Philadelphia Flyers Daily Clips by wuyunyi

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									Philadelphia Flyers Daily Clips- June 25, 2011

FLYERS Headlines
1. Philadelphia Inquirer- Flyers' No. 1 pick doesn't lack confidence
2. Philadelphia Inquirer- Flyers draft center Sean Couturier
3. Philadelphia Inquirer- A day later, the Flyers sort through the changes
4. Philadelphia Daily News- Schenn eager to work hard to make Flyers this year
5. Philadelphia Daily News- Stamkos still without a deal in Tampa; could he be a Flyer?
6. Philadelphia Daily News- Flyers grab Couturier at No. 8
7. Philadelphia Daily News- Carter's agent: Holmgren lied
8. Philadelphia Daily News- Pronger won't nominate himself for 'C'
9. Philadelphia Daily News- Flyers are not done yet
10.Philly.com - Sean Couturier bio box
11. CSNphilly.com- Flyers select center Couturier eighth overall
12. CSNphilly.com- Flyers' trade acquisitions excited to join new club
13. CSNphilly.com- Snider: Don't expect more major moves from Flyers
14. CSNphilly.com- Pronger reacts to Flyers' trades, captaincy rumors
15. CSNphilly.com- Greenberg: Post trades, Flyers need size at center
16. Bucks County Courier- Flyers feel fortunate to grab Couturier at No. 8 overall
17. Bucks County Courier- Pronger not thinking "captain''...yet
18. Camden Courier-Post- Flyers take Couturier with eighth pick overall
19. Camden Courier-Post- Overhaul gives Flyers incentive
20. Philadelphiaflyers.com- Flyers Select Sean Couturier Eighth Overall
21. Philadelphiaflyers.com- Pronger Reacts to Flyers Trades
22. NHL.com- Couturier stays the course despite adversity
23. NHL.com- Couturier's selection reinforces Flyers' depth
24. NHL.com- Pronger understands how Richards, Carter feel
25. NHL.com- Flyers set to move ahead after dealing 2 stars
26. TSN.ca- Numbers game: Flyers sign Bryzgalov

NHL Headlines
1. TSN.ca- Maple Leafs acquire defenceman Liles from Avalanche
2. TSN.ca- Campbell waives no- trade clause, dealt to Panthers for Olesz
3. TSN.ca- Numbers Game: Campbell going to Florida
4. TSN.ca- Sharks Trade Setoguchi, First- rounder to wild for Burns
5. TSN.ca- Numbers Game: Sharks bring in Burns, Ship out Setoguchi
6. TSN.ca-Blackhawks trade Brouwer to Capitals for First-rounder
7. TSN.ca- Numbers Game: Caps add power with Brouwer
8. TSN.ca- Numbers Game: Maple Leafs ass Liles
9. TSN.ca- Lightning Ink Brewers to four-year deal
10. TSN.ca- Winnipeg Jets Officially name Noel head coach
11. TSN.ca- Sabres announce agreement to purchase Americans of the AHL
12. TSN.ca-Maple Leafs add primer Thrashers GM Dudley to front office
13. TSN.ca- Canadiens re-sign Markov to three-year, $17.25 Million contract
14. ESPN.com- Edmonton drafts Ryan Nugent-Hopkins
15. ESPN.com- Hawks deal Brian Campbell to Panthers
16. ESPN.com- Winger Devin Setoguchi dealt to Wild
17. ESPN.com- Team to be Winnipeg Jets
18. ESPN.com- Winnipeg hires Claude Noel as coach
19. ESPN.com- Lightning re-sign Eric Brewer

FLYERS Articles

1. Philadelphia Inquirer- Flyers' No. 1 pick doesn't lack confidence

Sam Carchidi

In Friday's first-round of the NHL draft, the Flyers selected 18-year-old Sean Couturier, a 6-foot-
4, 197-pound center who hopes to earn a lineup spot this season.

Hey, the kid doesn't confidence.

The high-scoring Couturier was drafted with the eighth overall pick, acquired from Columbus
Thursday in the Jeff Carter trade.

A native of Phoenix, Couturier had 36 goals and 60 assists in 58 regular-season games for
Drummondville in the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League last season. His plus-55 rating was
second in the league.

Here were Couturier's thoughts in a conference call after he was selected on Friday:

 Q. What was your initial reaction when you heard your name called?
You were projected in the five spot. You fell a little bit. But what was
going through your mind while you were sitting there?

SEAN COUTURIER: I was just enjoying the moment. I'm really happy to
be part of the Philadelphia Flyers. It's a great honor. I mean, it's a
wonderful day.

Q. What do you know about the organization?

SEAN COUTURIER: I mean, they have a lot of history. It's a great
team, big guys. I'm looking forward to being part of it.

Q. Sean, was it tough sitting there after those picks went by and
not having been selected?

SEAN COUTURIER: Not really. Anything can happen in a draft. I
mean, once you get to camp it's a whole new story. I'm looking forward to
it.

Q. Were you getting nervous?
SEAN COUTURIER: Yeah, for sure. Since I got at the rink I was
nervous, so it wasn't any different.

Q. Today after they traded away two centers, did you like the
thoughts of there being an opening there?

SEAN COUTURIER: Yeah, maybe, but I think it's going to be up to me
to work hard this summer and show what I've got. I can't control the
decision after that.

But my main goal for sure is going to be part of the team.

Q. The Flyers didn't have any picks coming into this draft in the
first round. Did anybody talk to you from the organization this year?

SEAN COUTURIER: No, actually my first meeting was yesterday, so it
felt pretty special knowing they just moved up. I knew they had a lot of
interest, but like you said, anything can happen in the draft. I didn't
really know what to expect.

Q. Was there anything that they said that made you think they would
pick you?

SEAN COUTURIER: Not really. It's tough to get a feeling with all
the teams. I mean, everyone's had different opinions, and I didn't really
know what to expect.

Q. (Indiscernible)?

SEAN COUTURIER: Yeah, I haven't really had time to think about that.
It's pretty special just being part of the Philadelphia Flyers. I'm really
looking forward to getting there.

Q. Have you set a goal for yourself or path for yourself of where
you want to be this time next year? I mean, obviously you're signed up
with the Flyers, but do you have any thought on when you want to be there?

SEAN COUTURIER: For sure my main goal is going to be to try to make
a spot on the roster. We'll go from now and work hard, keep working hard
during the summer and improve myself and be ready for camp. Once I get
there, I just want to show what I've got.

Q. When you're a top-rated guy, you often think about going to a
team that's struggling. Now the Flyers move up and grab you. What does it
mean to be playing for a team that could be contending right away.
Especially when you see what happened to Tyler Seguin this year?

SEAN COUTURIER: Yes, I haven't had time to think too much about
that. But it's pretty special to be on such a great team and a great
organization. I'm looking forward to going there.

Q. Reflect back on your junior career and how that helped your
development?

SEAN COUTURIER: Yeah, I was really lucky to be part of a great
organization my three years in Drummondville were awesome. They treated me
well. They helped me a lot in my development and I thanked them. It's
probably one of the reasons why I'm here today.

Q. How far do you think you are from making it to the NHL?

SEAN COUTURIER: I haven't really talked to them too much. I mean,
me personally I've got to get stronger overall physically and improve my
explosiveness, my skating. But there is still a lot of work to be done. We'll see in training
camp.

2. Philadelphia Inquirer- Flyers draft center Sean Couturier

Tim Rohan

Sean Couturier had been a Flyer for less than five minutes before he was dubbed the heir to one
of the gaping holes at center left by Thursday's trades of Mike Richards and Jeff Carter.

Couturier put on the bright orange sweater and Flyers hat and posed for a picture, with one arm
wrapped around the man who traded away the two players who no longer blocked his potential
swift rise to the NHL.

 Flyers' 2011 draft picks Meet the new Flyers 2010-2011 Flyers fights "Philadelphia started
this yesterday with the trading of Carter and Richards [and] they just found a replacement for one
of them," a TSN announcer boomed soon after Flyers general manager Paul Holmgren
announced he was picking the sliding Couturier.

At one point earlier this season, Couturier was considered a candidate to be the top pick in the
draft, along with defenseman Adam Larsson, who ended up going fourth. The Flyers were able
to snag the 6-foot-31/2, nearly 200-pound Couturier with the No. 8 pick they got in the Carter
trade a day earlier.

"This guy's going to be one of those players that everyone's going to say, 'How did he slip?' "
another analyst gushed as text at the lower right of the screen said the newest Flyer compared to
Jordan Staal.
"We're similar in some ways," Couturier said.

Couturier explained that he suffered from mononucleosis last year, and that may have slowed
him down this past season, hurting his fitness and dropping his draft stock. He was on the Flyers'
radar as soon as they got the No. 8 pick in the Carter trade; Couturier's first meeting with the
team came on the eve of the draft.

The first question posed to Holmgren after the pick was whether he thought Couturier would be
there at No. 8: "No, no we didn't," Holmgren said.

The very next question was about Carter and Richards. The moves are still at the forefront of
anything the Flyers do as a franchise.

"I was actually pretty surprised; didn't really expect it," Couturier said of the trades. "After
thinking about it, I knew I could be drafted there."

The lefthanded center has good size. He was named the MVP of the Quebec Major Junior
Hockey League last season as he starred for Drummondville, scoring 96 points on 36 goals and
60 assists. The prior season, Couturier also tallied 96 points (41 goals, 55 assists) in the QMJHL,
leading the league in scoring at the ripe age of 17. The last 17-year-old to lead the league in
scoring was Sidney Crosby.

Known as a two-way player who is willing to do the dirty work in the defensive zone, Couturier
may be most proud of his plus-55 and plus-62 ratings the last two seasons in the QMJHL.

"I think Sean is a player who does a good job in his own zone for the number of points that he
puts up in the Quebec league," Holmgren said.

Couturier described his own game: "I'm pretty reliable defensively, and offensively I'm pretty
good at protecting and controlling the puck."

Now with the 18-year-old Couturier and the 19-year-old Brayden Schenn, who joined the Flyers
in the Richards deal, at center, Holmgren has two young players who will get a shot to make the
team in training camp. They actually played together on team Canada at the 2011 World Junior
Championships.

"I think with both of these young men we're going to be patient," Holmgren said. "We believe
[Schenn is] ready, but again, those players, ultimately, answer the questions [if they are ready]."

Hockey is in Couturier's blood. His father, Sylvain, was a career minor-leaguer after being
selected No. 65 overall in 1986 by the Los Angeles Kings. A center and left winger, Sylvain
played 33 games for the Kings over the course of his career.

His son is now a Flyer, with his sights on taking full advantage of that newfound hole left by
Carter and Richards.
"My main goal is to make the NHL next year," Couturier said. "Once I get to camp I'll be
prepared."

3. Philadelphia Inquirer- A day later, the Flyers sort through the changes

Tim Rohan

The way Chris Pronger sees it, the NHL is a cold, unforgiving business. Thursday's upheaval of
everything you thought you knew about the Flyers came with a price: In are goalie Ilya
Bryzgalov, center Brayden Schenn, and right wingers Jakub Voracek and Wayne Simmonds.
That's good.

Out are Mike Richards and Jeff Carter. Not so good.

 Flyers' 2011 draft picks Meet the new Flyers 2010-2011 Flyers fights "I think always, when
you make a move to get a goalie, you've got to find the money somewhere," said Pronger, who
has been traded four times in his 17-year career.

"Unfortunately for us, [Richards and Carter] were traded. You know, it sucks.

"As a teammate, you hate to see guys go. They were, for all intents and purposes, the face of the
franchise for four of their six years. . . . I'm sure it's tough for them. . . . This is all they really
know. But I've been traded a number of times, and sometimes a move is healthy for you."

The Flyers certainly hope it is good for the players they acquired. Whatever happens, their locker
room got a lot bigger and younger.

Schenn, at 6-foot-1, 190 pounds, is 19. Voracek, a 6-2, 214-pounder, is 21; and Simmonds, a 6-2,
183-pounder, is 22.

During his four years in the WHL, Schenn proved he could be a playmaker as he picked up 116
goals and 199 assists in 224 games.

He got a taste of the NHL in eight games this past season with the Los Angeles Kings when he
picked up two assists. He also played seven regular-season games for the King's AHL affiliate
and recorded three goals and four assists.

It's that resumé that has Schenn - and Flyers general manager Paul Holmgren - confident in the
center's ability to fit in with the Flyers.

"I think I'll be able to compete for a spot next year," Schenn said Friday, adding that he can be
both physical and offensively productive.

"I'm looking forward to being a part of the organization. [Simmonds] and I got traded for a great
player [Richards] who has established himself."
Voracek said he knows there are a "lot of expectations from me."

"That's why I'm working hard this summer in Montreal," he said. "I like to play on the boards.
I'm an up-and-down winger. I try to play the best way on both ends. . . . I just have to work on
my shot a little bit more in this offseason. . . . I would say I'm more of a playmaker than a scorer
or shooter.

"This team has a chance to win the Cup every year, and it's going to be a lot of fun."

Meanwhile, both Richards and Carter were in shock Friday. Richards said he and Carter never
expected to be traded and could not dream of leaving the Flyers. Carter had not made any
comments.

"It's disappointing to be traded from a place like Philadelphia, where hockey is so big," Richards
told the Los Angeles Times. "Decisions have to be made. . . . I think it was more of a business
decision than a personal one, which doesn't make it easier but at the same time allows you to
sleep a little better at night.

"I think when you underachieve as a team, there's a lot of fingers that get pointed. I didn't have a
problem with them pointing at me. [This] was tough for me. It wasn't a long conversation [with
Holmgren] but one that I didn't think I was ever going to have to do."

Pronger said that the day after a trade was always the toughest.

"They both played their hearts out in Philly," the defenseman said. "But sometimes you've got to
make tough decisions, and you've got to make moves that sometimes may hurt and may feel like
you're making your team worse to make it better."

Flyers left wing James van Riemsdyk said he is "embracing this challenge" of being a new team
leader.

"This is the kind of stuff you live for as a player," he told the Associated Press. "You kind of live
to be put in that role. You want to take it and run with it."

Richards and Carter were the heart and soul - and offense - of a Flyers team that fell just short of
hockey's holy grail in 2010 and disappointed in its encore in 2011.

On paper this past season, the Flyers had the third-best record in the NHL and a No. 2 playoff
seed in hand. But their three-headed goalie issue was exacerbated by Tim Thomas' performance
in the Boston Bruins' second-round sweep of the Flyers, who allowed 20 goals in the series.

Enter Bryzgalov. Exit Carter and Richards, whose play wasn't the same during the 2011 playoffs
as it was in 2010.
"We got off to a good start [this past season]," Pronger said. "You could argue no one seemed to
think we had a problem then. But as the season wore on, for whatever reason, we just didn't turn
that corner and continue to get better and peak at the right time."

4. Philadelphia Daily News- Schenn eager to work hard to make Flyers this year

Frank Seravalli


ST. PAUL, Minn. - Aside from his driveway, Brayden Schenn has only faced older brother Luke
once on the ice.
That might change this season. But Brayden will have to earn a spot on the Flyers' roster first to
have four cracks this season at Luke, one of the rising stars on the Toronto Maple Leafs.
"It would be a lot of fun," Brayden Schenn said yesterday in his first media availability since
being acquired Thursday from Los Angeles in a deal that saw Mike Richards head west. "There's
always a little bit of a battle that we have going. I've got to get there first and make it and prove
myself."
Schenn, the No. 5 overall pick in 2009, was hanging at Kings teammate Jarrett Stoll's charity
golf outing in western Canada when he found out about the trade.
"It was certainly unexpected," Schenn said.
Luckily, Flyers forward Scott Hartnell was at the same golf tournament - and was quick to
welcome his newest teammate.
"I had made some good friends on the Kings," Schenn said. "But it was good to get the inside
scoop from Scott."
Many consider Schenn to be the jewel of Thursday's trade, which included Kings forward Wayne
Simmonds and a second-round pick. Schenn was on the Kings roster for 25 games last season as
a 19-year-old, but played in only eight games before being sent back to juniors for more
seasoning.
Ironically, Schenn said he has tried to model his game after Richards. Schenn is expected to be in
the Flyers' Opening Night lineup if he continues to progress this summer.
"I try to be good in both ends and try to put up some points," Schenn said. "I got some
experience when I was up [in the NHL]. I think playing in the World Juniors and Memorial Cup
really helped prepare me. I think I'm ready to come into camp and compete for a spot next year."
Agent: Holmgren lied
Jeff Carter has yet to publicly address his stunning trade on Thursday, but that's because his
agent said yesterday he remains in total shock.
According to Rick Curran, his Philadelphia-based agent, who candidly spoke to the Columbus
Dispatch in the lobby of the Hilton Minneapolis yesterday morning, Carter had gotten
reassurance from general manager Paul Holmgren as recently as this week in a face-to-face
meeting that he would not be traded.
Carter signed an 11-year, $58 million extension on Nov. 13, 2010. His no-trade clause was set to
kick in on July 1, 2012.
"Jeff called me and asked about the rumors 2 weeks ago," Curran told the Dispatch. "He figured
teams were asking about him anyways. I called Paul, and I asked him if this is something we
should be concerned about.
"Paul assured me that there was nothing to worry about, that they weren't interested in trading
Jeff. He told me that Jeff could come in and meet with him to tell him the same things. And he
did. He assured him that they weren't trading him."
When asked about this week's conversation with Carter, Holmgren shot down Curran's version of
the story.
"I was in the room, and I'm not sure I would word it that way," Holmgren said. "That's between
Jeff and I. That was a hard phone call for me to make, too [about the trade]. It was a short
conversation. I happen to like Jeff a lot. It's just one of those things."
Pronger the next captain?
Chris Pronger said he was fishing with his kids "up in the bush" in Canada when he found out
about the Flyers' decision to gut the nucleus of their team on Thursday.
Even as the heir apparent to Mike Richards' captaincy, having worn the 'C' in St. Louis and
Anaheim, Pronger said he hasn't yet begun to think about the possibility of that role with the
Flyers.
"I haven't put that much thought into it, to be honest with you," Pronger said. "This is all very,
very fresh to a lot of us. I'd have to talk to [Holmgren] and [coach Peter Laviolette] and see what
their thoughts are, and go from there.

"You don't nominate yourself. I've never been part of a team where somebody nominates
himself. I think that may be a little bit premature to start talking about stuff like that. It's 1 day
after two huge trades on our team and in the history of the Flyers, so I don't think that's in
anybody's minds right now."
Pronger also couldn't say for sure whether the Flyers are a better team yesterday than they were
Thursday, having not known much about any of the three players the Flyers picked up.
But he did say that it might be too soon to judge, even though the Flyers traded away the heart
and soul of their team and their leading goal scorer.
"I haven't put the X's and O's together yet," Pronger said. "You've got to make tough decisions.
Sometimes


5. Philadelphia Daily News- Stamkos still without a deal in Tampa; could he be a Flyer?
Frank Seravalli

ST. PAUL, Minn. - Another day came and went yesterday without a contract extension for
highly coveted restricted free-agent forward Steven Stamkos in Tampa Bay.

On Wednesday in Las Vegas, Stamkos said he thought that a deal with the Lightning was "close"
and that he wasn't worried.

But Tampa Bay, a small-market team with rumored financial questions that never spends near
the salary-cap limit, has had nearly a month since its season ended to knock out a deal with
Stamkos.

Stamkos, 21, is already one of the NHL's three best players. No player has more than his 96
goals over the last two seasons.

Tampa Bay general manager Steve Yzerman reportedly has been seeking to sign Stamkos in the
$7 million-per-year neighborhood.

As each day peels off the calendar toward July 1, his situation will get more interesting for Flyers
fans.

According to sources familiar with the Flyers' thinking, the front office reportedly has been
salivating with nearly $10.2 million in salary-cap space for next season.

Nothing can happen until July 1, when Stamkos would need to be signed to an offer sheet that
Tampa Bay either can accept (in exchange for four first-round draft picks as compensation) or
choose to match.

A source close to Tampa Bay told the Daily News the team would be hard pressed to match an
outrageous offer; Vincent Lecavalier is due $50 million over the next five seasons and Ryan
Malone has an expensive long-term deal.

Yzerman has said he is "prepared for anything."

The Flyers are not permitted to comment publicly on any hypothetical involving Stamkos, as it
would be a violation of the NHL's tampering rule. Of course, many variables come into play,
such as the Flyers' cap space, Tampa Bay's ongoing negotiations, and even another team getting
into the mix with an offer sheet.

Toronto general manager Brian Burke reportedly would be willing to sign Stamkos to an offer
sheet for nearly $9 million per season.

But as each day passes without a new deal for Stamkos, the situation becomes a little more
interesting. It isn't out of the realm of possibility for the Flyers.
Voracek ready

Within just a couple hours on Thursday, Jakub Voracek went from playing on a team in a small
Columbus market that is a perennial doormat to the country's fourth-biggest media market and a
perennial contender.

"I was pretty happy," Voracek said yesterday on a conference call, discussing the trade for Jeff
Carter that brings him to Philadelphia. "I hear only great things about the Flyers organization,
and it's an honor to play there. I'm basically starting a new life, and this team has a chance to win
the Stanley Cup every year."

Voracek, 21, collected 134 points in his first three NHL seasons, but hasn't exactly had the
scoring talent around him in Columbus that the former seventh overall pick will now have
around him.

He is well regarded as a two-way player with his offensive upside, but his hockey sense has
always been under question, with his turnover vulnerability. The restricted free agent could
command as much as $2.5 million from the Flyers in what is expected to be a short-term deal. *

6. Philadelphia Daily News- Flyers grab Couturier at No. 8

Frank Seravalli

ST. PAUL, Minn. -- With the No. 8 overall selection in the 2011 NHL Entry Draft, the Flyers
selected... a player very few thought would slide to the No. 8 spot in center Sean Couturier.

Couturier was ranked as the No. 5 overall draft pick by the central scouting agencies. At one
point during the scouting rankings, Couturier was ranked as the No. 1 available prospect.

It was a surprising turn of events in not only that Couturier fell to No. 8, but that the Flyers
decided on a center instead of a defenseman just one day after Paul Holmgren unloaded Jeff
Carter and Mike Richards because of an “overload” at the position.

The Flyers likely would have selected Dougie Hamilton, a strong, two-way defenseman from the
OHL if Couturier had not been available. Hamilton went to Boston at No. 9 instead.

In a near instantaneous interview on TSN after making the pick, Holmgren said he “never
thought” Couturier would still be on the board.

Earlier in the week, Holmgren said the Flyers would pick the best player available regardless of
position.

Couturier racked up 96 points in 58 games for Drumondville (QMJHL) this past this season. At
6-foot-4 and 195 pounds, the 18-year-old already has a full-sized frame. He is slated to top out at
6-foot-5 and 225 pounds. The scouting reports list him as a solid, two-way forward with good
penalty killing abilities. The one weakness reported is his skating. His speed turning and pivoting
is said to be subpar.

7. Philadelphia Daily News- Carter's agent: Holmgren lied

Frank Seravalli

ST. PAUL, Minn. -- If you have been looking for a reason, aside from sheer disappointment, that
Jeff Carter has yet to publicly address his stunning trade to Columbus on Thursday, listen to his
agent.

Carter’s agent, Philadelphia based Rick Curran, told the Columbus Dispatch on Friday that
Flyers general manager Paul Holmgren lied to Carter earlier in the week in a face-to-face
meeting.

“He is disappointed,” Curran said on Friday morning in the Minneapolis Hilton lobby. “But
that’s no reflection of Columbus. It’s more that he made a commitment to Philadelphia.”

Curran said that commitment started three years ago when his client was presented with an offer
sheet when he was a restricted free agent. Carter declined.

“He had the opportunity to go somewhere on an offer sheet,” Curran said. “The Flyers told him
that he would be one of their cornerstone players.”

Then, last November, in the final year of his 3-year, $15 million deal, the Flyers approached
Carter to sign a long-term deal.

“They said that they would need some help on the AAV [average annual value] of the deal [a
longer deal to produce a lower cap number],” Curran said. “He said that he liked it here [in
Philadelphia] and liked his teammates. He said that if they wanted him, he would make the
commitment.”

Carter, 26, inked an 11-year, $58 million deal on Nov. 13, 2010. He surely could have earned
more on the open market. Instead, Carter did what he could to stay in Philly.

Last summer, he purchased a new beach house in Sea Isle City, N.J., fully expecting to be in the
area for the duration of his career. That all changed on Thursday, when his life was turned upside
down on Friday.

His no-trade clause was set to kick in on July 1, 2012.

The shocking part is that Carter and Holmgren met face-to-face earlier in the week, to discuss the
apparent rumors, and Holmgren re-assured Carter he was not being moved.
Carter had long been discussed as an option for the Flyers to move once they acquired Ilya
Bryzgalov’s rights on June 7. It was apparent that they would need to move a significant chunk
of salary in order to sign the free agent goaltender. Carter’s cap number was the only fit.

“Jeff called me and asked about the rumors two weeks ago,” Curran said. “He figured teams
were asking about him anyways. I called Paul and I asked him if this is something we should be
concerned about.

“Paul assured me that there was nothing to worry about, that they weren’t interested in trading
Jeff. He told me that Jeff could come in and meet with him to tell him the same things. And he
did. He assured him that they weren’t trading him.”

Rumored or not, you can imagine Carter’s shock when he heard about the trade on Thursday.

8. Philadelphia Daily News- Pronger won't nominate himself for 'C'

Frank Seravalli

ST. PAUL, Minn. -- Having been traded four different times in his career, Chris Pronger could
sympathize with Mike Richards and Jeff Carter yesterday.

“The Philadelphia Flyers, it’s all they really know,” Pronger said on Friday in a conference call
with reporters. “I’m sure it’s tough for them. It’s always difficult. They play their hearts out in
Philly. It sucks as a teammate, you hate to see guys go.”

Pronger himself was surprised. He said he was fishing with his kids “up in the bush” in Canada
when he found out. As the heir apparent to Richards’ captaincy, having worn the ‘C’ in St. Louis
and Anaheim, Pronger said he hasn’t yet begun to think about that role with the Flyers.

“I haven’t put that much thought into it, to be honest with you,” Pronger said. “This is all very,
very fresh to a lot of us. I’d have to talk to [Paul Holmgren] and [Peter Laviolette] and see what
their thoughts are and go from there.

“You don’t nominate yourself. I’ve never been part of a team where somebody nominates
himself. I think that may be a little bit premature to start talking about stuff like that. It’s one day
after two huge trades on our team and in the history of the Flyers, so I don’t think that’s in
anybody’s minds right now.”

Pronger also couldn’t say for sure whether the Flyers are a better team today than they were
yesterday, having not known much about any of the three players the Flyers picked up.

But he did say that it might be too soon to judge, even though the Flyers traded away the heart
and soul of their team and their leading goal scorer.
“I haven’t put the Xs and Os together yet,” Pronger said. “I’m sure you guys have looked at it
seven ways from Sunday and tried to figure out who wins and who loses. You’ve got to make
tough decisions.

“Sometimes it may hurt and may feel like you’re making your team worse to make it better.”

9. Philadelphia Daily News- Flyers are not done yet

Frank Seravalli

ST. PAUL, Minn. -- Exhaling, Paul Holmgren said it best on Thursday:

“A lot can happen between now and the start of training camp.”

Truthfully, a lot will happen for the Flyers between now and Sunday here at the Entry Draft in
Minnesota, let alone when free agency officially kicks off on July 1.

After all, the Flyers - suddenly with nearly $10.2 million in salary cap space without Michael
Leighton and Matt Walker on the roster and Ian Laperriere on the long-term injury list - will
have their hands full with re-signing restricted free agents Ville Leino, Dan Carcillo, Andreas
Nodl, and Darroll Powe.

Both newly acquired forwards Wayne Simmonds and Jakub Voracek are also restricted free
agents are looking for raises.

They may also have a few other tricks up their sleeve.

Here’s the latest on what I know:

MOVIN' ON UP? Since attending the NHL Combine in Toronto earlier this month, the Flyers
have been absolutely drooling over winger Gabriel Landeskog from the OHL’s Kitchener
Rangers.

Unfortunately for the Flyers, he won’t be falling as far as their No. 8 slot, which they acquired on
Thursday from Columbus.

The Flyers have been looking to upgrade their organizational depth on defense, but Holmgren
also said this week that he would be looking to tack the best player available when they pick,
regardless of position.

League sources have indicated that the Flyers are interested in swapping picks with Florida, who
is slated to select at No. 3 overall. The Panthers are looking to improve their team and they
already have a bevy of top young talent after missing the playoffs for an NHL record 10 straight
seasons.

So, what would it take to acquire the No. 3 overall pick?
How about Kris Versteeg and the No. 8 pick. That ought to do it. Versteeg has one year left on
his deal at $3.083 million but he did not perform up to expectations after being acquired on
Valentine’s Day for a first and third round pick.

The move seems to make sense. The Panthers are looking. They are $30 million below the
NHL’s salary cap floor, or minimum that must be spent. The Flyers have been shopping
Versteeg in deals. Most importantly, Panthers general manager Dale Tallon is a big believer in
Versteeg.

Tallon, the former Blackhawks GM, is the man who brought Versteeg to Chicago, one of the
moves that ultimately pushed them toward winning the Stanley Cup in 2010.

If the Flyers decide to not move up for tonight’s first round - which begins at 7 o’clock on
Versus - look for them to take a defenseman. If Dougie Hamilton (D, Niagara [OHL]) is still
available, he is a can’t-miss prospect. If not, smallish offensive defenseman Ryan Murphy
(Kitchener [OHL]) would be the next best bet.

SOMETHING BIG? With such an unusually large salary cap number to play with, after the NHL
officially set next year’s number at $63.4 million, one had to think that the Flyers might not be
finished in trying to acquire a big name player.

The first guess, for some, was Brad Richards, who has repeatedly turned down requests from
Stars GM Joe Nieuwendyk to waive his no-movement clause before July 1 so Dallas can move
his negotiating rights while they still have value.

Richards, 31, isn’t likely coming to Philly. One of the reasons Holmgren said he wanted to make
Thursday’s moves was to clear out their glutton of centers.

Holmgren might be willing to make an exception for Steven Stamkos.

From what I’m told by sources, that isn’t as far-fetched as it sounds. Upon hearing so on
Thursday, the logical side of my brain instantly wrote off the possibility. The more people I talk
to, the more it seems like it could be a possibility.

Stamkos, still just 21, is easily one of the NHL’s three best players already. He has a league-best
96 goals in the last two seasons. He was named a finalist for the Ted Lindsay Award as league
MVP as voted by the players.

Stamkos is believed to be looking at something in the $7 million per season range, which sounds
awful low.

Stamkos said in an interview on Wednesday in Las Vegas that he believed his negotiations with
the Lightning on an extension were “close.” Still, one has to wonder why the two sides haven’t
been able to come together. Tampa Bay’s season has been over for nearly a month and he should
have been the team’s top priority.
Personally, I don’t see a way that the Flyers - or any team - would acquire his rights via a trade,
unless the Stamkos camp flat out tells the Lightning that they have no interest in re-signing or
that the numbers just won’t work.

A much stronger option, though, is for someone to try to sign Stamkos to an offer sheet.

Lightning GM Steve Yzerman said on Wednesday that the team is “prepared for anything.”

It has long been reported that the Maple Leafs - and it should be noted that Toronto is Stamkos’
hometown team - under general manager Brian Burke would be willing to put in an offer sheet
for Stamkos if the opportunity presented itself. It has been reported that Burke could offer as
much as $9 million per season for Stamkos.

First, that cannot happen until July 1, when Stamkos officially becomes a restricted free agent.
Second, the Lightning can choose to match any offer sheet or walk away and accept the
compensation.

The compensation would be 4 first round draft picks, one pick per year for four years.

While the Lightning have plenty of cap room to match any offer, another source familiar with
Tampa Bay’s operation said Tampa Bay may not have the financial capability of matching an
offer because of their commitment to captain Vinny Lecavalier, who is contracted to collect $10
million per season for each of the next 5 years.

Throw in the small market team’s long-term deals on the table with Marty St. Louis and Ryan
Malone, their limited gate success and unwillingness to spend to the salary cap limit and the
discussion becomes all that more interesting.

That’s where the Flyers may come into play. By trading Mike Richards and Jeff Carter on
Thursday, they also dealt exactly $108.9 million dollars worth of long-term commitments off
their books. That’s a big number. Ed Snider could surely be convinced to spend a good portion
of that on Stamkos if the opportunity were to present itself.

Here’s one thing I can guarantee you: Stamkos’ name has come up in the Flyers’ organizational
plans. This rumor, for sure, has legs. This is something to keep an eye on.

HELLO, LEINO: The Flyers will likely have a deal in place with Leino before leaving
Minnesota this weekend.

Just a few days ago, it seemed nearly impossible that the Flyers would have the space to re-sign
Leino. That’s all changed now. And him and his agent have sat patiently since November,
constantly being re-assured by the Flyers that things will work out.

Leino seemed to be a little frustrated by the NHL’s tagging rule which prevented him from being
re-signed all the way back around Thanksgiving. Leino was forced to swallow hard again in
February when the Flyers acquired Kris Versteeg to completely dash any hope that he could be
re-signed before the season ended.

All the while, Leino has remained a quiet supporter of Holmgren’s job and has made it very clear
he would like to remain in Philadelphia.

The two sides have always remained close on a number, which is reportedly between $2.5
million and $3 million per season.

Leino has been in his native Finland for a few weeks and has been unavailable for comment. His
agent, Bill Zito, is in the Twin Cities for this weekend’s draft. Look for the two sides to hammer
out a deal very soon.

FREE AGENCY: Depending on what moves the Flyers make, they should have money to pursue
a few free agents.

While you could go up and down the free agent lists and throw out possibilities, here’s one name
to remember: Michael Ryder.

Ryder, who just captured the Stanley Cup with the Bruins, might be a great fit for the Flyers. He
is supposedly a player that has piqued the interest of Holmgren for a few years. Ryder will
become an unrestricted free agent on July 1.

Ryder, 31, is coming off a three-year deal with Boston which paid him $12 million. He was
overpaid for his production. Boston signed him from Montreal thinking he would build on the 58
point season he posted in 2006-07. His totals in Boston? 53 points in 2008-09, 33 points in 82
games in 2009-10, and 41 points in 2010-11.

Ryder came alive in the playoffs, though, for Boston. He collected 17 points in 25 playoff games
compared to 41 in 79 regular season contests.

GOT A LIL’ CAPTAIN IN YOU? Just a few hours after captain Mike Richards was dealt, many
thought the search was already on for the Flyers’ next bearer of the “C.”

While Danny Briere, Kimmo Timonen and Chris Pronger have all worn the “C” in other cities,
the logical choice appears to be Pronger. He has been the team's de facto captain in Richards'
absence over the last two years.

It is unclear when the Flyers could make an announcement about a new captain. Pronger was not
available for comment on Thursday but said he will address the media on Friday.

Holmgren said on Thursday that he “hasn’t even begun to broad the subject with Peter
Laviolette.” Laviolette is in Minnesota for the Flyers’ draft this weekend.
10. Phily.com- Sean Couturier bio box

Kerith Gabriel

Who: Sean Couturier

Drafted, first round, 8th overall

Position: Center

Height: 6-4 Weight: 195

Age: 18 Born: Dec. 7, 1992

Shoots: Left

Ice chips: Ranked by many as the top player in this year's draft, Couturier fell into the Flyers' lap
at No. 8 . . . Couturier, the star of Drummondville Voltiguers, of the Quebec Minor Junior
Hockey League, led the league in points last season and had the fewest points needed to capture
the claim of leading scorer in the history of QMJHL . . . Born in Phoenix because of his father
Sylvain's playing days with the Phoenix Roadrunners (IHL), Couturier moved to Canada
following his father's retirement . . . Couturier was named to the Canadian junior national team
and participated in December's junior worlds in Buffalo.

FLYERS' TOP 10s

All-time choices by the Flyers within the first 10 picks of the draft:

Overall

2007: James van Riemsdyk, LW 2 overall

2002: Joni Pitkanen, D 4 overall

1992: Ryan Sittler, LW 7 overall

1991: Peter Forsberg, C 6 overall

1990: Mike Ricci, C 4 overall

1982: Ron Sutter, C 4 overall

1978: Behn Wilson, D 6 overall

1978: Ken Linseman, C 7 overall
1975: Mel Bridgman, C 1 overall

1972: Bill Barber, LW 7 overall

1971: Larry Wright, C 8 overall

1971: Pierre Plante, RW 9 overall

1969: Bob Currier, C 6 overall

1968: Lew Morrison, RW 8 overall

1967: Serge Bernier, C 5 overall

Note: Bobby Clarke was selected by the Flyers 17th overall (second round) in 1969

11. CSNphilly.com- Flyers select center Couturier eighth overall

Tim Panaccio

St. PAUL, Minn. – Everyone knew as far back as February, when the Flyers traded away this
year’s first-round draft pick to Toronto for Kris Versteeg, that they would not be talking to many
top prospects, if any.

So, it shouldn’t surprise that Sean Couturier’s first exposure to the Flyers came on Thursday
afternoon in Minnesota.

Friday during the NHL draft in Xcel Energy Center, the Flyers selected the 6-foot-4, 197-pound
centerman with the eighth pick acquired from Columbus as part of the Jeff Carter deal.

“My first meeting was yesterday and it felt pretty special,” the 18-year-old Couturier said. “They
just moved up. I knew they had a lot of interest. Anything can happen at the draft …

“It’s tough to get a feeling with all the teams. Everyone has different opinions. I didn’t know
what to expect.”

He made an impression on the Flyers’ scouting staff.

“All of our guys liked him,” said general manager Paul Holmgren. “Last year, he was one of the
better under-aged players in Canada … He’s very confident in his own zone and has some
offensive pop, as well.”

Couturier was all smiles at the podium, despite slipping a few spots in the draft.

“I’m happy to be part of the Philadelphia Flyers,” he said. “It’s an honor and a great day. They
have a lot of history. A great team, big guys, I’m looking forward to it.”
He admitted he needs to improve his skating and get stronger, add more muscle.

The Flyers lack experienced size at center. How many years away is Couturier from making the
roster?

“I don’t know,” Holmgren replied. “It’s one of those questions that players usually answer.
We’re excited at him coming to our development camp right after the fourth of July. That will be
our first chance at working with him.”

If Couturier returns to junior, that would be his fourth year there.

“Is that a good thing or a bad thing? I don’t know,” Holmgren said. “He’s a big kid and pretty
filled out already. I’d say it’s an important summer for him.”

Holmgren added it was a “safe” bet that there may be some spots up for grab in training camp.
Perhaps a spot for Couturier?

“Who knows?” Holmgren said.

Couturier was the youngest and only draft-eligible player on Team Canada at the 2011 World
Junior Hockey Championships.

What’s interesting is that Couturier had mono last summer. It took him a while to recover. He
seemed to hit his stride after the World Juniors when he scored 20 goals in Drummondville’s
final 21 games.

He was consistent in junior, posting 96 points his last two years at Drummondville and scored 41
goals two seasons ago (36 this year).

Draftniks figured Couturier would go in the top six. That didn’t seem to bother him. When the
Winnipeg Jets passed on him at seventh and selected Barrie center Mark Scheifele, that left it
open for the Flyers.

“We had him high on our list in the range where we ended up picking,” Holmgren said. “Every
team likes different guys. You never know what’s going to happen. We’re happy we were able to
draft him with the eighth pick.”

Couturier didn’t seemed upset at slipping down.

“Not really,” he said. “Anything can happen in a draft. Once you get to [training] camp it’s a
whole new story and I am looking forward to it.

“It’s going to be up to me to work hard this summer and show what I got. I can’t control their
decision after that. My main goal, for sure, is to be part of the team.”
Oh, one more thing. Couturier played with Brayden Schenn at the World Juniors. The Flyers
acquired Schenn from Los Angeles as part of the Mike Richards trade.

“He’s a complete player, he plays hard,” Couturier said of Schenn. “He’s a good two-way
forward, who is responsible.”

Couturier has NHL pedigree, too. His father, Sylvain, played 33 games with the Kings in the late
1980s and early 1990s, and is now the GM of the Acadie-Bathurst Titans in the QMJHL.

Most figured if the Flyers got a first-round pick they would target a defenseman.

“Some of the defenseman that went right after [Couturier], we liked, too,” Holmgren said. “We
pretty much stick to our list.”

Rounds two through seven unfold on Saturday. In all, the Flyers have seven picks in this draft.

12. CSNphilly.com- Flyers' trade acquisitions excited to join new club

Tim Panaccio

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. – Brayden Schenn, who turns 20 in August, has played all of nine
games in his young National Hockey League career.

Flyers general manager Paul Holmgren pegged him as the “wild card” and “diamond in the
rough” among the team’s stunning deal that sent captain Mike Richards to the Los Angeles
Kings on Thursday.

“It’s pretty crazy,” Schenn said from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, where he was attending Jarret
Stoll’s golf tournament. “It’s a big deal. Myself and Wayne Simmonds got traded for a great
player.

“It’s a thrill, a little bit shocking to be here … I’m thrilled to be part of the organization and
history there. I’m going into a great organization that’s close to winning [the Stanley Cup] and
that’s what I’m excited for.”

The 6-foot-1, 190-pound center is considered a genuine blue chip prospect, who could become
an impact player with the Flyers down the road. What kind of impact Schenn provides this
coming season will depend on the kind of minutes he plays.

He averaged 30 goals for three seasons in the Western Hockey League, playing for Brandon,
plus scored 21 last year for Saskatoon.

“Schenn plays the game like a young Mike Richards,” said Flyer assistant GM John Paddock.
“In time, he’s going to be a pretty darnn good offensive player.”

Schenn said he feel’s ready to be a full-time player.
“I played eight games last year and I think the World Juniors and Memorial Cup have prepared
me for the next step,” he said.

“I try to [bring] the complete package and do it all. I try to play the game like Mike Richards. I
try to put up points and do whatever it takes to help the team win. That’s kind of how to play.”

A lot of NHL clubs would have liked to have gotten their hands on Schenn. Toronto GM Brian
Burke covets him and had hoped to bring Brayden to the Maple Leafs where older brother, Luke,
plays defense.

Recall, Burke had the Niedermayer brothers, Scott and Rob, on his roster in Anaheim in 2007
when the Ducks won the Cup.

In the Eastern Conference, Brayden will have the opportunity to play against Luke four times a
season.

“I only played against him once and to have the little battles we have ongoing, it will be kind of
cool,” Brayden said.

Simmonds was unavailable on Friday.

Right wing Jakub Voracek came to the Flyers, along with two draft picks, in the Jeff Carter
trade.

“I was pretty happy,” Voracek said. “I hear only great things about the Flyers organization and
it’s an honor to play there. I’m pretty excited. I’m basically starting a new life and this team has
a chance to win the Stanley Cup every year. It’s going to be a lot of fun.”

The 6-1, 205-pound Voracek won’t rip off 40 goals like Carter. His range is more like 20 goals.

“Yeah, well obviously Jeff Carter, when you look at his stats, I don’t think you can find a player
that has scored more than 120 goals in the last three seasons,” said the 21-yesr-old.

“There’s going to be a lot of expectations from me as well and that’s why I’m working hard in
the summer; I’m in Montreal right now and trying to get ready as much as possible, and I hope
everything is going to work out well.”

Voracek said he brings a physical edge to his play.

“When I’m on my game I like to play along the boards,” he said. “I’m an up-and-down, up-and-
down, up-and-down winger and I try to play the best I can on both ends and obviously I have to
work on my shot a little bit more in this off-season, but I would say that I’m more of a play-
maker than a shooter or scorer.”
Voracek is coming from an organization where the playoffs are rather foreign to one where
playoffs are commonplace and expectations are so much higher.

“That’s why you play hockey – to win the Cup and it’s a big challenge and I’m pretty excited for
it,” Voracek said. “It’s fun to go from a team that only make the playoffs one out of 10 years to,
like you said, a team that makes it basically every year. It’s exciting and it’s something that’s
new for me and I’m going to try and help as much as possible.”


13. CSNphilly.com- Snider: Don't expect more major moves from Flyers

Tim Panaccio

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. – Flyers chairman Ed Snider says he feels the organization needs to take
a breath and not make any more major moves this summer.

Speaking to CSNPhilly.com from his home in California, Snider said not to look for the Flyers to
sign a major name when free agency begins on July 1.

“We’re not looking to make any more deals,” he said emphatically. “We’ve got to catch our
breath. We don’t want to be just keep making deals, just to keep making deals.”

On Thursday, the Flyers stunned the hockey world by trading Mike Richards to Los Angeles and
Jeff Carter to Columbus. They were, arguably, the two young faces of the franchise.

Their departure leads a void in goal scoring and point production.

There are reports that the Flyers could be among several clubs bidding for Brad Richards’
services in free agency or even Erik Cole, a winger, who some feel would like to be reunited
with Peter Laviolette again.

Snider is not allowed to comment on pending free agents. He did say, however, he doesn’t
foresee the Flyers trying to sign a major free agent in the weeks ahead.

“I don’t feel there are any moves we have to make,” he said. “Basically, we may have to sign an
inexpensive free agent to round out the roster because I don’t know who is coming back … but
that’s up to [general manager] Paul Holmgren.”

Snider did say he wants to see Ville Leino re-signed.

“I’m hoping we can sign Leino,” he said. “It has nothing to do with cap room. In Leino’s case, it
has to do whether we can agree on a number with his agent [Bill Zito]. We’d like to sign him.”

Leino turned down offers of a multi-year deal last season that would have paid him $3 million a
year. He obviously wants more.
The trade of Richards and Carter ranks among the more pivotal moments in Flyer history, given
both had signed virtually lifetime deals, plus Richards was the captain.

“We’ll see how it turns out,” Snider said. “It was a dramatic day for us. For Paul’s part, it was
very, very difficult. This wasn’t spur of the moment. It was going on for a while. He felt we
needed a change.

“We’re not afraid to make any move that we feel helps our team. Like anything in life, you’re
not always right. Certainly, we’re not afraid to make deals.

“It wasn’t something done lightly. It started with the rumors with Carter and his situation in
playing him out of position. He’s a natural center. We had four centers and we needed wingers
…

“The Richards deal? Paul was offered a lot, liked the deal and went ahead.”

Snider had to sign off on both trades. He said that wasn’t easy, either.

“These were two that we drafted and nurtured and came through our farm system successfully
and were outstanding players for us throughout their careers,” he said. “It was difficult. It’s a
helluva lot easier when guys aren’t performing or doing things you want.

“These are two top notch players, both playing center. It was a pretty gutsy deal on Paul’s part. I
feel bad for the players themselves because they did sign long term deals and now they have
those long term deals with teams other than us. It’s the way the sport works.”

Snider said the opposite end here is that the Flyers got younger “and hopefully, better.”

With these moves that brought Brayden Schenn and Wayne Simmonds from Los Angeles
(Richards’ trade) and Jakub Voracek from Columbus (Carter trade), plus the signing of goalie
Ilya Bryzgalov, the question remains, are the Flyers any closer to winning that ever elusive third
Stanley Cup?

“Adding Brzygalov gives us the one thing we have not been as solid in as other positions –
goal,” Snider said. “I’m not saying our goalies were horrible, but they weren’t at the level of
Bryzgalov. If a goalie wins a few more games for you in the season and the playoffs, it’s a big
difference.”

The Flyers didn’t have a shutout last season.

“I don’t think a Flyer team ever went through a season and playoffs without having a shutout,”
Snider said. “Sometimes, you get a shutout by accident.

“We needed to upgrade in goal, just like when we got [Chris] Pronger, we needed to upgrade in
defense. It was something that had to happen.”
Time will tell whether it all comes together for the Flyers.

14. CSNphilly.com- Pronger reacts to Flyers' trades, captaincy rumors

Tim Panaccio

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. – Chris Pronger knows what it’s like to be traded. It has happened to
him four times in his 17-year NHL career.

He feels for Mike Richards and Jeff Carter, who were traded on Thursday.

“Having gone through it a number of times, you kind of need a day to gather your thoughts and
kind of get your wits about you,” Pronger said Friday during a conference call.

“It’s certainly not an easy thing. I think it makes it a little bit easier that they’re both single and
don’t have to lug around kids and logistically and that stuff, but it’s still very tough to be traded
and I’m sure both of them have mixed emotions.”

Pronger said he would attempt to contact both former Flyers today.

“I think when you make a move like that to get a goalie and you’ve got to pay him, you’ve got to
get the money somewhere,” Pronger said. “Time and again in the salary cap era, you’ve got to
give to get. Unfortunately for us, those two guys were traded.


“It sucks as a teammate. You hate to see guys go. They were for all intents and purposes the face
of the franchise for four of those six years, if not for the six years they were here. I’m sure it’s
tough for them. The Philadelphia Flyers, it’s all they really know. I’ve gone through it a number
of times, and sometimes a move is healthy for you.”

Pronger was asked about assuming the captaincy now that Richards is gone. A source told
CSNPhilly.com that Pronger, who was a captain in St. Louis and Anaheim, will be offered the
“C.”

“You know what, I haven’t put much thought in it to be honest with you,” Pronger said. “This is
all very, very fresh to a lot of us. Obviously I’d have to talk to Homer [Paul Holmgren] and Lavi
[Peter Laviolette] and see what their thoughts are, and kind of go from there.

“You don’t nominate yourself. I’ve never been part of a team where somebody nominates
himself. I think that may be a little bit premature to start talking about stuff like that. It’s one day
after two huge trades on our team and in the history of the Flyers, so I don’t think that’s in
anybody’s minds right now.”

Obviously, the makeup in the Flyers dressing room is going to change. Pronger was asked
whether there were issues in the Flyers’ room. He denied that, but added the Flyers needed
“more life” in the room.
“I don’t think anybody would say a year ago when we went to the Stanley Cup Final that there
was a chemistry problem,” Pronger said. “[That year] I think our play was very inconsistent, and
we were trying to find ourselves as a team with a new coach and a new system.

“I think the players were trying to find where they needed to be and how we needed to play to be
successful as a group. Last year, you’re coming off a tough defeat in the Stanley Cup Final in
overtime, we got off to a good start, and nobody seemed to think we had a problem then.

“As the season wore on, for whatever reason, we just didn’t turn that corner and continue to get
better and peak at the right time. That’s disappointing, and it’s tough. I don’t think there was
necessarily a rift, I think we just needed more life in the locker room.

“It all has to do with your play on the ice. If you’re playing well on the ice, there’s never any
questions as to who’s doing what or is there a rift, does this guy like that guy, and all of the rest
of the stuff that gets thrown out. If you play well on the ice, nobody wants to write about that
because everything’s going good.”

Is the room better today than before?

“I don’t know,” Pronger replied. “I don’t really know those other guys they brought in. I played
against Wayne Simmonds for one or two years when I was in Anaheim, but other than that, when
you play on the East Coast, you don’t really play the West very often, and vice-versa.

“When I was coming out here I didn’t really know many of the guys here, because I’d played in
the West pretty much my whole career. I can’t really speak to that right now, having no luxury to
know any of the three guys we picked up.”

The big question is whether the Flyers have gotten any closer to winning a Stanley Cup with
these moves.

“I don’t know,” Pronger said. “I haven’t really thought about that too much. I just heard about
the trades last night so I haven’t really put a whole lot of thought to it, I’m up in the bush with
my kids, fishing.

“I haven’t put the Xs and Os together – I’m sure you guys have looked at it seven ways from
Sunday and tried to figure out who wins or loses.

“At the end of the day, as I said before, having been traded a number of times, it’s always
difficult. They both played their hearts out in Philly, but sometimes as I said, you’ve got to make
tough decisions and you’ve got to make moves, and sometimes it may hurt and may feel like
you’re making your team worse to make it better.”

15. CSNphilly.com- Greenberg: Post trades, Flyers need size at center

Jay Greenburg
If you think the Flyers committed to a youth movement on the same day they signed a 31-year-
old goalie for nine years, then you were born yesterday. Into the rear ends of a team that didn’t
compete hard enough last season, Paul Holmgren swiftly put one shoe Thursday. And now we
wait for the other one to drop.

With Mike Richards and Jeff Carter traded, and cap space cleared for Ilya Bryzgalov and Ville
Leino, there still can be further room created for Brad Richards or Tim Connolly, the two best
centers free to sign on July 1. Failing that, or a trade for another scoring center, minimally there
is room for the next best free agent centerman, Brooks Laich, who is a suddenly-necessary 6-
foot-2.

Holmgren said it was important to get bigger on the wings, which he did with Jakub Voracek and
Wayne Simmonds. But it’s unfathomable the GM is going to leave the Flyers so small at center.

Brayden Schenn, 19, filling out a 6-1 frame, was an important, maybe the most important piece,
coming back in two stunning deals. But it will be four years, if ever, until he can anchor a first
line. And as skilled as Claude Giroux, 5-11, and Danny Briere, 5-10, are, it’s asking too much
from them to do it even now.

So the Flyers are going to buy somebody. If Schenn, the fifth player selected in 2009, is ready
for the NHL, if Voracek, a slow-developing No. 7 overall in 2007, matures, if Year Three turns
James van Riemsdyk into a night-in, night-out force, indeed maybe you can see the Flyers
finding enough scoring to replace Carter’s team-leading 36 goals and Richards' 23 goals in a bad
year with a bad wrist.

But what we cannot see is Holmgren foisting upon Peter Laviolette a team that is undersized
down the middle – not in a division where Pittsburgh lines up Sidney Crosby, Evgeni Malkin and
Jordan Staal and where the Rangers are all hot to get Brad Richards.


The Flyers can’t help but try to prevent that by getting Richards themselves or making a trade
that restores them as a team built to win now. If they still didn’t look at themselves like that,
Sergei Bobrovsky would remain their No. 1 goalie. But there’s more work to do and considering
what is at stake, our guess is that’s already half done or Holmgren wouldn’t have taken the risk
he did Thursday.

What we do not have to guess at is his motivation to trade a captain and a leading scorer.
Holmgren, who had only rising player van Riemsdyk playing this coming season at a cap-
friendly number, pretty well laid it out on Monday.

“The higher picks, we can’t keep giving them up,” Holmgren said.

The 2008 No. 1, Luca Sbisa, and the 2009 and 2010 No. ones were traded for Chris Pronger.
Friday night’s 25th pick went for Kris Versteeg, which hardly seemed worth it until Holmgren
effectively moved up 17 places in the first round by getting Columbus’ pick.
Of course that cost him a 36-goal scorer, although it was 36-goal scorer down from a high of 46
two years ago, the same guy who has missed 16 playoff games in the last two years and has
scored only 13 goals in the 47 postseason games he’s played. Maybe Carter would live that down
in time. Maybe he wouldn’t. But there was a year to go until both Carter’s and Richard’s no-
trade clause kicked in and two uncompetitive losses in Boston’s second-round sweep convinced
Holmgren that the locker room had to change.

Of course, the Flyers missed Pronger, whose broken hand precipitated the slide, and whose one
full game in the playoffs, Game 7 against Buffalo, had them fleetingly looking like themselves
again. But whether the rumors of enmity or power struggle between Pronger and Richards were
true or exaggerated, the room finally belonged unchallenged to Richards, and he did not take
control of it.

To take the captaincy away from him and give it to Pronger would have been at considerable risk
to Richards’ psyche and maybe the psyche of his alter ego, Carter, too. They were drafted in the
same year in the same first round, did rounds together on South Street, and then were traded
away on the same day.

Both were good players, but replaceable. Otherwise, on a day when the Flyers believed they
finally closed a 25-year-old hole, they wouldn’t leave themselves with another.

16. Bucks County Courier- Flyers feel fortunate to grab Couturier at No. 8 overall

Wayne Fish

Just about every scouting service had center Sean Couturier ranked no worse than No. 4 in pre-
NHL Entry Draft evaluations.

So when the Flyers found him still available with their No. 8 selection on Friday night in St.
Paul, Minn., they couldn't believe their good fortune.

They jumped at the opportunity, especially because they have to restock the position following
the trading of centers Mike Richards and Jeff Carter on Thursday.

Couturier, a native of Phoenix, Ariz., who played for Drummondville of the Quebec Junior
League this past season, registered a whopping 96 points in 58 games.

He's a skilled player but also one who is defensively accountable.

"No,'' said general manager Paul Holmgren when asked if he thought Couturier would still be
available. "But it's something that we thought might be.''

Both the International Scouting Service and The Hockey News had Couturier rated No. 4. He
was ranked as high as No. 1 last year, but his progress was slowed by a long case of
mononucleosis.
"We're excited, happy that we're able to draft Sean,'' Holmgren said. "We look forward to him
coming to training camp.

"We're going to be patient with him. Sean is a player who does a good job in his own zone for
the number of points he puts up. He's adapted well to the defensive work a center needs to
handle.''

Sean is the son of Sylvain Couturier, who played professional hockey for 14 years, including 33
NHL games with the Los Angeles Kings, as well as the Phoenix Roadrunners of the International
League.

That's how Sean wound up growing up in Phoenix.

Not many 18-year-olds make it to the NHL their draft year but who knows? He's got a chance
and he doesn't lack for confidence.

"For sure this summer I've got to work hard,'' Couturier said. "My main goal is to make the NHL
next year. Once I get to camp, I'll be prepared. It's up to the GM and staff to decide. I can't really
control that.

"I met the Flyers for the first time last night. It was a pretty good meeting. They seemed to have
a lot of interest, but anything can happen in the draft. But, now that the draft is over, I'm really
glad to be a part of the Philadelphia Flyers.''

As for his hockey-playing dad, Sean said: "It was good for me. I was drafted before him so I was
just bugging him about that."

He's been compared to Pittsburgh's Jordan Staal.

"It's a pretty good honor to be compared to him, but, for sure, we're similar in some ways,''
Couturier said.

As for areas of improvement, he's working on his skating, particularly those first couple steps.

"I've been working on it since I was young, and there's still a lot of improvement left to do,'' he
said. "But I'm working on it, and overall, that's about it.''

Couturier is aware the Flyers might have a "help wanted'' sign posted at center, what with the big
trades.

"I was actually pretty surprised, didn't really expect it,'' Couturier said. "After thinking about it, I
knew I could be drafted there, and now that I'm drafted that's pretty special."

Will this help his chances?
"Yeah, maybe," Couturier said. "I haven't really thought about it. It's going to be up to me with
my work ethic, keep working hard through the summer, and once I get to camp it's going to be
up to me to prove myself."

17. Bucks County Courier- Pronger not thinking "captain''...yet

Wayne Fish

Because the trade of Flyers captain Mike Richards is still fresh, Chris Pronger hasn't had time to
think about a possible candidate to be the team's new leader.

"This is all very fresh to a lot of us,'' he said in a conference call on Friday. "You don't nominate
yourself. I think that may be a little premature to talk about stuff like that.''

Other possible candidates for the Flyers' "C'' are Kimmo Timonen and Daniel Briere.

18. Camden Courier-Post- Flyers take Couturier with eighth pick overall

Chuck Gormley

The Flyers have selected 6’4’’, 197-pound center Sean Couturier eighth overall at the 2011
National Hockey League Entry Draft on Friday, June 24 at the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul,
Minn.

“All of our guys like him,” said Flyers general manager Paul Holmgren. “He’s a well-rounded
player right now and at a young age. He’s very competent in his own zone and obviously he’s a
guy that can add some offensive pop as well.”

Couturier, 18 (12-7-1992), recorded 36 goals and 60 assists for 96 points in 58 regular season
games with the Drummondville Voltigeurs of the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League this past
season. He led the team in assists (60), tied for the team lead in points (96 – 4th in QMJHL) and
finished second on the team in goals (36). He also led the club in plus/minus rating (+55 – 2nd in
QMJHL), points-per-game (1.66), and tied for the team lead in short-handed goals (4).

“I was just enjoying the moment. I’m really happy to be part of the Philadelphia Flyers. It’s a
great honor. It’s a wonderful day,” said Couturier. “I’m pretty reliable defensively, and
offensively I’m pretty good at protecting and controlling the puck.”

Couturier led his team in the QMJHL playoffs with 11 points (6G-5A) in 10 games and was later
named the QMJHL’s Most Valuable Player, the Top 2011 Draft Prospect and selected a First-
Team All-Star.

In 2009-10, Couturier led the QMJHL in scoring with 96 points (41G-55A), becoming the first
17 year-old to lead the league in scoring since Sidney Crosby (Rimouski) in 2004-05. He also led
the team with a plus/minus rating of +62.
Over the course of three seasons, all with Drummondville, Couturier has recorded 86 goals and
137 assists for 223 points in 184 regular season games, finishing with a career plus/minus mark
of +141. He also recorded 37 points (17G-20A) in 43 career QMJHL playoff games.

A native of Phoenix, Az., his father, Sylvain, was drafted 65th overall by Los Angeles in 1986
and played 33 games with the Kings between 1988-89 and 1991-92 – he is now the General
Manager of the Acadie-Bathurst Titans in the QMJHL.

19. Camden Courier-Post- Overhaul gives Flyers incentive

Chuck Gormley

Flyers chairman Ed Snider remembers hugging Bernie Parent and crying after the club traded
him to the Toronto Maple Leafs in 1971.

He remembers feeling the same painful pangs when Paul Holmgren, Dave Poulin and Rod
Brind'Amour were traded after long and distinguished careers in Philadelphia.
So when asked how he'll remember Thursday afternoon's salary purge of captain Mike Richards
and alternate captain Jeff Carter, Snider was emphatic with his response.
"It was very emotional for me," he said. "I hate to see two good kids like Richie and Carter go.
They signed long-term deals with us and I'm sure they thought they would spend their whole
careers with us.
"It's not easy, but I'll tell you what, we would trade our own mothers if it made us better."
That seems to be the question Flyers fans are asking themselves today. After all, Carter and
Richards combined to score 59 goals and record 132 points last season.
Their replacements, wingers Wayne Simmonds and Jakub Voracek and center Brayden Schenn,
combined for 28 goals and 64 points in the NHL last season.
Flyers veteran defenseman Chris Pronger said time will tell.
"Sometimes it may hurt," he said, "and you may feel like you're making your team worse to
make it better."
"I don't like to predict those kinds of things," Snider said when asked if the Flyers took a step
back in their quest for their first Stanley Cup since 1975. "We did what we needed to do to
improve the team. We got a guy (Ilya Bryzgalov) who I believe is one of the best goalies in the
league. So yes, I think we're better today than we were yesterday."
Contrary to popular opinion, Snider said the Flyers began thinking of trading Carter and
Richards in the weeks that followed their second-round sweep by the Boston Bruins, long before
they acquired the rights to Bryzgalov, who on Thursday was signed to a nine-year, $51 million
contract.
"This was something that probably cropped up before the goalie situation," Snider said. "We had
too many good centers and not enough good wingers."
(Page 2 of 2)
It was also no secret that Richards and Carter had stormy relationships with the media and that
there seemed to be a locker room power struggle between them and veterans Kimmo Timonen,
Danny Briere and Pronger.
"I have no idea if there was something there," Snider said. "I'm not close enough to make that
judgment."
Pronger, who is likely to be named Richards' successor as captain, downplayed the notion that a
locker room rift led to Thursday's double deal.
"I don't think there was necessarily a rift; I think we just needed more life in the locker room,"
Pronger said. "If you're playing well on the ice, there's never any questions as to who's doing
what or is there a rift, does this guy like that guy and all of the rest of the stuff that gets thrown
out."
Briere agreed.
"I don't think it's about the locker room," he said. "I know all the rumors out there and they are
all overblown. Mike Richards and Jeff Carter were not a problem in the dressing room. They are
good leaders and good people and I don't think it's fair to say other than that.
"The way I see it, it's a message to the players, basically, that the organization is not going to
accept half measures. The goal last year was to win the Stanley Cup and we didn't do that.
"It's sad to see our two teammates leave, but it tells us they're not going to sit back and watch the
parade go by. If we don't win next year more heads are gonna roll."
Pronger called Richards and Carter the faces of the Flyers franchise and said they "played their
hearts out" for the team. He said he planned to give each of them a call Friday to wish them well.
As for becoming the Flyers' next captain, Pronger said he'll leave that up to Holmgren and coach
Peter Laviolette.
"You don't nominate yourself," he said. "I've never been part of a team where somebody
nominates himself. I think that may be a little bit premature to start talking about stuff like that.
It's one day after two huge trades on our team and in the history of the Flyers, so I don't think
that's in anybody's minds right now."
With about $7.5 million in salary cap space, Snider said it would be "a stretch -- a giant stretch" -
- for the Flyers to land a high-priced star like Brad Richards in free agency.
Instead, Holmgren will use that money to sign Voracek and Simmonds, who are both restricted
free agents, and to see if there is still money available to keep unrestricted free agent Ville Leino
in the fold.

20. Philadelphiaflyers.com- Flyers Select Sean Couturier Eighth Overall

Philadelphia Flyers Staff

The Philadelphia Flyers have selected 6’4’’, 197-pound center Sean Couturier eighth overall at
the 2011 National Hockey League Entry Draft on Friday, June 24 at the Xcel Energy Center in
St. Paul, Minn.

“All of our guys like him,” said Flyers general manager Paul Holmgren. “He’s a well-rounded
player right now and at a young age. He’s very competent in his own zone and obviously he’s a
guy that can add some offensive pop as well.”

Couturier, 18 (12-7-1992), recorded 36 goals and 60 assists for 96 points in 58 regular season
games with the Drummondville Voltigeurs of the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League this past
season. He led the team in assists (60), tied for the team lead in points (96 – 4th in QMJHL) and
finished second on the team in goals (36). He also led the club in plus/minus rating (+55 – 2nd in
QMJHL), points-per-game (1.66), and tied for the team lead in short-handed goals (4).
“I was just enjoying the moment. I'm really happy to be part of the Philadelphia Flyers. It's a
great honor. It's a wonderful day,” said Couturier. “I’m pretty reliable defensively, and
offensively I’m pretty good at protecting and controlling the puck.”


Couturier led his team in the QMJHL playoffs with 11 points (6G-5A) in 10 games and was later
named the QMJHL’s Most Valuable Player, the Top 2011 Draft Prospect and selected a First-
Team All-Star.


In 2009-10, Couturier led the QMJHL in scoring with 96 points (41G-55A), becoming the first
17 year-old to lead the league in scoring since Sidney Crosby (Rimouski) in 2004-05. He also led
the team with a plus/minus rating of +62.

Over the course of three seasons, all with Drummondville, Couturier has recorded 86 goals and
137 assists for 223 points in 184 regular season games, finishing with a career plus/minus mark
of +141. He also recorded 37 points (17G-20A) in 43 career QMJHL playoff games.

A native of Phoenix, Az., his father, Sylvain, was drafted 65th overall by Los Angeles in 1986
and played 33 games with the Kings between 1988-89 and 1991-92 – he is now the General
Manager of the Acadie-Bathurst Titans in the QMJHL.

21. Philadelphiaflyers.com- Pronger Reacts to Flyers Trades

Philadelphia Flyers Staff

Flyers Defenseman Chris Pronger Conference Call – June 24, 2011

Q: What was your reaction to yesterday’s events?

“I think when you make a move like that to get a goalie and you’ve got to pay him, you’ve got to
get the money somewhere. Time and again in the salary cap era, you’ve got to give to get.
Unfortunately for us, those two guys were traded. It sucks as a teammate. You hate to see guys
go. They were for all intents and purposes the face of the franchise for four of those six years, if
not for the six years they were here. I’m sure it’s tough for them. The Philadelphia Flyers, it’s
all they really know. I’ve gone through it a number of times, and sometimes a move is healthy
for you.”

Q: Were you able to reach out to Jeff or Mike?

“I’m going to give them a call today. Having gone through it a number of times, you kind of
need a day to gather your thoughts and kind of get your wits about you. It’s certainly not an easy
thing. I think it makes it a little bit easier that they’re both single and don’t have to lug around
kids and logistically and that stuff, but it’s still very tough to be traded and I’m sure both of them
have mixed emotions.”
Q: Is the team closer to winning a Cup now?

“I don’t know. I haven’t really thought about that too much. I just heard about the trades last
night so I haven’t really put a whole lot of thought to it, I’m up in the bush with my kids, fishing.
I haven’t put the Xs and Os together – I’m sure you guys have looked at it seven ways from
Sunday and tried to figure out who wins or loses. At the end of the day, as I said before, having
been traded a number of times, it’s always difficult. They both played their hearts out in Philly,
but sometimes as I said, you’ve got to make tough decisions and you’ve got to make moves, and
sometimes it may hurt and may feel like you’re making your team worse to make it better.”

Q: Does this team have a better locker room today?

“I don’t know. I don’t really know those other guys they brought in. I played against Wayne
Simmonds for one or two years when I was in Anaheim, but other than that, when you play on
the East Coast, you don’t really play the West very often, and vice-versa. When I was coming
out here I didn’t really know many of the guys here, because I’d played in the West pretty much
my whole career. I can’t really speak to that right now, having no luxury to know any of the
three guys we picked up.”

Q: Did you think there was a problem in the room?

“I don’t think anybody would say a year ago when we went to the Stanley Cup Final that there
was a chemistry problem. [That year] I think our play was very inconsistent, and we were trying
to find ourselves as a team with a new coach and a new system. I think the players were trying
to find where they needed to be and how we needed to play to be successful as a group. Last
year, you’re coming off a tough defeat in the Stanley Cup Final in overtime, we got off to a good
start, and nobody seemed to think we had a problem then. As the season wore on, for whatever
reason, we just didn’t turn that corner and continue to get better and peak at the right time.
That’s disappointing, and it’s tough. I don’t think there was necessarily a rift, I think we just
needed more life in the locker room. It all has to do with your play on the ice. If you’re playing
well on the ice, there’s never any questions as to who’s doing what or is there a rift, does this guy
like that guy, and all of the rest of the stuff that gets thrown out. If you play well on the ice,
nobody wants to write about that because everything’s going good.”

Q: Do you want to be the captain?

“You know what, I haven’t put much thought in it to be honest with you. This is all very, very
fresh to a lot of us. Obviously I’d have to talk to Homer and Lavi and see what their thoughts
are, and kind of go from there. You don’t nominate yourself. I’ve never been part of a team
where somebody nominates himself. I think that may be a little bit premature to start talking
about stuff like that. It’s one day after two huge trades on our team and in the history of the
Flyers, so I don’t think that’s in anybody’s minds right now.”

22. NHL.com- Couturier stays the course despite adversity

Mike Morreale
Not much has changed for Drummondville Voltigeurs center Sean Couturier since learning he
had earned the No. 2 rating among North American skaters on NHL Central Scouting's midterm
report earlier this month.

Then again, even if there was a change, you'd never know it.

Couturier, rated right behind No. 1-ranked Gabriel Landeskog of the Kitchener Rangers, is a
pretty close-to-the-vest type of teenager. Like most teens, he has his quirks -- he likes pancakes
with chocolate in the morning, considers math his academic strong suit, and has met New Jersey
Devils goalie Martin Brodeur -- but stirring the pot is not on the list for this native of Bathhurst,
New Brunswick.

It's just not his style -- at least off the ice.

On the ice, Couturier has become a fantastic two-way hockey player in a short period of time and
that's what has so many scouts and general managers excited about his future. He has the
pedigree and the resume to naturally attract attention. His ability to adapt to change, though, has
certainly been a noticeable asset this season.

"I think adapting to change quickly is an asset of mine," Couturier told NHL.com. "You have to
adapt yourself as fast as you can in order to perform well."

Couturier did that in Drummondville and also as a silver-medalist for Team Canada at the 2011
World Junior Championship in Buffalo, N.Y., when he was the youngest -- and only draft-
eligible -- player on the team. Canada lost to Russia in the gold-medal game earlier this month,
surrendering five-straight goals in the third period of a 5-3 loss.

"The WJC was a great experience overall," Couturier said. "It was a sad ending … a bad ending.
But I try and take the positives out of it. I think I learned a lot just being a part of it. It's fast
hockey, it's the best in the world and just playing against the best, you get better. I think just
adapting to the best, it went pretty good overall, so that's a good thing."

After notching only 9 goals and 31 points in 58 games during his inaugural season in
Drummondville in 2008-09, Couturier led the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League with 96
points in 68 games last season. He was the first 17-year-old to lead the league in scoring since
Sidney Crosby of the Rimouski Oceanic did it in 2004-05 with 66 goals and 168 points in 62
matches.

Couturier's agent, former NHL defenseman Gilles Lupien, has compared his client to Hall of
Fame forward Darryl Sittler. He's also been compared favorably to Carolina Hurricanes center
Eric Staal.

"It's fun to be compared to those great players, but we still have our qualities and our own game
abilities," Couturier said. "I try to learn from those great players."
Sean Couturier (Courtesy: Voltigeurs)
Couturier has also been blessed with great coaching -- beginning with his father, Sylvain, the
current general manager of the QMJHL's Acadie-Bathurst Titans. Sylvain, who was drafted No.
65 by Los Angeles in 1986, played 33 games with the Kings between 1988-89 and 1991-92.

"I've heard some stories about his time in Los Angeles," Couturier said. "His first goal was off an
assist from (Wayne) Gretzky and his first assist was a goal by Gretzky, so that was pretty
special."

In his first season with the Voltigeurs, Couturier was coached by current Tampa Bay Lightning
head coach Guy Boucher.

"Guy was a great coach," Couturier said. "In that first year, I didn't know what to expect, but
having Guy around made my (adaptation) that much better and he made me comfortable in
Drummondville, so a lot of success comes from him.

"The thing is, I didn't have a whole lot of ice time, but Guy still kept me positive and made me a
better player. He just told me to get better every day and that's what I did because the next year
was a lot better."

In addition to Boucher's impact, the 6-foot-4, 193-pound left-handed center also received a
tremendous boost of confidence in 2007-08 with the Notre Dame Hounds. There, Couturier
played alongside Jaden Schwartz (St. Louis, No. 14, 2010) and Brandon Gormley (Phoenix, No.
13, 2010) for the Saskatchewan Midget AAA championship team.

"It was a great experience and good for me leaving home at such a young age," he said. "It was
kind of tough at the start, but I think it made me a better person … living away builds character.
It helped me when I got to juniors because the transition was easier."

Even though he's not the top-ranked player in North America, according to Central Scouting,
Couturier still has his share of admirers.

"He's a really good player … he's big and strong and really good on the puck," Saint John Sea
Dogs forward Tomas Jurco said. "He protects the puck and moves very well."

"He can be first or second overall," Victoriaville Tigres captain Phillip Danault told NHL.com.
"He can shoot the puck and protect it. He has speed -- all the teams want this player on their
team."

On Wednesday, Couturier participated in the Top Prospects Game at Air Canada Centre in
Toronto. As the captain for Team Cherry, he managed one shot on goal in a 7-1 loss. It certainly
wasn't the type of finish he envisioned.
"I think it went OK," he said. "I tried not to do too much, be too fancy. I tried to keep it simple
and it went OK." His counterpart, Team Orr captain Ryan Nugent-Hopkins, rated No. 3 by
Central Scouting, notched two assists and was named the team's most valuable player.

"Sean has excellent puckhandling and playmaking ability," Central Scouting's Chris Edwards
told NHL.com. "He sees the ice and reads the play very well. The top prospects game was far
from his best outing but he's extremely smart and gets himself into good scoring position. He
plays a solid two-way game and is very responsible defensively."

Couturier knows the rankings are out of his control, but there's always a chance of reaching the
top once again at the final ratings release in April.

"I'm looking forward to the draft but pretty nervous and anxious to see where I'm going to go,"
he said. "For sure, though, when the season ends in Drummondville, I'll be looking to get it over
and done with in order to get focused for the next season."

23. NHL.com- Couturier's selection reinforces Flyers' depth

Adam Kimelman

ST. PAUL -- One day after trading two All-Star centers in Jeff Carter and Mike Richards, the
Philadelphia Flyers have a pair of youngsters they hope can follow in their highly skilled skates.

Philadelphia acquired Brayden Schenn as part of Thursday's blockbuster deal that sent Richards
to Los Angeles, and with the No. 8 pick in Friday's first round of the 2011 Entry Draft -- a pick
obtained in the deal that sent Carter to Columbus -- the Flyers selected Drummondville
Voltigeurs center Sean Couturier.

After leading the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League in scoring with 96 points as a 17-year-old
in 2009-10, the 6-foot-4, 197-pound center scored another 96 points, this time in just 58 games --
10 fewer than the previous season. Couturier also had 3 points in seven games while helping
Canada win the silver medal at the 2011 World Junior Championship. He was the only draft-
eligible player on the team.

However, Couturier's goal total dipped from 41 to 36, and his stock slipped in the eyes of some
scouts. He entered the season as the early favorite to be taken with the first pick of the draft, but
ended the season No. 6 in NHL Central Scouting's final ranking of North American skaters.

"All our guys liked him," Flyers General Manager Paul Holmgren said. "Two years ago he was
one of the better underage players in Canada. This past year Sean, after the Canadian World
Junior camp, was diagnosed with mono, which zapped him of some of his strength. He struggled
early in the year, but bounced back on not one of the better teams in the Quebec League, still had
a good year offensively. He's a well-rounded player at a young age. He's very competent in his
own zone and he's a guy that has some offensive pop, as well."

Holmgren wasn't the only one who liked what he saw from Couturier this season.
"He possesses a very good work ethic and he's out there for every important faceoff," said
Central Scouting's Chris Bordeleau. "He's very responsible in the defensive aspect of the game --
a rare quality for such a young player in junior hockey."

The Flyers have three centers under contract for the 2011-12 season -- Danny Briere, Claude
Giroux and Blair Betts. Briere and Giroux have experience playing on the wing, and Betts will
center the fourth line, so there could be an opening or two entering training camp.

"At training camp we'll have spots guys are fighting for," Holmgren said. "That's one of those
things the players usually answer. We're excited about him coming to our development camp
after the Fourth of July. That'll be our first taste of working with him, and coming to training
camp. It'll be his fourth year of junior (if he doesn't make the team). Is that a good thing or a bad
thing? I don't know. He's a big kid, he's pretty filled out already, so I would say it's an important
summer for him."

Couturier said his goal is to be in Philadelphia for the 2011-12 season.

"For sure my main goal is going to be to try to make a spot on the roster," he said. "We'll go
from now and work hard, keep working hard during the summer and improve myself and be
ready for camp. Once I get there, I just want to show what I've got.

"I think it's going to be up to me to work hard this summer and show what I've got. I can't control
the decision after that. But my main goal for sure is going to be part of the team."

24. NHL.com- Pronger understands how Richards, Carter feel

Mike Morreale

MINNEAPOLIS -- Defenseman Chris Pronger played for four other NHL teams before being
dealt to the Philadelphia Flyers on the second day of the 2009 Entry Draft in Montreal.

He remembers the day well and has a pretty good idea the wave of emotions that former
Philadelphia teammates Jeff Carter and Mike Richards might be experiencing on the day after
general manager Paul Holmgren orchestrated two of the boldest moves in franchise history.

"It (stinks) as a teammate," Pronger told the media during a conference call on Friday. "You hate
to see guys go. They were, for all intents and purposes, the face of the franchise for four of those
six years, if not for the six years they were here. I'm sure it's tough for them. The Philadelphia
Flyers, it's all they really know. I've gone through it a number of times, and sometimes a move is
healthy for you."

Holmgren sent Carter to the Columbus Blue Jackets for right wing Jakub Voracek, the No. 8 pick
and a third-round pick (No. 68) of the 2011 Entry Draft. Richards was traded to the Los Angeles
Kings for right wing Wayne Simmonds, center Brayden Schenn and a second-round pick in the
2012 draft.
In one final move following the blockbuster deals, the Flyers signed goalie Ilya Bryzgalov to a
contract reportedly worth $51.5 million over nine years.

"I think when you make a move like that to get a goalie and you've got to pay him, you've got to
get the money somewhere," Pronger said. "Time and again, in the salary cap era, you've got to
give to get. Unfortunately for us, (Carter and Richards) were traded."

Pronger said he hadn't reached out to either Carter or Richards yet, but will at some point.

"Having gone through it a number of times, you kind of need a day to gather your thoughts and
kind of get your wits about you," he said. "It's certainly not an easy thing. I think it makes it a
little bit easier that they're both single and don't have to lug around kids, but it's still very tough
to be traded and I'm sure both of them have mixed emotions."

During a media conference call on Thursday, Richards admitted shock after initially hearing the
news.

"I was very shocked when I got a call from my agent, just kind of giving me the rundown on
what he knew," Richards said. "I actually found out about it on the Internet a few minutes before
I was able to get the confirmation from my agent about it. At first I was shocked, then I was
excited."

Richards is a two-time 30-goal scorer who captained the Flyers to the 2010 Stanley Cup Final
and won an Olympic gold medal, while Carter has scored at least 33 goals in three straight
seasons.

Pronger admits he hasn't really thought about the makeup of the team at this point following the
trades.

"I just heard about the trades last night, so I haven't really put a whole lot of thought to it," he
said. "I'm up in the bush with my kids, fishing. I haven't put the X's and O's together. I'm sure
you guys have looked at it seven ways from Sunday and tried to figure out who wins or loses but,
at the end of the day, and having been traded a number of times, it's always difficult.

"They both played their hearts out in Philly, but sometimes you've got to make tough decisions
and you've got to make moves. Sometimes it may hurt and may feel like you're making your
team worse to make it better."

Like Voracek, Pronger moved from a Western Conference team to the East following his trade to
the Flyers from Anaheim.

"I don't really know those other guys they brought in," Pronger said. "I played against Wayne
Simmonds for one or two years when I was in Anaheim, but other than that, when you play on
the East Coast, you don't really play the West very often."
Richards, 26, had been the team's captain the last three seasons. Pronger said it'll be up to coach
Peter Laviolette and the Flyers managerial team in naming the 18th captain in team history.

"Obviously, I'd have to talk to Homer and Lavi and see what their thoughts are, and kind of go
from there," Pronger said. "You don't nominate yourself. I've never been part of a team where
somebody nominates himself. It's one day after two huge trades on our team and in the history of
the Flyers, so I don't think that's in anybody's minds right now."

Pronger doesn't feel there were ever major issues within the locker room during his tenure with
Carter and Richards, although he did mention a lack of enthusiasm on the ice. He blamed an
inability to "turn the corner" during this year's playoffs.

The Flyers were swept by the Stanley Cup champion Boston Bruins in the conference semifinal
round.

"I don't think anybody would say a year ago when we went to the Stanley Cup Final that there
was a chemistry problem," Pronger said. "Last year, you're coming off a tough defeat in the
Stanley Cup Final in overtime, we got off to a good start, and nobody seemed to think we had a
problem. As the season wore on, for whatever reason, we just didn't turn that corner and continue
to get better and peak at the right time.

"I don't think there was necessarily a rift, I think we just needed more life in the locker room. It
all has to do with your play on the ice. If you're playing well on the ice, there's never any
questions as to who's doing what or is there a rift, does this guy like that guy, and all of the rest
of the stuff that gets thrown out. If you play well on the ice, nobody wants to write about that
because everything's going good."

25. NHL.com- Flyers set to move ahead after dealing 2 stars

Associated Press

PressPHILADELPHIA (AP) - In 30 minutes, the Philadelphia Flyers changed the face of the
franchise - just not the course of it.

Two separate trades resulted in the departure of leading goal scorer Jeff Carter and team captain
Mike Richards. Fans were stunned by the move by a franchise that hasn't won a Stanley Cup
championship since 1975.

Carter and Richards were expected to lead Philadelphia to the title. The duo came close, losing in
the finals to the Chicago Blackhawks in 2010.

Instead, the Flyers signed goaltender Ilya Bryzgalov to a nine-year deal.

Now the pressure falls on forwards James van Riemsdyk and Claude Giroux, and goalie Ilya
Bryzgalov.
On Friday, Flyers defenseman Chris Pronger said he was surprised as anyone about the deal and
he hasn't been approached about the captaincy.

26. TSN.ca- Numbers game: Flyers sign Bryzgalov

Scott Cullen

One of the catalysts for Philadelphia's blockbuster trades on Thursday was creating salary cap
space so that they could sign a goaltender.

Numbers Game takes a look at the Flyers' signing of Ilya Bryzgalov.

Flyers Get: G Ilya Bryzgalov.

Bryzgalov, who turned 31 on Wednesday, has been among the NHL's best goaltenders over the
last four seasons, posting a .917 save percentage in 266 games, 257 of which have been with the
Phoenix Coyotes. The save percentage ranks fifth in the league among goaltenders with at least
200 games over that four-year span and 266 games played ranks fourth.

The Flyers have long been going with patchwork solutions between the pipes and it hasn't
worked for them, so acquiring Bryzgalov's rights, then signing him to a nine-year, $51-million
contract is a decidedly different approach. They've found a proven starting goaltender.

The bad news for the Flyers is that even as Bryzgalov is a better option than they've had in net
for many years, a goaltending upgrade doesn't assure postseason success. The nature of a seven-
game playoff series is such that even good goaltenders can come out looking subpar in small
sample sizes; to wit, as Bryzgalov and the Coyotes were swept away by Detroit in the 2011
playoffs, his 4.36 goals against average and .879 save percentage were below his typical
standards.

However, in 23 playoff games prior to this past season, Bryzgalov owned a 2.23 goals against
average and .925 save percentage, so it's also not accurate to paint him with the brush of "unable
to perform in the playoffs", based on four games against Detroit this past April.

Given the talent that is in place in Philadelphia, Bryzgalov should have plenty of opportunities to
prove that he can perform under pressure in the postseason. If he comes up short, the fact that the
Flyers jettisoned Carter and Richards to help make room for him surely won`t be forgotten.

Bryzgalov's nine-year contract includes a payment of $3.5-million over the final two years,
prime years to be bought out, or buried, depending on the needs of the team and and Bryzgalov's
level of play as he approaches 40 years of age.

Bryzgalov's presence does complicate matters somewhat, at least for 22-year-old Sergei
Bobrovsky, who had a .915 save percentge in 54 games as a rookie for the Flyers last season.
Clearly, Bobrovsky won't be seeing that kind of workload for the foreseeable future, unless the
Flyers trade him or Bryzgalov gets hurt. If he remains in Philadelphia, though, Bobrovsky would
certainly be a high-quality backup.

Phoenix still has some work to do on finding a replacement for Bryzgalov. They did get a third-
round pick in exchange for his rights, which should give them about a one-in-four chance to get
an NHL player, but the more pressing concern is finding a starting goaltender to replace
Bryzgalov.

Jason LaBarbera has been signed to a two-year deal and he's a solid backup, but Phoenix now
has to look for a new solution in goal, whether that means trading for a young backup ready to
take on a starter's role -- which could be costly in terms of assets -- or signing a free agent.

If Tomas Vokoun is too pricey for the budget-conscious Coyotes, then the rest of the unrestricted
free agent market offers the likes of Johan Hedberg, Jose Theodore, Mike Smith or Brian
Boucher.

It's entirely understandable that the Coyotes weren't willing to pay to keep Bryzgalov, but if they
can't find the right solution in goal, it could be awfully difficult to remain a playoff team.


NHL Articles

1. TSN.ca- Maple Leafs acquire defenceman Liles from Avalanche

TSN.ca Staff

John-Michael Liles is heading to Toronto.

The Avalanche sent the defenceman to the Maple Leafs in exchange for Toronto's second round
draft pick in 2012. That draft pick was acquired when the Leafs dealt Tomas Kaberle to the
Bruins last year.

Liles has been with the Avs for all seven of his seasons in the NHL. Last year, he posted six
goals and 40 assists in 76 games.

The 30-year-old has 68 goals and 207 assists in 523 career games.

Liles has one year remaining on his contract at $4.5 million, with a cap hit at $4.2 million.

2. TSN.ca- Campbell waives no- trade clause, dealt to Panthers for Olesz

TSN.ca Staff

Defenceman Brian Campbell has agreed to waive his no-trade clause in order to go to the Florida
Panthers.
The Chicago Blackhawks sent Campbell to the Panthers in exchange for forward Rostislav
Olesz.

Campbell still has five years left in his current contract at $7.1 million per year.

The 32-year-old defenceman had 27 points and was a plus-28 last year for the Blackhawks. The
former sixth-round draft pick has 312 points in 11 seasons in the league.

Olesz scored six goals and 17 points in 41 games with Florida last season. The 25-year-old
former first-round draft pick missed a number of games due to injury, including a 17-game stint
on the injured list with a broken finger, and the final 21 games of the season with a knee injury.

Olesz has a no-trade clause that kicks in on July 1.

3. TSN.ca- Numbers Game: Campbell going to Florida

Scott Cullen

The Chicago Blackhawks suddenly have cap space after dealing what was thought to be an
immovable contract to a team that is still trying to climb up to the salary floor.

Numbers Game covers the Brian Campbell trade.

The Panthers Get: D Brian Campbell.

Brian Campbell's game had undergone a metamorphosis, as he went from a freewheeling
offensive defenceman to responsible defender. He finished last season with 27 points, his lowest
total since 2003-2004, yet also tied a career-high with a plus-28 rating.


32-year-old Campbell now blocks more shots and was playing second-unit power play time in
Chicago, but his role should change back to his more offensive nature, given the lack of proven
puck-moving defencemen on the Panthers roster.

Considering the talent in Florida, Campbell may still be hard-pressed to top 50 points, as he has
twice already in his career, but he's finished between 38 and 48 points in three other seasons and
that seems a reasonable expectation for him as the Panthers' power play quarterback.

The one reason that Campbell might have been considered, by some, to be an untradeable player
is that his contract has five years and more than $35.7-million remaining, but even after adding
Campbell's $7,142,875 cap hit, the Panthers are still $24-million below the cap floor
(www.capgeek.com) with a dozen players under contract, so the money owed to Campbell isn't
particularly burdensome to a Panthers team that needs to add talent.
Campbell had to waive his no-trade clause for this deal to be completed, so his loyalty to Dale
Tallon, the Panthers GM who signed Campbell to the contract with the Blackhawks, shouldn't be
overlooked, since Campbell is agreeing to leave a contender for a team that is in the beginning
stages of rebuilding.

The Blackhawks Get: C Rostislav Olesz.

For a forward that has yet to score more than 30 points in an NHL season, Rostislav Olesz has
been rather well compensated. He has three years remaining on his contract, at a cap hit of
$3,125,000 but, because his contract is escalating, the actual cash owed is $11,650,000, making
Olesz pricier than his actual cap hit for the Blackhawks.

That being the case, and considering Chicago just cleared Campbell's salary off the books, it
seems very likely that the Blackhawks would consider buying out Olesz because, as a 25-year-
old, the buyout cost would only be at one-third the cap hit, spread out over the next six seasons.

Theoretically, that would leave the Blackhawks on the hook for a little under $650,000 for the
next six years, instead of more than $7-million to Campbell, still leaving Chicago much more
financial flexibility than they've had recently.

Part of that money will likely go towards getting Patrick Sharp, who could be an unrestricted free
agent at the end of next season, signed to a long-term deal.

With Campbell gone, the Blackhawks will have to look for help on the blueline. Campbell was
playing 23 minutes per game and even if Niklas Hjalmarsson and Chris Campoli are capable of
playing more significant roles, there is an opening that can be addressed through free agency
without spending near what they were paying Campbell.

4. TSN.ca- Sharks Trade Setoguchi, First- rounder to wild for Burns

Associated Press

SAN JOSE, Calif. -- The San Jose Sharks acquired the top-flight defenceman they had been
seeking, sending a package headlined by forward Devin Setoguchi to the Minnesota Wild for all-
star Brent Burns.

The Sharks paid a steep price to acquire the 26-year-old Burns, who is eligible to become an
unrestricted free agent after next season.

"There's such a shortage of high-end defencemen in this league," general manager Doug Wilson
said. "That's why you better move quickly because other people are lined up and involved.
There's just not enough good defencemen and centermen around in this league. When they do
become available, if you hesitate you don't get them."
They sent a former 30-goal scorer who hasn't even reached his prime in the 24-year-old
Setoguchi, last year's first-round pick Charlie Coyle and the 28th overall pick in this year's draft
for Burns and a 2012 second-round selection.

After losing in the conference finals the past two seasons, the Sharks hope the addition of Burns
helps them get past that hurdle for the first time in franchise history.

"We're right in, we think, our wheel house, our window with our team," Wilson said. "Bringing
in a guy with his age and his type of game, it complements where our team is at."

Burns had 17 goals last season, third among all blue liners. He also had 29 assists, giving the
Sharks another proven puck-moving defenceman to go along with veteran all-star Dan Boyle.

San Jose's lack of depth on the blue-line was evident in the conference loss to Vancouver,
providing an impetus for this move.

"When you don't win you make changes. It happens," coach Todd McLellan said. "Even the
Bruins will make changes this year. That's the way the business is set up. For the past few years
we felt that we were maybe not as strong on the blue line as we needed to be."

McLellan coached Burns in the AHL during the 2004-05 season, when he made the transition
from forward to defence. McLellan gave a glowing review of Burns to Wilson and said he
believes he will be one of the top defencemen in the league for years to come.

"He has some offensive instincts that forwards would have driving the puck to the net, protecting
it and taking it to the post because he's played up there before," McLellan said. "And he's very
good on the blue line. He's a hybrid."

Burns has played 453 career games since joining the Wild as an 18-year-old first-round pick. He
has 55 goals and 128 assists in his career, but has not played in the post-season the past three
years.

Now he joins a team that has been one of the best in the league the past few seasons.

"To not make the playoffs, it's really hard to look back at your year and feel good about it,"
Burns said. "To get a chance to play with a great team like San Jose is pretty amazing. I can't
wait to get there."

Burns, the Wild's first pick in 2003, was probably their most tradable asset. The Wild have
missed the playoffs for three straight years, and general manager Chuck Fletcher spoke of the
need to "aggressively" add young players to keep up with the rest of the league.

"We weren't looking to trade Brent Burns, but it came together quickly and in the course of
discussing things with Doug Wilson, the pieces came together," Fletcher said after the draft in
Minnesota.
Fletcher lauded the addition of Setoguchi, but also was very high on Coyle, who played this past
season at Boston University.

"We feel he's one of the top young power forwards in the game," Fletcher said. "We gave up a
very important piece in Brent Burns, but our timeframe needs to be stretched back a bit and we
need to add more young players. We very quickly assembled a lot of young talent."

Setoguchi got dealt a day after signing a US$9-million, three-year contract. He said after
reaching that deal that he couldn't be happier, calling San Jose the best place to play in the NHL.

It will no longer be his home in a move that he said took him be surprise.

"It's tough to leave there," Setoguchi said. "I've been there so long and know so many people
there. I've grown to love the city and the organization. That will be tough. But you can't expect to
be there forever. Now you have to make new friends and start all over."

Setoguchi overcame a lacklustre start last season before finishing with 22 goals and 19 assists in
the regular season. He added seven goals and three assists in the playoffs, including overtime
goals to beat Los Angeles and Detroit in the first two rounds. He provides a needed scoring
threat for the Wild, whose 203 goals were the fifth fewest in the regular season.

Setoguchi has 84 goals in four seasons in the NHL, including a career-high 31 two years ago. He
also has 75 assists in 267 games and has one of the best shots on the Sharks.

5. TSN.ca- Numbers Game: Sharks bring in Burns, Ship out Setoguchi

Scott Cullen

In the biggest deal on the day, the Minnesota Wild moved out their number one defenceman, but
received a healthy package of talent in return.

Numbers Game digs into the Brent Burns-Devin Setoguchi trade.

The Sharks Get: D Brent Burns and a second-round pick.

Burns, 26, was finally healthy after a couple of seasons battling concussions, playing in 80
games last season and staked his claim to be considered among the top all-around blueliners in
the league, so this is a potentially difference-making deal for the Sharks.

Burns has a rare combination of size and puck skills that are borne out of his days as a forward
and scored a career-high 17 goals and 46 points last season. Though he was minus-10, his five-
on-five shot differential per 60 minutes was the best among Minnesota defencemen.

After logging more than 25 minutes per game last season, Burns will be able to handle a heavy
workload as long as he remains healthy, which may help ease the workload on Sharks
defencemen Dan Boyle, who ranked second in the league with 26:14 ice time per game.
The draft pick portion of this swap is really a sweetener for the Wild, with a marginal difference
in value between pick No. 28 and the No. 40.

Minnesota may need to look for some free agent help on defence after this deal as Marek
Zidlicky, with 24 points in 46 games, is now the top returning scorer on the Wild blueline.

The Wild Get: RW Devin Setoguchi, C Charlie Coyle and a first-round pick.

Signed to a new three-year contract Thursday, 24-year-old Devin Setoguchi was on his way to
another disappointing season when his game turned around in the second half. Due in no small
part to more chances playing with Joe Thornton, Setoguchi scored 15 goals and 29 points in the
last 33 games, giving him 41 points for the season.

For all of his ups and downs, Setoguchi does have three straight 20-goal seasons and he's done it
largely without requiring prime ice time, playing 15:12 per game last season.

In Minnesota, he could not only play alongside Mikko Koivu, but Setoguchi may be able to get a
few more minutes per game, which should give him an opportunity to put up the second 50-point
season of his career.

A first-round pick last summer, 19-year-old Charlie Coyle had a solid freshman year at Boston
University, scoring 26 points in 37 games, but thrived at the World Junior Hockey
Championships, tying to the Team USA lead with six points in seven games.

Coyle has good size, at 6-foot-2, 207 pounds already, plays a well-rounded game already and
should develop more offensively as he matures.

With the 28th pick, the Wild selected Zack Phillips, the high-scoring centre from the Memorial-
Cup-champion Saint John Sea Dogs. Phillips had 95 points and a plus-48 rating in 67 games last
season.

His speed is considered the one part of his game that could hold him back, but Phillips certainly
has a chance to make it as a playmaking centre in a few years.

It's not easy for the Wild to give up their top defenceman, but they've helped stock the system,
getting three skilled forwards with as-yet-unrealized potential.

Additionally, Burns' concussion history and contract status -- he'll be an unrestricted free agent at
the end of next season -- might have made the timing right for the Wild to deal a prime asset
while he could yield a significant return.

6. TSN.ca-Blackhawks trade Brouwer to Capitals for First-rounder

TSN.ca Staff
The Chicago Blackhawks have traded winger Troy Brouwer to the Washington Capitals for a
first-round draft pick (26th overall).

Chicago selected Victoriaville Tigres winger Phillip Danault with the 26th pick.

Brouwer tallied 36 points and finished with a minus-2 rating in 79 games in Chicago last season.

The former seventh-round draft pick was a plus-9 with 40 points in Chicago's Stanley Cup-
winning season two years ago.

Brouwer is a restricted free agent.

7. TSN.ca- Numbers Game: Caps add power with Brouwer

Scott Cullen

The Washington Capitals made a pre-emptive strike to add a physical forward with a scoring
touch.

Numbers Game looks at the Troy Brouwer deal.

The Capitals Get: RW Troy Brouwer.

Brouwer, 25, is a hard-hitting winger who doesn't have the best wheels, but has the size and
hands to finish around the net, scoring 39 goals over the last two seasons.

While Brouwer has some scoring upside, he can be a factor even when he's not scoring, ranking
fifth in the league with 262 hits last season.

The unfortunate part of that equation is that Brouwer goes through spells when he's not scoring
and, at least in Chicago, he's shuffled back-and-forth from a scoring role to a checking role rather
frequently.

Brouwer ended the 2010-2011 season with no goals in his last 29 games, including playoffs, and
he's surely capable of providing more consistent production.

In Washington, Brouwer has a chance to provide insurance in case the Capitals lose Brooks
Laich to free agency. Though Brouwer may not be Laich's all-around equal, he can play a similar
yet more physical role, has a Stanley Cup ring, can play the power play and do it at a reasonable
price.

A restricted free agent, Brouwer was a $1.025-million cap hit last season and while he'll get
more this season.

The Blackhawks Get: A first-round pick.
With the 26th pick, the Blackhawks selected left-winger Phillip Danault, a hard-working winger
who had 67 points and a plus-17 rating in 64 games. He's several years away from contributing,
but adds organizational depth in the meantime.

Chicago could afford, in some respects, to let Brouwer go because they have some relatively
inexpensive depth on the wings that may be able to produce at Brouwer's (20-goal) level, if not
necessarily play the same kind of physical role.

8. TSN.ca- Numbers Game: Maple Leafs ass Liles

Scott Cullen

Toronto, seeking help for their 22nd-ranked power play, made a deal for an offensive
defenceman that should make a difference.

Numbers Game looks at the Maple Leafs' deal for John-Michael Liles.

Leafs Get: D John-Michael Liles.

Liles, 30, is a proven puck-moving, mobile defenceman who was off to a sensational start in the
2010-2011 season before the wheels fell off for the Avalanche as a whole in the second half.

After opening the season with 23 points in 23 games, Liles had 34 points and a plus-12 rating
through 46 games in late January. Then, as Colorado's season went off the rails, Liles had 12
points and was minus-21 in his last 30 games.

To be fair to Liles, however, his overall minus-9 rating was affected to some degree by
Colorado's subpar goaltending. Among Avalanche defencemen that played at least 25 games,
Liles had the best shot differential per 60 minutes in 5-on-5 situations (www.behindthenet.ca).

While that doesn't mean he should be confused with a shutdown defender, Liles isn't a complete
defensive liability either. He's not big, so Liles doesn't play a particularly physical game, yet at
the same time, he led Avalanche defencemen with 153 blocked shots.

In the end, Liles played a career-high 22:01 per game, scoring a career-high 46 points.

Coming to Toronto, he'll be needed to quarterback the power play and Liles had 18 points on the
power play last season, the sixth straight season that he recorded at least 15 power play assists.

After trading Tomas Kaberle to Boston, the Maple Leafs really didn't have an established
offensive defenceman that they could lean on to run the power play and that's why they were
discussing a trade with Colorado for Liles prior to the NHL trade deadline.

Going into the last year of his contract, Liles has a $4.2-million cap hit, which is entirely
reasonable for the skills he provides.
Avalanche Get: A second-round pick in 2012.

The second-round pick that Colorado gets will be the pick that Toronto acquired from Boston in
the Tomas Kaberle trade. The standard second-round pick has a 25-30 percent chance of turning
into an NHL player, but Liles' departure leaves the Avs with an immediate significant hole.

Barring additional summer acquisitions, the defenceman most likely to benefit for the Avalanche
could be Kyle Cumiskey, an oft-injured, smooth-skating blueliner who has been playing nearly
20 minutes per game over the last two seasons, yet has played a total of 79 games due to
concussions, foot and shoulder injuries.

Erik Johnson will certainly be the focal point on the Colorado defence but Cumiskey, even if he's
not quite as offensively gifted, may be able to play a role more similar to the role that Liles
plays.

Colorado now sits about $20-million under the salary floor for next season, but they have nine
restricted free agents to deal with (Cumiskey included) in addition to any consideration of
unrestricted free agents, so they have plenty of financial flexibility to go about building their
team this summer.

Since Toronto is further along in their rebuilding plan, with expectations of competing for a
playoff spot next season, Liles makes more sense in the Toronto lineup next season.

9. TSN.ca- Lightning Ink Brewers to four-year deal

TSN.ca Staff

The Tampa Bay Lightning, who are still looking at a deal for forward Steven Stamkos, have
made a signing prior to Friday's NHL Entry Draft.

Defenceman Eric Brewer has agreed to a four-year deal with the club that will pay him just
under $16 million.

"We are very pleased to get Eric re-signed today," general manager Steve Yzerman said in a
statement. "He was an important part of our team after being acquired at last year's deadline and
he played a key role in the playoffs both on and off the ice."

The 32-year-old, who recorded nine goals and seven assists in 76 games last season with the St.
Louis Blues and the Lightning, was set to become a free agent on July 1.

"I'm happy to be a part of the Lightning going forward," Brewer said. "The organization is
clearly moving in the right direction and I'm proud to be a part of it."

Brewer, who won a gold medal with Canada at the Olympics in 2002, has 65 goals and 145
assists in 758 career games.
10. TSN.ca- Winnipeg Jets Officially name Noel head coach

The Canadian Press

MINNEAPOLIS - One thing that never left Claude Noel was the belief he was good enough to
coach in the NHL.

The unshakable confidence took him from Toledo to Manitoba - and several stops in between
over two decades -- and finally manifested itself in the opportunity of a lifetime as the first head
coach of Winnipeg's new NHL team - which was officially named the Jets on Friday night.

"When I got the news I was extremely excited," Noel said Friday afternoon. "There was a lot of
emotion. You know, I've gone through this process a few times and I'm a little older and I
thought, 'Jeez, I hope my day's coming.'

"I thought my day would come and I can't tell you how happy I am."

The 55-year-old briefly coached the Columbus Blue Jackets on an interim basis after Ken
Hitchcock was fired in February 2010, but didn't end up keeping the post once the season ended.
He became head coach of the American Hockey League's Manitoba Moose last year.

"When I didn't get the job in Columbus, there was disappointment like anybody would be," said
Noel. "I just sort of held on to my own inner confidence and thought `my day will come, I've just
to got to continue to try to do a good job and try to do some good work."'

His hiring brought an end to a coaching search that lasted two or three weeks and had the
potential to be a bit awkward for the Winnipeg front office.

Noel was chosen over Chicago Blackhawks assistant coach Mike Haviland, who has worked
with Winnipeg GM Kevin Cheveldayoff in the past. Noel and assistant GM Craig Heisinger
spent last year together with the Moose.

"(Haviland) was a qualified candidate," said Cheveldayoff. "I know him personally after
obviously winning a Stanley Cup championship with him. But in this situation here, you have to
take personal relationships out of it. He was very professional, he was extremely thankful for the
opportunity.

"Again, when Zinger and I sat down and went to the final conclusion, we said 'we don't think we
can make a bad choice here.' We just think that this is the right choice for moving forward."

Noel has coached in the AHL, ECHL and IHL and experienced plenty of success along the way.

He already has a few potential candidates in mind for assistants and hopes to lock them up
quickly. They'll need to get right down to work on preparations for a team that has missed the
playoffs the last four seasons.
"I think it's really important that you make sure you get people that are loyal and you can trust,"
Noel said of his assistants. "Because we are going to have to dig in as a staff, there is no question
that we're going have some areas we're going to have to dig in. We're going to have to find some
solutions."

Even when talking about some of the challenges that lie ahead, there was no taking the smile off
Noel's face.

He was out shopping with his family when Cheveldayoff called with the good news on
Wednesday night and couldn't help but reflect on the journey that got him here after the news
became official.

"I can't wait to get started," said Noel.

11. TSN.ca- Sabres announce agreement to purchase Americans of the AHL

Associated Press

The Buffalo Sabres have an agreement to purchase the Rochester Americans of the American
Hockey League.

The AHL Board of Governors unanimously approved the transaction on Friday. In the process,
the Sabres also announced their affiliation agreement with the Portland Pirates has ended.

The Sabres expect to hold a press conference in Rochester next week to set forth their plans for
the franchise. The purchase of the Americans reunites the Sabres with their former affiliate, one
that is approximately 120 kilometres away.

12. TSN.ca-Maple Leafs add primer Thrashers GM Dudley to front office

The Canadian Press

TORONTO - Rick Dudley is joining the Toronto Maple Leafs front office, the team announced
by its Twitter account Friday.

Dudley had been the general manager of the Atlanta Thrashers for one year before the team was
moved to Winnipeg this spring. The 62-year-old Toronto native was told three weeks ago that his
services would not be needed in Manitoba by team owners True North Sports and Entertainment.

Kevin Cheveldayoff was chosen as the new GM of the Winnipeg Jets.

The Maple Leafs did not specify what Dudley's role or title will be.

Dudley had previously been a GM with the Ottawa Senators, Tampa Bay Lightning and Florida
Panthers and has also coached the Panthers and Buffalo Sabres
13. TSN.ca- Canadiens re-sign Markov to three-year, $17.25 Million contract

The Canadian Press

MONTREAL -- Andrei Markov started his career with the Montreal Canadiens, and it looks like
he may end it with them too.

The Canadiens announced Thursday that the veteran defenceman has signed a US$17.25-million,
three-year deal with the club that will see Markov in a Montreal uniform through the 2013-14
season.

His yearly salary of $5.75 million is unchanged from his last contract.

"We are very pleased that Andrei has made the decision to pursue his career with the Montreal
Canadiens," general manager Pierre Gauthier said in a statement. "A player drafted and
developed by our organization, Andrei brings a high level of talent and leadership to our team.

"We look forward to having him back in our lineup for the start of the upcoming season."

Markov, 32, has played 10 seasons with the Canadiens, though his career has been hampered by
injuries to his right knee. He missed the first 10 games of last season due to his injured knee,
then he played just seven games before a second knee injury that required season-ending surgery.

When he's healthy, Markov is a huge offensive presence on the Montreal blue-line. The
Canadiens will be hoping Markov returns to the form he showed in the 2008-09 season, when he
had 12 goals and 52 assists for a career-high 64 points.

The six-foot, 209-pound defenceman has registered 366 points (81 goals, 285 assists) in 623
NHL regular-season games. He also has 18 points (three goals, 15 assists) in 49 career playoff
games.

The six-foot, 209-pound defenceman has recorded 361 penalty minutes and maintained a +31
plus/minus differential.

A native of Voskresensk, Russia, Markov was the Canadiens' sixth pick (third round, 162nd
overall) at the 1998 NHL draft.

He was part of the Russian Olympic teams in 2006 and 2010.

14. ESPN.com- Edmonton drafts Ryan Nugent-Hopkins

Associated Press

ST. PAUL, Minn. -- Ryan Nugent-Hopkins took center stage when the Edmonton Oilers made
him the No. 1 pick in the NHL draft.
It was quite fitting. Center was clearly the coveted position as player after player came off the
board.

Nugent-Hopkins was the first to go Friday night, starting a run of pivots with six of the first eight
selections. Then came the defensemen, with six being chosen in the top 14. After that came a
couple of eyebrow-raising trades.

Nugent-Hopkins, the first Western Hockey League player to be drafted first since 1996, has been
raising eyebrows at the junior level for a while. The Oilers, slotted first overall for the second
straight year, selected the slick passer from the Red Deer Rebels. The 18-year-old center led the
WHL last season with 75 assists, and maybe, just maybe, he'll be the next great player for the
Oilers.

Edmonton took left wing Taylor Hall No. 1 in 2010, and Nugent-Hopkins could eventually find
himself on a line with him. The first British Columbian to be taken first overall in the NHL draft,
Nugent-Hopkins has already spoken with Hall.

"He was so great to talk to. Everything looks good right now," Nugent-Hopkins said. "He just
said, 'Enjoy this whole experience. You're going to be nervous and stuff, but try to enjoy it as
much as you can.'"

As for their chemistry?

"I guess we'll never know until we get on the ice together, but hopefully we do. I can see it
working," Nugent-Hopkins said.

To get there, Nugent-Hopkins has to bulk up. Listed at 6-foot-1 and 164 pounds, he said this
week he's added 10 pounds to that total since the end of his junior season and plans to pack on
five more.

"Steak and potatoes, mostly," he said when asked about his diet. "Just trying to put some weight
on."

Nugent-Hopkins said he's heard general manager Steve Tambellini is in "no rush" to bring him to
Edmonton.

"If I do go back to junior, I won't be disappointed at all," Nugent-Hopkins said. "It'll be a great
opportunity for us as Red Deer as a team to hopefully get to the Memorial Cup. Personally, it'll
be a good development year for me, too. But my goal right now is to make the Oilers."

The remaining rounds, two through seven, will take place on Saturday.

The home fans will return happy, after the Minnesota Wild drew roars from the crowd following
the announcement of their big deal with the San Jose Sharks. The Wild sent All-Star defenseman
Brent Burns and their 2012 second-round pick to the Sharks, and they received a pair of forwards
Devin Setoguchi, a former 30-goal scorer, and Charlie Coyle, a first-round pick last year; plus
another first-round pick this year, 28th overall.

Setoguchi had just agreed to a three-year, $9 million-deal on Thursday.

Chicago then dealt right wing Troy Brouwer to the Washington Capitals for the 26th overall
selection, giving the Blackhawks a pair of first-rounders.

Left wing Gabriel Landeskog of Sweden went second overall to the Colorado Avalanche. He had
36 goals in 53 games last season for the Kitchener Rangers of the Ontario Hockey League.

Jonathan Huberdeau, a center from Quebec, was taken third by the Florida Panthers, who were
also in the same slot for the second year in a row. Huberdeau was the MVP of the Quebec Major
Junior Hockey League playoffs after getting three goals and three assists in four games for the
Saint John's Sea Dogs.

Huberdeau attended an English-speaking high school to help ease his transition to the NHL, and
he spoke this week about finishing his exams, another reminder of just how young these players
are under the spotlight on the stage with the whole hockey world watching.

Landeskog spoke of the "surreal" experience, hearing his name called while sitting in the seats
with his family.

"I was just telling my dad, 'I can't believe this is really happening,'" Landeskog said.

Adam Larsson, a 6-foot-3, 200-pound defenseman from Sweden, was selected fourth by the New
Jersey Devils. He played two full seasons for Skelleftea and was the third blue-liner to make his
debut in the Swedish Elite League at age 16.

Then the New York Islanders chose center Ryan Strome of the Niagara IceDogs of the OHL.
Strome was third in the league with 106 points in 65 games. Islanders right wing Kyle Okposo, a
native of Minnesota, introduced Strome. The Islanders, too, were picking fifth for the second
straight year.

After that, the Ottawa Senators chose center Mika Zibanejad from Djurgarden of the Swedish
Elite League with the first of their three first-round picks. His mother is Finnish, and his father is
Iranian, but he was born in Stockholm.

Then came the big announcement by Winnipeg: The team will be called the Jets. Formerly the
Atlanta Thrashers, the franchise waited until the seconds before choosing center Mark Schiefele
with the seventh selection to announce the new -- er, old -- nickname.

Team chairman Mark Chipman turned to general manager Kevin Cheveldayoff to make the pick
"on behalf of the Winnipeg Jets." That drew cheers and "Go Jets go!" chants from the dozens of
fans wearing white T-shirts with the old red-and-blue Jets logo.
The Philadelphia Flyers, using the eighth pick they obtained in one of Thursday's stunning
trades, the one that sent leading scorer Jeff Carter to the Columbus Blue Jackets, took center
Sean Couturier of the Drummondville Voltigeurs of the QMJHL.

Defenseman Dougie Hamilton was drafted ninth overall by the Stanley Cup champion Boston
Bruins. The son of an Olympic rower (dad) and basketball player (mom), Hamilton had 58 points
in 67 games last season for Niagara in the OHL.

Then came more cheers from the crowd, with defenseman Jonas Brodin from Farjestad of the
Swedish Elite League drawing a roar from the Wild fans in attendance at Xcel Energy Center.

The Avalanche were the first team to pick twice. They took defenseman Duncan Siemens at No.
11, a selection obtained earlier this year in a trade with the St. Louis Blues headlined by
defenseman Erik Johnson, himself a former No. 1 overall pick. Siemens was plus-40 for the
Saskatoon Blades in the WHL last season.

The run of defenseman continued when Ryan Murphy went at No. 12 to the Carolina Hurricanes.
He led OHL blue-liners with 26 goals last season for Kitchener. Then at No. 13, the Calgary
Flames picked left wing Sven Baertschi of the Portland Winterhawks of the WHL. The native of
Switzerland had 34 goals and 51 assists in 66 games last season.

The first American selection -- and first college player -- was defenseman Jamieson Oleksiak of
Northeastern University by the Dallas Stars at No. 14. Another American, center Jonathan
Miller, went 15th to the New York Rangers. Miller, headed for the University of North Dakota in
the fall, was part of the U.S. national team development program. He had 37 points in 48 games
last season in the United States Hockey League.

Four Americans, three from the U.S. program, went in the first round.

Ottawa took right wing Stefan Noeson from Plymouth of the OHL with the No. 21 pick that they
got from the Nashville Predators and the Senators then nabbed forward Matt Puempel from
Peterborough of the OHL at No. 24, a selection they picked up from Detroit during the draft.

15. ESPN.com- Hawks deal Brian Campbell to Panthers

Pierre LeBurn

ST. PAUL, Minn. -- The Chicago Blackhawks unloaded a huge contract Friday night, sending
talented defenseman Brian Campbell to the Florida Panthers in exchange for winger Rostislav
Olesz.

For all the latest on the Blackhawks, check out Jesse Rogers' blog on ESPNChicago.com. Blog

The Blackhawks announced the deal late Friday night. Campbell, who had to agree to waive his
no-trade clause, has five years left on his contract paying him $7.14 million a season.
Olesz has three more years on his deal with a cap hit of $3.125 million.

Campbell had refused to waive the no-trade clause as recently as Thursday night, a source told
ESPNChicago.com's Jesse Rogers earlier on Friday.

Campbell was a Blackhawks-best plus-28 this past season, which placed him eleventh in the
league in that category. Campbell had five goals and 22 assists in 65 games in 2011-11.

Olesz had six goals and 11 assists in 44 games for the Panthers last season.

16. ESPN.com- Winger Devin Setoguchi dealt to Wild

Associated Press

SAN JOSE, Calif. -- The San Jose Sharks acquired the top-flight defenseman they had been
seeking, sending a package headlined by forward Devin Setoguchi to the Minnesota Wild for
All-Star Brent Burns.

The Sharks paid a steep price to acquire the 26-year-old Burns, who is eligible to become an
unrestricted free agent after next season.

The trade involving Devin Setoguchi and Brent Burns fills needs for both San Jose and
Minnesota, writes Pierre LeBrun. Blog

"This is a guy that's not just a puck-moving defenseman," general manager Doug Wilson said.
"He's a 230-pound guy who can skate. He's got all the elements."

They sent a former 30-goal scorer who hasn't even reached his prime in the 24-year-old
Setoguchi, last year's first-round pick Charlie Coyle and the 28th overall pick in this year's draft
for Burns and a 2012 second-round selection.

After losing in the conference finals the past two seasons, the Sharks hope the addition of Burns
helps them get past that hurdle for the first time in franchise history.

"We're right in, we think, our wheel house, our window with our team," Wilson said. "Bringing
in a guy with his age and his type of game, it complements where our team is at."

Burns had 17 goals last season, third among all blue liners. He also had 29 assists, giving the
Sharks another proven puck-moving defenseman to go along with veteran All-Star Dan Boyle.

San Jose's lack of depth on the blue line was evident in the conference loss to Vancouver,
providing an impetus for this move.

"When you don't win you make changes. It happens," coach Todd McLellan said. "Even the
Bruins will make changes this year. That's the way the business is set up. For the past few years
we felt that we were maybe not as strong on the blue line as we needed to be when it was all said
and done."

McLellan coached Burns in the AHL during the 2004-05 season and said he believes he will be
one of the top defensemen in the league for years to come.

Burns has played 453 career games since joining the Wild as an 18-year-old first-round pick. He
has 55 goals and 128 assists in his career, but has not played in the postseason the past three
years.

Now he joins a team that has been one of the best in the league the past few seasons.

"To not make the playoffs, it's really hard to look back at your year and feel good about it,"
Burns said. "To get a chance to play with a great team like San Jose is pretty amazing. I can't
wait to get there."

Burns, the Wild's first pick in 2003, was probably their most tradable asset. The Wild have
missed the playoffs for three straight years, and general manager Chuck Fletcher spoke of the
need to "aggressively" add young players to keep up with the rest of the league.

"We weren't looking to trade Brent Burns, but it came together quickly and in the course of
discussing things with Doug Wilson, the pieces came together," Fletcher said after the draft in
Minnesota.

Fletcher lauded the addition of Setoguchi, but also was very high on Coyle, who played this past
season at Boston University.

"We feel he's one of the top young power forwards in the game," Fletcher said. "We gave up a
very important piece in Brent Burns, but our timeframe needs to be stretched back a bit and we
need to add more young players. We very quickly assembled a lot of young talent."

Setoguchi got dealt a day after signing a $9 million, three-year contract. He said after reaching
that deal that he couldn't be happier, calling San Jose the best place to play in the NHL.

It will no longer be his home in a move that he said took him be surprise.

"It's tough to leave there," Setoguchi said. "I've been there so long and know so many people
there. I've grown to love the city and the organization. That will be tough. But you can't expect to
be there forever. Now you have to make new friends and start all over."

Setoguchi overcame a lackluster start last season before finishing with 22 goals and 19 assists in
the regular season. He added seven goals and three assists in the playoffs, including overtime
goals to beat Los Angeles and Detroit in the first two rounds. He provides a needed scoring
threat for the Wild, whose 203 goals were the fifth fewest in the regular season.
Setoguchi has 84 goals in four seasons in the NHL, including a career-high 31 two years ago. He
also has 75 assists in 267 games and has one of the best shots on the Sharks.

The Wild used the pick acquired in the deal to draft center Zack Phillips from Saint John's of the
Quebec Major Junior Hockey League.

17. ESPN.com- Team to be Winnipeg Jets

Pierre Leburn

The new NHL team in Winnipeg will go with what the city's original team was named -- the
Winnipeg Jets.

The Atlanta Thrashers are no more, having moved north across the border earlier this month. The
name change was announced Friday night by team chairman Mark Chipman at the NHL draft in
Minnesota, just before the Jets took center Mark Scheifele with the seventh pick in the first
round.

"We are thrilled to be using a name that has so much history in our city and means so much to
our fans," Chipman said in a statement released by the team. "Our fans clearly indicated to us the
passion they hold for the name since we acquired the franchise."

The original Jets joined the NHL in 1979 after the World Hockey Association folded. They
played in Manitoba until 1996, when the franchise moved to Phoenix and became the Coyotes.

NHL commissioner Gary Bettman gave a "special welcome back" to the Winnipeg fans as he
introduced the draft, prompting cheers and "Go Jets go!" chants from fans wearing white T-shirts
with the old red-and-blue Jets logo.

Mark Scheifele's selection by the Winnipeg Jets with the seventh overall pick represents a new
future, a new beginning for a franchise that has known little but disappointment and disinterest in
a decade in Atlanta, writes Scott Burnside. Story

Ever since the announcement that the Atlanta Thrashers were moving to Winnipeg, fans have
debated what to call the team. The overwhelming choice has been Jets -- what the team was
called before it moved to Phoenix in 1996 and became the Coyotes.

Other options included Winnipeg Falcons, Manitoba Falcons, and Manitoba Moose, which was
the name of the AHL team there.

Logos and jerseys will be unveiled at a later date. The team also announced the website --
winnipegjets.com -- is up and running.

18. ESPN.com- Winnipeg hires Claude Noel as coach

Associated Press
ST. PAUL, Minn. -- Winnipeg introduced a new head coach and had the seventh pick in the
NHL draft.

But the biggest news of the day came when the franchise formally brought back the old
nickname: the Jets.

Claude Noel was hired as coach of the transplanted franchise Friday, returning to the NHL and
joining a team that has missed the playoffs the last four seasons. The Atlanta Thrashers moved
north across the border earlier this month.

Mark Scheifele's selection by the Winnipeg Jets with the seventh overall pick represents a new
future, a new beginning for a franchise that has known little but disappointment and disinterest in
a decade in Atlanta, writes Scott Burnside. Story

Just before the selection of center Mark Scheifele, team chairman Mark Chipman spilled the
poorly kept secret as he turned to general manager Kevin Cheveldayoff to make the pick "on
behalf of the Winnipeg Jets."

That drew cheers and "Go Jets go!" chants from the dozens of fans wearing white T-shirts with
the old red-and-blue Jets logo.

Noel was an interim head coach in the NHL with the Columbus Blue Jackets. He coached the
Manitoba Moose last season in the American Hockey League, leading them to a 43-40-1-6
record.

"Claude is someone that can teach, bring players together as a group, make the sum better than
the whole of their parts," Cheveldayoff said at a news conference before the NHL draft.

Before moving to Manitoba he spent three years with the Blue Jackets, first as an assistant and
then as head coach after Ken Hitchcock was fired in February 2010. He did not get the job when
the season ended. He has also coached in the ECHL and IHL. But now he is where he wants to
be.

"There was a lot of emotion," Noel said. "You know, I've gone through this process a few times
and I'm a little older and I thought, 'Jeez, I hope my day's coming.' I thought my day would come
and I can't tell you how happy I am."

Noel was shopping with his family when Cheveldayoff called with the news Wednesday night.

"I can't wait to get started," he said.

The 55-year-old Noel was chosen over Chicago Blackhawks assistant coach Mike Haviland, who
has worked with Cheveldayoff. Noel and assistant GM Craig Heisinger spent last year with the
Moose.
Haviland "was a qualified candidate," Cheveldayoff said. "I know him personally after obviously
winning a Stanley Cup championship with him. But in this situation here, you have to take
personal relationships out of it. He was very professional, he was extremely thankful for the
opportunity.

"Again, when Zinger and I sat down and went to the final conclusion, we said, 'We don't think
we can make a bad choice here.' We just think that this is the right choice for moving forward."

Noel said he has a few candidates in mind for assistants and hopes to sign them quickly.

"It's really important that you make sure you get people that are loyal and you can trust," he said.
"Because we are going to have to dig in as a staff, there is no question that we're going to have
some areas we're going to have to dig in. We're going to have to find some solutions."

The Thrashers were coached by Craig Ramsay last season and finished 34-36-12, fourth in the
Southeast Division.

The original Jets joined the NHL in 1979 after the World Hockey Association folded. They
played in Manitoba until 1996, when the franchise moved to Phoenix and became the Coyotes.

Scheifele was the 16th-ranked North American skater by the NHL's Central Scouting Service.
He led OHL rookies with 53 assists last season, playing for the Barrie Colts.

19. ESPN.com- Lightning re-sign Eric Brewer

Pierre LeBurn

The Tampa Bay Lightning re-signed veteran defenseman Eric Brewer to a four-year contract
Friday.

The deal is worth about $4 million per year, a source told ESPN.com.

"We are very pleased to get Eric re-signed today," general manager Steve Yzerman said. "He
was an important part of our team after being acquired at last year's deadline and he played a key
role in the playoffs both on and off the ice."

Brewer, who had a solid postseason for the Lightning after coming over from St. Louis at the
trade deadline in February, would have been an unrestricted free agent July 1.

Brewer, 6-foot-3, 220 pounds, led the Lightning in average ice time per game with 21 minutes,
34 seconds.

"I'm happy to be a part of the Lightning going forward," Brewer said. "The organization is
clearly moving in the right direction and I'm proud to be a part of it."

                                          -FLYERS-

								
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