Docstoc

Introduction to Scratch

Document Sample
Introduction to Scratch Powered By Docstoc
					Introduction to Scratch
     January 26, 2010
What is Scratch?

• Scratch is a free programmable toolkit that
  enables kids to create their own games, animated
  stories, and interactive art
• and share their creations with one another over
  the Internet.
What is Scratch?

• Scratch builds on the long tradition of Logo and
  LEGO/Logo, but takes advantage of new
  computational ideas and capabilities to make it
  easier for kids to get started with programming
  (lowering the floor) and to extend the range of
  what kids can create and learn (raising the
  ceiling).
What is Scratch?

• The ultimate goal is to help kids become fluent
  with digital media, empowering them to express
  themselves creatively and make connections to
  powerful ideas.
What is Scratch?

• Scratch is built on top of the Squeak environment
  developed by Alan Kay and colleagues.
What is Scratch?

• Scratch is being developed by the Lifelong
  Kindergarten research group at the MIT Media
  Lab, in collaboration with KIDS research group at
  the UCLA Graduate School of Education &
  Information Studies.
Learning

• Mathematical concepts (coordinates, variables,
  random numbers, etc.)
• Computational concepts (iterations, conditionals,
  variables, etc.)
• Process of design.
• Logical thinking.
• Meaningful and motivating context.
• 21st century learning skills and digital fluency
• Sharing and collaboration
Programming

• Designed for children, teens, and beginning
  programmers
• Building block programming with low floor, high
  ceiling
• Media and manipulation
• Sharing and collaboration
• Open source, closed development
Creating

• Dynamic interactive media.
• Combine music, animation, graphics, and
  other media in one program.
• Name comes from hip-hop disc jockey
  scratching technique – creativity.
• Sharing – download a complete program
  for use or pick pieces for your own
  program.
Advantages

•   Free.
•   Multiplatform.
•   Good resources/references.
•   Sharing and collaboration opportunities.
•   Open source.
•   Complex capabilities.
•   Vast audience.
Disadvantages

• You have to have the software installed (or
  program online) to use the final production.
• Some of the shared programs have some
  glitches/nuances.
• There are a lot of programs out there to fish
  from (good and bad).
• Takes time and training.
Let’s Get Started!

• To Open Scratch, double-click on the Scratch
  (cat) icon or click on Scratch.exe
Getting Started With Scratch

Once you’ve opened Scratch, you should see this
  default screen:
             The Basic Buttons
• New Sprite Buttons
   – The Scratch objects and characters
     are called Sprites


                                          • Get a new cat Sprite (Default)


                                          • Paint your own Sprite


                                          • Choose an image for a new Sprite


                                          • Get a surprise Sprite
            The Basic Buttons
• Sprite Costumes
   – Change your Sprite’s Look with a
     costume change
   – Click on the Costumes tab. To add a
     costume click Import
   – To modify your Sprite using the paint
     function, click Edit
   – Any image can be used
          The Basic Buttons
• Scratch Blocks
   – By snapping these blocks together
     you create a script
   – When you double click on a script,
     your program will run
   – The Scratch blocks are in 8 color-
     coded categories based on function
Exercise #1

   The “Cat Walk”
Doin’ the “Cat Walk”
          •   We will create a Sprite fashion show.
          •   This exercise will teach you how to make your
              Sprite:
                    • Change Color
                    • Walk
                    • Undergo a Costume Change
     Setting the Stage
• Before you can
  begin to move
  blocks onto the
  Script Area
   – Click on the
     “Scripts” tab
   – The tab should be
     pale blue
               Color Change
   1. Click on “Control”
      from the Palate.

2. Click and pull the block   onto the Script Area.

3. Click on “Looks” from
   the Palate.
4. Click and pull the block   onto the Script Area.

5. Snap the two blocks
   together.
                  Color Change

- Your Design &
Control Center
Screen should
look like this.
- Hit the space
bar and watch
your Sprite
change colors.
          Sprite Starting Position
 These are your (x:) and (y:)
 coordinates for your stage.

1. Click on “Motion” from
   the Palate.



2. Click on and pull the block              onto the Script Area.
   Click on the white holes and type in -139 for (x:) and 0 for (y:).
   This will be your starting point.
          Sprite Starting Position
3. Click on “Control” from
   the Palate.

4. Click and pull the block              onto the Script Area.


5. Snap the two blocks
   together.

6. Click on the green flag and watch your sprite
   change locations. Experiment with position by
   changing your (x:) and (y:) values.
           Sprite Starting Position

- Your Design
and Control
Center Screen
should look like
this.
- You can now
position your
Sprite and
change colors.
           Walking
1. Click on “Control”
   from the Palate.


2. Click and pull the blocks              ,        , and
   onto the Script Area.
3. Click on “Looks” from
   the Palate.

4. Click and pull the block                  onto the Script Area.
   Click on the arrow in the costume1 box and select costume2.
           Walking
5. You should have 2 separate blocks for                   ,
   that say “Costume1” and “Costume2”.

6. Click on “Motion”
   from the Palate.
7. Click and pull the block       onto the Script Area.

8. Snap the blocks              and          together as shown.
           Walking

8. Stack the remaining blocks in this pattern.
9. Click on the           and drag your
   new stack of blocks into the space in
   the          block.


IMPORTANT  If you do NOT click on
the           block then your complete
stack of blocks will NOT stay together
when moved. The blocks will come apart
instead of moving together.
 Walking
- Press the green
flag and watch!
- Experiment with
the purple
change effects
block. Click on
the arrow to see
the options.
- Press the space
bar to see the
new changes.
        Making Project Notes
                           • Using the project notes option you
                             can type and leave instructions for
                             other people who look at your
                             Scratch programs.
                           • This is also a great area to leave
                             any comments about the design of
                             your project.
Project Notes Icon – can
be found in the upper
right hand corner of the
Scratch Design and
Control Center Screen
From one Project to Another
• Click on Save to
  save your work
   – The file should
     be named
     “Exercise 1”
• Click on New to
  begin a new
  program.
Exercise #2

 The Digital Picasso
A Digital Picasso with
Animated Painting
• We will design digital artwork.
• This exercise will teach you how to:
    – Create a customized Sprite using:
         • The Paint Function
         • Animation
         • Sound
          Learning How to Paint

We will make a sprite
that is your name.

From the New Sprite
Buttons, Click on the
         button to get
started! The paint
function will appear in
the middle of your
screen.
             Learning How to Paint
1. Click on the
   paintbrush and
   select a color from
   below.
2. Click on the capital
   T. A black box and
   a blue vertical line
   will appear.
3. Click in the paint
   area. You will now
   be able to type
   your name. Click
   “OK”.
           Animation & Sound
1. Click on “Control”
   from the color palate.


2. Click and pull the blocks                and
   onto the scripts area.
3. Click on “Sound” from
   the color palate.
4. Click and pull the block                       4 times into the
   script area. For two of the blocks, click on the arrow in the 48
   box and change the value to 40. The other two stay the same.
           Animation & Sound
1. Click on “Motion”
   from the color palate.

2. Click and pull the blocks             ,              ,
                , and                     onto the scripts area.

  Note: You need 2 of each for these blocks…
         Turn Left
         Turn Right
         Glide

         Ignore the numbers at this point.
         Animation & Sound

3. Enter your values and variables:
         • In the block                      type in 3
           for the seconds area and (x:) 140 with
           (y:) as 50
         • In another                      block type
           in 3 for the seconds and (x:) -135 with
           (y:) -157
• For the 2             blocks and the 2       blocks
  have 1 Left and 1 Right stay at 15 degrees
• Type in 30 degrees for the other 2 blocks

• The                  should say x: (0), y: (0)
          Animation & Sound
4. Using what you have learned so far
   stack your blocks into this order.
5. Click the green flag and watch your
   Sprite go!
6. Celebrate Success!!
7. Save your new script under
   “Exercise 2”.
8. Open a new page and be creative.
Examples

• Paul Bunyan
  http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/Broadhead/432801
• Brer Rabbit
  http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/VAOgracie/425415
• The Ant and the Grasshopper
• http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/ncosta2/365377
Potential Classroom Uses

• Great way to integrate educational subjects (e.g. Math and
  Language Arts).
• Secondary classes can create stories or games for
  elementary students.
• Teacher can create unique ways for students to learn/retain
  material.
• Multimedia integration and editing.
• Get elementary students started in programming.
Resources

• Scatch Home - http://scratch.mit.edu/
• Scratch Reference/Resources –
  http://scratch.mit.edu/howto
• Scratch Educators-
• http://scratched.media.mit.edu/
• Have Fun and Let’s
       Create!!

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:2
posted:7/6/2011
language:English
pages:42