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2. What is Punch Out

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					Guide to Punch Out




                     Version 1.0

                      April 2010
                                                     Table of Contents



1.   Introduction ............................................................................................................................ 3

2.   What is Punch Out? ................................................................................................................ 3

3.   What are the Advantages of Punch Out? ............................................................................... 5

4.   Some Caveats for Buyers & Suppliers ..................................................................................... 5

5.   Possible Combinations of Punch Out Content & Connection Options ................................... 6

6.   Different Methods of Punch Out Integration ......................................................................... 6

7.   Typical Example of a High Level Punch Out Session Flow ...................................................... 7

Annex A          Requirements of Implementing a Punch Out Site with PECOS ............................... 10




                                                                                                                                              2
        1.      Introduction


This ‘Guide to Punch Out’ is issued to suppliers during the invitation to tender stage of the procurement
cycle. It will help both buyers and suppliers set up punch out catalogues where this content option is
appropriate.

Assuming the content decision has been made for ‘punch out’, there is some key information that
buyers can obtain from suppliers throughout the procurement cycle. This can be done by ensuring the
supplier populates the ‘Supplier Questionnaire’ fully with guidance from the buyer where required and
clearly indicates the preference that they are a punch out supplier.

This document aims to provide comprehensive guidance on punch out in terms of advantages, caveats,
functionality and ultimately its implementation. Readers should also read the ‘Guide to Advanced
Connections’ document in conjunction with this guidance.


        2.      What is Punch Out?1


Punch Out Sites

In basic terms punch out allows buyers to securely access a supplier's online transactional web-site while
they are using their existing e-procurement system. The buyer uses the supplier's web-site to search and
select items for purchase and then fill their requisition. The requsition of items is then pulled back via
the internet in real time into the buyer's e-procurement system. The e-procurement system converts
the information into a requisition, which is worked, approved and converted to a purchase order which
is then sent to the supplier.

Punch out sites put simply are live, interactive catalogues running on suppliers websites. If a supplier
already has an e-commerce website, they will be able to modify it to support punch out. Punch out sites
communicate with e-procurement systems over the Internet by using cXML.

Punch out is preferable where:-

            The catalogue is large and products have configurable specifications such as computers or
             furniture;


        1
         Elements of the section above are lifted from the following source document: ‘PECOS Internet
        Procurement Manager, Version 11.0, Integration Interface Series, Punch Out Implementation Guide,
        Dated: 24th August 2009, Version 1.2, Author: Product Management.

                                                                                                           3
           Products have frequent price changes.

Punch Out Catalogues

Punch out catalogues are interactive catalogues, available at supplier websites. Punch out catalogues
are web server applications, written in a programming language such as ASP (Active Server Pages),
JavaScript, or CGI, that manage buyers’ punch out sessions.

Punch out catalogues accept punch out requests from e-procurement systems, identify the buying
organisation,and display the appropriate products and prices in HTML format. Requisitioners then select
goods / services, configure them if required, and select from the various options available to them.

At the end of the punch out session, the punch out site sends descriptions of the requisitioners selection
of goods / services in cXML format, to the e-procurement system being used within the customers
organisation.

cXML

Put simply, cXML stands for ‘Commercial Extensible Mark-up Language’ and it is basically a solution that
allows different systems to ‘talk’ to eachother in the simplest and most efficient way possible. It is
simply the connection type being used between the e-procurement system and the suppliers website.

Understanding cXML

The first step to becoming punch out enabled is to understand cXML. cXML is a meta-markup language
used to create syntaxes for languages. A cXML document is constructed based on a XML Document Type
Definition (DTD). Acting as a template, a DTD defines the content model of a cXML document, for
example, the valid order and nesting of elements, and the data types of attributes.

To implement a punch out website, the supplier must have a fundamental understanding of how to
create, parse, query, receive, and transmit XML data to and from a remote source. The basic tools to
process XML documents are XML parsers. These parsers are freely available from Microsoft and other
companies (for example, an XML parser is standard in Microsoft Internet Explorer).

Please refer to the ‘Guide to cXML Advanced Connections’ document for further information about
cXML if required.




                                                                                                         4
        3.       What are the Advantages of Punch Out?2


Some advantages are:-

        o    The ability to cost effectively re-use suppliers existing transactional websites to provide
             custom content to individual buyers.

        o    The flexibility which allows suppliers to control product information to ensure real-time
             quality content, including price and availability.

        o    Punch out is a low-cost way to provide easily customised content for many buyers, leading
             to economies of scale, enhanced customer experience, and reduced customer support
             costs.

        o    Buyers no longer need to manage catalogue content.

        o    Punch out enables requisitioners to access supplier catalogues for products / services that
             reside within the supplier’s website.

        o    Punch out eliminates the need for the supplier to send electronic catalogues to buying
             organisations.

        o    Punch out reduces buyer and supplier error.

        o    cXML is the most widely adopted Business to Business protocol today.


        4.       Some Caveats for Buyers & Suppliers

As already mentioned, punch out enables suppliers to manage their own catalogue content on the
buying organisations’ behalf. This ultimately means that the supplier is solely responsible for the
creation & maintenance of the content from initial contract award right through until contract end date.
Periodically, the buyer / contract manager will need to check the content to ensure it is still an accurate
reflection of the contractual arrangements.

There is an expectation upon the supplier to only publish accurate content which has been agreed as
part and parcel of the contractual arrangements.

        2
         Elements of the section above are lifted from the following source document: ‘PECOS Internet
        Procurement Manager, Version 11.0, Integration Interface Series, Punch Out Implementation Guide,
        Dated: 24th August 2009, Version 1.2, Author: Product Management.

                                                                                                           5
        5.      Possible Combinations of Punch Out Content & Connection Options



                    Content                        Connection Type                         Notes

        * * * Punch Out * * *               * * * cXML * * *                 Optimum Combination

        Punch Out                           Secure eMail                     2nd

        Punch Out                           eMail                            3rd

        Punch Out                           Fax                              4th

        Punch Out                           Post                             Last Resort



As can be seen from the table, there are five possible connection types that can be implemented with
punch out. The ‘best’ combination is really to implement punch out with a cXML connection type,
however punch out can also be implemented with the remaining four connection types if cXML is not
possible.

Once there have been discussions between the buyer and the supplier and a decision has been made on
which content and connection option will be implemented, there is supplementary guidance called
‘Pecos Punch Out Implementation Guide’ for which a non disclosure agreement needs to be signed. To
obtain this guidance please contact 0131 244 3618 or e-mail eprocurement@scotland.gsi.gov.uk


        6.      Different Methods of Punch Out Integration3


As can be expected, suppliers have chosen to implement cXML punch out in slightly different ways.

The providers of the PECOS e-procurement system (which is in wide use across the Scottish public
sector) can adapt to these differences. If you are a supplier new to cXML, it is recommended that
suppliers allow in the design for these small differences and methods of implementation that may likely
be encountered as suppliers connect to different eProcurement or eMarketplace systems other than
PECOS.




        3
         Elements of the section above are lifted from the following source document: ‘PECOS Internet
        Procurement Manager, Version 11.0, Integration Interface Series, Punch Out Implementation Guide,
        Dated: 24th August 2009, Version 1.2, Author: Product Management.

                                                                                                           6
PECOS supports two different methods of integration for the cXML standard for punch out and they are
as follows:-

1. In the most basic form, a requisitioner within a buying organisation punches out to the suppliers
website from PECOS by selecting the supplier site name from a list, shops, and then returns with the
items to PECOS. From that point on, there is no association between the items in the PECOS requisition
and the suppliers website. This kind of integration requires the least amount of work, and is appropriate
for simple non-configuration items with fixed SKUs. (Reference: POcXML01).

2. The second level of integration is when PECOS maintains, with each item, a reference back to the
suppliers website. This reference is used in two ways (Reference: POcXML02).

        It allows a user to punch back out to the suppliers website to view and / or edit the contents of
         the shopping list.

or

        A reference to a specific shopping cart is sent back to PECOS. This reference is used to identify
         any special configurations or other attributes that can’t be contained in the cXML message. This
         is essential if suppliers have items that require configuration, or have sub-lines that are not
         returned to the end users requisition on PECOS.

PECOS supports two methods of integration for the cXML Standard for punch out.


         7.      Typical Example of a High Level Punch Out Session Flow4

There now follows typical process flow steps that a requisitioner would go through in order to place an
electronic purchase order via a punch out content solution with a pre-determined supplier.

The punch out session is composed of several distinct steps:-

Steps 1 & 2: Punch Out Request

Requisitioner logs in, searches for desired items within their local catalogues by commodity, supplier, or
product description or by directly selecting a supplier from a list. When they select a punch out supplier,
the application opens a session within the supplier’s website and logs them into their account.




         4
          Elements of the section above are lifted from the following source document: ‘PECOS Internet
         Procurement Manager, Version 11.0, Integration Interface Series, Punch Out Implementation Guide,
         Dated: 24th August 2009, Version 1.2, Author: Product Management.

                                                                                                             7
How does it work?

When a requisitioner clicks a punch out item, the e-procurement system sends a ‘cXML punch out setup
request document’ to the supplier’s punch out website. The purpose of this request is to notify the
supplier’s website of the buyer’s identity (organisation) and to communicate the operation to be
performed. This allows the supplier to present content on their website that is filtered specifically to the
buyers requirements (i.e. the buyer’s specific pricing and items). Supported operations include the
following:

       create – initiates a new punch out session

       edit – re-opens a punch out session for editing

       inspect – re-opens a punch out session for inspection (no changes can be made to the data)

After the supplier’s website receives a request, it automatically sends back a punch out setup response
containing a URL that tells PECOS where to go to initiate a browsing session on the supplier’s website.
PECOS opens a session logged into an account on the supplier’s website. This account can be specific to
a region, a company, a department, or a requisitioner.

Step 3: Product Selection

Requisitioners select items from the supplier’s website using all the features and services provided
within (this functionality resides within the supplier’s website). Depending on the product or customer,
these features might include the following:

       Configurator tools for building customised products (for example, computers, organic
        compounds, or personalised products);

       Search engines for finding desired products from large catalogues;

       Views of normalised data for comparing products based on price, features, or availability (for
        example, MRO products);

       Views of attributes unique to a particular commodity (for example, printed materials, chemical
        and reagents, or services);

       Real-time pricing, stock, and availability checking;

       Automatic VAT and freight calculations based on ship-to destination, size, or quantity of items
        (not necessary to calculate during the punch out session).

Step 4: Check Out

The supplier’s website calculates the total cost of the requisitioner’s selections, including VAT, delivery,
and customer specific discounts. Requisitioners then click the supplier’s website’s “check out” button to
send the contents of the shopping cart to their requisitions within PECOS.

                                                                                                           8
How does it work?

When requisitioners click the supplier’s “check out” button, they submit an HTML form back to PECOS.
One form field consists of a cXML punch out order message containing product details and prices. The
supplier can also send hidden supplier cookies, which can later associate items with a specific shopping
session.

Step 5: Transmittal of Purchase Order

After the contents of the shopping cart have been passed from the supplier’s website to the
requisitioner’s requisition, the PECOS approval process takes over. When the requisition is approved,
PECOS converts it into a purchase order and sends it to the supplier for fulfilment in the agreed format.




                                                                                                            9
       Annex A          Requirements of Implementing a Punch Out Site with PECOS5


Overview

The term supplier in the context of punch out encompasses more than the traditional definition of the
term. The punch out protocol was designed as a flexible framework capable of transmitting data about
virtually any kind of product or service from any kind of supplier, distributor, aggregator, or
manufacturer. Example products and services include:

      Computers direct from a manufacturer or reseller;

      Chemicals and reagents from an aggregator;

      Office supplies from a distributor;

      Contract services from a temporary agency

Work Estimate

The following list estimates the work required for cXML punch out integration based on experience:

      Transactive site with XML infrastructure:

                3 weeks with in-house IT staff

                3-4 weeks with contractors

      Transactive site without XML infrastructure:

                4 weeks with in-house IT staff

                4-5 weeks with contractors

Technical Issues

Suppliers must meet the following technical requirements:

      Reliable Internet Connection—The web server infrastructure and internet connection must be
       extremely reliable. If end users cannot access remote content, they are likely to go to another
       supplier.


       5
        This whole section is lifted from the following source document: ‘PECOS Internet Procurement Manager,
       Version 11.0, Integration Interface Series, Punch Out Implementation Guide, Dated: 24th August 2009,
       Version 1.2, Author: Product Management.

                                                                                                          10
       Competent Website Administrators—The punch out website and supporting applications will
        require periodic maintenance and modification. Users’ needs and the supplier’s product
        offerings will change, so the supplier needs personnel to modify the supplier’s punch out
        infrastructure.

       Support for Basic Transactions—punch out websites do not need to support all cXML
        functionality, but they must support the following required transactions:

                 Punch out Setup Request

                 Punch out Setup Response

Suggested Detailed Discussion

The most basic form of integration involves the use of only the punch out setup request, punch out
setup response and punch out order message. In this process, the end user of PECOS selects the
suppliers site from a list of sites that support punch put. PECOS sends the punch out setup request
message to the supplier’s site, specifying an operation of “create”. The supplier’s site responds with a…

PunchOut Setup Response

At this point, the end user’s browser will display the supplier’s “Home” shopping page. The end user
may select whatever functions suppliers have to offer, such as searching and browsing catalogues. The
end user adds items to a “shopping basket” that the punch out site manages until the end user “checks
out” of the site.

The end user is not really completing their shopping, but is simply returning the items they have chosen
to their requisition in PECOS. Suppliers should send back to PECOS the punch out order message as
described in the ‘cXML User’s Guide’. What actually happens is that the suppliers system creates a page
with the punch out order message encoded into a form field (cxml-url encoded). When the end user
clicks the suppliers “checkout” or “return to PECOS” button, the form is posted to PECOS where the
punch out order message is parsed, and the specified content added to the end user’s requisition.

The next level of integration adds support for punch out setup request message with the INSPECT and
EDIT operation options. When the suppliers system receives an edit or inspect operation, suppliers can
attempt to find the end user’s original shopping basket, or simply re-create the basket based on the
content of the punch out setup request message.

From PECOS you will only get a single item specified in this message, even if the end user has more than
one item from the supplier in their requisition. If the supplier wants to associate this message with the
original shopping basket, they will need to create the association based on either the SKU of the item, or
the ‘Supplier Part Auxiliary ID’ for the item.

Typically the ‘Supplier Part Auxiliary ID’ is used, and suppliers actually place a unique code into that field
when the punch out order message was originally returned to PECOS. That number, when returned to


                                                                                                            11
suppleirs in the punch out setup request message, can be the suppliers key to find the end user’s
original shopping basket.

If suppliers require the use of the ‘Supplier Part Auxiliary ID’ as a unique identifier, they must also
support the cXML order request method of accepting purchase orders from the PECOS system.

There are small differences in how companies have implemented the cXML Standard. In the punch out
setup request message there are a number of elements that have been interpreted differently by
different suppliers. The choice each supplier makes is up to them, as long as they let the customer and
service provider know what they have elected to do.

One area in particular that is subject to differing interpretations is the FROM, TO, and SENDER elements
in the header. According to the cXML User’s Guide, the FROM field represents the “Originator” (buying
organisation), and the Sender field represents the “Previous relaying entity”.

The shared secret is defined in the Sender field. In the case of PECOS coming directly into a punch out
site, these two fields would nominally contain identical information. In order to glean something slightly
more useful out of these fields, we are recommending that suppliers accept in the FROM field an
identity of “elcom” with a domain of “elcom.com”. The SENDER field will contain the end user’s email
address (up to 255 characters), or a fixed string of the suppliers choice, with a domain of “Network User
Id”. The TO field will be the suppliers DUNS number, or another character string supplied to elcom for
use in place of the DUNS number.

In the punch out setup request element, we send two extrinsics: USER and EMAIL. The USER extrinsic is
the end user’s actual name as recorded in the e-procurement system. There are no assurances of the
content of this field, except that it will not be empty. The EMAIL field should be the end user’s valid
email address, but this is not checked for correctness.

Example cXML

PunchOutSetupRequest

Below is a sample of the punch out setup request message as used in the default configuration:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

<!DOCTYPE cXML SYSTEM "cXML.dtd">

<cXML payloadID="Elco.test" timestamp="2001-04-24T08:44:42-05:00" version="1.0">

<Header>

<From>

<Credential domain="NetworkId">

<Identity>This will be the Users email address, or a string you specify</Identity>

                                                                                                          12
</Credential>

</From>

<To>

<Credential domain="DUNS">

<Identity>Your DUNS number goes here</Identity>

</Credential>

</To>

<Sender>

<Credential domain="NetworkUserId">

<Identity>This is the User's email address</Identity>

<SharedSecret>A password you send to us</SharedSecret>

</Credential>

<UserAgent>PECOS</UserAgent>

</Sender>

</Header>

<Request deploymentMode="test">

<PunchOutSetupRequest operation="create">

<BuyerCookie>10 - just remember this and send it back to us</BuyerCookie>

<Extrinsic name="User">lbudnick</Extrinsic>

<Extrinsic name="Email">6178521156@mobile.att.net</Extrinsic>

<BrowserFormPost>

<URL>http://10.3.5.9/pm/en/punchback.asp</URL>

</BrowserFormPost>

<SupplierSetup>

<URL>http://The URL that we are posting to.</URL>

</SupplierSetup>

                                                                            13
</PunchOutSetupRequest>

</Request>

</cXML>

If this message were an EDIT or INSPECT operation, then there would be additional information in the
form of the Item Out field. This field specifies the Supplier Part ID and the Supplier Part Auxiliary ID.
Since the Supplier Part ID is displayed to the User, this is usually the actual item SKU. Both these strings
originally came from your site in the PunchOut Order Message and are returned to the supplier in the
EDIT or INSPECT operation messages without modification.

The Supplier Part Auxiliary ID is the place to keep internal links if the supplier wants to be able to relate
a specific EDIT or INSPECT operation back to a previously established shopping cart. In this field they
would enter a unique string representing either the specific part or a shopping basket ID that will allow
them to locate the appropriate records when handling the EDIT or INSPECT operation.

Alternately, the supplier could choose not to remember the end user’s original shopping cart, and simply
use the EDIT or INSPECT operations to permit the end user to see detail about a specific item. In that
case the Supplier Part Auxiliary ID could be left blank.

PunchOut Order Message

Below is an example of a PunchOut Order Message: a shopping basket returned to PECOS from a
supplier’s punchout site.

<?xml version="1.0"?>

<!DOCTYPE cXML SYSTEM "http://xml.cxml.org/schemas/cXML/1.2.009/cXML.dtd">

<cXML payloadID="3470663390901130938080.2895625" timestamp="2009-01-13T09:38:08+00:00">

<Header>

<From>

<Credential domain="DUNS">

<Identity>727664321</Identity>

</Credential>

</From>

<To>

<Credential domain="DUNS">

<Identity>FromParty</Identity>
                                                                                                            14
</Credential>

</To>

<Sender>

<Credential domain="DUNS">

<Identity>ToParty</Identity>

</Credential>

<UserAgent>ISA on-line ordering</UserAgent>

</Sender>

</Header>

<Message>

<PunchOutOrderMessage>

<BuyerCookie>115</BuyerCookie>

<PunchOutOrderMessageHeader operationAllowed="edit">

<Total>

<Money currency="GBP">42.71</Money>

</Total>

</PunchOutOrderMessageHeader>

<ItemIn quantity="5">

<ItemID>

<SupplierPartID>03092</SupplierPartID>

<SupplierPartAuxiliaryID>93743</SupplierPartAuxiliaryID>

</ItemID>

<ItemDetail>

<UnitPrice>

<Money currency="GBP">3.12</Money>

</UnitPrice>

                                                           15
<Description xml:lang="en">Sellotape Double Sided Tape</Description>

<UnitOfMeasure>EA</UnitOfMeasure>

<Classification domain="UNSPSC"/>

</ItemDetail>

</ItemIn>

<ItemIn quantity="5">

<ItemID>

<SupplierPartID>23548</SupplierPartID>

<SupplierPartAuxiliaryID>97743</SupplierPartAuxiliaryID>

</ItemID>

<ItemDetail>

<UnitPrice>

<Money currency="GBP">0.56</Money>

</UnitPrice>

<Description xml:lang="en">Sellotape Clear Tape</Description>

<UnitOfMeasure>EA</UnitOfMeasure>

<Classification domain="UNSPSC"/>

</ItemDetail>

</ItemIn>

<ItemIn quantity="1">

<ItemID>

<SupplierPartID>36-189</SupplierPartID>

<SupplierPartAuxiliaryID>97743</SupplierPartAuxiliaryID>

</ItemID>

<ItemDetail>

<UnitPrice>

                                                                       16
<Money currency="GBP">6.76</Money>

</UnitPrice>

<Description xml:lang="en">Staple Gun 813-T</Description>

<UnitOfMeasure>EA</UnitOfMeasure>

<Classification domain="UNSPSC">44121615</Classification>

</ItemDetail>

</ItemIn>

<ItemIn quantity="10">

<ItemID>

<SupplierPartID>35461</SupplierPartID>

<SupplierPartAuxiliaryID>90743</SupplierPartAuxiliaryID>

</ItemID>

<ItemDetail>

<UnitPrice>

<Money currency="GBP">0.95</Money>

</UnitPrice>

<Description xml:lang="en">Pritt Glue Stick 40g Large</Description>

<UnitOfMeasure>EA</UnitOfMeasure>

<Classification domain="UNSPSC">44121631</Classification>

</ItemDetail>

</ItemIn>

<ItemIn quantity="5">

<ItemID>

<SupplierPartID>36523</SupplierPartID>

<SupplierPartAuxiliaryID>97743</SupplierPartAuxiliaryID>

</ItemID>

                                                                      17
<ItemDetail>

<UnitPrice>

<Money currency="GBP">0.31</Money>

</UnitPrice>

<Description xml:lang="en">Masking Tape 25mm</Description>

<UnitOfMeasure>EA</UnitOfMeasure>

<Classification domain="UNSPSC">31201517</Classification>

</ItemDetail>

</ItemIn>

<ItemIn quantity="10">

<ItemID>

<SupplierPartID>20631</SupplierPartID>

<SupplierPartAuxiliaryID>93773</SupplierPartAuxiliaryID>

</ItemID>

<ItemDetail>

<UnitPrice>

<Money currency="GBP">0.27</Money>

</UnitPrice>

<Description xml:lang="en">Bostik Blue Tack Handy Size</Description>

<UnitOfMeasure>EA</UnitOfMeasure>

<Classification domain="UNSPSC">44121631</Classification>

</ItemDetail>

</ItemIn>

<ItemIn quantity="1">

<ItemID>

<SupplierPartID>75024</SupplierPartID>

                                                                       18
<SupplierPartAuxiliaryID>30773</SupplierPartAuxiliaryID>

</ItemID>

<ItemDetail>

<UnitPrice>

<Money currency="GBP">11.5</Money>

</UnitPrice>

<Description xml:lang="en">Avery Smart Stamp Labels 7/2</Description>

<UnitOfMeasure>EA</UnitOfMeasure>

<Classification domain="UNSPSC">55121606</Classification>

</ItemDetail>

</ItemIn>

</PunchOutOrderMessage>

</Message>

</cXML>




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