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					                                                      KHP 220
                                                     Spring, 2007
                                                SEXUALITY EDUCATION

INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Melody Noland
OFFICE:             202 Seaton Building; 100 Seaton Building
PHONE:              257-5826
OFFICE HOURS:       MW 1:30 - 3:00 pm;
                    TTH 9:30 - 12:00 am and 1:30 - 3:00 pm
E-MAIL:             melody.noland@uky.edu

REQUIRED TEXTBOOK:

Bruess, C.E. & Greenberg, J.S. (2004). Sexuality Education: Theory and Practice, 4th ed.,
 Boston: Jones and Bartlett.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

          This course is designed to prepare educators to teach sexuality education in the schools. Emphasis is placed on
justification of sexuality education, relevant content, appropriate teaching techniques, and precautions to take when
teaching sexuality education.

Research and Reflection for Learning and Leading. This is the theme of the conceptual framework for the College of
Education and reflects how our College and this course approach the preparation of professional educators.
Research is the foundation for the information you will be learning in this class. When we discuss what programs are
effective in changing behavior, that information is based on the research literature. Reflection is included in this course
when you are asked to reflect on how to approach sexuality education and what types of methods are appropriate.
Learning is part of the conceptual framework because we are committed to our own learning and the learning of others. In
Sexuality Education, we are seeking the most appropriate way to promote learning related to this topic. Leading is an
expectation for faculty and students so that we can promote learning in sexuality education and so that you can advocate for
inclusion of sexuality education in the school curriculum.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1.       To provide an opportunity for the student to learn facts about the biological,
         psychological, cultural, and ethical dimensions of sexuality.

2.       To offer justifications for including sexuality education in a K - 12 curriculum.

3.       To acquaint the student with precautions that should be taken in teaching sexuality
         education.

4.       To describe essential characteristics of the sexuality educator.

5.       To acquaint the student with professional rules of conduct related to sexuality
         education.

6.       To discuss opposition arguments to sexuality education and ways of dealing with
         opposition.

7.       To describe the components of effective sexuality education.

8.       To identify sexuality concepts that are appropriate for different age levels.

9.     To provide information concerning the physiological aspects of the reproductive
       system, sexual response, the menstrual cycle, pregnancy and childbirth.

10.      To provide information concerning sexual orientation and gay/lesbian issues.

11.      To offer an opportunity to discuss feelings and concerns about sexuality and sexuality
         education issues.

12.    To introduce the teaching of personal and social skills.

This course will address the following New Teacher Standards published by the Kentucky Education Professional
Standards Board (EPSB):
Standard I: Designs/Plans Instruction
Standard II: Creates/Maintains Learning Climates
Standard III: Implements/Manages Instruction
Standard IV: Assesses and Communicates Learning Results
Standard V: Reflects/Evaluates Teaching/Learning
Standard VI: Collaborates with Colleagues/Parents/Others
Standard VII: Engages in Professional Development
Standard VIII: Knowledge of Content
Standard IX: Demonstrates Implementation of Technology

This course also addresses our professional association standards (AAHE – American Association for Health
Education). The following standards are emphasized:
I: Assess Individual and Community Needs of Health Education
II: Plan Effective Health Education Programs
III: Implement Health Education Programs
IV: Evaluate Effectiveness of Coordinated School Health Programs
VI: Act as a Resource Person in Health Education
VII: Communicate Health and Health Education Needs, Concerns, and Resources

Standards for Technology, Skills and Dispositions of UK Educator Preparation Unit, EPSB Themes are also
addressed (see attached matrix).

COURSE OUTLINE:

1.       Concepts of sexuality
2.       What is sexuality education?
3.       Justification for including sexuality education in the curriculum and opposition
         arguments
4.       Characteristics/components of effective sexuality education
5.       Sexual anatomy and physiology
6.       Sexual response
7.       Contraception
8.       Conception, pregnancy and childbirth
9.       Sexual behavior
10.      Family life and relationships
11.      Intimacy and love
12.      Childhood and adolescent sexuality
13.      Rules for conducting sexuality education
14.      Answering questions from children and adolescents about sex
15.      Personal and social skills

These topics will be covered as time permits.

READINGS:

All readings are contained in the textbook. As we progress through the topics listed above, students should read the articles
associated with each topic. The instructor often will not remind the class to do the reading--students should do the reading
as each topic arises. Students will be held responsible for the reading on the exams and in classroom discussion.

EVALUATION:

Participation and Attendance                                            10%
2 Quizzes                                                               30%
Midterm                                                                 25%
Final                                                             25%
Paper                                                             10%
Exit Requirement: Must achieve 90% on special exam sometime during the semester. If
this is not achieved, a grade of "E" will be administered.

PARTICIPATION AND ATTENDANCE:

          In order to fully learn and experience the material, participation and attendance are crucial. To encourage student
involvement in learning, students are expected to fully participate in group activities, student discussion, role plays,
learning games and other activities. Attendance will be checked. Unexcused absences will be counted against the
Participation and Attendance portion of the grade. Five points will be deducted from the Attendance and Participation
grade for each unexcused absence. To receive an excused absence, the student may be required to present documentation.
The student should contact the instructor before missing class if at all possible. In-class and brief homework assignments
will also be counted as part of the participation portion of the grade. Participation in class discussions will also be part of
the participation and attendance grade. If the student misses classes, it is his/her responsibility to contact the instructor to
get handouts. Please contact the instructor before or after class.
COMPLETION OF HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS AND DAILY PAPERS:

          Student involvement will be encouraged in a variety of ways, including brief written homework assignments and
individual worksheets completed in class. Students will be given credit for successful completion of these assignments in
the participation portion of the grade.

PAPER:

         See separate handout.

EXIT REQUIREMENT:

         Students must score 90% or better on a special exam dealing with the reproductive system before a passing grade
in KHP 220 will be issued. If a score of 90% is not achieved by the end of the semester, the student will receive an "E"
grade. NOTE: Misspelled words will be counted wrong. The purpose of this exit requirement is to be sure that all
students completing KHP 220 have the minimum knowledge of the reproductive system needed to teach sexuality
education.

         The test will be given the first time in class. After the first test is administered, the test will be administered
individually. You may report to Room 203 (Ms. Fielder) to take the exam. Also, the test will be administered at other
times outside of regular class time. Students will be notified of the additional dates and times later in the semester. The
score achieved on the exit exam will not be averaged into the final grade.

REVIEW FOR EXIT REQUIREMENT:

         It might be helpful for you to go to http://sexuality.jbpub.com to review for the exit requirement. Not all terms on
this website will be required. I will give you an objective sheet and handouts that will let you know exactly what terms you
need to know.

OBJECTIVES:

         Each student will be provided with a complete list of learning objectives. These objectives will state the content
material to be learned. Because of limited class time, we may not discuss all of the learning objectives in class. The
material for these objectives will come from the textbook, handouts and class notes. You will, however, be responsible on
exams and quizzes for all the learning objectives.
CLASSROOM EXPECTATIONS:

1. Respect others. Everyone has a different level of knowledge and different experiences. Please do not laugh at others
comments or questions. Sometimes the answers aren't as easy as they may seem.

2. I will not ask you about your personal sexual behavior and please do not ask about mine.
If you would like to share an experience that people can learn from, it will be permitted if it serves an educational purpose,
but no one will be asked to share anything with which they are uncomfortable.

3. Please arrive on time. If you have a problem that causes you need to be chronically late, please let the instructor know
and try to sit in the back when you come in so as not to disrupt class.

4. Turn off cell phones in class. Cell phones ringing in class are extremely disruptive. If your cell phone rings in class, I
will confiscate it until the end of class.

5. This is a health education class – no use of smokeless tobacco is permitted.

6. Please stay awake in class. If I see you sleeping, I will wake you up.

7. I want to see your eyes--no hats pulled down over your face, please.

8. Do not do other work or read the Kernel during class.

PLEASE PARTICIPATE IN DISCUSSIONS--YOUR VOICES AND IDEAS ARE AT LEAST AS INTERESTING
AS MINE!!
     Health Education Initial Preparation Program: Standards Alignment
     KHP 220                  Course Title: Sexuality Education

AAHE, EPSB & COE Technology Standards; COE Skills & Dispositions; EPSB Themes; &                     Addressed
KERA Initiatives                                                                                     in Course

American Association for Health Education (AAHE) Standards for Entry Level Health Educators
 Standard 1: Candidates Assess Individual and Community Needs of Health Education                       X
 Standard 2: Candidates Plan Effective Health Education Programs
 Standard 3: Candidates Implement Health Education Programs
 Standard 4: Candidates Evaluate Effectiveness of Coordinated School Health Programs                    X
 Standard 5: Candidates Coordinate Provision of Health Education Programs and Services
 Standard 6: Candidates Act as a Resource Person in Health Education
 Standard 7: Candidates Communicate Health and Health Education Needs, Concerns, and Resources          X

Education Professional Standards Board (EPSB) New Teacher Standards
 Standard 1: Standard Designs and Plans Instruction                                                     X
 Standard 2: Creates and Maintains Learning Climates                                                    X
 Standard 3: Implements and Manages Instruction
 Standard 4: Assesses and Communicates Learning Results
 Standard 5: Reflects and Evaluates Teaching and Learning                                               X
 Standard 6: Collaborates with Colleagues, Parents, and Others
 Standard 7: Engages in Professional Development
 Standard 8: Knowledge of Content                                                                       X
 Standard 9: Demonstrates Implementation of Technology                                                  X

UK Educator Preparation Unit Technology Standards
 Standard 1: Candidates integrate media and technology into instruction                                 X
 Standard 2: Candidates utilize multiple technology applications to support student learning.           X
 Standard 3: Candidates select appropriate technology to enhance instruction.
 Standard 4: Candidates integrate student use of technology into instruction.
 Standard 5: Candidates address special learning needs through technology.
 Standard 6: Candidates promote ethical and legal use of technology disciplines.

Functional Skills and Disposition (FSD) of UK Educator Preparation Unit
 FSD 1: Candidates communicate appropriately and effectively.                                           X
 FSD 2: Candidates demonstrate constructive attitudes                                                   X
 FSD 3: Candidates demonstrate ability to conceptualize key subject matter ideas and relationships      X
 FSD 4: Candidates interact appropriately and effectively with diverse groups of colleagues,            X
 administrators, students, and parents in educational settings.
 FSD 5: Candidates demonstrate a commitment to professional ethics and behavior.                        X


Additional Functional Skills and Dispositions for Health Educators
 FSD 1: Candidates demonstrate health literacy.                                                         X
 FSD 2: Candidates demonstrate conceptual knowledge and skills.                                         X

Educational Professional Standards Board (EPSB) Themes
Diversity                                                                                               X
Assessment                                                                                              X
Literacy Education
Closing the Achievement Gap

Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA) Initiatives
 KERA Goals and Academic Expectations                                                                   X
 Program of Studies
Core Content for Assessment   X
                                                                  Spring, 2007

KHP 222

                                                DRUG EDUCATION

INSTRUCTOR:         Dr. Melody Noland
OFFICE:     100 Seaton Building
PHONE:      257-5826
E-MAIL:     melody.noland@uky.edu
OFFICE HOURS:       MW 1:30-3:00pm; TTH 9:30am-12:00pm and 1:30-3:00pm

REQUIRED TEXTBOOK:

Wilson, R. and Kolander, C. (2003). Drug Abuse Prevention: A School and Community
 Partnership, 2nd ed., Sudbury, MA, Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

   This course is designed to prepare educators to teach drug education in schools. Emphasis is placed on the prevalence
of drug use by youth; physiological, psychological and social effects of various drugs; effective and ineffective approaches
to drug prevention; appropriate teaching strategies; and evaluating drug education curricula.

Research and Reflection for Learning and Leading. This is the theme of the conceptual framework for the College of
Education and reflects how our College and this course approach the preparation of professional educators.
Research is the foundation for the information you will be learning in this class. When we discuss what programs are
effective in changing behavior, that information is based on the research literature. Reflection is included in this course
when you are asked to reflect on how to approach drug education and what types of methods are appropriate. Learning is
part of the conceptual framework because we are committed to our own learning and the learning of others. In Drug
Education, we are seeking the most appropriate way to promote learning related to this topic. Leading is an expectation for
faculty and students so that we can promote learning in drug education and so that you can advocate for inclusion of
effective and appropriate drug education in the school curriculum.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

   1. To familiarize the student with proper terminology related to drugs and drug education.

   2. To present statistics on drug use.

   3. To acquaint the student with current philosophies of teaching drug education.

   4. To provide an opportunity for the student to learn information about drugs, including the        physiological,
psychological, and social effects of drugs.

   5. To acquaint the student with various approaches to drug prevention.

   6. To discuss policy issues related to drug use, especially policy issues in schools.

   7. To present methods of early intervention.

This course will address the following New Teacher Standards published by the Kentucky Education Professional
Standards Board (EPSB):
Standard I: Designs/Plans Instruction
Standard II: Creates/Maintains Learning Climates
Standard III: Implements/Manages Instruction
Standard IV: Assesses and Communicates Learning Results
Standard V: Reflects/Evaluates Teaching/Learning
Standard VI: Collaborates with Colleagues/Parents/Others
Standard VII: Engages in Professional Development
Standard VIII: Knowledge of Content
Standard IX: Demonstrates Implementation of Technology

This course also addresses our professional association standards (AAHE – American Association for Health
Education). The following standards are emphasized:
I: Assess Individual and Community Needs of Health Education
II: Plan Effective Health Education Programs
III: Implement Health Education Programs
IV: Evaluate Effectiveness of Coordinated School Health Programs
VI: Act as a Resource Person in Health Education
VII: Communicate Health and Health Education Needs, Concerns, and Resources

Standards for Technology, Skills and Dispositions of UK Educator Preparation Unit, EPSB Themes are also
addressed (see attached matrix).

COURSE OUTLINE:

The following topics will be addressed as time permits:

        Drug terminology
        Statistics regarding use
        Identification of high-risk youth
        Drug information
                  Alcohol
                  Tobacco
Other drugs - mostly legal
                           Over the counter drugs
                           Prescription drugs
                           Caffeine
                           Steroids
                           Inhalants
                  Other drugs - mostly illegal
                           Stimulants
                           Narcotics
                           Depressants
                           Marijuana
                           Hallucinogens
                           Designer drugs
         Singular-Focus Approaches to Prevention
         Current Prevention Approaches
         Policy Issues in ATOD Education
         Early Intervention with Drug Abuse and Related Problems

EVALUATION:

   Participation and Attendance               10%
   2 Quizzes                                  30%
   Midterm                                    25%
   Final                                      25%
   Paper                                      10%

ATTENDANCE POLICY:

Attendance is an important part of this class. Students and the instructor are informed by class discussion and participation
in class activities. Therefore, attendance will count 10% of the grade. Some in-class and brief homework assignments will
be given and will count as part of the participation grade.
Five points will be deducted from the attendance grade for each unexcused absence from class. To receive an excused
absence, some documentation may be required by the instructor. Call before class when possible to notify the instructor of
your absence.

COMPLETION OF HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS AND DAILY PAPERS

Student involvement will be encouraged in a variety of ways, including brief written homework assignments and individual
worksheets completed in class. Students will be given credit in the attendance and participation portion of the grade for
successful completion of these assignments.

PAPER:

See separate handout.

OBJECTIVES:

Each student will be provided with a complete list of learning objectives. These objectives will state the content material to
be learned. Because good drug education courses involve more than just cognitive material, we will be spending some time
in class doing affective activities. Because of limited class time, we may not discuss all of the learning objectives in class.
You will, however, be responsible on exams and quizzes for all learning objectives.
Health Education Initial Preparation Program: Standards Alignment
KHP 222                  Course Title: Drug Education

AAHE, EPSB & COE Technology Standards; COE Skills & Dispositions; EPSB Themes; &                     Addressed
KERA Initiatives                                                                                     in Course

American Association for Health Education (AAHE) Standards for Entry Level Health Educators
 Standard 1: Candidates Assess Individual and Community Needs of Health Education                       X
 Standard 2: Candidates Plan Effective Health Education Programs
 Standard 3: Candidates Implement Health Education Programs
 Standard 4: Candidates Evaluate Effectiveness of Coordinated School Health Programs                    X
 Standard 5: Candidates Coordinate Provision of Health Education Programs and Services
 Standard 6: Candidates Act as a Resource Person in Health Education
 Standard 7: Candidates Communicate Health and Health Education Needs, Concerns, and Resources          X

Education Professional Standards Board (EPSB) New Teacher Standards
 Standard 1: Standard Designs and Plans Instruction                                                     X
 Standard 2: Creates and Maintains Learning Climates                                                    X
 Standard 3: Implements and Manages Instruction
 Standard 4: Assesses and Communicates Learning Results
 Standard 5: Reflects and Evaluates Teaching and Learning                                               X
 Standard 6: Collaborates with Colleagues, Parents, and Others
 Standard 7: Engages in Professional Development
 Standard 8: Knowledge of Content                                                                       X
 Standard 9: Demonstrates Implementation of Technology                                                  X

UK Educator Preparation Unit Technology Standards
 Standard 1: Candidates integrate media and technology into instruction                                 X
 Standard 2: Candidates utilize multiple technology applications to support student learning.           X
 Standard 3: Candidates select appropriate technology to enhance instruction.
 Standard 4: Candidates integrate student use of technology into instruction.
 Standard 5: Candidates address special learning needs through technology.
 Standard 6: Candidates promote ethical and legal use of technology disciplines.

Functional Skills and Disposition (FSD) of UK Educator Preparation Unit
 FSD 1: Candidates communicate appropriately and effectively.                                           X
 FSD 2: Candidates demonstrate constructive attitudes                                                   X
 FSD 3: Candidates demonstrate ability to conceptualize key subject matter ideas and relationships      X
 FSD 4: Candidates interact appropriately and effectively with diverse groups of colleagues,            X
 administrators, students, and parents in educational settings.
 FSD 5: Candidates demonstrate a commitment to professional ethics and behavior.                        X
Additional Functional Skills and Dispositions for Health Educators
 FSD 1: Candidates demonstrate health literacy.                      X
 FSD 2: Candidates demonstrate conceptual knowledge and skills.      X

Educational Professional Standards Board (EPSB) Themes
Diversity                                                            X
Assessment                                                           X
Literacy Education
Closing the Achievement Gap

Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA) Initiatives
 KERA Goals and Academic Expectations                                X
 Program of Studies
 Core Content for Assessment                                         X
                                   KHP 230- HUMAN HEALTH AND WELLNESS
                                   Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion
                                               University of Kentucky
                                                     Fall 2006

Instructor and Course Information:           Kim H. Miller, Ph.D., CHES
Course Location and Meeting Time:            213 Seaton Building,
                                                     Tuesday & Thursday 9:30-10:45
Office Location:                                     217 Seaton Building
Phone:                                               859-257-4091
Email:                                       kmill5@uky.edu
Office Hours:                                        Monday           10:00- 12:00
                                                     Tuesday & Thursday         8:30- 9:30
                                                                              10:45- 11:45
                                                     Wednesday                  3:00- 5:00 p.m.


Research and Reflection for Learning and Leading: The College of Education has identified this as the theme of our
conceptual framework. It is a statement of the way in which the College intends to prepare future educators. All of the
work you will complete in this course is based on current research in the field of Health Promotion. Opportunities for
reflection will be ongoing as you process and apply information to your personal and professional practice. Learning is
the primary goal of education and everything we do, both faculty and students, will contribute to that goal. Having a solid
base of the content presented in this course will help prepare you for leading others to healthier lifestyles and behaviors.
This class addresses Education Professional Standards Board (EPSB) Standards VIII and IX. This class also addresses
American Association for Health Education (AAHE) Standard I.

Course Objectives:
1. Increase your knowledge and understanding of human health issues.
2. Learn how to apply health information in a way that fosters personal, familial, and community well-being.
3. Develop analytical skills that allow you to make informed health decisions as both an individual and as a professional
   in your field.

Course Text and Readings: Alters & Schiff (2003). Essential concepts for Healthy Living, 4th edition. Jones & Bartlett.
The text is available at the UK Bookstore.

Attendance Policy: The attendance policy is very simple. Students are required to attend class and participate in all class
activities. Should a student be absent for some reason, the student has the responsibility to provide documentation about the
nature of the absence not later than one week after the absence occurs. Only absences that have been discussed with me
prior to their occurrence will have the potential to be considered ―excused.‖ An excess of six unexcused absences
requires withdrawal from the course, according to University policy. Each unexcused absence results in a deduction of
3 points from your attendance/participation grade.

Policy on Late Assignments: Assignments are due at the appointed time as stated in class or on the syllabus. Any
assignment submitted after the due date may be lowered one letter grade for each day late.

Additional Policies: Following is a list of additional policies of which you should be aware.
1. Falling asleep in class will not be tolerated. This is rude and disrespectful. If this occurs I will ask you to:
     A. Wake-up and/or
     B. Leave class
2. Repeated late arrival to class will not be tolerated. This, too, is rude and disrespectful. If this occurs:
     A. Student will be warned to arrive on time
     B. Student will not be allowed to enter the class
3. Students may not leave class to put money in the parking meters. Please do not ask to do this and do not plan to do this.
If this occurs:
     A. Student will be warned not to do this
     B. Student will be asked to leave class and not return that day
4. Use of cell-phones during class is not permitted. Turn it off when you enter and leave it in your purse or pocket for the
entirety of the class. I will confiscate any cell-phone that is brought to my attention during class and will return it when
class is over that day.
Evaluation Criteria/Assignments              Point Value                Percent of Grade
Attendance/ Writing Assignments                      84 pts                             16%
Exam #1                                              100 pts                            21%
Exam #2                                              100 pts                            21%
Exam #3                                              100 pts                            21%
Project                                              100 pts                            21%

Total Possible:                                       484 pts

Grading Scale:
Point Range       Letter Grade
436-484           A
387-435           B
339-386           C
290-338           D
0 - 289           E

Assignment Details

Attendance/Writing Assignments( 3 pts ea. x 28 class days): These assignments will be completed in class. Typically,
they will ask students to reflect on a question or questions or report on issues previously discussed or presented in the
textbook.

Exams (3@ 100 pts each): Three written exams will be given on the dates indicated on the Course Schedule below. These
exams will cover material from the textbook, class activities, class handouts and guest speakers. Review sheets will
be provided prior to each exam

Project (100 pts): This is a creative project designed to provide an opportunity for students to express what it means to
them, personally, to live a healthy life. More details about this assignment will be given later.

A warning regarding plagiarism: All assignments that you submit must be your own work. Copying work from anyone
else is considered plagiarism and is not allowed. If you submit work that is not your own, the minimum penalty is failure
from the course.


                                    Suggested Ground Rules for Dr. Miller’s Classes

This semester, my role is to:

   Be on time for every class.
   Be prepared for every class.
   Treat you with respect.
   Maintain a professional demeanor.
   Ensure only one person speaks at a time, with no one dominating and no one remaining silent.
   Ensure a safe environment where everyone can speak his or her mind (respectfully).
   Be fair and consistent with grading.
   Return graded materials promptly to the best of my ability.
   Be vigilant about keeping discussions on track and related to the topic.
   Be accessible and available to talk with students outside of class.
   Enjoy the process of learning together.


This semester, your role is to:

   Be on time for every class.
   Be prepared for every class.
   Treat the instructor and other classmates with respect.
   Maintain a professional demeanor.
   Refrain from speaking when others are speaking; avoid dominating; and avoid remaining silent.
   Participate in creating a safe environment where everyone can speak his or her mind (respectfully).
   Commit to the responsibility you have for your own learning, doing what is necessary for that learning to be
    accomplished.
   Turn in assignments when they are due.
   Engage in class discussions in a manner that is respectful of differences.
   Be committed to developing as a professional.
   Enjoy the process of learning together.

Course Outline
                          (Note: Subject to change at the instructor’s discretion)

Date                               Topic                             Reading/Assignment Due
Thursday Aug 24                     Introductions; Review syllabus &
                                    introduction to the course
Tuesday Aug 29                      Health: The foundation for life   Reading: Chap. 1

Thursday Aug 31                     Health: The foundation for life

Tuesday Sept 5                      Psychological Health                  Reading Chap 2

Thursday Sept 7                     Psychological Health

Tuesday Sept 12                     Stress & Its Management               Reading Chap 3

Thursday Sept 14                    Stress & Its Management

Tuesday Sept 19                     Violence and Abuse                    Reading Chap 4


Thursday Sept 21                    Violence and Abuse

Tuesday Sept 26                     Relationships & Sexuality             Reading Chap 6
                                    Distribute exam review sheet
Thursday Sept 28                    Relationships & Sexuality

Tuesday Oct 3                                                             Exam #1 on Chaps 1, 2, 3, 4, 6
Thursday Oct 5                      Drug Use and Abuse                    Reading Chap 7
Tuesday Oct 10                      Drug Use and Abuse
Thursday Oct 12                     Alcohol and Tobacco                   Reading Chap 8
Tuesday Oct 17                      Alcohol and Tobacco

Thursday Oct 19                     Nutrition                             Reading Chap 9
Tuesday Oct 24                      Nutrition
Thursday Oct 26                     Body Weight and Its                   Reading Chap 10
                                    Management
Tuesday Oct 31                      Physical Fitness                      Reading Chap 11
                                    Distribute exam review sheet
Thursday Nov 2                      Physical Fitness
Tuesday Nov 7                                                             Exam #2: Chaps 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
Thursday Nov 9                      Reproductive Health                   Reading Chap 5 and 14
Tuesday Nov 14                      Reproductive Health
Thursday Nov 16                     Cardiovascular Health                 Reading Chap 12
Tuesday Nov 21                      Cardiovascular Health

Thursday Nov 23                     No Class: Thanksgiving Holiday
Tuesday Nov. 28                     Cancer                                Reading Chap 13
                                                           Due: Class Project
Thursday Nov 30             Cancer
Tuesday Dec 5               Environmental Health           Reading Chap 16
                            Distribute exam review sheet
Thursday Dec 7              Environmental Health
Thursday Dec 14 8:00 a.m.   Final Exam                     Exam #3: Chaps 5, 12, 13, 14,
                                                           16
Health Education Initial Preparation Program:        Standards Alignment
Course Number KHP 230                                Course Title_Human Health & Wellness

AAHE, EPSB & COE Technology Standards; COE Skills & Dispositions; EPSB Themes; &                               Addressed
KERA Initiatives                                                                                               in Course

American Association for Health Education (AAHE) Standards for Entry Level Health Educators
 Standard 1: Candidates Assess Individual and Community Needs of Health Education                                 X
 Standard 2: Candidates Plan Effective Health Education Programs
 Standard 3: Candidates Implement Health Education Programs
 Standard 4: Candidates Evaluate Effectiveness of Coordinated School Health Programs
 Standard 5: Candidates Coordinate Provision of Health Education Programs and Services
 Standard 6: Candidates Act as a Resource Person in Health Education                                              X
 Standard 7: Candidates Communicate Health and Health Education Needs, Concerns, and Resources

Education Professional Standards Board (EPSB) New Teacher Standards
 Standard 1: Standard Designs and Plans Instruction
 Standard 2: Creates and Maintains Learning Climates                                                              X
 Standard 3: Implements and Manages Instruction
 Standard 4: Assesses and Communicates Learning Results
 Standard 5: Reflects and Evaluates Teaching and Learning
 Standard 6: Collaborates with Colleagues, Parents, and Others                                                    X
 Standard 7: Engages in Professional Development
 Standard 8: Knowledge of Content                                                                                 X
 Standard 9: Demonstrates Implementation of Technology

UK Educator Preparation Unit Technology Standards
 Standard 1: Candidates integrate media and technology into instruction
 Standard 2: Candidates utilize multiple technology applications to support student learning.
 Standard 3: Candidates select appropriate technology to enhance instruction.
 Standard 4: Candidates integrate student use of technology into instruction.
 Standard 5: Candidates address special learning needs through technology.
 Standard 6: Candidates promote ethical and legal use of technology disciplines.

Functional Skills and Disposition (FSD) of UK Educator Preparation Unit
 FSD 1: Candidates communicate appropriately and effectively.                                                     X
 FSD 2: Candidates demonstrate constructive attitudes                                                             X
 FSD 3: Candidates demonstrate ability to conceptualize key subject matter ideas and relationships                X
 FSD 4: Candidates interact appropriately and effectively with diverse groups of colleagues, administrators,      X
 students, and parents in educational settings.
 FSD 5: Candidates demonstrate a commitment to professional ethics and behavior.                                  X


Additional Functional Skills and Dispositions for Health Educators
 FSD 1: Candidates demonstrate health literacy.                                                                   X
 FSD 2: Candidates demonstrate conceptual knowledge and skills.                                                   X

Educational Professional Standards Board (EPSB) Themes
Diversity                                                                                                         X
Assessment
Literacy Education
Closing the Achievement Gap

Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA) Initiatives
 KERA Goals and Academic Expectations
 Program of Studies
Core Content for Assessment
                           UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY              Spring, 2007
                                      KINESIOLOGY AND HEALTH PROMOTION
                                                   KHP 330
                           PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTING HEALTH EDUCATION PROGRAMS

INSTRUCTOR:                Richard Riggs, Ed. D.
OFFICE:                    204 Seaton Bldg.
PHONE:                     257-3645 (KHP Departmental Phone Number: 257-5826)
E-MAIL:                    richard.riggs@uky.edu
OFFICE HOURS:              MWF: 9:00-11:00;         TT: 8:30 – 9:30; Other Hours by Appointment
CLASS MEETING:             Tuesday – Thursday 9:30 – 10:45 - - 213 Seaton Bldg

TEXTBOOK:         Fodor, J. T., Dalis, G. T. & Giarrantanto-Russell, S. C. (2002). Health instruction: theory and
application for community, school, health care and workplace settings. 6thEdition. Dubuque: Kendall/Hunt

COURSE DESCRIPTION:                  The course analyzes the foundations of the coordinated school health program (CSHP)
with an emphasis on comprehensive school health education (CSHE). Additionally, the course examines the processes of
planning and developing a comprehensive health education instructional program. The course reinforces the College of
Education’s Conceptual Framework of, ―research and reflection for learning and leading‖. Research serves as one of the
major ways for the educator to locate and access current and scientifically valid health content information to be taught to
students. Also, research provides the basis for developing as well as selecting health education curriculum based upon
what researchers have found to be the most effective in influencing health behavior. All elements comprising a curriculum
(philosophy, content, instructional strategies, assessment, resources should be identified and utilized based upon research.
Reflection is emphasized for the purpose of decision-making in order to gain health related knowledge and skills and to
learn how to apply health knowledge to teaching and learning situations. Reflection also enables the teacher to make refine
teaching and learning processes. Reflection requires one to evaluate learning processes and to make adaptations to improve
the quality of teaching and learning that occurs. Leading is an expectation for all teachers and candidates for future
teaching positions. Teachers must become leaders in their classroom, school and in the community. Teachers serve as
leaders for curriculum development, program planning, lesson plan development, policy development, in addition to many
other leadership roles. All educators must commit to Learning and the need to address different learning styles and the
effectiveness of various teaching strategies with diverse and changing student populations in a multicultural environment.

American Association of Health Education/NCATE Standards and Key Elements:

Standard I        Candidates assess individual and community needs for health education

                  Key Element A: Candidates obtain health-related data about social and cultural environments, growth
                  and development factors, needs, and interests of students.
                  Key Element B: Candidates distinguish between behaviors that foster and those that hinder well-being.
                  Key Element C: Candidates determine health education needs based on observed and obtained data.


Standard II       Candidates plan effective health education programs,

                  Key Element B: Candidates develop a logical scope and sequence plan for a health education program.
                  Key Element C: Candidates formulate appropriate and measurable learner objectives.
                  Key Element D: Candidates design educational strategies consistent with specified learner objectives.


Standard III      Candidates implement health education programs.

                  Key Element A: Candidates analyze factors affecting the successful implementation of health education
                  and Coordinated School Health Programs (CSHPs).
                  Key Element B: Candidates select resources and media best suited to implement program plans for
                  diverse learners.


Standard IV       Candidates evaluate the effectiveness of coordinated school health programs
                 Key Element A: Candidates develop plans to assess student achievement of program objectives.

Standard V       Candidates coordinate provision of health education programs and services

                 Key Element A: Candidates develop a plan for coordinating health education with other components of a
                 school health program.
                 Key Element B: Candidates demonstrate the dispositions and skills to facilitate cooperation among health
                 educators, other teachers, and appropriate school staff.
                 Key Element C: Candidates formulate practical modes of collaboration among health educators in all
                 settings and other school and community health professionals.
Standard VI      Candidates act as a resource person in health education

                 Key Element A: Candidates utilize computerized health information retrieval systems effectively.
                 Key Element B: Candidates establish effective consultative relationships with those requesting assistance
                 in solving health-related problems.
                 Key Element C: Candidates interpret and respond to requests for health information.
                 Key Element D: Candidates select effective educational resource materials for dissemination.

Standard VII:   Candidates communicate health and health education needs, concerns, and resources


                 Key Element A: Candidates interpret concepts, purposes, and theories of health education.
                 Key Element B: Candidates predict the impact of societal value systems on health education programs.


EPSB New Teacher Standards (NTS):

NTS I:          Designs and plans instruction
NTS VI: Collaborates with Colleagues/parents/Others
NTS VII:        Engages in Professional Development
NTS VIII:       Knowledge of Content
NTS IX: Demonstrates Implementation of technology

COE Technology Standards:

Standard 1:      Candidates integrate media and technology into instruction
Standard 3:      Candidates select appropriate technology to enhance instruction
Standard 5:      Candidates address special learning needs through technology
Standard 6:      Candidates promote ethical and legal use of technology disciplines

PLEASE TURN OFF ALL CELL PHONES WHEN IN CLASS

LEARNER OUTCOMES FOR JANUARY 12 – MARCH 8, 2007

1.      Define health, holistic health, wellness,
2.      Analyze characteristics of health and wellness
3.      Compare and contrast definitions of health and wellness
4.      Review the history of health and health education
5.      Explain each of the four components of the Health Field Concept and give examples for each component
6.      Identify the six preventable priority health behaviors targeted for programming and educational intervention
7.      Construct a personal definition of health or wellness
8.      Define and explain the significance of and need for a coordinated school health program (CSHP)
9.      Define comprehensive school health education (CSHE), health promotion, iatrogenic health education disease,
        health literacy
10.     Compare and contrast definitions of health education
11.     Analyze the history of health education
12.     Construct a personal definition of health education
13.     Analyze predominate health education philosophies
14.      Analyze major education philosophies
15.      Formulate a personal philosophy of health education that incorporates one or more of predominate health
         education philosophies and at least one major education philosophy
16.      Analyze short term, intermediate, and long term learner outcomes of health education
17.      Formulate a hierarchy of learner outcomes for health education
18.      Analyze research-based academic effects of comprehensive school health education (CSHE)
19.      Formulate a defensible justification with supporting research for the inclusion of health education in a P-12 school
         curriculum
20.      Analyze the purpose & functions of each component of the coordinated school health program (CSHP)
21.      Analyze research-based effects of the coordinated school health program (CSHP) on academic achievement
22.      Describe roles of school personnel within each component of the coordinated school health program (CSHP)
23.      Discuss legal issues applicable to being a classroom teacher
24.      Research Internet Web sites for community health agencies/organizations for use as resources for comprehensive
         school health education (CSHE)
25.      Describe functions and give examples of official health agencies, voluntary health agencies, professional health
         associations, commercially sponsored health organizations, and civic clubs in coordinated school health programs
         (CSHP)
27.      Define, explain and give specific examples of direct health instruction, indirect health instruction, correlated
         health instruction, and integrated health instruction
28.      Define: health education curriculum; horizontal curriculum; vertical curriculum; curriculum scope; curriculum
         sequence
29.      Analyze general principles of health education curriculum development {(a) education involves preparation for
         adult life; (b) success of curriculum development is related to variety and number of people involved; (c)
         curriculum consists only of planned educational experiences; and (d) curriculum must reflect value system of
         community}
30.      Analyze principles of teaching and learning in health education and of health education curriculum development
31.      Identify the ten/eleven content areas that comprise comprehensive school health education (CSHE)
32.      Identify a variety of health education topics to be included within each of the ten/eleven major content areas that
         comprise comprehensive school health education (CSHE)

LEARNER OUTCOMES FOR MARCH 20 - - APRIL 26, 2007

32.      Define and describe the relationship among the major components of a lesson plan (context; goals; objectives;
         KERA Goals, Academic Expectations and Core Content for Assessment; teaching/learning strategies (with
         content embedded); materials, resources, & technology; assessment/evaluation; reflection and refinement)
33.      Develop a basis for establishing content selection for the health education curriculum (What factors guide the
         selection of content to be taught in the comprehensive school health education program?)
34.      Identify sources of data for determining health education curriculum content (Where do I get the content that I will
         teach in my comprehensive school health education program?)
35       Differentiate between a concept and a conceptual statement
36.      Construct health education conceptual statements
37.      Define, explain and critique various approaches to organizing/structuring health education content (unit plan, body
         systems, problems, conceptual, competency-based, outcome-based, and standards-based, etc)
38.      Explain and critique ways of scheduling and sequencing health education (cycle plan, spiral plan, continuous
         emphasis plan)
39.      Define: goal, objective, outcome, standard, demonstrator, learner expectation, behavioral objective, informational
         objective, planning objective, competency,
40.      Define outcomes-based comprehensive health education
41.      Examine Bloom’s Taxonomy of Objectives
42.      Construct effective learner outcomes for health education in the cognitive, affective, and action/psychomotor
domains
43.     Construct effective health education learner outcomes that address higher levels of learning
44.     Apply functionality criteria to health education learner outcomes
45.     Identify criteria for selecting effective teaching/learning strategies
46      Identify characteristics of different teaching/learning strategies
47.     Identify teaching/learning strategies to meet cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domain learner outcomes.
48.     Define and explain measurement and evaluation
49.     Propose reasons for measurement and evaluation in health education
50.     Explain validity and reliability as measurement and evaluation terms
51.     Identify techniques to increase the reliability and the validity of measurement and evaluation in the cognitive,
      affective, and action/psychomotor domains of learning in health education
52.   Define and give examples of packaged comprehensive health education curriculum, packaged categorical health
      education curriculum, locally developed health education curriculum, and textbooks as health education
      curriculum
53.   Analyze advantages and disadvantages of using packaged comprehensive health education curriculum
53.   Analyze advantages and disadvantages of packaged categorical health education curriculum
54.   Analyze advantages and disadvantages of voluntary health agency health education curriculum
55.   Analyze advantages and disadvantages of locally developed health curriculum
56.   Analyze advantages and disadvantages of using textbooks as health education curriculum
57.   Develop health education lesson ideas to integrate math, science, social studies, and language arts
58    Develop a plan for fostering collaboration among teachers in other subject areas in providing health instruction
59.   Develop a plan for incorporating literacy education into health education
60.   Generate ideas as to how health education can help close the achievement gap
61.   Generate ideas for linking health education areas/topics as an instructional strategy
62.   Analyze and apply the National Health Education Standards to health education
63.   Analyze and apply the KERA Goals and Academic expectations for health education
64.   Analyze and apply the KY Core Content for Assessment for health education
65.   Analyze and apply the KY Program of Studies for health education
66.   Use the National Health Education Standards, KY Core Content for Assessment, KY Program of Studies, and
      KERA Goals & Academic Expectations in planning health education instruction
67.   Plan health education lessons that address diversity
68.   Develop a detailed week long unit plan that includes 5 lesson plans that incorporates instructional sequence for
      health education




COURSE REQUIREMENTS:


      1.       ATTEND CLASS, BE ON TIME, and PARTICIPATE in all class activities.

               ATTENDANCE POLICY

               The attendance policy for KHP 330 is that you are required to attend class. Specifically, each time you
               have an unexcused absence, you will have 2.0 points deducted from your attendance and participation
               grade. If you have absences (excused or unexcused or a combination of excused and unexcused
               absences) totaling 6 (20%) or more, you will be required to either petition for a ―W‖ (Withdraw) or
               receive an ―I‖ grade (To meet the requirements for an Incomplete grade you will be required to repeat the
               entire class in a future semester). (See Student Rights and Responsibilities 5.2.4.2; US: 2/9/87; RC:
               11/20/87)


               TARDINESS POLICY

               Class begins at 9:30 and the expectation is that you will be on time and in your seat. Students who are
               late will have one point deducted from their attendance and participation grade for that class. Class
               dismisses at approximately 10:45 and students are expected to remain in class until it is dismissed.
               Students who leave class early will have one point deducted from their attendance and participation grade
               for that class.




      Student Rights and Responsibilities 5.2.4.2 Excused Absences: (US: 11/11/85; 2/9/87; 4/12/04) The following are
      defined as excused absences: A. Significant illness of the student or serious illness of a member of the student's
      household (permanent or campus) or immediate family. The instructor shall have the right to request appropriate
        verification. B. The death of a member of the student's household (permanent or campus) or immediate family.
        The instructor shall have the right to request appropriate verification. *Children of students are considered
        members of the immediate family (RC: 11/9/94). * For the purpose of this rule, immediate family is defined as
        spouse or child or parent (guardian) or sibling (all of the previous include steps, halves and in-laws of the same
        relationship) and grandchild or grandparent (US: 4/12/04) C. Trips for members of student organizations
        sponsored by an academic unit, trips for University classes, and trips for participation in intercollegiate athletic
        events. When feasible, the student must notify the instructor prior to the occurrence of such absences, but in no
        case shall such notification occur more than one week after the absence. Instructors may request formal
        notification from appropriate university personnel to document the student's participation in such trips. *
        Intercollegiate athletic events include club sports registered with the university as well as varsity sports. (RC:
        10/18/00) D. Major Religious Holidays. Students are responsible for notifying the instructor in writing of
        anticipated absences due to their observance of such holidays no later than the last day for adding a class. E. Any
        other circumstances which the instructor finds reasonable cause for nonattendance. (US: 4/23/90) Students
        missing work due to an excused absence bear the responsibility of informing the instructor about their excused
        absence within one week following the period of the excused absence (except where prior notification is required),
        and of making up the missed work. The instructor shall give the student an opportunity to make up the work
        and/or the exams missed due to an excused absence, and shall do so, if feasible, during the semester in which the
        absence occurred. (US: 11/10/85 and RC: 11/20/87) * If a student has an excused absence on a day when a quiz is
        given, the instructor may not deny permission for a makeup exam and simply calculate the student's grade on the
        basis of the remaining requirements. (RC: 8/20/87) * The language ―The instructor shall give the student an
        opportunity to make up the work and/or the exam missed during an excused absence...‖ implies the student shall
        not be penalized for the excused absence. (RC: 8/25/95) * This rule applies to all graded work. (RC: 1/29/03)

2.      Complete quizzes that address important course material contained in the Electronic Journal Articles and Book
        Chapters identified in the Course Bibliography. This material is essential to your understanding of health
        education concepts discussed in class. The Class Calendar identifies the readings that should be completed for
        each class period and that will be assessed by each quiz.

3.      Complete a variety of Miscellaneous Class Activities that will be assigned throughout the semester.         These
        activities will contribute toward your Miscellaneous Class Activities grade. Examples of activities may include
        but not limited to: Peer Reviews of Portfolio Entries; Accessing and Using Internet Sites for Health Education,
        Listing of 10/11 Major Content areas and Health Education topics within each; Linking Health Education Topics
        and Content Areas; Integrating Health Education into Other School Curricula Areas; AND OTHERS

4.      Complete examination 1 and examination 2. Questions on examination 1 and examination 2 are derived from
        course material from the textbook, class lectures, class activities, course bibliography, and class handouts.
        Specifically, Learner Outcomes identify what you should know and what you should be able to do to be successful
        on each examination and in additional class activities. Examinations will consist of multiple choice questions
        (approximately 20-25%) and short answer items (75-80%). Short answer questions require you to list, explain,
        define, describe, give examples, and/or to discuss to demonstrate your understanding of the concepts addressed in
        class.


5.      Develop a Health Education Portfolio Entry (HEPE) to be submitted for evaluation. Details for this assignment
        are attached
        as a separate page.

6.      Construct a 6-day lesson plan demonstrating instructional sequence for the elementary school, middle school or
        high school in a selected health education content area. One lesson plan must integrate the teaching of
        mathematics, science, language arts, or social studies into the lesson.

LATE ASSIGNMENTS: The instructor has the prerogative of either accepting or not accepting late assignments. IN
MOST CASES, LATE ASSIGNMENTS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Late assignments that are accepted will be
penalized by a grade reduction.

CAUTION: ALL ASSIGNMENTS THAT YOU SUBMIT MUST BE YOUR OWN WORK. COPYING WORK FROM
PRESENT OR FORMER STUDENTS IS CONSIDERED PLAGIARISM AND IS NOT ALLOWED. IF YOU SUBMIT
WORK THAT IS NOT YOUR OWN, THE MINIMUM PENALTY IS FAILURE FOR THE COURSE. For additional
information, please refer to the Student Rights and Responsibilities Handbook.
EVALUATION ACTIVITIES

1.       Class Attendance & Class Participation                                              15%
2.       Quizzes                                                                              5%
3.       Health Education Portfolio Entry                                                    15%
4.       Miscellaneous Class Activities                                                      10%
5.       6-Day Unit/Lesson Plans                                                             15%
7.       Examination 1                                                                       20%
8.       Examination 2                                                                       20%

FINAL GRADE DETERMINATION

          Each required class activity contributes a specific percentage towards your final grade. In order to determine your
final grade, the percentage of the activity will be multiplied by the letter grade point value* you receive on the activity.
When this is completed for all class activities, the total points will be added and rank ordered from highest to lowest. For
example, an examination is valued at 20% of your final grade and you receive a B+ on the exam. The value of the exam,
(.20), will be multiplied by 3.3 (points you receive for the letter grade of B+) for a total of 66 points. You will receive 66
points out of a total possible of 80 points for that examination. This process will be repeated for each class activity. When
all class activities have been completed, points will be totaled and compared to point ranges listed below to determine your
final grade.

LETTER GRADE POINT VALUES:                                 POINT RANGE DETERMINATION OF FINAL LETTER
GRADE

A                 4.0                                           A=       360 - 400
A-                3.7                                           B=       300 - 359
B+                3.3                                           C=       240 - 299
B                 3.0                                           D=       180 - 239
B-                2.7                                           E=        0 - 179
C+                2.3
C                 2.0
C-                1.7
D+                1.3
D                 1.0
D-                 .7
E                   0

EXAMPLE:          Final grade calculation for hypothetical student:

Letter Grade &
REQUIRED CLASS ACTIVITY                                               % of Final Grade     Point Value       TOTAL

1.   Class Attendance & Class Participation                   15%                  A (4)                60
2.   Quizzes                                                            5%                   B+ (3.3)          16.5
3.   Portfolio Entry                                                   15%                   B- (2.7)          40.5
4.   Miscellaneous Class Activities                           10%                  A (4)            40
5.   6-Day Unit/Lesson Plans                                           15%                   B (3)             45
7.   Examination 1                                                     20%                   C (2)             40
8.   Examination 2                                                     20%                   A (4)             80
                                                                                                 TOTAL       322 pts.

                                                                                                 Final Grade = B
                                             HEALTH PROMOTION
                                           UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY


KHP 330, CLASS CALENDAR, SPRING, 2007


JANUARY           11      Course Orientation; Chapter 1 (pages 3-6) Concept of Health
                  16      Health; Wellness; articles 1 & 2
                  18      Health & Wellness; Chapter 1 (pages 9-12): Coordinated School Health Program (CSHP);
        article #3
                  23      CSHP & Comprehensive School Health Education (CSHE); Chapter 1 (pages 13-16); article #4
                  25      CSHE; articles # 5 & 6
                  30      CSHE; articles # 7 & 8


FEBRUARY            1     CSHE; articles # 9, 10, & 11; Comprehensive School Health Program (CSHP) Submit Draft #1
                  of Health
                                   Education Portfolio Entry (HEPE) to Instructor
                  6       Instructor distributes HEPE for First Peer Review; articles 12 and 13
                  8        Return Peer Review of HEPE Draft #1 to Instructor and Instructor returns HEPE to Owner
                  13      Submit HEPE Draft # 2 to Instructor

15       Instructor distributes HEPE for Second Peer Review
                   20       Return Peer Review of HEPE Draft #2 to Instructor and Instructor returns HEPE to Owner;
                            Principles of Curriculum Development and Health Education;
                   22       Submit HEPE Draft #3 to Instructor; Principles for Curriculum Development and Health
                            Education;
                   27       Instructor distributes HEPE for Third Peer Review; Principles of Curriculum Development and
for Health
                            Education


MARCH             1       Return Peer Review of HEPE Draft #3 to Instructor and Instructor returns HEPE to Owner;
Health
                          Education Curriculum;     Chapter 6
                  6       Health Education Curriculum
                  8       SUBMIT DRAFTS # 1, 2, 3, AND 4 (FINAL DRAFT); EXAMINATION 1

13      SPRING BREAK
               15    SPRING BREAK
               20    Chapter 2: Determining Content for Health Education;       Listing of Health Education
                     Content Areas and Topics Due
               22    Chapter 3: Structuring Knowledge for Health Education (Organizing Plans Health Education)
               27    Organizing Plans for Health Education
               29    Chapter 4: Formulating Goals and Objectives for Health Education


APRIL             3       Linking Health Education Topics and Integrating Health Education
                  5       Chapter 7: Evaluating Health Education
                 10       Evaluating Health Education
                 12       Curriculum Sources: Advantages and Disadvantages
                 17       Curriculum Sources: Advantages and Disadvantages
                 19       Curriculum Sources: Advantages and Disadvantages
                 24       Curriculum Sources: Advantages and Disadvantages
                 26       6-Day Lesson/Unit Plans


MAY                       EXAMINATION 2
                                                    HEALTH PROMOTION - - KHP 330
                                                                   SPRING, 2007

                            ELECTRONIC JOURNAL ARTICLES AND BOOK CHAPTERS


COURSE BIBLIOGRAPHY

* Articles for Quizzes

1.       *Eberst, R. (1984). Defining health: A multidimensional model. Journal of School Health, 54(3), 99-104.

2.       *Greenberg, J. (1985). Health and wellness: A conceptual differentiation. Journal of School Health, 55(10),
403-406.

3.       *Balog, J.E. (2005). The meaning of health. American Journal of Health Education, 36(5), 266-271.

4.       *Pollock, M. P. & Hamburg, M. (1985). Health education: the basic of the basics. Health Education, 16(6), 5-
11.

5.       *Allensworth, D. D. (1994). The research base for innovative practices in school health education at the secondary
level.
                  Journal of School Health, 64(5), 180-187.

6.       *Allensworth, D.D. (1993). Health education: State of the art. Journal of School Health, 63(1), 14-19.

7.       *Hochbaum, G. M. (1978). Some select aspects of school health education. Health Education, 9(2), 31-33.

8.       *Kolbe, L. (1982). What can we expect from school health education? Journal of School Health, 52(3), 145-150.

9.       *Russell, R. (1963). Are health educators "warriors against pleasure"? Journal of School Health, May, 201-204.

10.      *Welle, H.M., Russell, R.D., & Kittleson, M.J. (1995). Philosophical trends in health education: Implications for
the

                  21st century. Journal of Health Education, 26(6), 326-332.

11.      *Cottrell, R. R., Girvan, J.T., & McKenzie, J.F. (2006). Philosophical foundations. In Principles & foundations of

                  health promotion and education (pp. 74-93). San Francisco: Benjamin Cummings.

12.      *Lohrmann, D. K., Wooley, S. (1998). Comprehensive school health education in Health is academic: A guide to

                  coordinated school health programs. (ed. Marx, E., Wooley, S. F. and Northrop, D. (pp. 43-66). New
                  York:

                  Teachers College Press.

13.     *Kolbe, L. (2002). Education reform and the goals of modern school health programs. The State Education
Standard,
                Autumn, 4-11.

14.      National Professional School Health Education Organizations. (1984). Comprehensive school health education.

                  Journal of School Health, 54(8), 312-315.

15.      Kentucky Department of Education. (1998). Program of studies for Kentucky schools

16.      Kentucky Department of Education. (1999). Introduction to core content for assessment.
17.   American Cancer Society. (2005-2006). Pre-Publication document of National Health Education Standards,
      PreK-12.

OTHER ARTICLES MAY BE ADDED.
         UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY DEPARTMENT OF KINESIOLOGY AND HEALTH PROMOTION
                            HEALTH EDUCATION PORTFOLIO ENTRY

KHP 330 HEALTH EDUCATION PORTFOLIO ENTRY COURSE REQUIREMENT
         Prepare a well constructed and organized computer word-processed Health Education Portfolio Entry (HEPE),
free from typographical, punctuation, and grammar errors, footnoted where appropriate, and a
bibliography/reference/works cited page documenting references used in the paper. The bibliography/reference/works
cited page must include at least four to five scholarly sources. The paper should be written using professional vocabulary
and written for a professional audience. When you submit the final draft (Draft #4) of your HEPE to your instructor, you
must submit the previous three drafts in addition to the HEALTH EDUCATION PORTFOLIO ENTRY PEER REVIEW
EVALUATION FORM from each peer review (total of 3).

1.      State your personal definition of health or wellness and explain your definition of health or wellness. (Choose
        EITHER health or wellness—not both)

2.      State and briefly explain three different definitions of health or wellness referenced from scholarly journals or
        books. Compare and contrast your definition of health or wellness to each of the three definitions from scholarly
        sources.

3.      State your personal definition of health education and explain your definition of health education.

4.      State and briefly discuss three different definitions of health education referenced from scholarly journals or
        books. Compare and contrast your definition of health education to each of the three health education definitions
        from scholarly sources.

5.      State and explain your personal philosophy of health education. Your philosophy must be linked to one or more
        of the 5 major health education philosophers (cognitive based, decision making, freeing/functioning, social
        change, or behavior change). Additionally your philosophy must be linked to one or more of the major
        educational philosophers and/or philosophical beliefs (i.e., Dewey, Bandura, Piaget, Vygotsky). For example,
        John Dewey believed in the integrated aspects of the mind and body--holism--and the need to educate and develop
        the whole body (holistic health). Dewey also supported reflective thinking and experiential learning (learning by
        doing). Rousseau believed that children have a natural curiosity and teachers can take advantage of this curiosity
        to give direction and structure to learning. Dewey and William Kilpatrick believed that children gain social skills
        through working in cooperative work groups. Bandura developed and others support social cognitive/learning
        theory (SCT or SLT) that has broad application in health education. Social Learning theory is the major
        conceptual framework on which successful research-based drug education programs are based. The learning
        theory of constructivism says learners construct knowledge for themselves-each learner individually and socially
        constructs meaning as he/she learns. As teachers we do not teach knowledge--we teach content from which
        learners construct meaning (concepts)/knowledge/understanding. The theory of constructivism is based on
        principles that include: Learning is an active process in which the learner uses sensory input and constructs
        meaning out of it; people learn to learn. Constructivism also states that learning is a social activity and is
        intimately associated with our connection with other human beings. Learning is contextual in that we do not learn
        facts and theories in some abstract form and in isolation from the rest of our lives-we learn in relation to what else
        we know--we enhance the potential for learning by applying what we are teaching to real life examples.

6.      State five major, defensible, research-supported reasons why comprehensive health education is needed in
        schools. State and explain each reason for including health education in the school curriculum. Do not justify
        health education by singling out specific content areas that you believe should be taught to students such as
        sexuality or drug, or nutrition.

7.      Each draft of your portfolio entry will be evaluated using the Peer Review Evaluation Form. Due dates for each
        complete draft of your portfolio entry are: February 2; February14; February 23; and March9. Failure to
        submit a draft (draft #1, 2, 3 or 4) that is due will result in a grade of ―E‖ for this assignment.

8.      Failure to submit a required section or component (definition of health, scholarly definitions of health, definition
        of health education, scholarly definitions of health education, personal philosophy, justification of health
        education, reference/bibliography page) of your portfolio entry (see Health Education Portfolio Entry Peer Review
        Evaluation Form) by 9:30 AM on the scheduled date each draft is due will result in a grade reduction of one letter.

9.      Failure to complete your scheduled portfolio peer review and returned to your instructor by 9:30 AM on its due
        date (February 9, February 21, and March 2) will result in a grade reduction of one letter. You will be evaluated
        on the quality of your HEPE Portfolio Reviews.

10.     You are strongly encouraged to take each HEPE draft to the Writing Center (257-1356) W. T. Young Library,
        room B108-C, and have it reviewed by the staff of the Writing Center. In order to take full advantage of the
        Writing Center, you must make an appointment in advance and you must have a complete draft of your work.

HEALTH EDUCATION PORTFOLIO ENTRY PEER REVIEW EVALUATION FORM

REVIEWER__________________________               OWNER OF PAPER_________________________ DATE__________
      DRAFT # _____

5 = Outstanding       4= Good        3 = Average         2 = Fair      1 = Poor          0 = Not Present    NA = Not
Applicable

I.      HEALTH or WELLNESS:                  Does the writer clearly and effectively:

        a.        state his/her own personal definition of health or wellness?
        b.        explain his/her own personal definition of health or wellness?
        c.        address the multidimensional nature of health or wellness?
        d         address the integrated nature of health or wellness, dimensions
        e.        address the importance of having balance among all of the dimensions of health or wellness?
        f.        state health or wellness is dynamic?
        g.        state health or wellness is a quality of life?
        h.        identify factors that may influence an individual's health or wellness?
        i.        state three different definitions of health or wellness referenced from scholarly sources?
        j.        explain each one of the three definitions of health or wellness from scholarly sources?
        k.        compare & contrast his/her definition of health or wellness with three other definitions?

        COMMENTS (USE BACK OF PAGE IF NECESSARY)

II.     HEALTH EDUCATION: Does the writer clearly and effectively:

        a.        state his/her personal definition of health education and explain it?
        b.        explain his/her own personal definition of health education
        c.        address the process of health education? (how does the health educator do health education?)
        d.        identify immediate learning outcomes and/or goals (results) of health education?

        e.        address longer term learning outcomes and /or goals of health education?
        f.        explain how health education is different from other professions/subject areas?
        g.        state three different definitions of health education referenced from scholarly sources?
        h.        briefly explain each one of the three definitions of health education from scholarly sources?
        i.        compare & contrast his/her definition of health education with three other definitions?

        COMMENTS

III.    PHILOSOPHY OF HEALTH EDUCATION:                         Does the writer clearly and effectively:

        a.        state what he/she believes about health education (states a personal philosophy?)
        b.        state how he/she believes health education should be taught
        c.        explain his/her philosophy as including one or more of the 5 predominate health education philosophies?
        d.        relate/link elements of his/her philosophy to major education philosophers/philosophies?
        e.        explain or elaborate on his/her philosophy?

        COMMENTS

IV.     RATIONALE FOR P-12 COMPREHENSIVE SCHOOL HEALTH EDUCATION: Does the writer clearly and
        effectively:

        a.        state 5 different reasons for including health education in schools?
     b.     explain each one of the five reasons supporting health education?
     c.     include reasons that are substantially different from one another?
     d      state reasons that are realistic, measurable, & defendable?

     COMMENTS

V.   OVERALL QUALITY OF PAPER: Is the paper:

     a.     written in the writer's own words?
     b.     written for a professional audience using professional vocabulary/terminology?
     c.     a fully communicative document?
     d.     free from typing errors, correct in use of grammar and punctuation?
     e.     computer generated using word processing?
     f.     long enough to clearly and effectively present needed information?
     g.     footnoted in the text?
     h.     documented with a reference/works cited/bibliography page at the end of the paper?
     i.     documented with a minimum of at least 4 references?

     COMMENTS
        Health Education Initial Preparation Program:     Standards Alignment
        KHP 330          Course Title: Planning and Implementing Health Education Programs 8/23/2006

AAHE, EPSB & COE Technology Standards; COE Skills & Dispositions; EPSB Themes; &                               Addressed
KERA Initiatives                                                                                               in Course

American Association for Health Education (AAHE) Standards for Entry Level Health Educators
 Standard 1: Candidates Assess Individual and Community Needs of Health Education                                  X
 Standard 2: Candidates Plan Effective Health Education Programs                                                   X
 Standard 3: Candidates Implement Health Education Programs
 Standard 4: Candidates Evaluate Effectiveness of Coordinated School Health Programs
 Standard 5: Candidates Coordinate Provision of Health Education Programs and Services                             X
 Standard 6: Candidates Act as a Resource Person in Health Education                                               X
 Standard 7: Candidates Communicate Health and Health Education Needs, Concerns, and Resources                     X

Education Professional Standards Board (EPSB) New Teacher Standards
 Standard 1: Standard Designs and Plans Instruction                                                                X
 Standard 2: Creates and Maintains Learning Climates
 Standard 3: Implements and Manages Instruction
 Standard 4: Assesses and Communicates Learning Results                                                            X
 Standard 5: Reflects and Evaluates Teaching and Learning
 Standard 6: Collaborates with Colleagues, Parents, and Others                                                     X
 Standard 7: Engages in Professional Development                                                                   X
 Standard 8: Knowledge of Content                                                                                  X
 Standard 9: Demonstrates Implementation of Technology                                                             X

UK Educator Preparation Unit Technology Standards
 Standard 1: Candidates integrate media and technology into instruction                                            X
 Standard 2: Candidates utilize multiple technology applications to support student learning.
 Standard 3: Candidates select appropriate technology to enhance instruction.                                      X
 Standard 4: Candidates integrate student use of technology into instruction.
 Standard 5: Candidates address special learning needs through technology.                                         X
 Standard 6: Candidates promote ethical and legal use of technology disciplines.                                   X

Functional Skills and Disposition (FSD) of UK Educator Preparation Unit
 FSD 1: Candidates communicate appropriately and effectively.                                                      X
 FSD 2: Candidates demonstrate constructive attitudes                                                              X
 FSD 3: Candidates demonstrate ability to conceptualize key subject matter ideas and relationships                 X
 FSD 4: Candidates interact appropriately and effectively with diverse groups of colleagues, administrators,       X
 students, and parents in educational settings.
 FSD 5: Candidates demonstrate a commitment to professional ethics and behavior.                                   X


Additional Functional Skills and Dispositions for Health Educators
 FSD 1: Candidates demonstrate health literacy.                                                                    X
 FSD 2: Candidates demonstrate conceptual knowledge and skills.                                                    X

Educational Professional Standards Board (EPSB) Themes
Diversity                                                                                                          X
Assessment                                                                                                         X
Literacy Education                                                                                                 X
Closing the Achievement Gap                                                                                        X

Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA) Initiatives
 KERA Goals and Academic Expectations                                                                              X
 Program of Studies                                                                                                X
Core Content for Assessment   X
                                                         KHP 371
                                            Student Teaching in Health Education
                                                         Fall, 2006

HEALTH EDUCATION UNIVERSITY SUPERVISORS:

Richard Riggs, Ed.D.                                   Melody Noland, Ph.D                          Karen Guarnieri, M.S.
204 Seaton Bldg                                        100/202 Seaton Bldg                          272-9319
257-3645                                               257-4265 or 257-5826                         gkg74@alltel.net.
richard.riggs@uky.edu                                  melody.noland@uky.edu

Office Hours:      MTWTF:           9:00-11:00         MW: 9:00 – 11:00; 2:00 – 4:00
                   Other hours by appointment          Other hours by appointment

Purpose:

The purpose of student teaching is to help the health education major candidate become an effective, competent teacher,
and one who uses research and reflection for learning and leading. The course reinforces the College of Education’s
Conceptual Framework of, ―research and reflection for learning and leading‖. Research serves as one of the major ways
for the candidate to locate and access current and scientifically valid health content information to be taught to students.
Also, research provides the basis for selecting or developing the most effective teaching and learning techniques used to
enable and empower all students to learn. Reflection is emphasized for the purpose of decision-making in order to gain
health related knowledge and skills and to learn how to apply health knowledge to personal as well as teaching and
learning situations. Reflection also enables the candidate to make refine teaching and learning processes. Reflection
requires one to evaluate learning processes and to make adaptations to improve the quality of teaching and learning that
occurs. Leading is an expectation for all teachers and candidates for future teaching positions. Teachers must become
leaders in their classroom, school and in the community. Teachers serve as leaders for curriculum development, program
planning, lesson plan development, policy development, in addition to many other leadership roles. All teachers and
candidates must commit to Learning and the need to address different learning styles and the effectiveness of various
teaching strategies with diverse and changing student populations in a multicultural environment. To accomplish all this,
candidates will be placed in either one or two school settings (middle school and/or high school) under the direction of one
or two Cooperating Teachers and at least two University Supervisors. All supervisors will monitor the student teacher's
progress throughout the semester and assist in providing guidance and an environment conducive to professional growth.

American Association of Health Education (AAHE/NCATE) Standards:


           Standard I: Candidates assess individual and community needs for health education.

                   Key Element A: Candidates obtain health-related data about social and cultural environments, growth
                   and development factors, needs, and interests of students.
                   Key Element B: Candidates distinguish between behaviors that foster and those that hinder well-being.
                   Key Element C: Candidates determine health education needs based on observed and obtained data.

           Standard II: Candidates plan effective health education programs.

                   Key Element A: Candidates recruit school and community representatives to support and assist in
                   program planning.
                   Key Element B: Candidates develop a logical scope and sequence plan for a health education program.
                   Key Element C: Candidates formulate appropriate and measurable learner objectives.
                   Key Element D: Candidates design educational strategies consistent with specified learner objectives.

           Standard III: Candidates implement health education programs.

                   Key Element A: Candidates analyze factors affecting the successful implementation of health education
                   and Coordinated School Health Programs (CSHPs).
                   Key Element B: Candidates select resources and media best suited to implement program plans for
                   diverse learners.
                Key Element C: Candidates exhibit competence in carrying out planned programs.
                Key Element D: Candidates monitor educational programs, adjusting objectives and instructional
                strategies as necessary

        Standard IV: Candidates evaluate the effectiveness of coordinated school health programs.

                Key Element A: Candidates develop plans to assess student achievement of program objectives.
                Key Element B: Candidates carry out evaluation plans.
                Key Element C: Candidates interpret results of program evaluation.
                Key Element D: Candidates infer implications of evaluation findings for future program planning.

        Standard V: Candidates coordinate provision of health education programs and services.

                Key Element A: Candidates develop a plan for coordinating health education with other components of a
                school health program.
                Key Element B: Candidates demonstrate the dispositions and skills to facilitate cooperation among health
                educators, other teachers, and appropriate school staff.
                Key Element C: Candidates formulate practical modes of collaboration among health educators in all
                settings and other school and community health professionals.
                Key Element D: Candidates organize professional development programs for teachers, other school
                personnel, community members, and other interested individuals.

        Standard VI: Candidates act as a resource person in health education.

                Key Element A: Candidates utilize computerized health information retrieval systems effectively.
                Key Element B: Candidates establish effective consultative relationships with those requesting assistance
                in solving health-related problems.
                Key Element C: Candidates interpret and respond to requests for health information.
                Key Element D: Candidates select effective educational resource materials for dissemination.

        Standard VII: Candidates communicate health and health education needs, concerns, and resources.

                Key Element A: Candidates interpret concepts, purposes, and theories of health education.
                Key Element B: Candidates predict the impact of societal value systems on health education programs.
                Key Element C: Candidates select a variety of communication methods and techniques in providing
                health information.
                Key Element D: Candidates foster communication between health care providers and consumers.


Education Professional Standards Board (EPSB) New Teacher Standards:

                I.       Designs and Plans Instruction
                II.      Creates and Maintains Learning Climates
                III.     Implements and Manages Instruction
                IV.      Assesses and Communicates Learning Results
                V.       Reflects and Evaluates Teaching and Learning
                VI.      Collaborates with Colleagues, Parents, and Others
                VII.     Engages in Professional Development
                VIII.    Knowledge of Content
                IX.      Demonstrates Implementation of Technology
COE Technology Standards:


               Standard 1: Candidates integrate media and technology into instruction.
               Standard 2: Candidates utilize multiple technology applications to support student learning.
               Standard 3: Candidates select appropriate technology to enhance instruction.
               Standard 4: Candidates integrate student use of technology into instruction.
               Standard 5: Candidates address special learning needs through technology.
               Standard 6: Candidates promote ethical and legal use of technology disciplines.
Course Description:

         This experience is required of students who expect to teach and who meet the requirements for a major in health
education. The course involves working in a school setting with school age youth in the middle and/ or high school in
health education. Student teachers earn either 6 or 12 semester hours of credit and grades are recorded on a pass/fail basis.

Course Objectives:

1.       Objective: The student will demonstrate the skills necessary to meet all nine of the EPSB New Teacher Standards
         and six of the American Association for Health Education (AAHE) standards.
         Educational Opportunity: The student teacher is responsible for observing, assisting, planning, implementing,
         and evaluating lessons. A minimum of one solo week is required. The University Supervisor and the Cooperating
         Teacher will evaluate all of the student teacher’s efforts.
         Assessment: The student teacher will be assessed by on-site evaluations from the University Supervisors and
         continuous assessment by the Cooperating Teacher.

2.       Objective: The student teacher will assemble a quality portfolio that provides evidence that he/she has met all
         nine EPSB New Teacher Standards.
         Educational Opportunity: Each student teacher will be advised by the University Supervisor to compile the
         appropriate materials for successful completion of the student teaching experience. This portfolio should also
         assist him/her in later job acquisition.
         Assessment: A rating of three or better (five point scale) on each area of the assessment evaluation form is
         required.

3.       Objective: The student teacher will demonstrate appropriate use of technology.
         Educational Opportunities: The student teacher is required to use word processing for all written work, as well as
         utilize spread sheets when recording student work. In addition, reflective journals must be e-mailed to the
         University Supervisor on a regular basis.
         Assessment: The college supervisor performs continuous assessment. Documentation is required in the student’s
         portfolio.

4.       Objective: The student teacher will participate in educational related activities that will improve his/her ability to
         obtain a job.
         Educational Opportunities: The student teacher must participate in biweekly KHP Student Teaching Seminars and
         the Career Center’s mock interview and resume writing workshops.
         Assessment: This objective will be evaluated by the University Supervisor’s assessment of the portfolio and
         reports from the Career Center.

Course Requirements:

         During the semester the student teacher will be required to observe, assist, teach, and evaluate classroom lessons
and activities. The student teacher will be expected to attend faculty meetings (see Student Teaching Handbook for a
complete list of student teaching duties) and perform some clerical duties. Lesson plans are required for all forms of
teaching whether a partial or full lesson. The student teacher should place a copy of the lesson plan and related material in
the portfolio, and provide copies for the cooperating teacher and university supervisor. Student teachers are expected to be
on time (required arrival time for teachers or earlier), prepared and ready to teach. Professional dress is required. Student
teachers are required to purchase the student teaching handbook as their course text. The price of the book is $22.00 and
may be purchased in the Taylor Education Building, Room 104. The Student Teaching Handbook is also available on-line.


        Additionally you are required to complete the Student Teachers’ Evaluation of Supervisors and Teacher Education
         Program that is in your Student Teacher Folder you receive today and the EPSB New Teacher Survey (EPSB
         NTS) which you will receive information about later. The dates for the completion of the Education Professional
         Standards Board (EPSB) survey is November 1 - December 15. Student teachers will receive notification from
         the EPSB when the survey is available on their web-site. You will receive a pass code to take the EPSB New
         Teacher survey online or via Interactive Voice Response. If you do not receive a postcard with your pass code by
         the end of November, contact Jaime Rice at (888) 598-7667 or Jaime.rice@ky.gov Please provide proof
         /verification that you have completed the EPSB NTS survey to either Dr. Beighle or Dr. Riggs by the end of the
         semester and NO LATER THAN DECEMBER 15, 2006.
Course Grade:

          Student teaching in health education is either 6 or 12 semester hours of credit and is graded on a pass/fail basis. In
order to receive a passing grade, student teachers must demonstrate their competency in teaching health education for a
sustained period of time without the assistance of the Cooperating Teacher. At each health education placement a
minimum of one solo week of teaching is required. (This is interpreted to mean that you will teach five health education
classes per day for five days (5 health education classes each day for 5 days for a total of 25 health education classes). If
you have a problem meeting the minimum instructional time you should contact your University Supervisor immediately so
that more instructional time can be scheduled with another teacher, if necessary.) However, the student teacher is
encouraged to teach as much as possible. When not actively teaching, the student teacher shall assist his/her Cooperating
Teacher. In addition, the student teacher must satisfactorily complete: daily/weekly journal entries, a portfolio, mock
interview at Career Center, attend KHP Student Teaching Seminars, complete the required video and critiques, and
participate in exit interview(s). If the student teacher fails to complete ANY one of these assignments or if assignments are
performed in an unsatisfactory manner, a grade of "I" or "E" will be recorded.

         All assignments must be completed in a satisfactory and professional manner. Your teaching performance and
written work will be evaluated by your middle school and/or high school Cooperating Teacher and your University
Supervisor(s). All materials will be turned in to your KHP Student Teaching Coordinator(s). After review and evaluation,
all appropriate forms will be filed in the Student Teaching Office, 104 Taylor Education Building and the portfolio will be
returned to the student.

Student Teaching Journal:

         The student teacher will be required to make daily entries in a journal. The contents of the journal should reflect
personal reactions and reflections toward this educational experience. The student teacher will be required to e-mail his/her
journal to his/her University Supervisors on a daily or weekly basis. You must work out a schedule for submitting your
journal submissions with your university supervisor. The following is an example of an effective journal entry:

Monday, _________, 20__

Today was every eventful. My first hour health education class went well. Students met their learning objectives for the
lesson. I began class with a review of yesterday's class asking questions of students. I then introduced today’s class and
gave an overview of the lesson. The students were interested in the reaction test that compared hand-eye coordination to
hand-ear coordination. Student involvement and answering questions also went well with this class. However I need to
allow a longer wait time for the students to answer my questions. I also need to incorporate higher level processing
questions into the lesson and this would also greatly benefit this class. Third hour class started off really well. I began
with a review of yesterday's lesson asking questions of my students to get them involved. I then gave an overview of today's
class. I demonstrated the reaction test first, and then I had the students work with a partner to perform the activity. For
some of the students, I chose their partner. This was to ensure their on-task behavior and to also address class diversity.
The class did really well with the activity and this surprised me. However, class behavior went down hill from the time I
asked them to complete the handout on the nervous system. Two students, both with IEP's, were having a difficult time
focusing on the task at hand since they were more interested in talking and making up rude stories than in completing their
work. I stood beside the student believing that my close proximity would be enough to eliminate the behavior. I even spoke
privately with the students asking them to stop their talking. When this did not work I simply had one of the student move
to a nearby seat. I also told them that if they did not act more maturely, the handout they were working on would be
graded as a test. I was not happy about threatening them but the comment seemed to have a claming effect on the class.
After we discussed the handout, I asked questions on the nervous system as a review of today's lesson. I then had the
students use the remaining class time to complete the writing prompt. To ensure that the students actually worked on the
prompt, I made it a requirement to have the paragraph in their notebook by the end of the class today. This specific class
needed an incentive such as this so they would begin their work and complete it in a timely manner. A couple of the
students read their paragraphs in class before the bell rang.

While the students were writing the prompt, Mr. _____ and I spoke privately with one student who has recently been
disrespectful and rude in class. Mr. _____ asked the student if he knew how he had shown disrespect towards me. The
student knew that he had made rude comments and admitted it. I told the student that I expected him to respect me because
I was respectful of him. Because Mr. ____ turned the responsibility of identifying the rude behavior over to the student, an
ugly confrontation was avoided. It worked out well with the student saying there would no longer be any more problems.

After our conversation, I could not believe the way my heart was pounding. I knew I had to confront the problem today
because I was beginning to lose my patience with the student. Hopefully the rest of the week will go more smoothly

Faculty e-mail addresses and office phone numbers:

Dr. Beal          rkbeal01@uky.edu        257-2706 OR 257-4267
Dr. Beighle       beighle@uky.edu 257-2655
Dr. Erwin         heather.erwin@uky.edu 257-5311
Ms. Guarnieri     gkg74@alltel.net        272-9318 OR 227-8654 (cell phone)
Dr. Hall          jwhall0@uky.edu 257-8935
Dr. Noland        melody.noland@uky.edu 257-4265 OR 257-5827
Dr. Parker        spark01@uky.edu         257-7904
Dr. Riggs         richard.riggs@uky.edu   257-3645
Dr. Taylor        lbtayl00@uky.edu        257-5163

Note: After each name (except Hall & Taylor), the last 2 numbers are zero and one. After Dr. Hall's second "L" is a zero
and after Dr. Taylor's "L" are two zeros.

Student Teaching Portfolio:

         The portfolio serves as an organizational format for work completed throughout the student teaching semester. It
should contain pertinent pieces of written work together with the assignments listed below. A three-ring binder with
pockets for additional storage is required. The first page should contain the table of contents. Page two should list the
long-term teaching schedule for health education. Minimally you should list the major content areas taught in addition to
the topics within that content area taught (e.g., week I - nutrition (nutrient categories, 5-food groups, food guide pyramid,
analyzing food labels for nutrient values); week 2 mental and emotional health; week 3 human sexuality). After that, the
organization of the portfolio should follow the EPSB New Teacher Standards. The portfolio should be professionally
prepared and be ready for use in your job search. Please be sure to include the items listed below and copies of the
midterm and final evaluation for each eight-week placement (if you have two health education placements). If your
placement does not provide sufficient information to complete your assignment, you should create that material and
include it in the portfolio. For example, many placements do not require the quantity of assessment examples that we
require. Please notify your University Supervisor when it becomes evident that you will have to create the information.
Provide sufficient information in your portfolio to demonstrate that you have mastered each one of the nine EPSB
standards.

Resume Writing & Interviewing Skills:

         Since this portfolio will be helpful in obtaining a teaching position, a professional resume is required. Student
teaching seminars and work at the Career Center will assist the student teacher in developing a high quality resume. The
student teacher must also participate in a videotaped interview at the Career Center.

Statement of Philosophy-

          In order to be an effective, reflective decision-maker, it is very important for the teacher to express ideas
concerning formal educational training and your role in the teaching/learning process. This statement of philosophy should
reflect your personal and professional beliefs related to health education.
Lesson Plans and Units:

         All lesson plans and units are to be typed on a word processor and shared with the Cooperating Teacher before
presenting the lesson. After the lesson is taught, the student teacher must complete the impact and refinement portion of
the lesson plan. You should include one copy of all lesson plans developed for lessons you have had a major responsibility
for teaching to the class. At the end of each lesson, a brief written reflection on possible ways to improve the plan must be
included. All lesson plans, supporting material (e. g., all PowerPoint Slides, transparencies, tests, and all other printed
materials to be used with students), and units should be included in the portfolio. Strategies you have used for
individualizing instruction should also be documented and should be included in your portfolio under Standard II. Samples
of student work should be included under Standard VIII.

Reports:

           Brief reports should be included in the portfolio for each of the following:

1.      Two or more formal visits to other classrooms (observations) for each placement.
2.      One or more faculty meetings (one should be a School-Based Decision Making Council meeting) for each
placement.
3.      Intramural and Extramural activities.

         Reports should include a brief summary of the specific topic and the student teacher's impressions of the event.
For instance, the student teacher may wish to share his/her observations or to discuss ways he/she would use the ideas
gathered in another situation. Reports may be in outline form with a brief description of the activities. This material
should be in your portfolio under Standard VI. Any and all material from Professional Development Activities should be
placed in your portfolio under Standard VII.

Student Behavior Management Plan:

          In each placement, describe the student behavior management plan. Briefly describe why the plan was selected,
the rules that were set up for implementation, and an evaluation of the plan's effectiveness.

Assessment Measures:

         Briefly describe measures to evaluate student performance, used by each Cooperating Teacher and the student
teacher. Include sample quizzes, tests, rubrics and other measures. Be sure to provide criteria for evaluation and critique
of the process (i.e. Was this a good measure of learning? Why or why not?)

Videotaping and Critique of Instruction:

          You are required to videotape one health education instructional segment during the student teaching semester.
The lesson you videotape must be different from the one that is observed by your University Supervisor. As with the
Kentucky Teacher Internship Program (KTIP), this videotaped lesson should be part of a three-lesson instructional
sequence. All three of your lesson plans should be clearly labeled as part of the instructional sequence. The videotaped
segment should include the introduction of the lesson, motivational activities, the student response to the lessons, a portion
(entire period not necessary) of the class working periods and closure of the lessons. You should also include an extensive
written reflection and evaluation of the videotape lesson in your portfolio. As with all lessons, the following points should
be emphasized for the evaluation:

           -How would you rate the lessons in relation to your objectives?
           -What did the students learn?
           -How did the class respond to the lessons?
           -How would you evaluate your teaching (strengths and area for growth)?
           -What would you change if you taught the lesson again to improve your teaching and/or student's learning?
           -Will future lessons build upon the concepts learned in this lesson?
           -How did you modify your lesson to address diverse populations?


USE THE ATTACHED PERMISSION FORM! This form is to be given to each student before videotaping. Only show in
your videotape those students for whom you have signed permission forms.

IMPORTANT DATES:

-Midterm Health Education Evaluation from Site Supervisor:                                 September 18, and November 10,
200 6*

*NOTE: The 4 and 8 Week Self Assessment form is used by the student teacher and Cooperating Teacher(s) for
discussion and evaluation. They are not turned in to the University Supervisor, but must be completed and saved by the
student teacher. The KHP Student Teacher Performance Assessment Form contains a four-week evaluation and an eight-
week evaluation. This is a crucial part of the final evaluation package and is to be turned in to Dr. Beighle or Beth Graham
(Seaton 118) at the end of each placement, October 13, 2006 and December 8, 2006.

-School Portfolios Submitted to University Supervisor*:        October 13, and December 8, 2006

-Exit Interview with University Supervisor:           October 16-20 and December 11-15, 2006

*Return all materials to your supervisor. Schedule an exit interview within three working days after each placement.

STUDENT TEACHING SEMINARS - ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY

All KHP seminars will meet on Wednesday and start at 4:30 PM in Rm. 103, Seaton Building, except as noted below.
Seminars will end on or before 6:00 PM. Attendance at seminars is crucial to your professional development. If you are
absent, you are expected to write a 10 page paper on the seminar topics. This paper must be included in your portfolio. If
you arrive late or leave a seminar early, you will be given an appropriate assignment by Dr. Beighle or Dr. Riggs. You will
receive a grade of "I" for your student teaching experience until all requirements are completed.



SEMINAR DATES              SEMINAR TOPICS

August 30, 2006            PRAXIS I Preparation; Systematic Observation; Issues, Problems and Teaching Concerns;
Beighle                    BRING HEALTH EDUCATION PORTFOLIO

September 6                Student Assessment including Open Response Questions; Discussion-Issues, Problems and
                           Teaching
Erwin                      Concerns

September 21               MEET AT 4:00 AT THE JAMES W. STUCKERT CAREER CENTER – 408 ROSE ST. - 2ND
FLOOR
(Thursday)                 (CONFERENCE ROOM). BRING YOUR RESUME & PERSONAL CALENDAR SO YOU
Hall                       SCHEDULE AN INTERVIEW

October 4                  Employment Applications; Critiquing Unit & Lesson Plans; Discussion - Issues, Problems and
Noland                     Teaching Concerns

October 18                 Reading in the Content Area
Parker

October 25                 Kentucky Code of Ethic; AAHE Code of Ethics for Health Educators; NASPE Code of Conduct
                           for Sport
Riggs                      and Physical Educators; KTIP preparation; Discussion--Issues, Problems and Teaching Concerns

November 3 (Friday)        Professional Seminal for All Student Teachers - - GRAND BALLROOM - Old Student Center
                           8:00 am to 12:30 pm

NOVEMBER 8-10              KAHPERD—Hyatt Regency LEXINGTON (Wednesday – Friday)

November 15                Discipline in the School--BRING HEALTH EDUCATION PORTFOLIO;
Taylor                     Documentation of Interview at the Career Center must be submitted

November 29                Pot Luck Dinner – Location TBA - - 6:00
December 6                 Portfolio Contents; Evaluation Forms for Cooperating Teachers &         Supervisors; Exit
Beighle & Riggs            Interviews; Discussion - Issues, Problems, and Teaching Concerns



Attendance Policy at Your School Placements:

Absences:

1.       Illness of the student or serious illness of a member of the student's immediate family. Your Cooperating Teacher
         and University Supervisor must be notified immediately of illness. Your Cooperating Teacher and/or University
         Supervisor shall have the right to request appropriate verification.

2.       The death of a member of the student's immediate family. Your Cooperating Teacher and University Supervisor
         must be notified immediately of a death in your family. Your Cooperating Teacher and/or University Supervisor
         shall have the right to request appropriate verification.

3.       Students are responsible for notifying the Cooperating Teacher and University Supervisor in writing of an
         anticipated absence due to observance of major religious holidays by Friday of the first week of student teaching.

4.       All absences (i.e., illness, personal emergencies) should be reported to the University Supervisor (as well as
         Cooperating Teacher) on the day of the absence. The University Supervisor in discussion with the Cooperating
         Teacher will determine how absences are to be made up. At a minimum all absences beyond two shall be made
         up during the UK final examination week. However, THE STUDENT TEACHER SHOULD NOT MISS ANY
         STUDENT TEACHING DAYS UNLESS ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY.




Evaluation Criteria:

The following must be completed before a passing grade can be recorded:

         1.       Portfolio, Resume, Journal, and Mock Interview at Career Center
         2.       Lesson Plans, Units, and Videotape & Critique (see p. 58 in the Student Teaching Handbook)
         3.       University Supervisor Observations
         4.       Cooperating Teacher Evaluations
         5.       University Supervisor Evaluations
         6.       Seminar Attendance and Participation
         7.       Student Teaching Handbook

Other Information:

"Policies related to excused absences, cheating/plagiarism, withdrawal, incomplete grades, final exams and common exams
can be found in your copy of Student Rights and Responsibilities. As students and faculty in the University of Kentucky,
we are all responsible for adhering to these policies."

         The following information concerning plagiarism is outlined in the Student Rights and Responsibilities:

         All academic work, written or otherwise, submitted by students to their instructors or other academic supervisors,
is expected to be the result of their own thought, research, or self-expression. In cases where students feel unsure about a
question of plagiarism involving their work, they are obligated to consult their instructors on the matter before submission.

        When students submit work purporting to be their own, but which borrows ideas, organization, wording or
anything else from another source without appropriate acknowledgment of the fact, the students are guilty of plagiarism.
         Plagiarism includes reproducing someone else's work, whether it be published article, chapter of a book, paper
from a friend or some file or whatever. Plagiarism also includes the practice of employing or allowing another person to
alter or revise work that a student submits as his/her own, whoever that other person may be. Students may discuss
assignments among themselves or with an instructor or tutor, but when the actual work is done, it must be done by the
student and the student alone. When a student's assignment involves research in outside sources or information, the student
must carefully acknowledge exactly what, where and how he/she has employed them. If the words of someone else are
used, the student must put quotation marks around the passage in question and add in the appropriate indication of its
origin. Making simple changes while leaving the organization, content and phraseology intact is plagiaristic. However,
nothing in these Rules shall apply to those ideas that are generally and freely circulated as to be part of the public domain

ETHICAL CONDUCT:

All students are expected to conduct themselves in an ethical manner during their UK classes and related field placements,
as befitting undergraduate students and future teachers. Any unethical behavior in class or during your field placements
may result in failure in your courses and/or expulsion from the KHP Teacher Education Program/UK Teacher Education
Program, determined on a case-by-case basis. Faculty will follow all university due process procedures in cases of
academic or ethical conduct. Please consult your academic advisor, UK KHP Student Teacher Coordinator (Dr. Aaron
Beighle) or Department Chairperson, (Dr. Melody Noland), if you have questions regarding this requirement.




STUDENT TEACHER PLACEMENTS, COOPERATING TEACHERS AND UK SUPERVISORS

                 Student                                  1st Block                                   2nd Block
Abby Jackson                                            Kathy Yeary                   Stephanie Adams/Allison Denton
(270) 668-1921                               Garden Springs Elementary                          Lafayette High School
abbyjackson127@hotmail.com                               (Beighle)                               (Parker, Guarnieri)

Amy Kaplan                                               Debbie Rose                                 Terri Least
(847) 209-0388                                        Squires Elementary                      Tates Creek High School
AKKAPL2@uky.edu                                            (Taylor)                               (Hall, Guarnieri)

Bradley Sowder                                            Lisa Carr                               Sam Simpson
(505) 321-2299                                      Lansdowne Elementary                      Henry Clay High School
bradleysowder800@hotmail.com                              (Beighle)                             (Parker, Guarnieri)

Valerie McCoy                                            Jamie Herndon                           Mona Chapman
(740) 534-3169                                           Christ the King                        Dunbar High School
(859-323-3124                                               (Taylor)                             (Hall, Guarnieri)
valeriemccoy@excite.com

Jason Earlywine                                        Sam Simpson                                   Billy Noble
(859) 537-9155                                     Henry Clay High School                      Tates Creek Elementary
(859) 987-0974                                       (Parker, Guarnieri)                              (Beighle)
Earlybird40@aol.com




         Health Education Initial Preparation Program:          Standards Alignment

                                                                                                                          45
      KHP 371               Course Title: Student Teaching in Health Promotion                  8/23/2006
AAHE, EPSB & COE Technology Standards; COE Skills & Dispositions; EPSB Themes; &                            Addressed in
KERA Initiatives                                                                                            Course

American Association for Health Education (AAHE) Standards for Entry Level Health Educators
 Standard 1: Candidates Assess Individual and Community Needs of Health Education                             X
 Standard 2: Candidates Plan Effective Health Education Programs                                              X
 Standard 3: Candidates Implement Health Education Programs                                                   X
 Standard 4: Candidates Evaluate Effectiveness of Coordinated School Health Programs                          X
 Standard 5: Candidates Coordinate Provision of Health Education Programs and Services                        X
 Standard 6: Candidates Act as a Resource Person in Health Education                                          X
 Standard 7: Candidates Communicate Health and Health Education Needs, Concerns, and Resources                X

Education Professional Standards Board (EPSB) New Teacher Standards
 Standard 1: Designs and Plans Instruction                                                                    X
 Standard 2: Creates and Maintains Learning Climates                                                          X
 Standard 3: Implements and Manages Instruction                                                               X
 Standard 4: Assesses and Communicates Learning Results                                                       X
 Standard 5: Reflects and Evaluates Teaching and Learning                                                     X
 Standard 6: Collaborates with Colleagues, Parents, and Others                                                X
 Standard 7: Engages in Professional Development                                                              X
 Standard 8: Knowledge of Content                                                                             X
 Standard 9: Demonstrates Implementation of Technology                                                        X

UK Educator Preparation Unit Technology Standards
 Standard 1: Candidates integrate media and technology into instruction                                        X
 Standard 2: Candidates utilize multiple technology applications to support student learning.                  X
 Standard 3: Candidates select appropriate technology to enhance instruction.                                  X
 Standard 4: Candidates integrate student use of technology into instruction.                                  X
 Standard 5: Candidates address special learning needs through technology.                                     X
 Standard 6: Candidates promote ethical and legal use of technology disciplines.                               X

Functional Skills and Disposition (FSD) of UK Educator Preparation Unit
 FSD 1: Candidates communicate appropriately and effectively.                                                  X
 FSD 2: Candidates demonstrate constructive attitudes                                                          X
 FSD 3: Candidates demonstrate ability to conceptualize key subject matter ideas and relationships             X
 FSD 4: Candidates interact appropriately and effectively with diverse groups of colleagues,                   X
 administrators,
 students, and parents in educational settings.
 FSD 5: Candidates demonstrate a commitment to professional ethics and behavior.                               X


Additional Functional Skills and Dispositions for Health Educators
 FSD 1: Candidates demonstrate health literacy.                                                                X
 FSD 2: Candidates demonstrate conceptual knowledge and skills.                                                X

Educational Professional Standards Board (EPSB) Themes
Diversity                                                                                                      X
Assessment                                                                                                     X
Literacy Education                                                                                             X
Closing the Achievement Gap                                                                                    X
Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA) Initiatives
 KERA Goals and Academic Expectations                                                                         X
                                                                                                                      46
Program of Studies            X
Core Content for Assessment   X




                                  47
Fall, 2006

                                                HEALTH EDUCATION
                                             UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

                                                          KHP 430

                                          METHODS OF TEACHING HEALTH


INSTRUCTORS: Melody Noland, Ph.D., CHES

OFFICES:                   202/100 Seaton Building

PHONE:                     257-5826

E-MAIL:                    melody.noland@uky.edu

OFFICE HOURS:              MW 9:00-11:00 a.m. and MW 2:00-4:00 p.m.

REQUIRED TEXTBOOK:            Meeks and Heit (2007).COMPREHENSIVE SCHOOL HEALTH
               EDUCATION: TOTALLY AWESOME STRATEGIES FOR TEACHING               HEALTH. McGraw
Hill. 5th Edition.

Research and Reflection for Learning and Leading. This is the theme of the conceptual framework for the College of
Education and reflects how our College and this course approach the preparation of professional educators.
Research is the foundation for the teaching methods you will be learning in this class. It is important to choose curricula
and teaching methods that are research-based and are proven to be effective. Reflection is heavily emphasized in this
course. You will be expected to provide a reflective assessment of performance, outcomes and approaches to problems.
Learning is part of the conceptual framework because we are committed to our own learning and the learning of others.
We will explore ways to conceptualize, promote, and accomplish learning. Leading is an expectation for faculty and
students so that we can promote learning among diverse student populations. In this class you will develop your teaching
and presentation skills, which will in turn help you to become a more effective leader. You will learn teaching methods that
will promote leadership skills among your students.

PURPOSE:           To acquaint potential health educators with an array of contemporary health education teaching methods.
The course will allow for students to exercise their creativity in developing original teaching methods, and to peer/student
teach and to reflect on their own teaching and others teaching. Upon completion of the course, the student will have a
collection of a wide variety of teaching techniques and possess the knowledge of how to implement them in health
instruction. The course will also provide an overview of the Kentucky Education Reform Act of 1990 with a specific focus
on performance-based instruction.

OBJECTIVES: The student will be able to:
   1.  Describe various philosophies of teaching health.
   2.  Create variety types of original lesson plans.
   3.  Describe the key features of the Kentucky Education Reform Act
   4.  Write lesson plans that reflect the Kentucky Goals and Academic Expectations, Program of Studies and Core
       Content for Assessment
   5.  Construct Performance Assessment Tasks and Open-Ended questions
   6.  Adapt lesson plans for low literacy, mainstreamed, and ESL and other special needs students.
   7.  Examine CATS scores by subgroups and design lessons plans that include lower-achieving sub-groups.

   This course will address the following New Teacher Standards published by the Kentucky Education Professional
Standards Board (EPSB):
Standard I: Designs/Plans Instruction

                                                                                                                          48
Standard II: Creates/Maintains Learning Climates
Standard III: Implements/Manages Instruction
Standard IV: Assesses and Communicates Learning Results
Standard V: Reflects/Evaluates Teaching/Learning
Standard VI: Collaborates with Colleagues/Parents/Others
Standard VII: Engages in Professional Development
Standard VIII: Knowledge of Content
Standard IX: Demonstrates Implementation of Technology

This course also addresses our professional association standards (AAHE – American Association for Health
Education). The following standards are emphasized:
I: Assess Individual and Community Needs of Health Education
II: Plan Effective Health Education Programs
III: Implement Health Education Programs
IV: Evaluate Effectiveness of Coordinated School Health                Programs
VI: Act as a Resource Person in Health Education
VII: Communicate Health and Health Education Needs, Concerns, and Resources

Standards for Technology, Skills and Dispositions of UK Educator Preparation Unit, EPSB Themes are also
addressed (see attached matrix).

COURSE TOPICS:

         Philosophy of Teaching Health
         Health Instruction Methods
         Kentucky Education Reform Act
         Kentucky Goals and Academic Expectations
         Kentucky Program of Studies and Core Content for Assessment
         Adapting Lessons for Sub-groups, Cultures and Special Needs
         Writing Performance Tasks
         Writing Open-Ended Questions

REQUIREMENTS:

I.       Attendance to class                                                               (10 points)
II.      Notebook of Methods                                                               ( 5 points)
         (Notebook should include all notes, handouts, and materials
          listed in Sections A - I organized in an orderly fashion)

Included in your notebook will be the following sections:

SECTION A: 5 Original Teaching Methods                                            (30 points)

         The student must develop an original method (total of 5) that represents each one of the following types of
methods: (1) health hazard appraisal, (2) simulation game, (3) decision making, (4) inoculation/refusal skills, and (5)
experiential OR health activation method.

This assignment addresses New Teacher Standard I, II, III, IV, V, VIII, and IX.


* NOTE: Each original method must come from a different topical area.
____________________________________________________________________________

Personal Health
Substance Use and Abuse

                                                                                                                          49
Sexuality and Family Life
Nutrition
Environmental Health
Mental/ Emotional Health
Disease
Unintentional Injury
Consumer Health
Growth Development
____________________________________________________________________________

- Simulation Games (1)            -Inoculation/Refusal Skills (1)
- Health Hazard Appraisal (1)       -Experiential OR Health Activation (1)
- Decision Making (1)

____________________________________________________________________________

SECTION B: 4 Adapted Methods                                                               (12 points)

           In order to ensure that students read the text and are able to adapt methods for their own purposes, 4 adapted
methods are required. Methods in the textbook should be adapted or modified in some way. (These methods must be
substantially modified. If not, the method will receive no credit). These methods will not be evaluated according to type,
but it is expected that they cover the various topical areas listed above.

This assignment addresses New Teacher Standards I, II, III, IV, V, VIII, and IX


SECTION C: 2 Methods Presented in Class                                           (12 points)

          These 2 methods (1 content lesson and 1 from an outside source) should not duplicate any of the methods you
have written, adapted, or seen in KHP 430. Each of these methods should be a different type and from different topical
areas. You will present these lessons in class on a scheduled date. These methods will be evaluated by your peers and by
your instructor using the Teacher Performance Rating Scale. You must complete a lesson plan and give it to your
instructor prior to teaching the lesson. Additionally the method from an outside source may be obtained from a book,
journal, a practicing teacher or hearsay (basically, any source). The purpose of this assignment is for you to find an
excellent, fun, creative method from any source and present it in class. This should be the BEST method you can

find. The lesson on content must present factual material in a traditional, but interesting way. More details will be given
on this in class.

This assignment addresses New Teacher Standard I, II, III, IV, V, VIII, and IX.

SECTION D: Methods Presented in the Public Schools                       (12 points)

         Each student is required to teach two lessons to school children in Fayette County. One lesson will be a group
project developed around a theme. More details on these methods will be provided at a later date.
The other lesson will be scheduled by the student with an individual teacher and evaluated by that teacher.

This assignment addresses New Teacher Standard I, II, III, IV, V, VIII, and IX.


SECTION E: OBSERVATION REPORTS                                                                      ( 6 points)

         Students are required to observe two health lessons in the public schools and complete a form evaluating the
observation.


                                                                                                                              50
SECTION F: CLASS NOTES AND HANDOUTS                                                           ( 1 point)

Notes should be neat and in a well-organized fashion so that they will be usable. This section should also contain all
handouts and class notes. Points for class notes and handouts will be awarded under "Notebook" section.


SECTION G: METHODS (5 FOR EACH ONE OF THE 10 TOPICS)                                          ( 2 points)

         The student is required to collect 50 methods from sources other than him/herself and put in the notebook
according to topical areas. The curriculum planning map, performance assessment and open-ended questions should be
included as methods.

SECTION H: CD OF METHODS PROVIDED BY CLASS                                    ( 2 points)

   The student is required to furnish a blank CD to the instructor and to participate in the process of getting his/her "best
methods" burned onto the CD. The instructor will coordinate this activity among the students and each student will receive
a CD that contains all students' best methods.

III.    RETENTION PORTFOLIO                                                                        ( 8 points)
   As part of the initial teacher certification process, a retention portfolio is required. This portfolio must be
completed in a satisfactory manner as one of the requirements for the student to be retained in the teacher
education program




         The following is a list of items that you must include in your portfolio:

1.         Cover page
2.         A revised Health Education philosophy (TEP portfolio and KHP 330)
3.         Your definition of health (TEP portfolio and KHP 330)
4.         A unit plan in health education (KHP 330)
5.         A summary of all observation experiences and teaching experiences
    in health education
6.         A performance assessment task or original open-ended questions
7.         Samples of (2) best lesson plans (KHP 430)
8.         Evidence of ability to locate health-related information on the World
     Wide Web by including assignment from KHP 509 that used information
     from the World Wide Web to develop a handout and overlay. Put handout
     and overlay in portfolio and web addresses used. (KHP 509)
9.         Evidence of ability to advocate for health education by writing a
     letter to a site-based council, local newspaper, etc. to advocate for   a position related to health in the schools or
product produced from
     advocacy assignment (brochure, radio PSA, etc) (KHP 509)
10.        An outline of the professional development activities you will
           engage in over the next five years.

This assignment addresses New Teacher Standard V. VI, VII, and IX.




                                                                                                                              51
Your final grade in the class will be based upon the following point totals:
        90 - 100 points = A
        80 - 89 points = B
        70 - 79 points = C
        60 - 69 points = D
        Below 60 points = E

Evaluation of Methods:

       Written lesson plans for methods presented in class will be graded on a 6-point scale with 6 being excellent.
Methods presented in schools and the original methods will also be evaluated on a 6-point scale.

REWRITES

         The Decision-Making, Experiential or Health Activation and Simulation methods (original methods) may be
rewritten once and handed in again in order to improve the grade. However, an improved grade is not guaranteed. Other
methods may not be rewritten. Whenever a lesson plan is rewritten, please submit both the original lesson plan and the
rewrite. On any lesson plans that are rewritten, write REWRITE in the top left-hand corner of your paper.

LESSON PLAN FORMAT
   This will be provided on a separate handout. Lesson plans will be turned in one class day after the lesson is taught so
students will have an opportunity to complete the Reflection and Refinement portions of the lesson plan.



** Please label methods in the upper right-hand corner in the following
         manner:

         -ORIGINAL METHOD                                 -ADAPTED METHOD
         -TYPE OF METHOD                      OR              -TOPICAL AREA
         -TOPICAL AREA                                        -PAGE # IN TEXT FROM WHICH
                                                               METHOD WAS ADAPTED

ATTENDANCE POLICY:

         Students are required to attend class. Excused absences for illness or other reasons may be considered by the
instructor. Proof of illness from a physician may be required to have an absence excused.

         One point will be deducted from the final average for every unexcused absence over two (up to a maximum of 10
points). IN ADDITION, IF YOU ARE ABSENT (UNEXCUSED) WHEN YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO TEACH A
PEER LESSON IN CLASS OR ARE ABSENT WHEN YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO TEACH IN THE SCHOOLS, YOU
WILL NOT BE ABLE TO RESCHEDULE A TIME TO TEACH THESE LESSONS. THEREFORE YOU WILL
RECEIVE 0 POINTS FOR THIS PART OF YOUR GRADE.




                                                                                                                             52
LATE PAPERS:

         The instructor has the prerogative of either accepting or not accepting late papers. Late papers that are accepted
will be penalized by a grade reduction. LATE NOTEBOOKS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.

CAUTION:

         All methods except the method from an Outside Source (discussed in Section C) and the 50 methods (Section G)
must be your own work. Copying adapted or original methods from former or present students or from books or other
sources and presenting the work as your own is considered plagiarism and is not allowed. If you copy methods you will
be subject to failure of the course, removal from the Teacher Education Program, and dismissal from the
University.

CLASSROOM RULES:
No tobacco use of any kind (including dip or chew).
Please turn off cell phones. Cell phones that ring in class will be taken by the instructor until
  class is over.
During class, do not read the Kernal or reading material not related to the class. Do not do work
  for other classes in my class.
Please do not sleep in class.
If you wear a hat, please be sure I can see your face. If I can't see your face, I reserve the right to
  ask you to remove your hat.
Please do not wear t-shirts with alcohol, drug or sex slogans. You can’t wear them in public school
  so you need to start role-modeling.
When you teach in class, please dress professionally. Points will be deducted from your grade if
  you do not dress professionally.

Thank you for complying with these classroom rules.




                                                                                                                              53
NCATE Checklist for Syllabi --- KHP 430

AAHE, EPSB & COE Technology Standards; COE Skills & Dispositions, EPSB Themes, & KERA                           Addressed
Initiatives                                                                                                     in Course

Skills and Dispositions of UK Educator Preparation Unit
 Functional Skill and Disposition 1: Candidates communicate appropriately and effectively.                         X
 Functional Skill and Disposition 2: Candidates demonstrate constructive attitudes                                 X
 Functional Skill and Disposition 3: Candidates demonstrate ability to conceptualize key subject matter
 ideas and relationships                                                                                           X
 Functional Skill and Disposition 4: Candidates interact appropriately and effectively with diverse groups of
 colleagues, administrators, students, and parents in educational settings.                                        X
 Functional Skill and Disposition 5: Candidates demonstrate a commitment to professional ethics and
 behavior.                                                                                                         X

Additional Sills and Dispositions for Health Educators
 Functional Skill and Disposition 1: Candidates demonstrate health literacy.                                       X
 Functional Skill and Disposition 2: Candidates demonstrate conceptual knowledge and skills*.                      X

American Association for Health Education (AAHE) Standards for Entry Level Health Educators
 Candidates Assess Individual and Community Needs of Health Education                                               X
 Candidates Plan Effective Health Education Programs                                                                X
 Candidates Implement Health Education Programs                                                                     X
 Candidates Evaluate Effectiveness of Coordinated School Health Programs                                            X
 Candidates Coordinate Provision of Health Education Programs and Services
 Candidates Act as a Resource Person in Health Education                                                            X
 Candidates Communicate Health and Health Education Needs, Concerns, and Resources                                  X

Education Professional Standards Board New Teacher Standards
 Designs and Plans Instruction                                                                                      X
 Creates and Maintains Learning Climates                                                                            X
 Implements and Manages Instruction                                                                                 X
 Assesses and Communicates Learning Results                                                                         X
 Reflects and Evaluates Teaching and Learning                                                                       X
 Collaborates with Colleagues, Parents, and Others                                                                  X
 Engages in Professional Development                                                                                X
 Knowledge of Content                                                                                               X
 Demonstrates Implementation of Technology                                                                          X

UK Educator Preparation Unit Technology Standards
 Standard 1: Candidates integrate media and technology into instruction                                             X
 Standard 2: Candidates utilize multiple technology applications to support student learning.                       X
 Standard 3: Candidates select appropriate technology to enhance instruction.                                       X
 Standard 4: Candidates integrate student use of technology into instruction.                                       X
 Standard 5: Candidates address special learning needs through technology.                                          X
 Standard 6: Candidates promote ethical and legal use of technology disciplines.                                    X




                                                                                                                        54
EPSB Themes
Diversity                               X
Assessment                              X
Literacy Education                      X
Closing the Achievement Gap             X

KERA Initiatives
 KERA Goals and Academic Expectations   X
 Program of Studies                     X
 Core Content for Assessment            X




                                            55
                     FALL, 2006



                                                HEALTH EDUCATION
                                              UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
                                                      KHP 509

                                        EXPERIENTIAL HEALTH EDUCATION

INSTRUCTOR:        Melody Noland, Ph.D., C.H.E.S.

OFFICE:           100/202 Seaton Building

PHONE:            257-5826

E-Mail:           melody.noland@uky.edu

OFFICE HOURS: MW 9:00 am-11:30 am and MW 2:00-4:00pm

PURPOSE: The purpose of this course is to address skills that potential health educators will need to teach K-12.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is designed to address the need in our health education program to enhance the
skills of students who will be health education teachers. The emphasis will be on identifying the characteristics of effective
teaching and developing skills among students so that they will be effective teachers; developing basic computer skills; and
becoming aware of how Kentucky school systems operate.

Research and Reflection for Learning and Leading. This is the theme of the conceptual framework for the College of
Education and reflects how our College and this course approach the preparation of professional educators. Research is the
foundation for the topics we will cover in this class. Specifically, we will discuss the research behind effective teaching and
discipline methods, as well as the research base for Postponing Sexual Involvement (PSI). Reflection is emphasized when
you present lessons and write lesson plans for PSI. You will be expected to provide a reflective assessment of performance,
outcomes and approaches to problems. Learning is part of the conceptual framework because we are committed to our
own learning and the learning of others. We will explore ways to conceptualize, promote, and accomplish learning.
Leading is an expectation for faculty and students so that we can promote learning among diverse student populations. In
this class you will develop your teaching and presentation skills as well as advocacy skills, which will in turn help you to
become a more effective leader.

NEW TEACHER STANDARDS: This course is designed to address the following new teacher standards as published
by the Kentucky Department of Education:
I. Designs/Plans Instruction
II. Creates/Maintains Learning Climates
III. Implements/Manages Instruction
IV. Assesses and Communicates Learning Results
V. Reflects/Evaluates Teaching/Learning
VI. Collaborates with Colleagues/Parents/Others
VII. Engages in Professional Development
VIII.Knowledge of Content
IX. Demonstrates Implementation of Technology

This course also addresses our professional association standards (AAHE – American Association for Health Education).
The following standards are emphasized:
Responsibility I: Assess Individual and Community Needs for Health Education
Responsibility II: Plan Effective Health Education Programs
                                                                                                                            56
Responsibility III: Implement Health Education Programs
Responsibility IV: Evaluating Effectiveness of Coordinated School Health Programs
Responsibility VI: Act as a Resource Person in Health Education
Responsibility VII: Communicate Health and Health Education Needs, Concerns and Resources

Standards for Technology, Skills and Dispositions of UK Educator Preparation Unit, EPSB Themes are also
addressed (see attached matrix).

REQUIRED TEXTBOOK: No required textbook; readings will be assigned.

OBJECTIVES:
Students will:

1. Increase knowledge about effective teaching.

2.    Become acquainted with types of school governance such as site-based councils and boards of
     education.

3.    Learn effective methods for disciplining students.

4. Learn methods of advocating for health education.

5. Write lesson plans revolving around lessons for the Postponing Sexual Involvement curriculum.

6. Teach Postponing Involvement to middle school students.

7. Observe and reflect on instruction in elementary, middle and/or high schools.

5. Learn methods of searching for and evaluating information and resource materials on the internet.

8. Learn methods for evaluating health education software.

9. Be able to compute grades using computer software.

10. Be able to utilize several different types of technology.

COURSE TOPICS:
 Kentucky Education Reform Act
 Effective Teaching
 School Governance
 Discipline
 Advocating for Health Education
 Expectations for student teaching
 Searching for information via the internet
 Evaluating health education software
 Using the computer for grading

UNDERGRADUATE REQUIREMENTS:

1. Attendance to class and participation in class discussions. 10%
   Part of this grade may be earned by reading and responding to e-mail.

2.    Conducting or supervising assigned classroom sessions of PSI in the public schools. The following reports will be
      turned in as part of this assignment: lesson plans, self-evaluation, and teacher verification. 20%
                                                                                                                          57
3.   Logs of observations of health education teaching (5 classes at least 45 min. long). 10%

4. Logs of observation of a site-based council meeting and a school board meeting. 10%

5. At least 4 pages of textual information on an approved topic from at least four different sources
   obtained from the internet, development of a handout using the information that could be used in
   middle school or high school and development of a transparency. The handout and transparency will
   be presented in class. Competent use of the smart classroom technology must be demonstrated.15%

6. Advocacy assignment (more details given at a later date). 15%

7.   Quizzes 5%

8. Final Exam. 15%


GRADUATE REQUIREMENTS (ONLY AVAILABLE FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS)




                                                                                                       58
In place of evaluation of health education software programs and logs of site-based council and school board meeting,
graduate students will write a research paper on effectiveness of health education curricula. More details will be provided
by the instructor. This will be worth 15% of the final grade.

ATTENDANCE POLICY:
Students are expected to attend class. This is especially important in this class because of the experiential nature of the
course. Six points will be deducted from the Attendance/participation portion of the grade for every unexcused absence.

TYPING OF ASSIGNMENTS:
All assignments must be typed. If not typed, they will be counted as late assignments.

LATE WORK:
Assignments turned in after the due date will be penalized 10% per day late.

OBSERVATION AND TEACHING IN SCHOOLS:
The instructor will provide the names of teachers who are willing to have students observe. It is the student’s responsibility
to schedule visits with teachers. If you know a teacher who might let you observe, please provide that name to me. It is
difficult to get enough placements for students, so if you know someone, that will help.

Please remember you are a representative of the University of Kentucky, the Department of Kinesiology and Health
Promotion and the teaching profession. Dress professionally and arrive before the scheduled observation or teaching
experience. Go to the main office to sign in. Professional dress includes neat slacks for the men and a skirt, dress, or
slacks for the women. No blue jeans, workout clothes, warm-up suits (remember this is NOT P.E.), or hats of any kind.
Also, do not wear revealing clothes or shirts with alcohol/drug or other similar logos.

Documentation of visits/teaching: When you arrive at the school, sign in as a visitor at the main office.
If you are observing a teacher, you will have to fill out an observation form. Also, have the teacher sign a form that will be
provided by your instructor. You must have a signature from the teacher documenting your visit. Some visits will be
randomly verified to determine if the student was actually there. If it is determined that a student has falsely reported a
visit, this will be considered a serious offense representing unprofessional conduct and could prevent entry into, or removal
from, the Teacher Education Program.

PSI PLACEMENTS
PSI is presented in the public schools by the Fayette County and Woodford County Health Departments. The supervisor
assigns the placements for PSI. It could happen that there are not enough placements for everyone in KHP 509 to teach
PSI. If that happens, the instructor reserves the right to place KHP 509 students at other schools for their teaching
experiences. These experiences will require approximately the same amount of time as PSI placement.

CLASSROOM RULES:
No tobacco use of any kind (including dip or chew).
Please turn off cell phones. Cell phones that ring in class will be taken by the instructor until the class is over.
During class, do not read the Kernal or reading material not related to the class. Do not do work for other classes in my
class.
Please do not sleep in my class.
If you wear a hat, please be sure I can see your face. If I can’t see your face, I reserve the right to ask you to remove your
hat.
Do not wear shirts with alcohol, drugs or sex logos.
Please be on time. If you are chronically late, points will be deducted from your participation grade.

Thank you for complying with these classroom rules.


Health Education Initial Preparation Program:          Standards Alignment
                                                                                                                              59
KHP 509                   Course Title: Experiential Education

AAHE, EPSB & COE Technology Standards; COE Skills & Dispositions; EPSB Themes; &                     Addressed
KERA Initiatives                                                                                     in Course

American Association for Health Education (AAHE) Standards for Entry Level Health Educators
 Standard 1: Candidates Assess Individual and Community Needs of Health Education                       X
 Standard 2: Candidates Plan Effective Health Education Programs                                        X
 Standard 3: Candidates Implement Health Education Programs                                             X
 Standard 4: Candidates Evaluate Effectiveness of Coordinated School Health Programs                    X
 Standard 5: Candidates Coordinate Provision of Health Education Programs and Services
 Standard 6: Candidates Act as a Resource Person in Health Education                                    X
 Standard 7: Candidates Communicate Health and Health Education Needs, Concerns, and Resources          X

Education Professional Standards Board (EPSB) New Teacher Standards
 Standard 1: Standard Designs and Plans Instruction                                                     X
 Standard 2: Creates and Maintains Learning Climates                                                    X
 Standard 3: Implements and Manages Instruction                                                         X
 Standard 4: Assesses and Communicates Learning Results                                                 X
 Standard 5: Reflects and Evaluates Teaching and Learning                                               X
 Standard 6: Collaborates with Colleagues, Parents, and Others                                          X
 Standard 7: Engages in Professional Development                                                        X
 Standard 8: Knowledge of Content                                                                       X
 Standard 9: Demonstrates Implementation of Technology                                                  X

UK Educator Preparation Unit Technology Standards
 Standard 1: Candidates integrate media and technology into instruction                                 X
 Standard 2: Candidates utilize multiple technology applications to support student learning.           X
 Standard 3: Candidates select appropriate technology to enhance instruction.                           X
 Standard 4: Candidates integrate student use of technology into instruction.
 Standard 5: Candidates address special learning needs through technology.
 Standard 6: Candidates promote ethical and legal use of technology disciplines.                        X

Functional Skills and Disposition (FSD) of UK Educator Preparation Unit
 FSD 1: Candidates communicate appropriately and effectively.                                           X
 FSD 2: Candidates demonstrate constructive attitudes                                                   X
 FSD 3: Candidates demonstrate ability to conceptualize key subject matter ideas and relationships      X
 FSD 4: Candidates interact appropriately and effectively with diverse groups of colleagues,            X
 administrators,
 students, and parents in educational settings.
 FSD 5: Candidates demonstrate a commitment to professional ethics and behavior.                        X


Additional Functional Skills and Dispositions for Health Educators
 FSD 1: Candidates demonstrate health literacy.                                                         X
 FSD 2: Candidates demonstrate conceptual knowledge and skills.                                         X




                                                                                                                 60
Educational Professional Standards Board (EPSB) Themes
Diversity                                                X
Assessment                                               X
Literacy Education
Closing the Achievement Gap                              X

Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA) Initiatives
 KERA Goals and Academic Expectations                    X
 Program of Studies
 Core Content for Assessment                             X




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