and moderate- income citizens.
With the cost of new housing rising and the attraction for developers to build larger,
more expensive single-family detached housing, we need to look at our existing
housing stock for affordable housing. The employment growth mentioned earlier
indicates a need for additional affordable housing. This need is related to the
demand to house low and moderate-income workers. To the degree that such
workers can be housed in the County, economic development prospects are
improved. By providing more affordable housing it becomes possible for residents,
children and parents, as well as teachers, fire and safety personnel to live in the
County. Opportunities are also increased to support our movement to self-
sufficiency by providing opportunities for current renters to become homeowners.


Some affordable units will be created within the major Mixed Use Districts, which
permit construction of townhouses and apartments, subject to certain limits. The
regulations require that 5% to 10% of the dwellings be affordable to households
with incomes between 50% and 80% of the median income (the normal definition
for low and moderate income).
The existing housing stock in older neighborhoods provides the major remaining
source of affordable housing. There has been a trend toward a greater ratio of rental
property to owner occupied property in given neighborhoods which often brings
deferred maintenance and neglect. Therefore there is a need for homeownership


                                     32                          Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
                                DRAFT
programs to provide affordable housing in our older neighborhoods. This not
only provides affordable housing opportunities, it revitalizes neighborhoods.


Since the majority of the County’s growth occurred with the birth of Columbia,
more than thirty years ago, the percentage of housing units, which are substandard
and cannot be rehabilitated, is low. The definition of substandard housing is one
which lacks: operable and complete plumbing facilities; electricity; a safe source of
heat; a kitchen; has been declared unfit for habitation by an agency or unit of
government; and /or is overcrowded (more than one person per room).
There are, however, a significant number of houses that can be characterized as
deteriorated. Our new owner-occupied rehabilitation program, operating since July
of 2004, has been providing loans to income eligible households for major repairs.
The program is designed to offer below market rate loans to individuals with
incomes at or below 80% of median, with deferred or amortized loan schedules.
Rebuilding Together, formerly “Christmas in April”, continues to be a vital
volunteer effort in the County. The organization has operated in the community for
the last 15 years and has rehabilitated about 30 homes a year.


The cost of rehabilitation for these houses is averaged between $15,000 and
$30,000, being the maximum dollar amount easily reached due to the conditions
presented in certain houses. With three rehabilitation contracts signed by the first
quarter of FY 2006 and three additional rehabilitation projects being considered,
based on eligibility, the department anticipates around 25 owner-occupied
rehabilitations to be performed by the end of fiscal year 2010. The older villages of
Columbia, as well as other towns, are exhibiting the signs of deterioration due to age
and lack of repairs at the appropriate times. Homeowners have not been able to
afford such repairs. Therefore, there is a need for continued assistance to
low/moderate income homeowners to rehabilitate their homes.




                                     33                          Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
                                       DRAFT
                      Housing Sales by Type from 10/03 to 10/04
           500000
           450000
           400000
           350000
           300000
           250000
           200000
           150000
           100000
            50000
                  0
                           Condo                MH                 SFA         SFD
         # of Sales         1009                   6              2339        3095
         Mean           190,140.00         108,717.00          252,498.00   467,352.00
         Median         170,000.00          96,000.00          240,100.00   435,000.00


                Source: Howard County Department of Planning & Zoning

The cost of housing in Howard County has been increasing steadily and
dramatically, from a mean sales price of $226,390 in 98/99 to $345,720 last year for
all housing types combined. This is an overall increase of 52.7 percent over a four
year time period and an average annual increase of about 11.2 percent.


According to Table 4-5 the Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS)
Housing Needs updated by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development to 2002 projections, both renter and owner households are likely to be
cost burdens of some kind. According to table 4-5, 32 percent of renters and 33
percent of owners have some kind of housing problem. Households making 50
percent of the area median income and elderly are especially cost burdened. Special
needs populations are also vulnerable. For a couple where one qualifies for SSI, the
maximum payment is $796 per month. If the household relied solely on SSI for
income for all living costs, the household would have to find a unit for no more than
$239 monthly payment based on a 30 percent housing budget. The average monthly
rent for a one bedroom is $961 (see table 4-1). Finding a housing unit would be
extremely difficult without some assistance.




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             35                Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
Table 4-5. Housing Assistance Needs of Low and Moderate Income Households 2006



Households by Type, Income, & Housing   Elderly 1 & 2   Small      Large         All    Other   Total Renters   Elderly   All    Other   Total Owners   Total
Problem                                 Member          Related    Related       Households                               Owners                        Households
                                        Households
                                                        (2 to 4)   (5 or More)
                                                                                                (E)                                      (H)
                                        (A)
                                                        (B)        (C)           (D)                            (F)       (G)                           (I)

                                        RENTERS                                                                 OWNERS

1. Very Low (0-50% MFI)                 1,599           1,882      340           1,469          5,290           1,438     1,814          3,252          8,542

2. 0 to 30% MFI                         994             944        146           785            2,869           579       792            1,371          4,240

3. % with any Housing Problem           65.8%           74.6%      69.2%         66.9%          69.2%           77.5%     84.4%          81%            72.7%

4. % with cost burden >30%              64.4%           69.8%      56.2%         65.6%          66.1%           77.5%     84.4 %         80%            70.6%

5. % with cost burden >50%              52.3%           60.9%      47.9%         67.8%          57.5%           50.8%     79%            64.4%          59.7%

6. 31 to 50 MFI                         650             898        159           573            2,280           780       678            1,458          3,738

7. % with any Housing Problem           67%             78%        71%           91%            78%             36%       27%            60%            70%

8. % with cost burden >30%              67%             78%        71%           86%            76%             35%       24%            59%            69%

9. % with cost burden >50%              43%             42%        35%           72%            49%             14%       20%            34%            43%

10. Other Low income (51-80% MFI)       759             2,118      488           1,732          5,097           1,318     2,453          3,771          8,868

11. % with any Housing Problem          74%             65%        62%           74%            69%             12%       19%            51%            61%

12. % with cost burden >30%             74%             63%        52%           74%            67%             12%       37%            49%            59%

13. % with cost burden >50%             26%             7%         5%            5%             9%              3%        17%            20%            14%

14. Moderate Income 81-95%              258             1,327      156           1,490          3,231           618       2,636          3,254          6,485

15. % with any Housing Problem          50%             31%        36%           42%            38%             20%       15%            50%            44%

16. % with cost burden >30%             50%             28%        25%           40%            35%             20%       29%            49%            42%

17. % with cost burden >50%             9%              0%         0%            0%             0%              2%        4%             6%             4%

18. Total Households                    3,269           11,946     1,622         10,181         27,018          7,709     58,728         66,437         93,455

19. % with Housing Problems             59%             29%        41%           32%            34%             19%       33%            21%            25%




                                                          36                           Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
   Conclusion

      •   Property values have made it very difficult for a family whose income is 80% of median or lower
          to purchase a home. Therefore, Home Ownership assistance programs are needed.
      •   Developers are more likely to build larger, more expensive housing, limiting the availability of
          new affordable housing being constructed. Many of our older neighborhoods, particularly those
          in Columbia, have high ratios of rental property, which brings deferred maintenance and neglect.
          Therefore, there is a need for Home Ownership Programs targeted at older neighborhoods to
          provide affordable housing as well as neighborhood revitalization.
      •   For owner occupied houses in older neighborhoods, rehabilitation may be necessary, but may be
          out of reach for many low to moderate-income homeowners. Therefore, there is a need for
          rehabilitation assistance for these homeowners.
      •   A review of the estimate job growth chart (see Table 3-5) shows in the year 2010, 198,200 jobs
          will be available in Howard County. The majority of these jobs will be in the Service and Retail
          trade sectors, which typically are lower paying. These are our teachers, police, fire and safety
          persons who need a place to live. Yet, the rental housing market is very tight and does not
          expect to ease in the near future and increased housing is expected to be for the higher end
          market and not the needed affordable housing. This again forces us to the existing housing stock
          for our affordable housing.
Assisted Housing
   The rental assistance program for Howard County consists of Federal Public Housing, Section 8 and
   several scattered site opportunities around the County. The populations served are income eligible
   families, individuals, seniors and disabled citizens. Howard County Housing Commission administers
   the Public Housing and the Section 8 Housing Program.

   The Section 8 program allows income eligible households to locate their own housing in the private
   rental market and use the voucher to assist with that portion of the rent, which exceeds 30 percent (or in
   some cases 40 percent) of their household income. HUD has currently authorized 804 vouchers; 43
   under the CHAP program. As of December 2005, a total of 847 vouchers/certificates were available and
   100% of the vouchers available were under lease.

   The success and usage of the Section 8 program depends in large part on the availability of households
   to locate adequate rentals and on the participation of private landlords in older housing developments.
   Very little newer, non-luxury rental housing has been built in the County in the past fifteen years,
   making it difficult for clients to locate decent housing which is also affordable.

   There have been several mobile home parks closings during the last few years. These closings have
   severely affected the availability of affordable housing in the county. It is anticipated that the closing of
   the Aladdin Mobile Home Park, located on Rt.1, will cause the displacement of 235 households. In
   addition, 40 more mobile homes will be eliminated as the result of the Beechcrest Mobile Home Estates
   closing. The owner is planning to replace the mobile home park with a development of up to 81
   apartments from which 20% would be reserved for moderately priced housing. At least 75% of the total
   households, based on prior mobile home parks closing experiences, will need relocation assistance or
   some kind of rental assistance.


                                                   37                      Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
  According to the 2005 Howard County Rental Housing Survey, there are 2,156 assisted multifamily
  units available. Selborne House at Dorsey Hall and Park- view at Snowden River has added 220
  subsidized affordable units for income eligible seniors. Additionally, between the County and the
  Commission there are 300 scattered units. Some of these are set-aside units for the elderly and/or
  disabled. This amounts to a public/private total of 2,676.00 assisted units available.

  As of February 2006, there were 2901 households on Howard County’s combined waiting list. All
  applicants for housing in Howard County are placed on this combined list. If there application indicates
  they are qualified for another program they are listed on that program as well. The racial breakdown of
  this list is 47 Native Americans, 58 Asian Americans, 1155 African Americans, 415 White and 3 Native
  Hawaiian/Pacific Island.

  Of some concern are the expiring rental subsidy contracts. Older assisted housing projects may become
  eligible for conversion to market rate housing in the future. While the State of Maryland is responsible
  for monitoring the status of Federal and State assisted projects, a clearer process for communicating with
  the State to monitor these projects is required for the County to determine an appropriate and timely
  response to a conversion proposal.




V. Housing, Homeless and Special Needs

  HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT NEEDS
  Cost of Housing

  Over the last several years, housing prices have rapidly increased in Howard County and across the
  Baltimore/Washington region. The increase is not unique to this area alone, as prices in most
  metropolitan areas across the country have also escalated. Most of the increase has occurred since 2000.
  There are many reasons for the sharp jump in prices including job growth in the area and constraints on
  housing supply. The subject of housing affordable housing is a complex issue with many variables.
  Housing issues affect various income levels differently. Housing affordability has become more of a
  problem for the average resident seeking to buy or rent, and in most cases impossible for low -and
  moderate-income residents.

  Another group affected by the shortage of affordable housing are elderly persons over 55. This group is
  expected to dramatically increase as baby-boomers retire. Another concern is the ongoing displacement
  of low –and moderate – income households located in mobile home parks in the Route 1 corridor. As the
  County moves to revitalize the area and property values increase, several parks have closed and others
  will close in the near future.




                                                 38                     Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
In 2005, the average monthly rent for a two-bedroom apartment in the County was $1,167, and the
average selling price of a single-family house was $432,662 (Source: 2005 Howard County Rental
Survey/Maryland Association of Realtors). There have been large deceases in the number and
percentages of homes selling between $50,000 and 200,000. There are not enough affordable units for
average working families: those who are employed in occupations such as policeman, firefighter,
teacher, nurse, child-care worker, health aide, and cooks.

A recent report by the Howard County Department of Planning has determined that in 2005, the typical
first time homebuyer in Howard County (income 50 percent of medium) could only afford a home
priced 37 percent below the median priced home available to first time buyers, or $168,683. In January
2006, there were four listings for homes for sale under 168,683 in Howard County. They were all one
bedroom and one-bath condominiums. Despite record low mortgage rates and continued increases in
household income, sharply increasing housing prices have resulted in a decline in affordability.
Montgomery and Howard Counties have experienced the greatest decline in affordability than other
jurisdictions in the region. (Source: Housing Affordability in Howard County and Central Maryland,
Howard County Department of Planning and Zoning, Research Report 14, August 2005).

The National Low Income Housing Coalition has estimated the affordability of rental housing for
Howard County in 2005. The Fair Market Rent (FMR) in Howard County for a two-bedroom apartment
was $950 in 2005. To afford this rent and utilities, without paying more than 30% of income on housing
(HUD considers a unit affordable if it costs no more than 30% of the renter’s income), a household
needs to earn $3,167 monthly or

$38,000 annually. Assuming a 40-hour workweek, 52 weeks per year, this level of income translates
into $18,27 per hour.

The estimated average (mean) wage for a renter was $13.17 in 2005. In order to afford a two-bedroom
apartment at this wage, a renter would have had to work 55 hours per week, 52 weeks per year. It is
estimated that a minimum wage worker in Howard County earned $5.15 an hour in 2005. In order to
afford a two-bedroom apartment at this wage, a renter would have had to work 142 hours per week, 52
weeks per year. (Source: Out of Reach 2005 – Howard County, National Low Income Housing
Coalition, January 2006.)

The discussion above illustrates the problems of housing affordability in Howard County particularly for
low –and moderate – income residents. Housing affordability has become a major issue in Howard
County, the region, and across the country. In Howard County there has been much discussion
concerning slowing growth and the need to expand the supply of affordable housing including
expanding the County’s Moderate Income Housing Unit Program (MIHU).

In order to illustrate housing affordability for all jurisdictions in the Country, HUD has developed the
Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS) data to estimate the housing needs of low –and
moderate-income persons. However, this information is from income and housing data from the 2000
Census. As discussed above, Howard County has experience a large increase in housing prices between
2000 and 2005. This means that the housing needs of low –and moderate - income persons are much
greater today than the CHAS data for Howard County suggests.




                                              39                     Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
Table 2A below attempts to estimate the housing needs of low –and moderate – income persons in
Howard County and assigns housing priorities and goals that the County expects to provide over the
next five years. The Total Need estimates are from the 2000 CHAS data.

The 2000 CHAS data indicates that black and Hispanic households have a disproportionately greater
housing need in comparison to white non-Hispanic households. The black non-Hispanic need was about
10 percent above the white non-Hispanic need: 63 percent of low-income households (50 to 80 percent
of medium) and 83 percent of very low –income households (below 50 percent of medium) were
experience housing problems. Although the number of Hispanic households was much smaller, their
need was much greater: 71 percent of low-income households and 98 percent of very low-income
households were experiencing housing problems.

The 2000 Housing Census for Howard County provides information on occupants per room. This
information can be used as an indication of overcrowded housing conditions. Of the estimated 90,043
housing units in Howard County in 2000, only 2,064 or 2.1 percent had 1.01 or more occupants per
room. Overcrowding does not appear to be a major problem in the County.



In addition, the 2000 Housing Census indicates that only 240 units lack complete plumbing facilities and
401 lack complete kitchen facilities. The CHAS data indicates a high percentage of renters and owners,
particularly low and moderate income households, have some type of housing problem including cost
burden, overcrowding and/or without complete kitchen or plumbing facilities. The data also indicates
that most of these high percentages are due to cost burden as discussed above. Substandard housing is
not a major problem in the County.

Howard County does not have any Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Areas therefore it has not
adopted definitions for “standard” or “substandard conditions but suitable for rehabilitation” for such
areas. To be eligible for the County’s various housing rehabilitation programs, the property must meet
at least one of the following criteria: 1. The failure or danger of failure of one or more major systems; 2.
Systems that do not meet current Howard County codes or standards; 3. The existence of conditions that
constitute health or safety hazards; and 4. The need for modifications to accommodate the needs of
occupants with disabilities. It is the goal of these rehabilitation programs to bring the unit up to the
Section 8 Housing Quality Standards, meet the County’s building and Housing Rehabilitation codes, and
meet ANSI standards for handicapped accessibility.


Community Development Needs

Table 2B attempts to estimate the community development needs of the County. The County position is
not to use Community Development Block Grant funds for Capital Fund projects like infrastructure, etc.
The County does provide some CDBG funds for youth programs and economic development that
provide a direct benefit to low and moderate-income citizens. However, they are only a small percentage
of the County funds allocated to these programs.




                                                40                      Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
                                        Table 2A
                             Priority Needs Summary Table
PRIORITY                                   Priority Need
HOUSING NEEDS                                  Level        Unmet    Goals
(households)                            High, Medium, Low   Need
                                        0-30%       M        944       48

                        Small Related   31-50%      M        938      305

                                        51-80%       L      1955      131

                                        0-30%       M        146        4

                        Large Related   31-50%      M        194        8

                                        51-80%       L       415       12
Renter
                                        0-30%       H        994       90

                           Elderly      31-50%      M        605      117

                                        51-80%      M        440      120

                                        0-30%       M        785       19

                          All Other     31-50%       L       684       5

                                        51-80%       L      1785        2

                                        0-30%       H       1371        5

Owner                                   31-50%      M       1881       14

                                        51-80%      M       5212      130

  Special Populations                   0-80%       M         -        30

     Total Goals                                                     1040

   Total 215 Goals                                                     -




                                        41                  Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
Definitions

High Priority: Activities to address this need will be funded by the locality with federal funds, either
alone or in conjunction with the investment of other public or private funds during the period of time
designated by this plan.
Medium Priority: If funds are available, activities to address this need may be funded by the locality
with either federal funds, either alone or in conjunction with the investment of other public or private
funds during the period of time designated by this plan.
Low Priority: The locality will not fund activities to address this need during the period of time
designated by this plan. The locality will consider certifications of consistency for other entities’
applications for Federal assistance.
Section 215 Affordable Housing:
Rental Housing: A rental housing unit is considered to be an affordable housing unit if it is occupied by
an extremely low-income, low-income or moderate-income family or individual and bears a rent that is
the lesser of (1) the existing Section 8 Fair Market Rent for comparable units in the area or, (2) 30
percent of the adjusted income of a family whose income equals 65 percent or the median income for the
area, except that HUD may establish income ceilings higher or lower than 65 percent of the median
income because of prevailing levels of construction costs or fair market rents, or unusually high or low
family incomes.
Homeownership: Housing that is for purchase (with or without rehabilitation) qualifies as affordable
housing if it (1) is purchased by an extremely low-income, low-income or moderate-income first-time
homebuyer who will make the housing his or her principal residence; and (2) has a sale price that does
not exceed the mortgage limit for the type of single family housing for the area under HUD’s single
family insuring authority under the National Housing Act.
Table 5-2 attempts to estimate the dollars to be spent on community development activities. The
County’s position is not to use Community Development Block Grant Funds for Capital Fund Projects
like infrastructure, etc. The County intends to use its funds for direct benefit for low and moderate-
income citizens.




                                              42                      Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
TABLE 2B PRIORITY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT NEEDS


        PRIORITY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT NEEDS                                   Estimated
                                                                               Dollars to
                                                                                Address
 PUBLIC FACILITY NEEDS                                                       $105,200,000
 INFRASTRUCTURE                                                              $365,500,000
 PUBLIC SERVICE NEEDS                                                        $ 24,200,000
 ANTI-CRIME PROGRAMS                                                         $   3,400,000
 YOUTH PROGRAMS                                                              $ 11,800,000
 SENIOR PROGRAMS                                                             $   6,500,000
 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT                                                        $    800,000
 PLANNING                                                                    $ 11,200,000
 TOTAL ESTIMATED DOLLARS NEEDED:                                             $528,600,000




Barriers to Affordable Housing


The main barriers to affordable housing are (1) availability of land, (2) cost of land and (3) the
opposition to “affordable” housing. The latest Comprehensive Zoning, approved in 1993, allows about
121,010 housing units to be built. Of this total, 88,950 units have already been built, leaving
approximately 32,000 still to be built. However, more than 40 percent of the remaining units are
already committed to development, leaving only about 17,980 additional units to be built. (See chart
below.) Of these, 5,320 can be built in the West and 12,660 can be built in the East. Although no major
zoning changes are expected in the West, changes could occur in the Eastern part of the County, in areas
such as Columbia’s Town Center and along the Route 1 corridor.
The cost of land housing in Howard County has increased steadily and dramatically in recent years. The
mean price of all housing increased form $226,390 in 1999 to $345,720 in 1994. This is a 52.7 percent
increase over the four-year period, and an average annual increase of 11.2 percent. Prices have
continued to increase in 2005. Single-family detached units have increased the most, but Single-family
attached and condominium units have all increased dramatically.
Opposition to additional development is increasing particularly in the Western part of the County.
Concerns about traffic and general NIMBY (not in my backyard) attitudes are being heard.




                                              43                     Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
                                Figure 5-1 Dwelling Units

                                                              Comm itted Units


                                                                     Fut ure Units




                                  Exis ting Dwelli ng Units




(Source: Development Monitoring Systems Report, Howard County Department of Planning and
Zoning, January 2005.)



Poverty in Howard County


Poverty in Howard County is relatively low. An estimated 9,491 residents, or 3.9 percent of all
residents, live in poverty according to the 2000 Census. This compares to 8.5 percent of all residents in
the State of Maryland. Despite the low rate in Howard County, there was an increase in poverty
compared to 1990, when the poverty rate was a lower 3.1 percent. Poverty rates have also increased in
the State of Maryland, but have slightly decreased n the United States.
The graph below illustrates the status of poverty in Howard County between 1990 and 2000. Of the 12
groups reported by the Census, the rate went up for 7 and down for 5. The family poverty rate went up
from 2.2 percent to 2.5 percent. Families with related children under 18 also went up from 2.2 percent
to 2.5 percent. The greatest increase was the rate for unrelated individuals 15 and over which went up
from 8.7 percent to 11.3 percent. There was a significant decrease for single mother households with
children under 5, which dropped from a 33.2 percent poverty rate 20.2 percent.




                                                  44                                 Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
(Source: 2000 Census – Profile of Selected Social, Economic and Housing Characteristics, Howard
County Department of Planning and Zoning, Research Report 7, August 2002)

The figures show that the poverty picture in Howard County is mixed. There is improvement on some
fronts, particularly single mother households, yet the percentage of individuals in poverty has increased.
In all cases except one, the absolute numbers in poverty have risen. Reducing the poverty rate in
Howard County and the State will largely be based on national economic policies and the availability of
Federal funding for social programs.
The excellent job market in Howard County and Maryland during the last decade, along with increased
social services such as childcare has probably been responsible for the significant decrease for single
mother households. The same factor, the excellent job market, has probable been responsible for the
increase in the rate for unrelated individuals. Large numbers of immigrants and other individuals have
moved to the area to fill low paying construction and service jobs. Because of the temporary nature of
many of these jobs and the high cost of housing and other living expenses, many of these individuals
have not been able to rise out of poverty.
Howard County has an abundance of services available to all low-income residents. These services
include a wide variety of help including: eviction prevention, counseling, first months rent, food stamps,
medical assistance, job training, education, transportation assistance and child care assistance.


                                               45                     Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
  The Department of Social Services (DSS) Temporary Cash Assistance (TCA) program provides
  temporary cash assistance including food stamps. Caseloads have dropped significantly in recent years.
  The average monthly Temporarily Cash Assistance (TCA) caseload has dropped form 1,593 in State
  Fiscal Year (SFY) 1990 to 690 in (SFY) 1994.             It should be noted that the State welfare program
  (AFDC) was eliminated in October 1996 and replaced with the Temporary Cash Assistance (TCA)
  program.
  The Department provides those qualifying for the TCA program with a wide variety of other services
  including medical assistance, job search assistance including resume preparation, job banks and
  interviewing practice and transportation while on the job search. In conjunction with the CDBG
  program, transportation is provided for up to a five weeks once a new job is obtained so the individual
  can be employed while finding alternative transportation.
  The Community Action Council (CAC) provides grants, in the form of eviction prevention assistance, to
  income eligible households facing the loss of their housing. Additionally, they have funds to provide
  emergency cash assistance to those who are in danger of utility turn-offs and provide a means of
  overcoming utility debt preventing a household from getting utilities when they move into a new
  location. Counseling services are also provided to assist income eligible customers with information
  and referral necessary to overcome obstacles in the way to self-sufficiency. CAC also has funds
  available to help with the first month’s rent to help those who have found housing but are having
  difficulty with the security deposit plus the first month’s rent.
  Job training is also provided through Employment and Training as well as a Job Training program
  sponsored through The Howard Community College Educational Foundation funded by the CDBG
  program.
  Child Care is available through the Howard Community College Educational Foundation for income
  eligible students while they participate in curricula that will lead to a new job. Purchases of Care
  vouchers are also available for DSS Customers to assist with childcare expenses.
  The County transit system, known as Howard Transit, has recently restructured and coordinated transit
  services in the County to better serve client needs. The restructured system has a fixed route bus service
  operating in the more populated portions of the County, including Columbia, Ellicott City, Dorsey,
  Savage and North Laurel. The system also includes a by request curb-to-curb Para-transit service which
  serves the clients of various County social service programs for the elderly, low income and disabled
  which meets the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The County has also instituted a morning and
  evening peak period shuttle bus operation, known as Spirit Shuttle, that provides free bus service
  between the MARC rail system and employment sites in the I-95/US 1 corridor and Western Anne
  Arundel County.
  Housing for those living in poverty and other income eligible citizens is essential for family
  stabilization. Without the basic shelter, all the support programs discussed above will not be given an
  opportunity to work. The County Housing assistance programs are described in the Housing Market
  Analysis, Chapter IV.

Homeless Needs

  Continuum of Care Planning Process

  Howard County, Maryland has a well-coordinated Continuum of Care process, having no obvious
  overlapping or duplicative efforts. The Local Board on Homelessness is the recognized entity for
  carrying out the County’s Continuum of Care planning process. Now in its 15th year of existence, the


                                                 46                     Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
Board continues to add to its infrastructure of service providers, mainstream resource providers that
serve the homeless, local, state and quasi-government representatives, community advocates, faith based
organizations and persons who are currently or formerly homeless

The Board operates as an independent, multi-agency collaborative and is recognized and supported
locally by Howard County Government, the non-profit community and the general citizenry. The Board
structure includes a Chair, Vice-Chair, and Secretary. For all regular monthly meetings, the Board
follows a formal agenda, prepares and distributes meeting minutes and recognizes Roberts Rules of
Order for governance guidance.

The Local Board on Homelessness utilizes the experience and expertise of seven working committees
that meet outside of the monthly meetings to further refine, implement and evaluate the Continuum’s
goals. The efforts of these committees help to minimize and eliminate the possibility of duplicative
services within the Continuum. The committees are:

   •   Grant Review Committee - responsible for reviewing and prioritizing funding requests for
       homeless grants. The Grant Review Committee typically meets three to four times annually and
       spends a considerable amount of time assessing the performance of agencies that have requested
       both initial and renewal grant funds.
   •   Homeless Survey Committee - responsible for planning, developing, and carrying out the
       County’s Point in Time Shelter and Street Survey. In addition to its work with the Point-in-Time
       Survey, this committee also works to raise public awareness of homelessness by developing and
       distributing a pre-survey letter to area businesses and agencies informing them of the street and
       shelter count date and who will be included in the count.
   •   Landlord/Tenant Committee - tasked with educating landlords and tenants about programs and
       services available in Howard County to prevent evictions. The role of this committee will
       expand to include assistance with the ongoing development and evaluation of the prevention
       element of the Continuum.
   •   Mainstream Resources Committee - responsible for assisting service providers in accessing
       mainstream resources for homeless individuals and families. Members will work closely with
       the HMIS Users Group in the on-going implementation of the homeless management
       information system to ensure the integration of mainstream resources.
   •   Policy Development Committee - tasked with developing the Board’s goals and action steps to
       carry out the goals. It is also responsible for collaborating with Howard County Government in
       the development and implementation of a Ten Year Plan to End Chronic Homelessness
   •   Public Awareness Committee - responsible for Homeless Month Activities (in February of each
       year) and for generating publicity on homeless issues.
   •   HMIS Users Group – With the advent of HMIS, this group has been newly formed and now
       functions as a workgroup comprised of local ServicePoint users and System Administrators who
       will assist the County in its efforts to refine and expand its usage of a Homeless Management
       Information System. The workgroup attends regular trainings, participates in local and state
       policy discussions and represents Howard County’s Continuum at statewide meetings.




                                              47                     Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
       At the core of the Continuum lies a basic planning process:

           •   Identifying the needs of homeless individuals and families;
           •   Determining gaps in the service delivery system;
           •   Developing strategies to fill identified gaps;
           •   Setting priorities for local, state, and federal funding resources;
           •   Reviewing and assessing the Continuum’s goals; and
           •   Strengthening the relationship between the Local Board on Homelessness and providers of
               mainstream resources to ensure homeless persons are connected to appropriate services as
               they move through the Continuum.

       As the lead entity for the Continuum of Care planning process, the Department of Citizen Services
       works closely with the Local Board on Homelessness and is the primary provider of direct technical
       assistance and staff support in the implementation of the Continuum’s goals. The agency administers
       the funding for homeless projects including funding received through the Community Development
       Block Grant Program, managed by the Department of Housing and Community Development.
       Additionally, the Grants Officer of the Department of Citizen Services works with community
       development staff on program design and monitoring of programs which directly support the County’s
       Continuum. Both County departments work closely with local service providers and the Local Board on
       Homelessness to plan and carryout programs serving the needs of County residents who are homeless or
       at risk of homelessness.


       Homeless Strategy

       Howard County’s strategy to end chronic homelessness by 2012 includes:

       •   Increasing the number of supportive housing program units for chronically homeless;
       •   Increasing mental health and substance abuse services to the chronically homeless;
       •   Strengthening the capacity of the County’s nonprofit service providers;
       •   Providing outreach to the chronically homeless; and
       •   Connecting the chronically homeless to mainstream resources.

While continuing to plan, develop, and implement programs to serve the chronically homeless, the Continuum
must work within the reality of the community. Howard County is an affluent suburban County. Residents are
highly educated and enjoy a high standard of living. They are aggressive in their advocacy to fight what they
perceive as “low income housing,” whether it is for seniors, the moderate-income wage earner, residents who
are economically disadvantaged, or homeless individuals and families. The Continuum has worked diligently to
influence the public’s perception of the issues surrounding the County’s less fortunate residents. With extensive
media exposure and strong support for the cold weather shelter by the faith based community, local builders,
and hundreds of community volunteers, the tide seem to be turning. Nonetheless, the Local Board on
Homelessness and the County recognizes that public resistance to new projects will be strong. Therefore, the
Continuum is placing a priority on the following:

   •   Increasing the number of supportive housing units for chronically homeless by applying for
       additional HUD funds and creating deeper financial leveraging partnerships with other local agencies


                                                      48                     Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
    who serve the same population. In FFY 04, the Continuum was awarded funding for three additional
    units for chronically homeless.
•   Developing stable permanent housing options for individuals who are mentally ill by working with
    Mainstream Housing to increase the availability of units for chronically homeless.
•   Increasing substance abuse services by working with the recently hired Director of Substance Abuse
    Services to provide assistance in the development of a full continuum of care for all county residents
    suffering from substance abuse, including individuals who are chronically homeless.
•   Implementing Centralized Intake that provides prompt and thorough assessments for individuals in
    need of substance abuse treatment with referrals to the appropriate level of care.
•   Working with the United Way of Central Maryland Project Lift campaign to increase the number of
    physicians in Howard County approved to describe bubprenorphine, which expands treatment
    options for individuals who are chronically homeless or at risk of homelessness.
•   Increasing PATH funds to provide additional outreach and support to chronically homeless. (The
    Mental Health Authority and Grassroots have been successful in increasing PATH in 2002, 2003, and
    2004.)
•   Strengthening the capacity of the County’s nonprofit service providers to serve the chronically
    homeless by advocating for increased funding of the Community Services Partnership Program, the
    County’s general fund grant program, which provides essential funding for core services provided by 30
    health and human service agencies in Howard County and by providing for more targeted technical
    assistance to improve the effectiveness of service delivery.
•   Connecting the chronically homeless to mainstream resources by providing consistent and continual
    training to direct service workers on expediently accessing mainstream resources.
•   Expanding the use of Howard County’s HMIS to include non-housing service providers. This will
    increase both the quantity and quality of data and minimize the occurrence of duplicated
    information regarding the area’s homeless population.
•   Integrating local planning efforts, i.e., development of Howard County’s Human Services Master Plan
    and Consolidated Plan for 2006-2011, with statewide initiatives. The Continuum works closely with
    the Maryland Office of Transitional Services on issues impacting the homeless. Maryland’s Interagency
    Council on Homelessness was created in June 2002 and has as its mission “to make homelessness rare
    and brief.” Its current action plan encompasses three areas: housing, income, and health/supportive
    services. The Council’s scope and mission parallel that of Howard County’s Continuum.
                                                     Current         Under             Unmet
                                                    Inventory Development Need/ Gap
    Individuals

              Emergency Shelter                 20            0                10
    Beds      Transitional Housing              0             0                10
              Permanent Supportive Housing      31            3                15
              Total                             51            3                35
    Persons in Families with Children

              Emergency Shelter                 42            0                10
    Beds      Transitional Housing              88            0                50
              Permanent Supportive Housing      22            0                10
              Total                             152           0                70



                                                 49                     Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
FY2005 Howard County Consolidated Plan
Table 1A
Continuum of Care: Housing Gap Analysis Chart

Continuum of Care Homeless Population and Subpopulations Chart

Part 1: Homeless Population          Sheltered                    Unsheltered     Total
                                     Emergency     Transitional
1. Homeless Individuals              38 (N)        0 (N)          15 (N)          53 (N)

2. Homeless Families with            13 (N)        20 (N)         3 (N)           38 (N)
Children

 2a. Persons in Homeless Families    44 (N)        71 (N)         14 (N)          129 (N)
     with Children
                                     82 (N)        71 (N)         29 (N)          182 (N)
Total (lines 1 + 2a only)
Part 2: Homeless                     Sheltered                    Unsheltered     Total
Subpopulations

1.   Chronically Homeless            13                           3               16
2.   Severely Mentally Ill           16                           *
3.   Chronic Substance Abuse         23                           *               23
4.   Veterans                        5                            *               5
5.   Persons with HIV/AIDS           1                            1               2
6.   Victims of Domestic Violence    9                            *               9
7.   Youth (Under 18 years of age)   0                            *               0




                                              50                      Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
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             51           Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
                                                                  Inventory of Homeless Facilities

                                                    Fundamental Components in CoC System - Housing Activity Chart
EMERGENCY SHELTER
                                                                 HMIS                          Target Pop.            2005 Year-Round Units/Beds                 2005 Other Beds
                                                                  Number of                                                                         Total          Over-
                                                         Part.                      Geo Code
         Provider Name                Facility Name              Year-Round                                     Family       Family      Individual Year-          flow/
                                                         Code       Beds                          A     B        Units        Beds         Beds     Round Seasonal Voucher
Current Inventory                                                 Ind.       Fam.
Domestic Violence Center of
Howard County                        Safehouse          Z                             249027 SF       DV                                          8          8
Grassroots Crisis Intervention
Center                               Family Shelter     S                      23     249027 FC                                     42                      42         25
Grassroots Crisis Intervention       Randy Sands
Center                               Men's Shelter      A               12            249027 SM                                                  12         12

                                                   TOTALS      12    23                         TOTALS                              42           20         62         25
                                                         Anticipated
Under Development                                      Occupancy Date
None - N/A




                                                                                                TOTALS

Unmet Need                                                                                      TOTALS                              10           10         20

1. Total Year-Round Individual ES Beds                                                    20          4. Total Year-Round Family ES Beds                                        42
2. Year-Round Individual ES Beds in HMIS                                                  12          5. Family ES Beds in HMIS                                                 23
3. HMIS Coverage Individual ES Beds                                                     60%           6. HMIS Coverage Family ES Beds                                         55%
(Divide line 2 by line 1 and multiply by 100. Round to whole number.)                                 (Divide line 5 by line 4 and multiply by 100. Round to whole number.)




                                                                 52                            Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
                                             Fundamental Components in CoC System- Housing Activity Chart
Transitional Housing
                                                       HMIS                         Target Pop                    2005 Year-Round Units/Beds
                                               Part.
   Provider Name          Facility Name                 #Yr. Round Geo Code                             Family        Family Individual Total Year-
                                               Code
                                                                                    A         B          Units         Beds    Beds     Round Beds
Current Inventory                                        Ind    Fam
Congregations
Concerned for the
Homeless                Scattered            A                     54   249027 FC                                            54                             54
St. John's Catholic     Transitional
Church                  Housing              N                          249027 FC                                             9                                 9
Baptist Family &        Transitional
Children's Services     Housing              N                          249027 FC                                             4                                 4
Domestic Violence
Center of Howard
County                  Scattered            Z                          249027 DV                                            21                             21




                                          TOTALS       0 54                         TOTALS                                   88             0               88
                                               Anticipated
Under Development                            Occupancy Date
None




                                                                                    TOTALS

Unmet Need                                                                          TOTALS                                   50           10                60

1. Total Year Round Individual TH Beds                 o                                 4. Total Year Round Family TH Beds
2. Individual TH Beds in HMIS                          o                                 5. Family TH Beds in HMIS
3. HMIS Coverage Individual TH Beds                                         0            6. HMIS Coverage Family TH Beds
(Divide line 2 by line 1 and multiply by 100. Round to whole number)                     (Divide line 5 by line 4 and multiply by 100. Round to whole number)

                                                                  53                          Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
                                         Fundamental Components in CoC System - Housing Activity Chart
Permanent Supportive Housing

                                                   HMIS                            Target Pop                   2005 Year-Round Units/Beds
                                            Part.
   Provider Name          Facility Name           #Yr. Round           Geo                            Family        Family      Individual Total Year-
                                            Code
                                                                       Code        A        B          Units         Beds       /CH Beds Round Beds
Current Inventory                                    Ind    Fam
                        Housing for
                        Homeless with
Howard County,          Disabilities                                          SM/SF/F
Maryland                (Scattered)         S           5      5       249027 C                                            22 21/5CH                     43
Howard County
Mental Health           Shelter Plus Care
Authority               (Scattered)       A            10              249027 SM                                                10/0CH                   10




                                      TOTALS      15    5                          TOTALS                                  22      31/5CH                53
                                            Anticipated
Under Development                         Occupancy Date

                        Permanent
Howard County,          Housing Chronic
Maryland                Homeless                   Oct-05
                                                                                                                                          3




                                                                                   TOTALS                                             3CH

Unmet Need                                                                         TOTALS                                  10    15/10CH

1. Total Year Round Individual PSH Beds                                    31           4. Total Year Round Family PSH Beds
2. Individual PSH Beds in HMIS                                             15           5. Family PSH Beds in HMIS
3. HMIS Coverage Individual PSH Beds                                     48%            6. HMIS Coverage Family PSH Beds
(Divide line 2 by line 1 and multiply by 100. Round to whole number)                    (Divide line 5 by line 4 and multiply by 100. Round to whole number)


                                                             54                              Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
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     55           Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
Fundamental Components in CoC System - Service Activity Chart
Component: Prevention (Actions taken to prevent homelessness)

Services in Place:

General Prevention Programs:

    •   Emergency Assistance for Families with Children – Community Action Council
    •   Family Preservation Services – Howard County Department of Social Services
    •   Homeless Prevention Program (HPP) – Community Action Council
    •   Temporary Cash Assistance – Howard County Department of Social Services
    •   Service Linked Housing Program – Community Action Council
    •   Transitional Emergency Medical and Housing Assistance – Howard County Department
        of Social Services

Rental/Mortgage Assistance:

    •   Eviction Prevention/First Month’s Rent – Community Action Council, Salvation Army,
        FISH of Howard County, Churches
    •   Rental Allowance Program – Community Action Council
    •   Financial Assistance for Home Purchases – Howard County Department of Housing and
        Community Development

Utilities:

    •   Electric Universal Service Program– Community Action Council
    •   Fuel Fund – Community Action Council
    •   Maryland Energy Assistance Program – Community Action Council
    •   Utility Assistance – Salvation Army, FISH of Howard County, Churches

Health and Mental Health Services:

    •   General health services including immunization clinics Howard County Health
        Department, Health Alliance Free Clinic
    •   HIV/AIDS – Howard County Health Department, AIDS Alliance of Howard County
    •   Mental Health Services – Howard County Mental Health Authority, Humanim, The
        Growth Center, NAMI of Howard County, Woodside Center
    •   Addiction Services – Howard County Health Department, Serenity Center, Adolescent
        Intensive After-school Program of Ellicott City, Greenspring/Pathfinder Mental Health
        Services
    •   Medical Assistance – Howard County Department of Social Services, Volunteer
        Physician, Grassroots Crisis Intervention




                                            56                    Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
Food:

   •    Food Bank – Community Action Council, FISH of Howard County
   •    Food Pantries – Bethany Lane Baptist Church, Bethany United Methodist Church, Bethel
        Assembly of God, Bridgeway Community Cupboard, Columbia Baptist Fellowship,
        Elkridge Food Pantry, Elkridge Independent Christian Community Church, First Baptist
        Church of Savage, First Church of Nazarene, Friendship Baptist Church, Jessup Baptist
        Church, Lisbon United Methodist Church, Locust United Methodist Church, Long Reach
        Church of God, Mt. Pisgah AME, Rolling Hills Baptist Church, St. Francis of Assisi
        Parish, St. Michael’s Roman Catholic Church, St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, St. Paul’s
        Catholic Church, SHARE
   •    Food Stamps – Howard County Department of Social Services

Education:

   • Adult Basic Education – Howard County Public Schools
   • General Equivalency (GED) – Howard County Public Schools
   • Extended Education Program – Howard County Public Schools
   • Continuing Education – Howard Community College
   • Disability Services – Family Advocacy and Parent Education (FAPE), Howard County
     Department of Education, MD Coalition for Inclusive Education (MCIE)
  • Single Parents Returning to Workforce – Howard Community College Career Links
     program
  • Youth Enrichment – Youth Enrichment Program, Inc.
Employment:

   •    Job Readiness and Training – Division of Rehabilitation Services (DORS), Employment
        and Training Center, ARC of Howard County, Athelas, Humanim- School to Employment
        Program (STEP), Maryland State Employment Office,

Home Maintenance:

   •    Home Repair Program – Howard County Department of Citizen Services, Rebuilding
        Together (formerly Christmas in April, Habitat for Humanity
   •    Weatherization Assistance Program – Community Action Council

Children’s Services:

   •    Purchase of Care Vouchers – Department of Social Services
   •    Headstart – Community Action Council
   •    Healthy Families – Howard County General Hospital
   •    Child Care – Children’s Resource Center LOCATE: Child Care, Columbia Association,
        Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks
   •    Child Advocacy – Child Advocacy Center, The Listening Place


                                            57                    Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
Component: Outreach

Services in Place:

Veterans:

   •   Street canvassing – Howard County Police Department, Mobile Crisis Team (Mental
       Health Authority)
   •   Grassroots Crisis Intervention
   •   American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars

Seriously Mentally Ill:

   •  Mobile Crisis Team
   •  Grassroots Crisis Intervention Center – PATH links homeless persons with mental health
      issues to appropriate community services.
Substance Abuse –

  • Howard County Health Department, Bureau of Addictions
  • A Better Way Counseling Services
  • Columbia Addictions Center
  • Drugensix
  • Metro Alcohol & Drug Abuse Services
  • Act II Counseling Services, Inc.
HIV/AIDS –

   •   AIDS Alliance of Howard County facilitates coordination of programs and services for
       people with AIDS related complex or HIV infection.
   •   Howard County Health Department provides HIV and AIDS counseling and testing.
Domestic Violence -

   •   The Domestic Violence Center of Howard County provides crisis intervention and support
       services to battered spouses or significant others.

Youth -

   •   The Judy Center provides support to low-income and single parents of preschool age
       children to ensure school readiness.
   •   Healthy Families is a program of Howard County General Hospital and Family and
       Children’s Services which provides support and in-home visitation services to first time
       parents who are at risk for child abuse or neglect.
   •   Services to Families with Children provided by the Howard County Department of Social
       Services. It is designed to preserve the family unit.
   •   Runaway Program is a collaboration between Grassroots Crisis Intervention Center and

                                             58                    Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
       the Howard County Police Department. It includes assessment, intervention, and
       reunification (when appropriate).
   •   Howard County Public Schools provides assistance with a variety of children’s needs
       including tutoring on site at area shelters and motels, school supplies, and linkages with
       community resources.
   •   Columbia Teen Center provides recreational, educational and vocational programs for
       youth ages 11 to 17. Advocacy and Information and Referral services are also provided.



Component: Assessment

Services in Place:

   •   Domestic Violence Center provides        a 24-hour hotline for individuals experiencing
       domestic violence. Crisis workers are on hand around the clock to deal with the physical
       and emotional consequences experienced by the victims of domestic violence.
   •   Grassroots Crisis Intervention Center offers 24-hour hotline and walk-in crisis
       intervention services.
   •   Mobile Crisis Team operates seven days a week from 7 p.m. until midnight and is staffed
       with mental health professionals and a police officer.
   •   Howard County Mental Health Authority through contracts with local providers offers
       assessments of individuals presenting with mental illness. Services include outpatient
       treatment, case management, residential rehabilitation, and vocational services.
   •   Howard County Department of Social Services offers 24-hour assistance for children and
       adults requiring protective services.
   •   Community Action Council provides assessment of families in housing crisis and
       homeless families seeking permanent housing.
   •   Howard County Office on Aging provides information, referral, and assistance to senior
       members of the community.


Component: Supportive Services

Services in Place:

Case Management –

   •   Community Action Council
   •   Domestic Violence Center provides short-term (30 days or less) and long-term case
       management to the victims of domestic violence and their families.
   •   Grassroots Crisis Intervention Center provides short-term case management for clients
       living in emergency shelter, long-term case management (up to one year) to clients living
       in transitional shelter; and case management for up to two years to clients in its Motel
       Relocation Program (which moves families living long term in motels to permanent

                                              59                     Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
       housing).
   •   Howard County Health Department, Bureau of Addition provides a minimum of six
       months of case management to clients receiving services through its Outpatient Treatment
       Program.
   •   Howard County Mental Health Authority provides case management services to
       individuals who are eligible for services from the public mental health system.
   •   Howard County Department of Social Services provides short-term case management for
       most clients; however, long-term case management is available to some clients depending
       upon circumstances.
   •   Humanim and ARC of Howard County provide long-term case management for
       individuals with disabilities.
   •   Howard County Department of Citizen Services, Office on Aging provides information
       and referral, and case management to seniors 60+ and disabled citizens 55+.

Life Skills –

   •   Congregations Concerned for the Homeless provides extensive work and life skills
       through its supportive services program, which is comprised of volunteer teams.
   •   Humanim provides job placement and supported employment for individuals with
       developmental, neurological and/or emotional disabilities.
   •   Disabilities Office, Department of Citizen Services provides specialized services for
       individuals with disabilities, advocacy for and assistance with housing, transportation,
       employment, and improved access to public facilities.
   •   Howard County Cooperative Extensive Service provides a variety of programs including
       nutrition, meal planning, budgeting, and personal finance.
   •   Our House Youth Home, Inc. is a residential job-training center for at-risk boys.
       Individual counseling and group therapy is provided as well as life skills classes.

Alcohol and Drug Abuse Treatment –

   •   Howard County Health Department, Bureau of Addictions
   •   A Better Way Counseling Services
   •   Columbia Addictions Center
   •   Drugensic
   •   Metro Alcohol and Drub Abuse Services, Inc.
   •   Act II Counseling Services
   •   Serenity Center
   •   Teens at Risk program
   •   Greenspring/Pathfinder Mental Health Services
   •   Adolescent Intensive After-school Program of Ellicott City

Mental Health Treatment –

   •   Mental Health Authority is the Core Service Agency for Howard County; it is responsible
       for planning, managing, and monitoring publicly funded mental health services.

                                             60                     Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
AIDS-related Treatment –

   •   AIDS Alliance of Howard County
   •   Howard County Health Department

Education –

   •   Howard Community College, Continuing Education Division
   •   Howard County Department of Social Services – Jobs First Program
   •   Howard County Employment and Training
   •   Howard County Department of Education

Employment Assistance –

   •   Howard County Employment and Training
   •   Foreign Born Information and Referral Network
   •   Howard Community College, Career Links (Displaced Homemaker’s Program)
   •   The ARC of Howard County
   •   Athelas
   •   MD State Employment Office

Child Care –

   •   Howard County Department of Social Services – Purchase of Care Vouchers
   •   LOCATE, Howard County Children’s Resource Center
   •   Columbia Association
   •   Howard County Recreation and Parks

Transportation –

   •   Howard Transit
   •   Commuter Solutions of Howard County




Special Needs Populations

Special needs populations in Howard County include the elderly, frail elderly, physically,
mentally and/or developmentally disabled, persons with alcohol or other drug addictions, and

                                              61                     Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
persons with HIV / AIDS and their families. The crosscutting issue encompassing all of the
previously named subpopulations is access to and affordability of housing.

Elderly - The “Howard County Senior Housing Master Plan” indicates that the 55 and older
population is expected to increase by more than 46,000 persons, rising from 19 to 31 percent of
the total population. Along with the increase in population, the existing housing stock will also
age and additional housing options will be needed.

As new housing is developed, the County must ensure that the elderly and frail elderly have
adequate and convenient access to services including retail, medical and health care services,
transportation, recreation, and cultural and religious activities. Equally as important will be the
incorporation of universal design principles, allowing environments to be usable by all
individuals to the greatest extent possible.

At the end of 2003, Howard County had 1,866 housing units in senior apartments or age-
restricted (55+) active adult developments. In addition, nursing homes, assisted living facilities
and continuing care communities provided 2,248 beds. According to a survey conducted in
2004, the large assisted living facilities in the County were 87 percent occupied while the small
facilities were at 73 percent capacity. Based upon the number of beds available, the supply of
assisted living and nursing facility beds appear to be meeting the current need however, low and
moderate-income seniors who might benefit from such facilities are less likely to be able to
afford these homes.

Persons w/ Disabilities – The Howard County Disability Survey conducted in 1996 (the most
recent survey data) states that approximately 9.2 percent of Howard County’s population have an
identified disability. The primary disabilities reported were: orthopedic disability, heart
condition, blindness/severe visual impairment and mental retardation. 41 service providers
reported the leading disability categories, of persons receiving services, to be psychiatric
disability (33.2%), mental retardation (27%), specific learning disabilities (9.4%), cancer (4.7%),
and head injury (3.7%).

Persons w/ Disabilities (Mental Health)- The Howard County Mental Health Authority
(HCMHA) provides a number of mental health services throughout the community including
some permanent housing opportunities through the HUD-funded Shelter Plus Care (S+C)
program. The Authority has identified several significant gaps in services, most notable being
the lack of such services as residential crisis, mobile treatment, respite services, and affordable
housing.

The most recent data available from FY 2003 indicates that 2062 individuals were served in the
public mental health system. The most significant growth being in the Medical Assistance (MA)
population. As it was in prior years, most individuals served by the public system receive one
service, outpatient treatment. The second most utilized service is psychiatric rehabilitation. MA
expenditures for psychiatric programs have shown a steady increase over the last four fiscal
years.




                                                 62                      Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
A significant portion of Howard County’s funds are spent on in-patient and Residential
Treatment Center placements. In FY 2003, claims data indicates that $4,488,843 was spent on
78 high cost users. Of the 78 consumers, 27 were under the age of 18 and the Residential
Treatment Center costs for this group alone totaled $1, 854,814. Rehabilitation services
accounted for $2,011,387 in expenditures for high cost users.
To effectively treat and prevent mental illness, health care providers must understand the
differences in how various populations perceive mental health issues. Select populations may
not seek mental health services in the formal system, may drop out of care or may seek care at
much later stages of illness. Stigma about mental health issues often create barriers to providing
and receiving effective mental health treatment and can lead to inappropriate treatment,
unemployment, and homelessness.

Substance Abuse - The 2010 Comprehensive Health Improvement Plan for Howard County
indicates that the most popular substances used by students are alcohol, cigarettes and marijuana.
Smaller percentages of Howard County students, ranging from zero to eight percent, report the
use of other drugs such as crack, designer drugs, heroin, inhalants, LSD, methamphetamines, or
amphetamines. (1998 Maryland Adolescent Survey). In addition, among all drug –related
suspensions from Howard County Public Schools, tobacco use was reported as the most common
reason for suspension followed by use of drugs, alcohol and inhalants (Center For Substance
Abuse Research).




                                               63                      Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
                                        Table 1B
                        Special Needs (Non-Homeless) Populations


                                               Priority Need                   Dollars To
         SPECIAL NEEDS                             Level       Unmet Need       Address      Goals
        SUBPOPULATIONS                     High, Medium, Low                  Unmet Needs
                                             No Such Need
Elderly                                    M                   1500          $3,150,000      200 units
Frail elderly                              M                   450           $1,080,000      95 units/beds
Severe Mental Illness                      H                   76            $4,670,000      35 beds
Developmentally Disabled                   H                   Unknown       Unknown         10 beds
Physically Disabled                        M                   Unknown       Unknown         Unknown
Persons w/ Alcohol/Other Drug Addictions   H                   32            Unknown         32 units/beds
Persons w/ HIV/AIDS                        L                   10            $475,000        10
Other


Total




                                                   64                    Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
                                            Table 1C
                      Summary of specific Homeless/Special Needs Objectives
                              (Table 1A/1B Continuation Sheet)


(From the FY 2005 Howard County Continuum of Care)
                                                    Action Steps                      Target Dates
        Goal: End Chronic
          Homelessness                                                               (mo/yr will be
    (“What” are you trying to              (“How” are you to go about                accomplished)
           accomplish)                         accomplishing it)
Goal 1:
Develop a day shelter to be open    a. Conduct a strategic planning session          September 2005
for the duration of the Cold        including service providers and county
Weather Shelter from November       agencies to determine feasibility.
through March
                                    b. Identify potential funding sources.           September 2005


                                    c. Develop site selection criteria and           October 2005
                                    conduct search.


                                    d. Develop a program plan for shelter            December 2005
                                    operation and preliminary budget.



                                    e. Apply for local, State and Federal            January 2006
                                    funding

                                                                                     September 2006
                                    f. Funding / site due diligence activities


                                    g. Implement Day Shelter                         November 2006



Goal 2:
Increase     opportunities    for   a. Research and develop a draft local policy     November 2005
chronic homeless persons to         statement and related implementation
obtain affordable permanent         criteria regarding set aside units
housing within new housing and
existing subsidized developments    b. Host a housing stakeholders forum to          April 2006
through the creation of set aside   open discussion with the broader housing
units.                              development/rental community.

                                    c. Present proposed policy           to local    June 2006
                                    government   officials and             housing
                                    commission.

                                    d. Begin local legislative process               August 2006

                                    e. Local policy implemented                      January 2007
Goal 3:
Continue     Renovation     and     a. Project (Facility) Planning                   January 2005
Expansion Project of Emergency
Shelter at Grassroots Crisis
Intervention Center including 6

                                                            65                             Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
beds for chronically homeless      b. Selection of A & E firm.                     May 2005
individuals.

                                   c. Initiate Capital Campaign                    September 2005

                                   d. Apply for State Bond Bill                    October 2005

                                   e. Complete funding applications for            April 2006
                                   DCHD / MAHT

                                   f. Begin Construction                           September 2006
Goal 4:                            Identify sponsor of project.                    September 2005
Develop 10 new Shelter Plus Care
beds
                                   Develop interagency project plan to include     December 2005
                                   populations served.


                                   Develop criteria for selection.                 December 2005




                                   Identify match resources.                       January 2006




                                   Develop timeline for completion.                January 2006




                                   Develop application for FFY ’06 funding         April 2006
                                   round.



Goal 5:
Develop a Discharge Resource       a. Research and data compilation of             October 2005
Directory.                         existing discharge policies for all publicly
                                   funded institutions

                                   b. Convene and facilitate a roundtable          January 2005
                                   discussion w/ representatives of institutions
                                   and agencies involved in discharge
                                   planning

                                   c. Develop draft Directory and circulate for    May 2006
                                   review and comment




                                   d. Finalize Directory and distribute locally    October 2006




                                                           66                            Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
VI. Strategic Plan
Priority Needs

  Howard County’s Five-Year Strategic Plan and the identified goals and strategies address the
  priorities for allocating investment in housing and community development to meet the needs
  outlined in this document for the period FY2006-FY2010.


  Priority activities to be undertaken in the next five years include:
     •   preservation of existing affordable housing stock and revitalization of older
         neighborhoods;

     •   an aggressive, multi-faceted strategy to move current subsidy dependant residents and
         homeless to economic and housing self sufficiency;

     •   public-private funding partnerships to promote the expansion of low/ moderate-income
         and middle-income (work force) housing in scattered sites;

     •   increase the rental and assisted housing options for low income, cost burdened elderly
         residents.

  Priority Housing Needs
  Rental households


  Based on data provided in Table 4-5, 8,028 households pay in excess of 30% of their total
  household income on housing rental costs and 3,265 of these pay in excess of 50% toward
  housing costs. The impact is greatest for the 2,280 extremely low-income households. The high
  demand for housing is further evidenced by the 2,910 households on the combined waiting list as
  of March 1, 2006. (NEED FROM SAM) Cost burdened household are having a difficult time
  meeting financial obligations.




  Senior households continue to experience cost burden problems. Increases in rental rates with
  limited adjustments to fixed incomes have left many senior households in a cost burdened state.

                                                   67                    Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
Affordable senior housing rental options continue to be needed within the County for low-
income seniors. With the anticipated continued growth of the senior population the demand for
affordable housing will also continue. Strategies have been identified in this plan to address this
priority area.


Owner-Occupied Households


According to the data provided in Table 4-5, 3,252 households have incomes below 50% of
median. Forty-four percent these households are seniors. Of these 3,252 households, 1,371 are
extremely low income and 80% of these pay in excess of 30% of their total household income on
housing costs, placing them at greatest risk. Programs have been identified to identify to address
this priority area.


Priority Homeless Needs
During the last several years the need to expand the homeless shelter has become increasingly
evident. Plans are underway to expand the facility to accommodate an additional 19 people in
shelter daily with the increased capacity for up to five additional people when an individual or
family would be at risk and there are no other resources available.
Other Special Needs
In addition to the elderly individuals with developmental and physical disabilities are among
those needing services within the County. Job training for the disabled is also a need as
demonstrated in the Human Services Master Plan, September 2005. With emphasis on “aging in
place” there will be a continued need to assist seniors in retrofitting their residences to make
them more accessible and to ensure safety.
Waiting lists for residential units and services suggest that the County needs additional housing
and support services for the mentally ill. Rental units that can serve the physically disabled are
also needed. The use of Universal Design in retrofitting rental sites is a continued need.




                                               68                      Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
   Priority Non-Housing Community Development Needs
   There are several non-housing community development needs that have emerged as major
   priorities. Four of the five areas identified in this third Consolidated Plan were also identified in
   the second Consolidated Plan.         These include transportation, affordable childcare and
   employment. A new non-housing need identified is emergency/crisis services. These needs
   directly impact the ability of very low, low and moderate-income individuals and families to
   afford housing in the County. Working with residents to achieve self-sufficiency continues to be
   critical in order to reduce the cost burden in the above noted areas of need. In the same respect,
   affordable services need to be accessible to this population in order to maintain employment and
   move toward career advance to improve self-sufficiency.


   The need to assist seniors and the disabled to age in place and/or earn a living is a continued
   focus in this plan. The foreign-born population increased from 6.1% to 11.3% of the total
   population between 1990 and 2000. They face the same challenges of other low/moderate
   income persons coupled, in many instances, with language and cultural barriers that make the
   move toward self-sufficiency even more challenging. Providing opportunities for children and
   youth which provide a safe and productive after school environment continued to be needed.
   Revitalization of the Route One Corridor is continuing into this strategic plan as well as
   revitalization of the Route 40 Enhancement Area. Support of anti-crime programs by the Police
   Department will continue. Strategies identified in this Consolidated Plan address these areas of
   need.



Specific Strategies and Objectives

   The area of need categorizes the goals.      In some instances components of one goal may be
   included in another. Goals are indicated as Roman numerals. Most goals identified in this
   Consolidated Plan are going to be expanded and increased efforts of previous plans. The
   identified needs in the County have not changed significantly since the last plan. While the new
   Performance Measurements System calls for objectives, outcomes and outcome indicators to be
   included in the Action Plan at the project level, we have included objectives and outcomes at the



                                                   69                      Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
  goal level and in some instances outcome indicators have also been included. We believe that
  this is a logical approach for reviewing projects against the goals of the strategic plan.
Housing

  Goal I. Expand efforts to preserve and retain existing Housing Stock
                 Work with villages, homeowner and community associations to revitalize
                 neighborhoods and create or retain affordable housing, stabilize neighborhoods
                 and improve the overall quality of life.
  Objective: Decent Affordable Housing
          Strategies
          1.     Work with developers to implement the MIHU code
          2.     Continue to utilize property tax abatements, tax credits and other favorable
          financing plans to encourage new construction of affordable housing.

          3      Partner with local community organizations to revitalize older neighborhoods and
          assist homeowners in maintaining and improving properties while allowing them to
          remain affordable.

          4.     Update, as necessary, and promote the availability of Keeping Our
          Neighborhoods Beautiful, A Property Maintenance Handbook

          5.     Provide technical assistance to homeowners in accessing funding and/or resources
          to maintain and improve properties.

          6.     Expand marketing efforts of the County single-family rehabilitation loan program
                 for those income eligible homeowners who do not qualify for other assistance.

  Outcome: Affordability and Availability/Accessibility

  Output Indicators:
  1. Increase the number of housing units rehabilitated by 30 (6/year) by June 30, 2010.



Goal II. Increase affordable housing through Home Ownership Assistance

  Recognizing that the County’s main supply of affordable housing is in existing neighborhoods,
  increase the stock of affordable housing for homeownership; increase supply of well maintained

                                                   70                      Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
affordable homeownership units; assist low and moderate-income and middle-income (work
force) buyers with the purchase of their home.
Objective: Decent Affordable Housing
       Strategies
       1.        Continue to expand, modify and market existing homeownership programs for
                 low/moderate-income buyers

       2.        Partner with the state to increase homeownership opportunities for middle-income
                 (work force) buyers.

       3.        Continue to develop programs to assist in keeping sale purchase prices low and
                 financing of improvements and upgrades.

       4.        Continue to purchase properties for resale to low and moderate-income buyers.

       5.        Encourage use of State funded homeownership such as House Keys 4 Employees,
                 to assist first time homebuyers with financing.

       6.        Increase the use of the Housing Choice Voucher Program for homeownership.

       7.        Identify opportunities for new partnerships with the business sector and real estate
       companies

       8.        Expand outreach and support programs to reach income eligible minorities.

       9.        Continue to leverage the resources of the Share Equity Program to make
       homeownership affordable in conjunction with the Moderate Income Housing Units
       (MIHU) Program.

       10.       Support implementation of zoning laws and subdivision regulations that
       encourage the development of affordable housing.

Outcome: Affordability and Availability/Accessibility

Output Indicators:

1.     Increase in the stock of affordable housing for homeownership by 100 units (20/year) by
June 30, 2010.

2.     Increase minority homeownership by 20 families (5/year) by June 30, 2010.

Goal III. Expand the supply of affordable rental housing.
                                                 71                      Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
Objective:    Decent Affordable Housing
       Strategies
       1.     Continue the County Low Interest and Deferred Rental Housing Loan Programs.

       2.     Grant property tax abatements under the County’s current Payment in Lieu of
              Taxes Program (PILOT) for low-income properties.

       3.     Acquire property for affordable rental housing for low/moderate-income families,
              middle-income families (workforce) and special needs populations, seniors and
              disabled

       4.     Identify opportunities for new partnerships


Outcome:      Availability/Accessibility and Affordability
Output Indicators:
 Increase the number of affordable rental units by 142 (28/year) by June 30, 2010.


Goal IV. Support the County’s existing public and assisted housing programs to provide
rental assistance and support services.


Objective:    Decent Affordable Housing


       Strategies
       1.     Continue to support the Housing Commission’s continued operation of the
              Section 8 Program and other rental assistance programs.

       2.     Continue to assist owners of rental developments built with HUD-assisted
              mortgages to secure financing for the rehabilitation and stabilization of these units
              as affordable housing.

       3.     The Housing Choice Voucher programs will continue to be administered by the
              Housing Commission. Efforts will continue to obtain additional vouchers for the
              citizens of Howard County.

Outcomes:     Affordability

                                              72                      Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
Goal V. Support the enhancement and development of Crisis Intervention Programs to
assist the working poor and others in need


Objective:   Suitable Living Environment
      Strategies
      1.     Encourage the development of community or faith-based organizations to form
             short-term emergency service programs
      2.     Support coordination between governmental agencies to improve service delivery
      3.     Enhance communications to residents regarding programs for individuals and
             families
Outcome:     Availability/Accessibility
Goal VI. Comprehensively address the issue of homelessness by providing a continuum of
care including prevention, outreach, assessment and supportive shelter to aid in assisting
the homeless to move toward self-sufficiency and permanent housing.


Objective:   Suitable Living Environment and Decent Affordable Housing
      Strategies
      1.     Continue to provide support to a variety of programs provided by the Department
             of Citizen Services to provide services to the Homeless.

      2      Provide CDBG funds to increase the services provided by the Department of
             Citizen Services to nonprofit organizations for eviction prevention, emergency
             and transitional housing, counseling and other services to provide a continuum of
             care for the homeless.

      3      Provide technical assistance and low interest or deferred loans to non-profit
             agencies to increase their capacity to provide shelter by acquiring property.

Outcome:     Availability/Accessibility and Affordability

Goal VII. Implement the County’s Anti-Displacement and Relocation Assistance Policy

      Strategies




                                             73                      Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
             1.     Provide    involuntarily   displaced    persons    with    assistance   to   relocate
                    consistent with the county’s policy.

             2.     Updated the County’s anti-displacement and relocation assistance policy as
                    necessary to conform to HUD guidelines



Special Needs

Goal VIII.        Expand and support a variety of affordable housing options, which in
conjunction with needed supportive services, will maximize independence of seniors, promote
aging in place and enable those persons with physical, mental and developmental disabilities to
live as self-sufficiently and independently as possible in the community.

Objective: Suitable Living Environment and Decent Affordable Housing

       Strategies

             1.     Continue to support the efforts of the Department of Citizen Services in its
                    programs for persons with disabilities and the senior population of Howard
                    County.

             2.     Continue to support the development of affordable housing with appropriate
                    accommodations and services for low income special needs population.

             3.     Continue to assist income-eligible special needs homeowners to modify their
                    homes to improve accessibility so they can remain in their homes.

             4.     Support and encourage the use of Universal Design Standards in new construction
                    and the County’s rental housing properties.

             5.     Continue with programs like Personal Assistance Services that might be required
                    for an individual to age in place or be able to go to work.

             6.     Utilize the MIHU program to increase the housing units for low-income seniors.

             7.     Continue to assist community based special need service providers to acquire or
                     rehabilitate homes for special needs persons



                                                     74                       Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
             8.       Continue to provide low interest loans or grants to low to moderate-income
                      homeowners seniors and those with disabilities to rehabilitate their homes to meet
                      emergency needs and to make them more accessible.

             9.       Develop and support programs to provide affordable elements of assisted living to
                      income eligible seniors.

             10.      Support emergency preparedness efforts for seniors and disabled citizens to
                      shelter in place without assistance for 36 hours.

             11.      Support increased linkages with volunteers, service and faith based organizations
                      business associations and other partners to assist seniors and disabled
                      homeowners with assessing home repairs and maintenance needs

Outcome:              Availability/Accessibility and Affordability




Planning and Administration

Goal IX.           Support Howard County’s fair housing efforts and programs and continue to
work on a regional level to affirmatively further fair housing.

Objective:         Suitable Living Environment

             Strategies
             1.       Continue to support the Office of Human Rights effort to affirmatively further fair
                      housing and overcome barriers to fair housing identified in the analysis of
                      impediments study.

             2.       Review and update as necessary, the analysis of impediments.

             3.       Review and implement, as feasible, actions identified in the Baltimore Regional
                      Fair Housing Action Plan of 2002 (Amendment to the 1996 Analysis of Impediments for
                      the Baltimore Region)

             4.       Provide funds to support the Office of Human Rights outreach efforts.

             5.       Continue to work with surrounding jurisdictions to implement strategies identified
                      in the Baltimore Regional Fair Housing Action Plan.


                                                      75                     Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
  Outcome:       Sustainability



  Goal X. Administer and monitor entitlement programs under the Consolidated Plan


  Strategies
         1.      Manage the day-to-day operation of the CDBG and HOME Programs.

         2.      Develop annual reports and annual action plans.

         3.      Monitor the activities of the sub-recipients, Community Housing Development
                 Organizations (CHDOs) developers, owner and sponsors via reports, technical
                 assistance meetings and monitoring visits.

Infrastructure

  Goal XI. Increase and Support Establishment of Affordable Transportation Services
  Objective: Suitable Living Environment and Creating Economic Opportunities
  Strategy
         1.      Continue to support improvements in transportation and programs making
                 transportation more available to the low and moderate-income population of
                 Howard County.

         2.      Support efforts to establish a new and improved car donation program to provide
                 cars to qualified individuals.

         3.      Support linkages with community and faith-based/community organizations and
                 supportive services.

         4.      Support efforts to provide adequate transportation to persons with disabilities.

  Outcome:       Availability/Accessibility and Affordability


  Goal XII. Support efforts in the Route 40 Enhancement Area and continued revitalization
  of the Route One Corridor




                                                  76                     Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
  Objective:    Suitable Living Environment, Decent Affordable Housing and Creating Economic
                Opportunities
  Strategies
         1.     Land use recommendations from the Route 40 Enhancement Study Report will be
                implemented through the Comprehensive Zoning process.
         2.     Continue to support the efforts of the Route One Corridor revitalization
                Committee to enhance and improve the Route One Corridor.

         3.     Continue involvement with housing and community development issues.

         4.     Assist with relocation efforts, if needed.

         5.     Encourage and support the retention and development of affordable housing
         within the revitalization areas.



  Outcome:      Availability/Accessibility, Affordability and Sustainability



Economic Development

  Goal XIII. Creation of new businesses and jobs through low interest financing to start-up
         and expanding businesses
  Objective: Creating Economic Opportunities
  Strategies

         1.     Continue the job creation program by making loans to local businesses that will
                create businesses and/or jobs and careers for low and moderate-income citizens.

  Outcome:      Availability/Accessibility


  Goal XIV. Expand job training and Micro enterprise development to include increased
  opportunities for the disabled and foreign born


  Objective:    Creating Economic Opportunities



                                                 77                     Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
   Strategies

           1.      Assist the low and moderate-income residents by providing job training, jobs
                   placement and assisting with job retention.

           2.      Continue to support the development of new types micro enterprises.

           3.      Provide for follow up on previously placed individuals to ensure job retention and
                   opportunities for job growth.
           4.      Provide counseling, training, tutoring and mentoring to increase the wage earning
                   capacity of low and moderate-income individuals.

           5.      Support programs to develop employment and training programs and micro
                   enterprises for the disabled and foreign born.

Outcome:        Availability/Accessibility

Outcome Indicators: The number of low and moderate-income persons assisted in training and
obtaining employment.

Youth Programs

   Goal XV. Affordable Child Care


   Objective: Suitable Living Environment and Creating Economic Opportunities


           Strategies
           1.      Continue to support the development of affordable childcare programs and
                   facilities.

           2.      Continue to provide technical assistance and support to the development of
                   affordable childcare centers.

           3.      Support linkages between faith-based organizations and after-school programs.

   Outcome: Affordability and Availability/Accessibility


   Goal XVI. Opportunities for children and youth that increase healthy behaviors and
           improve academic success.

                                                   78                    Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
Objective:    Suitable Living Environment and Availability and Accessibility

       Strategies
       1.     Make a variety of programs available for children and youth including affordable
              after school, academic and recreation activities in order to reduce crime as well as
              provide leadership, mentoring, skills building opportunities and improve
              academic achievement.

Outcome:      Availability/Accessibility and Affordability

Goal XVII. Life skills and parenting training programs
Objective: Suitable Living Environment
Strategies
       1.     Support life skills and parenting training programs that positively impact the lives
              of parents and their children.

       2.     Support services to aid families in balancing home and work life

Outcome: Availability/Accessibility and Affordability


Goal XVIII. Reduce the hazard to children, particularly those age six or less, presented by
elevated blood levels of lead resulting from lead based paint.
Objective:    Suitable Living Environment and Decent Affordable Housing
Strategies
       1.     Continue efforts to identify and abate lead paint hazards in single and multifamily
              residential properties being rehabilitated with federal and state funds.

       2.     Support efforts of the Health Department to monitor children with elevated blood
              levels of lead.

       3.     Continue efforts to identify and abate lead paint hazards in mortgage programs
              funded with CDBG and HOME Funds.

       4.     Perform lead paint assessments on all residential properties built before 1978 that
              receive federal or state funds.

       5.     Provide for training in lead based paint assessment and abatement techniques to
              staff and contractors, as needed

                                                 79                    Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
         6.      Require that all homeownership mortgage assistance accomplished on houses
         built before 1978 have lead paint assessment completed.

         7.      Provide lead-based paint information brochure and appropriate disclosures as part
                 of sales contracts and rehabilitation projects.

         8.      Provide public information on lead based paint hazards and abatement techniques.

Outcomes:        Availability/Accessibility and Affordability

Anti-Crime Programs

  Goal XIX. Continues support of anti-crime efforts


  Objective:     Suitable Living Environment




  Strategies
         1.      Support the Police Department in its anti-crime efforts throughout communities
                 within the County, particularly in the C-Safe Communities

         2.      Assist first time homebuyers to purchase previous rental housing to reduce the
         ratio of rental property to home ownership in the C-Safe Communities.
  Outcome:       Sustainability

  BARRIERS TO AFFORDABLE HOUSING


  As discussed in the Needs Section, the main barriers to affordable housing are (1) availability of
  land, (2) cost of land and (3) the opposition to “affordable” housing.
  The County is taking steps to remove or ameliorate these barriers. The lack of affordable
  housing is one of the major issues now being debated in Howard County. One important step is
  to continue to bring the problem to the publics attention. The Howard County Housing and
  Community Development Board and the Howard County Housing Commission has examined
  barriers to affordable housing in the Howard County Housing Plan April 2005 (to be updated
  April 2006).       Several citizen groups including the Howard County Low-income Housing
  Coalition continue to bring the problem to the public’s attention and lobby for legislation.

  Progress being made in the County includes mixed-use zoning. In these districts, proposing
  projects with residential densities exceeding 2.3 dwelling units per gross acre must have between
  5 percent and 10 percent of the units affordable to low -and moderate - income renters or

                                                  80                    Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
homebuyers. The requirement has produced 12 units of affordable housing. There are currently
587 units in process. This total includes apartments, single family attached and single family
detached, age restricted and not age restricted units.


Measures to expand the low –and moderate -income housing requirements to other zoning
districts are now being discussed. There is also much discussion of increasing the allowable
density of Columbia’s Town Center. In exchange for the increased density, the County would
like to require that a percentage of the new units be affordable housing. Similar changes could
occur in the Route 1 corridor.

Lead Based Paint Hazards

Howard County has a relatively new housing stock, thereby decreasing the number of units,
which carry a potential risk. However, according to the 2000 Census, a total of 3,770 housing
units in use in the county were constructed prior to 1950. An additional 35,696 were built
between 1950 and 1978. If nationwide figures can be assumed to be correct for Howard County,
then a disproportionate number of units housing low and moderate income residents would be at
higher risk for lead paint hazards. The Census Data does not correlate age of housing with the
rental cost for such units.
Because the majority of homes in Howard County were built during the last 20 years, incidences
of lead paint hazards are low in comparison with other Maryland jurisdictions. According to
anecdotal data from the Building Inspections Department, there were one half-dozen cases
during the 10-year period from 1980 to 1990. (Note: There was little regulatory oversight for
lead during that time). Health Department staff reports involvement in less than 10 cases over
the past three years, in which environmental studies were conducted following lead poisoning
reports. Howard County Health Department staff conducts educational activities among
community residents to raise their level of awareness regarding lead paint hazards in homes,
daycare sites and in the workplace.

Standard procedure for the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) is to notify the
County Health Department if an elevated blood level (≥ 10 micrograms/deciliter (mcg/dl) in a
child is reported. Under the following circumstances the MDE will conduct an inspection of a
property:
    • If a child has a confirmed venous blood level of ≥ 15 mcg/dl
    • A complaint or referral for a property owner, contractor or inspector subject to Maryland
        State Laws and Regulations
    • At a daycare facility if a rental property, or as a joint inspection with daycare or school
        administration officials when the property is not a rental

Based upon a poisoned child or referral, MDE’s inspection may encompass:
   • Visual inspection for chipping, pealing, cracking paint
   • An XRF analysis, plus paint chip sampling of the property in question
   • An Environmental Investigation Questionnaire, or
   • Inspection of other possible sources or locations which the child frequents (e.g. daycare
       home or center, grandparents house)

                                              81                     Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
If a reported case has a level of above 15 but below 20 a HCHD Community Health Nurse
(CHN) will visit the family to further evaluate the case. The nurse will first call the child’s
pediatrician to determine that the family is aware of the EBL, then the CHN will initiate
telephone contact with the family to coordinate a home visit and to discuss a plan of treatment.
If the family has no telephone the CHN will make a home visit to establish initial contact.
During the home visit the CHN will identify other children and adults at risk in the environment
and coordinate blood lead testing. The CHN will also assess family resources, refer and
coordinate services as needed for:
     • health insurance for adequate medical coverage
     • nutritional counseling or the supplemental food program of WIC
     • temporary relocation
     • relocation to alternative housing

Generally, any awareness of such reported cases is tied to rental properties within the County due
to the licensing requirements. In 1996 the County revised its rental licensing procedure to link
renewals and new rental license applications to the MDE lead paint requirements. This ensures
that the MDE is aware of rental housing units with lead paint (built prior to 1950) and the
potential for lead-based paint for units built between 1951 and 1978. As a result of this
procedure rental units in the County with potential for lead-based paint have been identified.
With each new rental occupancy a house must be re-evaluated for lead-based paint hazards. It is
the obligation of the license holder to have the house revaluated for lead based paint hazards
when there is a tenant change in the house. The application to the County for a rental license may
also trigger a need for additional information.

Lead paint hazards must be continually monitored, particularly in the county's older housing
stock. All units purchased or rehabilitated by DHCD are inspected for lead based paint. All
public housing units have been tested. Education of Section 8 landlords regarding testing
requirements and lead paint abatement strategies generally occurs when the units are inspected
for occupancy, or building or health inspectors are responding to Code violations. During these
inspections, landlords are provided with information regarding their obligations, liabilities and
the means of limiting their exposure.

Anti-Poverty Strategy

The needs section outlined the many services available to all low-income residents in Howard
County. Howard County has recently completed the Howard County Human Services Master
Plan, 2005-2010. The Plan includes a clear set of human service goals to guide the community’s
funding, service delivery and policy decisions through 2010. It also creates an organizational
framework that promotes collaboration among the organizations providing services and develops
a system to evaluated progress. (See: Howard County Human Services Master Plan, 2005-2010,
Howard County Department of Citizen Services and the Association of Community Services,
September 2005)




                                               82                     Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
Institutional Structure

The Howard County Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) is one of
seventeen departments that comprise county government. The Director reports directly to the
County Executive. The DHCD has a Housing and Community Development Board that
recommends policy for County owned housing and makes recommendations for approval of
County Housing and Community Development loan and grant programs. The Board advises the
County Executive on housing policy and community development activities.

The County Housing Commission is a separate legal entity that serves as a Public Housing
Authority for the purpose of developing and managing housing resources for low and moderate-
income residents. There is a close working relationship between the Office of Housing and
Community Development and the Housing Commission, the primary public agencies responsible
for developing affordable housing options.


As the lead agency, the DHCD will assume responsibility for oversight, administration and
distribution of CDBG and HOME funds. Economic development project funding will be
channeled to the County's Economic Development Authority, a quasi-governmental organization
with a nine member Board of Directors appointed by the County Executive with the approval of
the County Council. The Economic Development Authority will assume responsibility for
project management of Consolidated Plan projects that involve economic development
initiatives. The Economic Development Authority works closely with the business community
and is the most appropriate entity to manage economic development funding.

CDBG funds for supportive services for special populations such as frail elderly, the disabled
and the homeless will be channeled to the County's Department of Citizen Services. This
Department is responsible for disbursement and oversight of the County's Community Service
Partnership Program. The Department of Citizen Services works closely with the human service
community and is the most appropriate entity to manage supportive services funding.

Coordination


The County’s effort to improve coordination among County agencies, the business community,
and non-profits involved in community development has been described throughout the Plan.
The Housing Needs Plan and the Human Services Master Plan, 2005-2010, described above, are
examples of this effort.


Public Housing


The Howard County Housing Commission owns and operates fifty units of public housing. Over
half of these are scattered site and the remainder is in small clusters. Residents are encouraged to
become actively involved in their communities of residence, but due to the scattered site
arrangement, public housing is not conducive to the development of housing management by the

                                                83                     Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010
residents. The entire fifty public housing families have became a committee of the whole and
had the opportunity to review the Public Housing Agency Plan.

Two families who started out in our Hilltop facility have recently purchased their own homes.
At least one additional public housing family purchased their home under the Smart Growth
program and four other public housing families have left the program by purchasing their own
homes.

 THE FFY2006 ACTION PLAN IS PUBLISHED IN A SEPARATE FILE ON THE WEB PAGE




                                              84                     Consolidated Plan FY2006-2010

				
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