Case Study A Flexible Learning program for the International Computer Drivers License Central Western Metropolitan Region of Adult Community by iqf18603

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									            Case Study

      A Flexible Learning program
                 for the
International Computer Drivers License



       Central Western Metropolitan Region
   of Adult, Community and Further Education
                                         Table of Contents
   Introduction ............................................................................................. 3
   Challenge ................................................................................................. 4
   Similar previous work in the area............................................................ 4
   Solution.................................................................................................... 5
      The International Computer Drivers Licence ........................................................ 5
      The flexible learning and testing PD program ....................................................... 5
      The tutor/mentor .................................................................................................... 6
      Self-study learning resources ................................................................................. 6
      Access to online help and support ......................................................................... 7
      Face-to-face tutorials ............................................................................................. 7
      Testing facilities ..................................................................................................... 7
   Outcomes ................................................................................................. 7
      The Learners' responses ......................................................................................... 8
      Learner assessment and program evaluation ....................................................... 11
   Lessons learnt ........................................................................................12
      Demand for enhancing ICT skills: ....................................................................... 12
      The value of flexible learning: ............................................................................. 12
      Two unresolved issues: ........................................................................................ 12
      Key messages for the sector:................................................................................ 12
   Conclusion .............................................................................................13
   Organisational profile ............................................................................13
      Brief description of organisation: ........................................................................ 13
      Staff involved in the case study: .......................................................................... 14
      Acknowledgements .............................................................................................. 14
   Appendix 1 ............................................................................................15
      Survey Form (questionnaire) for the case study of the International Computer
      Driving Licence professional development program. .......................................... 15




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                                       Case Study
                    A Flexible Learning program for the
                  International Computer Drivers License


Introduction
    For the past three years the Central Western Region of Adult, Community and
    Further Education (CWMR of ACFE) has been conducting a professional
    development (PD) program to enhance the use of information and communication
    technology (ICT) by its 70+ registered Providers. The program has primarily
    addressed the application of ICT to teaching and learning, but has also provided
    an opportunity for administrative and clerical staff to improve their knowledge of
    applications such as word processors, spreadsheets and presentation software, by
    qualifying for the International Computer Drivers License (ICDL).
    This is a case study of a flexible learning program to enable staff of the Region's
    Providers to study and be assessed for the ICDL.
    The case study considers the following topics:
            a description of the participants, their needs and why they applied;
            challenges faced by those offering the program (e.g. learning resources
             required, provision of convenient access to learning resources and face-to-
             face sessions, access to authorised testing, the diversity of initial skills and
             knowledge of participants);
            participants' responses;
            descriptions of learning resources, face-to-face sessions, references, etc.;
            assessment strategies (formative and accreditation);
            an assessment of the outcomes of the program;
            plans for the future of the program; and
            advice to others who may wish to implement a similar program.

The flexible learning program commenced in November 2002. This study was
conducted between April and June 2003.

Twenty-five employees of thirteen Providers from across the CWM Region are
involved in the flexible learning program. The tutor/mentor or the program is
Michael Gwyther, manager of YarraNet. This study was conducted by Keith
Anderson, ICT Project Officer of the CWMR of ACFE office.




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Challenge
The project studied here is part of the response to a broader challenge confronted by
the CWMR Council in 2001: to enhance the ICT knowledge and skills of staff of
ACFE Providers throughout the CWMR in order to improve the quality of delivery of
ACFE programs and to provide better outcomes for learners.

The first step was the adoption by Council in August 2001 of a blueprint for the
development of ICT in the Region entitled "ICT Training Proposal" which suggested
a number of professional development activities that could lead to the desired
outcomes. Included were a number of programs, with multiple entry levels, intended
to provide tutors with the skills and knowledge to commence or expand their use of
ICT for teaching and learning. Also included were training and testing programs that
would enable any staff member (administrative and clerical staff as well as tutors) to
acquire the International Computer Drivers License (ICDL) in order to enhance their
general computing skills.

The challenge was to provide a professional development program that met the
following requirements:

1. It had to be very broad in scope, as it had to accommodate the needs of all staff
   from all Providers (administrative, clerical and tutorial staff) who need to use
   word processors, spread sheets, filing and database systems, presentation software,
   etc.

2. It had to offer optional entry points, as some staff are already well skilled in
   some areas and need to learn only advanced features, whilst others are newcomers
   to particular applications.

3. It had to include a variety of learning resources and methods, as many will
   have difficulty attending face-to-face sessions; some will have online computers at
   home and some will not; and participants' preferred learning styles will vary.

4. It had to permit flexible rates of progression, as some participants will be able to
   devote more time per week to the program than others and the amount of time per
   week may vary from month to month.

5. It had to provide conveniently accessible authorised testing centres, as the
   ICDL requires applicants to pass tests in seven areas of ICT and these tests may be
   administered only by organisations approved by the Australian Computer Society.


Similar previous work in the area

Staff of ACFE Providers have previously been encouraged to undertake training
programs in particular aspects of ICT (e.g. word processing) about which they need to
know more. This case study is different in that the aim is to raise the level of each
participant's seven areas of ICT skills to a uniformly high standard and to provide
them with a widely recognised reputable qualification.


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A more similar project is one being conducted at Geelong Adult Training &
Education (GATE) that enables ACFE staff to qualify for the ICDL. It commenced in
2000 and we are grateful for them sharing with us their insights into what worked and
what didn't work for them; valuable information used by us in formulating our
strategy.

There are, of course, many private and government providers around Australia
offering courses and testing services for people desiring to acquire the ICDL, but we
believe that we have created a flexible learning, tutoring and testing professional
development program which is uniquely suitable for the staff of ACFE Providers.

Solution

The International Computer Drivers License
The ICDL is an international computer competency standard being promoted for
adoption throughout Australia by the Australian Computer Society (ACS). It is set to
become the most widely recognised qualification in the field of work-related
computer use. (Details about the ICDL may be found on the ACS web site at
www.acs.org.au/icdl/.)

In order to obtain the ICDL, an individual must attain a specified (quite high) level of
competency in the following seven areas of ICT:
           Module 1: Basic Concepts of Information Technology
           Module 2: Using the Computer & Managing Files
           Module 3: Word Processing
           Module 4: Spread Sheets
           Module 5: Databases/Filing Systems
           Module 6: Presentation
           Module 7: Information & Communication.

That the required level has been attained must be certified by an Accredited Test
Centre which issues each applicant with a Skills Card and arranges for them to sit for
a test in each of the seven modules. The process is controlled, and the licenses issued,
by the Australian Computer Society. The necessary skills may be acquired by self-
study or by undertaking appropriate training courses.


The flexible learning and testing PD program
In order to meet the five requirements listed above, it was decided to create a flexible
learning and testing program intended to enable an initial group of ten Provider staff
(subsequently expanded to 25) to undertake training appropriate to each participant's
needs and to sit for the ICDL tests.

The length of time required for candidates to complete the program was expected to
vary between a few months and twelve months (or even longer), depending upon their



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prior level of knowledge and skills, and the amount of time they could devote to the
program.

After investigating the cost and availability of authorised testing facilities, it was
decided to support the tutor/mentor in applying for YarraNet (of which he is manager)
to be accredited as an authorised tester. The Australian Computer Society
subsequently accredited YarraNet, which enabled the testing program to be run in
parallel with the tutorial/mentoring program. (See the ACS web site at
www.acs.org.au/icdl/ for a complete list of authorised testers.)

The program commenced during term 4, 2002, and will continue through 2003. The
estimated cost of the program is $10,000.

The flexible learning and testing program consists of the following components:
              A tutor/mentor.
              A variety of self-study learning resources.
              Access to online help and support.
              Occasional face-to-face tutorials.
              Testing facilities.

Each of these components is discussed below.

The tutor/mentor
The manager of a Provider within the Region (a person with extensive experience in
using and teaching ICT) was appointed to act as mentor/tutor. His roles were to tutor
and support the candidates as they utilised a variety of self-study learning resources to
gain the knowledge and skills required. The learning resources included a suite of
self-paced online learning modules, self-study print resources, online help and
collaboration with other participants, and various other resources that happened to be
available to individual participants.


Self-study learning resources
The self-study learning resources used in the program included:

              NETg online ICDL learning resources available, free of charge, on the
               TAFE Virtual Campus. Published by Thomson NETg.
               http://www.tafevc.com.au/Pl03/netg/icdl_home.asp

              "Complete ICDL Package", published by Software Publications.
               Self-study books that cover all seven modules of the ICDL.
               www.softwarepublications.com.au
               .
              "ICT Professional Development: Operations and Concepts"
               Part of OTTE ICT Professional Development Project.
               www.tafevc.com.au/ict/


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              Other resources such as ICT training CD-ROMs, web sites and
               colleagues, that happened to be conveniently available to individual
               participants when learning needs arose.

Access to online help and support
Access to online help and support from the tutor/mentor and online interaction with
other participants is facilitated via a "My Connected Communities" group.


Face-to-face tutorials
Face-to-face tutorials are delivered by the tutor/mentor at locations throughout the
Region convenient to a subgroup of the participants. As the program progressed to the
stage of participants being ready to sit for tests, a test session was scheduled before or
after the tutorial, for the convenience of participants. These events are referred to as "a
visit from the ICDL caravan".

Testing facilities
Tests may be undertaken as set of task-orientated activities at the computer under the
supervision of the tester and evaluated by the tester, or as a set of tests at the computer
with automatic evaluation by the computer. In either case the test must be conducted
under formal examination conditions: no books or other help may be used during the
test, no talking to other students or the tester, no leaving the room unaccompanied,
etc. Pass marks are set at a high level to ensure that candidates who achieve the ICDL
have a high level of competence.


Outcomes

Because of the breadth and depth of the knowledge and skills required to qualify for
the ICDL, it was anticipated that the time required for participants to complete the
program would vary enormously, depending largely on prior knowledge and
experience of the individuals involved. The program was commenced in November
2002 and expected to run at least until December 2003. This study was undertaken
between April and June 2003, about seven months into the fourteen month program,
so the outcomes discussed here are less than half of what we anticipate the final
outcomes to be.

The original intention was to run the program with ten initial participants and to
progressively add new candidates as the initial participants acquired the ICDL and left
the group. Also, previous experience with the professional development program in
ICT led us to believe that we would probably attract about 10 to 15 applicants.
However, the response was much better than expected, with 25 staff members of
Regional Providers expressing interest and attending introductory sessions and
logging-on to the TAFE Virtual Campus ICDL learning materials. Subsequently, 20
were issued with an ICDL Skills Card and continued with the program.

It was decided to satisfy the larger-than-expected demand by dividing the participants
into four groups and to conduct the face-to-face sessions in various locations in order
to keep tutorial groups small and to minimise the distance traveled by participants.

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In regular reports on progress of the project, the tutor reported a very positive and
enthusiastic response from those who were able to find the time to participate, but that
some participants were apparently unable to find the time and were making little or no
progress.

Thus far, eleven face-to-face sessions have been conducted at seven different
locations spread widely throughout the Region as can be seen from the following list:

Carlton Neighbourhood House                               Williamstown Community & Education
                                                          Centre
Laverton Community Centre
                                                          YarraNet (Richmond)
Sydenham Community Centre
                                                          Yarraville Community Centre
Werribee Community Centre

These sessions have involved totals of approximately 35 hours of tutoring/mentoring
and 30 hours of testing.

The Learners' responses
The learners' responses were surveyed for this study by two methods: a questionnaire
to all participants (see appendix 1) and interviews with four participants.

Item 1 of the questionnaire sought reasons why the participant had chosen to
undertake the professional development program. The reasons offered in the item are:
       1.      To improve my ICT knowledge and skills in order to perform my job
               better.
       2.      To enhance my CV.
       3.      To obtain a qualification recognised throughout Australia.
       4.      To obtain a qualification recognised throughout the world.
       5.      The program is free of charge.
       6.      The flexibility of the program (study at home or online and few scheduled
               meetings).
       7.      Other (please specify).

The results indicate that most of the participants considered all of the six reasons were
of medium to very important in their decision to participate.

Item 2 sought information about how much each of the learning resources offered to
them had contributed to their learning. The resources listed are as follows:
       1.      TAFE Virtual Campus (NET G) material
       2.      Software Publications booklets
       3       ICT Professional Development: Operations and Concepts (OTTE) booklet
       4       Face-to-face tutorials (the “ICDL caravan”)


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       5       Online help from tutor or other participants (e.g. email, mc2 forum, etc.)
       6       Other (please specify)

As might be expected of a group of 20 learners with different preferred learning style,
different availability for attending tutorials and different access to the Internet, the
results show that most of the alternative learning resources made a large contribution
to some participants and that all of the alternatives made little contribution to other
participants.

The least used alternative was the book "ICT Professional Development: Operations
and Concepts", probably because those who prefer to learn from text material chose
the Software Publications book as it was written specifically for the ICDL whereas the
former was not. Although covering much the same content, "ICT Professional
Development" did not exactly match the ICDL testing program.

Generally, participants seem mainly to use either the TAFE Virtual Campus NETg
material or the Software Publications book, together with attendance at tutorials if
possible. Most also gained a little online help from the tutor and other participants
(e.g. via the "My Connected Communities" site) and some specified "Other" and cited
knowledgeable friends or colleagues or CD-ROM courseware.

Items 3 and 4 required the respondent to assess the extent to which participating in
the program had improved their competence in the seven areas of ICT tested in the
ICDL program. (We know that those who pass the tests have attained the quite high
level of competence required for the ICDL, but some might have already been at that
level when they entered the program.) See Appendix 1 for details of items 3 and 4.

Responses indicated that most assessed themselves as having improved one point on
the five point scale in competence and some having improved two points. This
relatively small improvement in most cases is probably due to the fact that those who
have gained the ICDL or passed a number of the tests at this stage of the program
would have been quite competent in many of the seven areas when they began. It is to
be expected that those who take tests in the remaining half of the program would
assess themselves as having made larger gains in competence.

Item 5 sought opinion on the face-to-face tutorial sessions. The aspects that
respondents were asked to consider were:
       1.      The number of tutorial sessions provided in your locality
       2.      The location of the tutorials
       3.      The helpfulness of the tutorials
       4.      The performance of the tutor
The number of tutorials was mostly considered quite adequate or very adequate; the
location of the tutorials was mostly considered to be quite convenient or very
convenient; the helpfulness of the tutorials was mostly considered to be quite helpful
or very helpful and the performance of the tutor was mostly considered to be quite
good or very good.



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Item 6 invited comments and suggestions. Responses included:

"It's very flexible, easy to understand and I have found that so far I have learnt a lot."

"Initial sessions not particularly helpful due to uncertainty of course structure, levels
of participants. Perhaps a quick survey could have been undertaken prior to
commencement to gather preliminary information regarding student needs."

"It's a great opportunity particularly for a person who has a lot of knowledge and
experience but no actual qualification. Improvements would be better organisation of
the information sessions - knowing ahead of time exactly what was being covered in
each session."

"Flexible delivery - I could pick it up and put it down when it suited. Nice
combination of online, publication booklet and face-to-face tutorials. Personally, the
PD program has been great for me."

Item 7 gathered personal information about the respondent: type of employment
(admin/clerical or tutor), gender and age band. Approximately two thirds of the
respondents were admin/clerical and one third tutors; all were female and spread
across the age bands with a peak in the 35 to 49 years old band.

One interview/discussion was held with three participants from the same Provider.
The main points arising from the discussion were:

Learning styles: One participant was adamant about the great value she had derived
from using the online course materials available on the TAFE Virtual Campus while
another swore by the value of the Software Publications book. Although they had both
used all of the resources to some extent, neither could really understand why the other
felt the way she did about the superiority of her favourite method. This conversation
underlined the importance of providing a range of learning resources in order to meet
the variety of learners' preferred learning styles, lifestyle constraints, etc.

Peer group learning: All three were agreed that their rapid progress through the
ICDL program (one had completed the ICDL and the other two had only a couple of
modules to go) was to a considerable extent due to the fact that they worked together.
Learning from each other and encouraging each other had been a great help. It's
worth noting that there are in fact three groups of three people from single providers
and two people from another provider among the 20 participants: 11 of them having
the opportunity of regular peer group learning may be a significant factor in the
success of the project. We'll have to examine that question at the end of the program!

Another interview was held with a participant who was apparently anxious to
participate and to acquire the ICDL but was not managing to get to tutorials or to
make progress with her studies and sit for tests. The discussion with her revealed an
unfortunate combination of circumstances: as the program commenced in November
she was responsible for packing the office at her place of work in preparation for a
move to a new location. Then came the move during December followed by several

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months of sorting out difficulties with the new premises. Following that, staff
changes occurred that required her to learn about and take over a range of new duties.
All of which meant that, despite strong support from her employer for her to
undertake the PD program, there simply hasn't been time. It is hoped that her
situation will improve in the near future and that she will be able to complete the
program in the latter half of this year. This should be possible as she is already
competent in many of the seven areas of ICT required. However, this case highlights
the fact that the apparent failure of a program to meet the needs of some of those for
whom it is intended is sometimes due to circumstances and events completely
unrelated to the program itself.


Learner assessment and program evaluation
Learner assessment for accreditation for the ICDL is performed by the tutor/mentor,
either at YarraNet in Richmond or in conjunction with the tutorial program. For
example, he typically schedules a two hour test session followed by a three hour
tutorial session on the same day at a particular location convenient to a group of
participants

An indication of progress thus far can be gained from the following statistics as at
June 2003. Note that to qualify for the ICDL, each of the 20 participants must pass a
test in each of seven areas of ICT, i.e. a total of 140 tests must be passed.

                                                                  Data as at   Proportion of total
                                                                  June 2003      for all to gain
                                                                                     ICDL.

Number of active Skill Cards:                                          20            100%

Number of participants who have taken at                               12             60%
least one test:

Number of tests conducted:                                             54

Number of tests passed:                                                52             37%

Number of participants qualified for the                                3             15%
ICDL at this stage:

The outcomes thus far represent a certifiable improvement in the ICT skills available
to the six Providers from which come the 12 participants who have passed at least one
test. In addition, there has been an improvement in ICT skills available to the
Providers from which come most of the other eight participants who have studied, but
not yet sat for tests. It is anticipated that upon completion of the program, significant
improvements will have been made to ICT skills and knowledge in the Region, even
though some participants may not manage to qualify fully for the ICDL in the time
available. If funding can be found, the program will be extended for the benefit of
those who need additional time and for new participants to be given the opportunity.


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Informal formative evaluation of the flexible learning program has been carried out by
the tutor/mentor/ soliciting feedback at tutorials and online since the program began.
The survey for this case study has provided additional evaluation information. All
such information is used to fine-tune the program as it progresses.

Lessons learnt

Lessons learnt form this project include:

Demand for enhancing ICT skills:
This program aroused more interest than any of the other eight courses or events
offered for PD in ICT in the past two years. It appears that many staff of the ACFE
division desire to improve their ICT skills and that a significant part of the appeal of
this program is due to the fact that the qualification obtained is the ICDL, probably
because of its national and international recognition and the quality testing program
which guarantees its value.

The value of flexible learning:
The project has verified the value of flexible learning programs which meet the varied
needs of different learners by providing participants with a choice of place, pace and
learning resources.

Two unresolved issues:
One unresolved difficulty is that of satisfactorily integrating face-to-face tutorials into
a flexible learning program in such a way that the tutorials benefit all participants.
The freedom of choice of pace implies that soon after the program commences,
participants' learning is not synchronised. As the course progresses it becomes
difficult to have a group discussion that is really relevant to more than a few
participants. In this program, the tutor has adopted the procedure of advising
participants that the next tutorial will be at a particular location, on a particular topic,
e.g. spreadsheets. Some people will decide not to come, and those who do will gain
more or less from the session depending upon where they are up to and what
questions are asked. However, they all gain from discussion with other participants
and from the mutual encouragement afforded by such sessions.

Another issue is knowing what to change (if anything) in order to convert the current
program into an ongoing, rolling program in which participants who complete the
ICDL and leave the program are replaced by new participants. This would exacerbate
the tutorial problem, but apart from that, such an change could probably be made
without too much difficulty.

Key messages for the sector:
The key messages for the ACFE sector are:

The ICDL is attractive to staff of the sector as a qualification that provides them with
the skills and knowledge they require, and that is widely recognised.




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A flexible learning program is ideal for staff of the sector, many of whom have tight
constraints on their time, varying access to computers and the Internet, and different
preferred learning styles.

The learning resources required in a flexible learning program for this purpose
should include at least the following (tailored to the competencies required for the
ICDL):
              Online instructional resources accessible via the Internet (e.g. NETg on
               the TAFE Virtual Campus).
              Printed self-study resources (e.g. Software Publications)
              Online discussion facilities where participants can discuss aspects of the
               program with each other and with the tutor/mentor. (e.g. a My Connected
               Community group.)
              As many face-to-face tutorials as can be afforded (e.g. each participant
               might attend one session per month in a group of about 6 - 8).

Testing facilities should be available free of charge at a convenient location as soon
as possible after a participant has completed studying any of the seven modules. (This
service may be out-sourced to an existing authorised tester, or a suitably qualified and
equipped local Regional Provider could apply to become an authorised tester.)

Peer group learning and support appears to significantly assist learners, so
Providers should be encouraged to permit two or three staff members to undertake the
ICDL program at the same time.

Conclusion
At the halfway mark, this professional development program, aimed at raising the
level of ICT skills and knowledge of ACFE Provider staff and enhancing their
qualifications, seems to be quite successful. We recommend it to others who face
similar challenges.


Organisational profile
Central Western Metropolitan Region of Adult, Community and Further Education
(CWMR of ACFE)

Brief description of organisation:

The CWMR Council, through its Regional Office, funds and monitors ACFE
education and training throughout the western suburbs and central city areas. The
Office is currently undertaking an extensive program of enhancing the ICT skills of
staff of all providers in the region by offering a range of professional development
programs and promoting the use of flexible learning.




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Staff involved in the case study:

Keith Anderson (ICT Project Officer, CWMR Regional Office), who conducted the
case study.
Michael Gwyther (Manager, YarraNet, a CWMR Provider) who is the tutor, mentor,
tester and organiser of the ICDL flexible learning program and who assisted with the
case study.

Twenty five staff of CWMR Providers, who are participating in the program.



Acknowledgements
Many thanks to the participants of the ICDL PD program and other staff involved
who provided the information for the compilation of this case study.




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Appendix 1




Survey Form (questionnaire) for the case study of the International Computer
Driving License professional development program.




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           Central Western Metropolitan Regional Council of Adult, Community and Further Education


           Flexible Learning Week 2003: Case Study of ICDL PD Program

                                               Survey Form
Thank you for taking the time to provide information to enable us to prepare a case study of the International
Computer Drivers Licence professional development program for Flexible Learning Week 2003.

Please indicate your responses by ticking an appropriate box (mostly to indicate your opinion on five-point
scales ranging from “low” or “bad” on the left, to “high” or “good” on the right) or by writing in the space
provided.

You will notice that you have not been asked to provide your name or the name of your employer and only
aggregated data will be published, so please be frank in your responses.


1.     Please rate the importance to you of the following reasons for
       participating in the ICDL PD program:                                        Not                      Very
                                                                                    import-                import-
       1.1     To improve my ICT knowledge and skills in order to perform           ant                       ant
               my job better: ……………………………………………………                                       
       1.2     To enhance my CV: …………………………………………….                                     
       1.3     To obtain a qualification recognised throughout Australia: …              
       1.4     To obtain a qualification recognised throughout the world: ...           
       1.5     The program is free of charge: ………………………………..                             
       1.6     The flexibility of the program (study at home or online and
               few scheduled meetings): ……………………………………...                               
       1.7     Other (please specify): _____________________________                     

2.     Please rate the extent to which the following                                                            Very
       aspects/resources of the ICDL PD program contributed to                      No                          large
       your learning:                                                               contri-                    contri-
       (Respond only for the items you have used or experienced)                    bution                     bution

       2.1     TAFE Virtual Campus (NET G) material: …………………….                         
       2.2     Software Publications booklets: ……………………………….                             
       2.3     ICT Professional Development: Operations and Concepts
               (OTTE) booklet: …………………………………………………                                     
       2.4     Face-to-face tutorials (the “ICDL caravan”): …………………                    
       2.5     Online help from tutor or other participants (e.g. email, mc2
               forum, etc.): ……………………………………………………..                                     
       2.6     Other (please specify): ____________________________                    


9a5190df-42cd-40f1-ad1b-abd8205ae072.doc7/5/2011   Page 16 of 18
3.     Please rate your competence in the following aspects of         Not            Very
       information and communication technology BEFORE                 comp-          comp-
       commencing the ICDL program.                                    etent           etent

       3.1 Basic Concepts of Information Technology (Module 1):          
       3.2 Using the Computer & Managing Files (Module 2): ……             
       3.3 Word Processing (Module 3): …………………………….                      
       3.4 Spreadsheets (Module 4): ………………………………..                       
       3.5 Databases/Filing Systems (Module 5): ………………….                 
       3.6 Presentation (Module 6): ………………………………….                       
       3.7 Information & Communication (Module 7): ……………..                

4.     Please rate your competence in the following aspects of         Not            Very
       information and communication technology AFTER                  comp-          comp-
       completing the ICDL program. (Skip modules not yet completed)   etent           etent

       3.1 Basic Concepts of Information Technology (Module 1):          
       3.2 Using the Computer & Managing Files (Module 2): ……              
       3.3 Word Processing (Module 3): ……………………………                       
       3.4 Spreadsheets (Module 4): ………………………………..                       
       3.5 Databases/Filing Systems (Module 5): ………………….                  
       3.6 Presentation (Module 6): ………………………………….                        
       3.7 Information & Communication (Module 7): ……………..                 

5.       Please indicate your opinion of the face-to-face tutorial
         sessions provided as part of the ICDL PD program.
                                                                       In-              Very
       5.1 The number of tutorial sessions provided in your            adequate-    adequate
           locality: ………………………………………………………                               
                                                                       In-               Very
                                                                       convenient   convenient
       5.2 The location of the tutorials: ……………………………..                    
                                                                       No                Very
                                                                       help            helpful
       5.3 The helpfulness of the tutorials: …………………………                  
                                                                                         Very
                                                                       Poor              good
       5.4 The performance of the tutor: …………………………..                    
                                                                       
                                                                       
9a5190df-42cd-40f1-ad1b-abd8205ae072.doc7/5/2011   Page 17 of 18
6.       Comments and suggestions:
         (Please make positive or negative comments about any
         aspect of the ICDL professional development program, and
         any suggestions as to how the program could be improved)

         ______________________________________________

         ______________________________________________

         ______________________________________________

         ______________________________________________

         ______________________________________________

         ______________________________________________

         ______________________________________________



7.       Please provide the following information about yourself to
         assist our analysis of the questionnaires:

       7.1 Type of employment: ……………………………………..                       Admin/Clerical   
                                                                      Tutor            
                                                                      
       7.2 Gender: ……………………………………………………                               Female           
                                                                      Male             
                                                                      
       7.3 Age band: …………………………………………………                              Less than 20     
                                                                      20 to 34         
                                                                      35 to 49         
                                                                      50 or more       


Please return this form to:

CWMR of ACFE, 29 Cobden Street, North Melbourne, 3051

FAX: 9326 9202                Email: acfecwm@edumail.vic.gov.au


9a5190df-42cd-40f1-ad1b-abd8205ae072.doc7/5/2011   Page 18 of 18

								
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