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Computer Information Systems Technology

VIEWS: 16 PAGES: 14

									                           Computer Information Systems Technology
                                      Associate in Science Degree
                  (For students entering their technology October 2001 to June 2002.)
                                          General Information

In the associate degree program, the emphasis is on how to use computers to meet business needs. The
analysis and design of systems is covered to expose the student to problems that may be expected on the
job. The student learns to program in languages in demand for the workplace. Further, the student is
introduced to the current software packages for spreadsheets, work processing, database management, and
the Internet. The student is allow prepared to meet the technical needs of a business office through
Microsoft, Cisco and Novell network courses which introduce the student to LAN administration.

Towards the end of the fourth quarter of the associate degree program, the student selects a specialization
in either the programming or the networking track. The programming track provides and introduction to
languages such as VisualBasic and C++ and database design. Upon completion of this track, student are
qualified to apply for positions in software support, programming, or a wide range of other entry-level
positions or to continue in the programming concentration of the CIS bachelor degree. The networking
track provides more focus in data communications, the Windows and NetWare operating systems and
Cisco courses. When this track is complete, students are eligible to take the certification exams to become
Microsoft Certified Professionals (MCP) and Certified Novell Administrators (CAN). Graduates may apply
for positions such as network technician, operator, LAN administrator, or a variety of other entry-level
positions or to continue tin the networking concentration of the CIS bachelor degree.




(Rev. 05/30/03 TRT)




                                                     1
                      Computer Information Systems Technology
                                   Associate in Science Degree
               (For students entering their technology October 2001 to June 2002.)
                                Curriculum (Programming Track)

                                            Quarter I
Course No.         Course Title                                                      C    L   T
CIS    114         Fundamentals of Computer Programming                              4    6   7
CIS    112         Introduction to Computers                                         3    0   3
MA     110         Introduction to College Math                                      4    0   4
CE     101         Community Enrichment                                              1    0   1
                                                                                     12   6   15

                                            Quarter II
Course No.         Course Title                                                      C    L   T
CIS    124         Advanced Computer Programming                                     4    4   6
CIS    253         Operating Systems                                                 2    2   3
                                       CHOOSE ONE
CIS          122   Computer Applications I
      -or-
CIS          122   Computer Applications I On-line                                   2    2   3
                                       CHOOSE ONE
EN           101   English I
      -or-
EN           102   English II (depending upon placement)                             4    0   4
                                                                                     12   8   16

                                            Quarter III
Course No.         Course Title                                                      C    L   T
CIS    223         Structured Application Development                                4    2   5
NET    233         Introduction to Workstation Software                              4    2   5
MA     121         Business Math                                                     4    0   4
                                         CHOOSE ONE
EN       102       English II (depending upon Quarter I)
    -or-
 ELECTIVE          Humanities or Social Science Elective                             4    0   4
                                                                                     16   4   18




                                                2
                            Computer Information Systems Technology
                                         Associate in Science Degree
                     (For students entering their technology October 2001 to June 2002.)
                                      Curriculum (Programming Track)

                                                  Quarter IV
      Course No.         Course Title                                                      C    L    T
      CIS    233         Advanced Structured Applications Development                      4    2    5
      NET    132         Intro to Novell LAN Administration I                              3    6    6
      MA     120         Technical Math I                                                  4    0    4
                                              CHOOSE ONE
      CIS          212   Computer Applications II
            -or-
      CIS          212   Computer Applications II On-line                                  1    2    2
                                                                                           12   10   17

                                                  Quarter V
      Course No.         Course Title                                                      C    L    T
      CIS    270         Intermediate Computer Programming                                 2    2    3
      NET    235         Installing, Configuring & Administering Servers                   3    3    5
      CIS    263         Database Design                                                   2    2    3
       ELECTIVE          Humanities or Social Science Elective                             4    0    4
                         CHOOSE ONE
      PHY          120   Physics I                                                         3    0    3
      PHY          121   Physics Lab I                                                     0    2    1
            -or-
       MA          160   Finite Math                                                       4    0    4
                                                                                           15   9    19
                                                                                           16   7    19

                                                  Quarter VI
      Course No.         Course Title                                                      C    L    T
      CIS    222         Systems Analysis & Design                                          2   2    3
      CIS    275         OOP's Fundamentals                                                3    4    5
       ELECTIVE          Humanities or Social Science Elective                             4    0    4
                                              CHOOSE ONE
      CIS          285   Ethics & the IT Workplace                                         3    0    3
            -or-
      CIS          295   Externship Program**                                              20   0    4
                                                                                           12   6    15

Legend
C = Number of lecture hours per week
L = Number of laboratory hours per week
T = Total Quarter Hours where each lecture hour per week is one credit and each pair of
laboratory hours per week is one credit.

This technology requires EN 101 and EN 102 and 2 Humanities/Social Science electives for the
Associate degree track. If a student places out of EN101the number of Humanities/Social
Science electives goes up by one



                                                      3
                           Computer Information Systems Technology
                                       Associate in Science Degree
                   (For students entering their technology October 2001 to June 2002.)
                                    Course Descriptions (All Tracks)

CIS 110 Fundamentals of Computer Programming
4 Class Hours 4 Quarter Credit Hours
A study of the BASIC programming language will be used as the vehicle to introduce flowcharting, control
structures, calculations, interactive programming techniques, and editing.

CIS 111 Fundamentals of Computer Programming Lab
6 Lab Hours 3 Quarter Credit Hours
Students will learn to write in BASIC implementing the techniques mastered in CIS 110. Laboratory
projects will grow in complexity as the student gains hands-on experience. Both personal and business
applications will be provided.

CIS 112 Introduction to Computers
3 Class Hours 3 Quarter Credit Hours
The basic concepts of computer hardware and systems are presented as tools used to provide services and
solve problems in businesses. Topics include: processing data, input/output, auxiliary files, data
communications, system organization, and computer-related issues in business.

CIS 114 Fundamentals of Computer Programming
4 Class Hours 6 Lab Hours 7 Quarter Credit Hours
A study of the BASIC programming language will be used as the vehicle to introduce flowcharting, control
structures, calculations, interactive programming techniques, and editing. Students will learn to write high-
quality BASIC programs. Laboratory projects will grow in complexity as the student gains hands-on
experience. Both personal and business applications will be provided.

CIS 120 Advanced Computer Programming
4 Class Hours 4 Quarter Credit Hours
Prerequisites: CIS 110 and CIS 111
A study of advanced topics in BASIC will be covered. Topics include: string handling, advanced input and
output, subroutines, subscripted variables, and creating, editing, sorting, searching, and updating files.

CIS 121 Advanced Computer Programming Lab
1 Class Hours 4 Lab Hours 3 Quarter Credit Hours
Prerequisites: CIS 110 and CIS 111
The student will design and write programs to illustrate concepts covered in CIS 120.

CIS 122 Computer Software Applications I
2 Class Hours 2 Lab Hours 3 Quarter Credit Hours
Prerequisite: CIS 112 or ELS 115
Students are introduced to the concepts of word processing and spreadsheet manipulation. Topics include
creating, saving, editing, and printing text files. Students will experience creating, editing, analyzing and
graphing of numerical data.

CIS 122 Computer Software Applications I On-line
2 Class Hours 2 Lab Hours 3 Quarter Credit Hours
Prerequisite: CIS 112 or ELS 115
This is the on-line version of the CIS 122 Computer Applications I course. Much of the coursework is
performed off-campus with three on-campus meetings required each quarter, the first day of class, mid-
way, and the last day of class.

Students are introduced to the concepts of word processing and spreadsheet manipulation. Topics include
creating, saving, editing, and printing text files. Students will experience creating, editing, analyzing and
graphing of numerical data.




                                                      4
                           Computer Information Systems Technology
                                       Associate in Science Degree
                   (For students entering their technology October 2001 to June 2002.)
                                    Course Descriptions (All Tracks)

CIS 124 Advanced Computer Programming
4 Class Hours 4 Lab Hours 6 Quarter Credit Hours
Prerequisites: CIS 114 or CIS 110 and CIS 111
A study of advanced topics in BASIC will be covered. Topics include: string handling, advanced input and
output, subroutines, subscripted variables, and creating, editing, sorting, searching, and updating files.
During lab time the student will design and write programs to illustrate learned concepts.

CIS 212 Computer Software Applications II
1 Class Hour 2 Lab Hours 2 Quarter Credit Hours
Prerequisite: CIS 112
Students will continue to build their experience with end-user software. This course will expose students to
end-user tools for database work such as Microsoft Access or Lotus Approach.

CIS 212 Computer Software Applications II On-line
1 Class Hour 2 Lab Hours 2 Quarter Credit Hours
Prerequisite: CIS 112
This is the online version of the CIS 212 Computer Applications II Course. Much of the coursework is
performed off-campus with three on-campus meetings required each quarter, the first day of class, mid-
way, and the last day of class.
Students will continue to build their experience with end-user software. This course will expose students to
end-user tools for database work such as Microsoft Access or Lotus Approach.

CIS 222 Systems Analysis and Design
2 Class Hours 2 Lab Hours 3 Quarter Credit Hours
Prerequisite: CIS 112
An overall understanding of systems analysis skills and their application to industry are the key objectives
of this course. The student learns the design of systems processing and controls, and develops skills to
present the completed system to management

CIS 223 Structured Applications Development
4 Class Hours 2 Lab Hours 5 Quarter Credit Hours
Prerequisites: CIS 124
Students are provided with the tools to write and test simple COBOL programs. Instructions for coding a
program to read, move, sort, and print data; instructions for arithmetic calculations and report writing; and
additional features for input/output are covered. Students also learn to create, sort, generate reports, and
update sequential masterfiles. Indexed sequential files are also covered in detail.

CIS 233 Advanced Structured Applications Development
4 Class Hours 2 Lab Hours 5 Quarter Credit Hours
Prerequisite: CIS 223
Students will learn to write programs in the Interactive COBOL environment, writing programs and
subroutines to create, sort, generate reports, and update master files. Indexed sequential files will also be
covered in depth. Students also apply the techniques learned in CIS 223 through laboratory projects. These
exercises cover a variety of areas in business data processing.

CIS 252 Operating Systems I
2 Class Hours 2 Lab Hours 3 Quarter Credit Hours
Operating systems have become more powerful over time, and increasingly complex. Students in this
course will gain expertise using current operating systems that they will be expected to use on the job. This
course also discusses the history and theory of operating systems, and students will be assigned tasks on a
current operating system such as Windows 95.




                                                       5
                           Computer Information Systems Technology
                                       Associate in Science Degree
                   (For students entering their technology October 2001 to June 2002.)
                                    Course Descriptions (All Tracks)

CIS 253 Operating Systems
2 Class Hours 2 Lab Hours 3 Quarter Credit Hours
Operating systems have become more powerful over time, and increasingly complex. Students in this
course will gain expertise using current operating systems that they will be expected to use on the job. This
course also discusses the history and theory of operating systems, and students will be assigned tasks on
current operating systems.

CIS 261 Operating Systems II
4 Class Hours 2 Lab Hours 5 Quarter Credit Hours
Prerequisite: CIS 252
The study of operating systems will continue with an in-depth examination of a currently used operating
system such as Windows 95 or Windows NT.

CIS 262 Introduction to Mail Servers
4 Class Hours 4 Quarter Credit Hours
Study using the Internet will be used to develop student knowledge and competence in using the Internet
for end-user purposes such as research and transferring messages and data. Business and commercial uses
of the Internet including electronic commerce will also be covered in the course.

CIS 263 Database Application Design
2 Class Hours 2 Lab Hours 3 Quarter Credit Hours
This course introduces students to database structure and design. The student will learn the basic SQL
constructs to create and query tables, do inner and outer table joins, aggregate functions as well as database
views and indexes. Database administration will be covered, and the students will be introduced to
Microsoft SQL Server. Other Relational Database Systems such as Microsoft Access may be used to
illustrate different design concepts.

CIS 270 Intermediate Computer Programming
2 Class Hours 2 Lab Hours 3 Quarter Credit Hours
Prerequisites: CIS 124
This course provides an introduction to programming languages using ANSI C, emphasizing portability
and structured design. Thorough treatment is given to the topics of string and character manipulation,
dynamic memory allocation, standard I/O, macro definition, the C runtime library, and ANSI C
specifications. The course explains the use of aggregate structures, unions, and pointers allowing students
to practice extensively in the lab.

CIS 275 Object Oriented Programming Fundamentals
3 Class Hours 4 Lab Hours 5 Quarter Credit Hours
Prerequisite: CIS 124
This course is an introduction to object oriented programming using Visual Basic. The main goal is to
enable the participant to create business applications with VB that utilize multi-tier application design
strategy for maintainability and reusability. The hands-on exercises focus on solving commonly
encountered business problems. It introduces the VB integrated development environment (IDE) and its
wealth of development tools. Students will also learn to build effective user interfaces with VB controls,
forms, and other GUI components. An introduction to OOP's programming techniques, integrating help
files is also covered.

CIS 285 Ethics and the IT Workplace
3 Class Hours 0 Lab Hours 3 Quarter Credit Hours
This course will focus on the ethical and social implications of computer technologies. Students will
discuss computing and human values as they deal with pressing ethical issues arising from the development
and deployment of computers in society.




                                                      6
                           Computer Information Systems Technology
                                       Associate in Science Degree
                   (For students entering their technology October 2001 to June 2002.)
                                    Course Descriptions (All Tracks)



CIS 295 Externship
20 Field Hours 4 Quarter Credit Hours
Prerequisites: successful completion of CIS Quarters I through V
The student will gain practical experience through work experience at a local company within an
Information Technology department or industry. The student will use the knowledge through previous
coursework in his/her technology to work in an entry-level position within a programming or networking
environment.

NET 132 Introduction to Novell LAN Administration I
3 Class Hours 6 Lab Hours 6 Quarter Credit Hours
The student will prepare to become eligible to take the exam for CNA certification by studying
microcomputer concepts for NetWare Users, DOS for NetWare Users, Windows, and NetWare
Administration.

NET 214 Introduction to Novell LAN Administration II
3 Class Hours 6 Lab Hours 6 Quarter Credit Hours
Prerequisites: NET 132
Students learn advanced administration skills such as tuning the network and server for better performance
and managing complex tree structures. This course teaches how to oversee a complex NetWare networking
environment, including Novell Directory Services (NDS), optimize the NetWare server, back up and
restore NDS and file system information, provide appropriate TCP/IP functionality for workstations and
servers, install and configure Web and FTP services. Students also learn how to install and configure a
NetWare network, gaining hands-on experience augmenting previous work with NDS configurations.
Scenarios for upgrading, migrating, and installing teach how to implement a different design of the NDS
tree structure.

NET 231 Introduction to Windows Server
2 Class Hours 4 Lab Hours 4 Quarter Credit Hours
Prerequisite: NET 230
This course complements and augments instruction begun in NET230. Lab exercises offering students
opportunities to install, monitor, administer Windows NT workstations are presented.

NET 233 Introduction to Workstation Software
4 Class Hours 2 Lab Hours 5 Quarter Credit Hours
Students are introduced to a desktop operating system. They perform the installation of the operating
system as well as implementing and conducting the administration of resources, the implementation,
management and troubleshooting of hardware devices and drivers, the monitoring and optimizing of system
performance and reliability, and configuring and troubleshooting the desktop environment.

NET 234 Introduction to Directory Services
3 Class Hours 2 Lab Hours 4 Quarter Credit Hours
Prerequisite: NET 235
This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to design a directory services
infrastructure in an enterprise network. Strategies are presented to assist the student in identifying the
information technology needs of an organization, and then designing a structure that meets those needs.

NET 235 Installing, Configuring and Administering Servers
3 Class Hours 3 Lab Hours 5 Quarter Credit Hours
Prerequisite: NET 233
Students will learn to install a network server. They perform the installation, configuration and
troubleshooting of access to resources, the configuration and troubleshooting of hardware devices and




                                                      7
                           Computer Information Systems Technology
                                       Associate in Science Degree
                   (For students entering their technology October 2001 to June 2002.)
                                    Course Descriptions (All Tracks)

drivers, the management, monitoring and optimizing of system performance, reliability and availability,
and the managing, configuring and troubleshooting of storage use.


NET 240 Internetworking Principles
3 Class Hours 4 Lab Hours 5 Quarter Credit Hours
This course introduces students to concepts such as the seven layers of the OSI model, network addressing,
data encapsulation and the TCP/IP protocols.

NET 250 Data Communications
4 Class Hours 2 Lab Hours 5 Quarter Credit Hours
This course is an introduction to the many aspects of data communications. Topics include: the principles
of operation of various hardware components, system configuration, communication protocols, and
software control. Also included in an introduction to common network services, transmission media and
media connections, network protocols, protocol stack models, and an in-depth discussion of each layer of
the OSI model.




                                                      8
                           Computer Information Systems Technology
                                       Associate in Science Degree
                   (For students entering their technology October 2001 to June 2002.)
                                   Questions and Answers (All Tracks)

1.   When do my classes meet?
     Days: Your technical classes normally meet for three hours a day five days a week. Classes normally
     begin in the early morning (7:45), late morning (usually 11:25), or mid afternoon. Your class starting
     time will be confirmed on registration day. A technical time slot may vary from quarter to quarter.

     Evenings: Your technical classes meet on the average of three nights a week, although there may be
     times when they will meet four nights a week. Classes normally begin at 5:45. Your class starting time
     will be confirmed on registration day.

     IN ADDITION, to achieve your associate degree, you will take a total of eight liberal arts courses,
     which will be scheduled around your technical schedule over the course of your entire program. Each
     liberal arts course meets approximately four hours per week.

     At the beginning of each quarter you will receive a detailed schedule giving the exact time of all your
     classes.

2.   How large will my classes be?
     The average size for a class is about 20 to 25 students; however, larger and smaller classes occur from
     time to time.

3.   How much time will I spend in lab?
     Almost half of your technical courses consist of laboratory work. In order for you to get the most out
     of your laboratory experiences, you will first receive a thorough explanation of the theory behind your
     lab work.

4.   Where do my classes meet?
     Students should be prepared to attend classes at any of NEIT’s classroom facilities: either on Access
     Road or at the Post Road campus.

5.   I have not earned my high school diploma or GED: can I enroll in the program?
     If you are beyond the age of compulsory school attendance, your admissions officer will set up an
     appointment for you at the New England Tech Academic Skills Center (ASC). ASC staff will
     administer a standardized test approved by the federal government for determining a student’s ability
     to benefit from a program. If you pass the test, you may enroll in the program.

6.   How long should it take me to complete my program?
     To complete your degree requirements in the shortest possible time, you should take the courses
     outlined in the prescribed curriculum. For a typical six-quarter curriculum, a student may complete the
     requirements in as little as 18 months.

     To complete all your degree requirements in the shortest time, you should take at least one liberal arts
     course each quarter as long as no special technical elective is required. Students who need more time to
     complete their curriculum may postpone some of the liberal arts courses until after the completion of
     the technical requirements. Students are provided up to two additional quarters of study to complete
     the liberal arts requirements without any additional tuition assessment. During these additional quarters
     of study, students are required to pay administrative fees, as well as any other applicable fees.

     Students may also elect to complete some of their liberal arts requirements during Intersession, a
     special five-week term scheduled between the Spring and Summer quarters. Students will not be
     assessed any additional tuition for liberal arts courses taken during the Intersession.

     Students wishing to extend the required technical courses in their curriculum will be assessed
     additional tuition and fees.




                                                       9
                            Computer Information Systems Technology
                                       Associate in Science Degree
                   (For students entering their technology October 2001 to June 2002.)
                                   Questions and Answers (All Tracks)

7.   How many credits do I need to acquire my financial aid?
     In order to be eligible for the maximum financial aid award, you need to maintain at least 12 credits
     per academic quarter.

8.   What does my program cost?
     The cost of your program will be as outlined in your enrollment agreement, along with your cost for
     books and other course materials. Students who decide to extend their curriculum will be subject to
     additional fees and possible additional tuition costs.
     Students who require prerequisite courses will incur additional tuition and fees above those outlined in
     their enrollment agreement.

9.   Is NEIT accredited?
     NEIT is accredited by the New England Association of Schools & Colleges’ (NEASC’s) Commission
     on Technical and Career Institutions. Accreditation by NEASC is recognized by the federal
     government and entitles NEIT to participate in federal financial aid programs. Some academic
     departments have specialized professional accreditations in addition to accreditation by NEASC. For
     more information on accreditation, see NEIT’s catalog.

10. Can I transfer the credits that I earn at NEIT to another college?
    The transferability of a course is always up to the institution to which the student is transferring.
    Students interested in the transferability of their credits should contact the Office of Teaching and
    Learning for further information.

11. What kind of employment assistance does NEIT offer?
    The Office of Career Services assists NEIT students and graduates in all aspects of the job search,
    including resume writing, interviewing skills, and the development of a job search strategy. Upon
    completion of their program, students may submit a resume to be circulated to employers for technical
    employment opportunities. Employers regularly contact us about our graduates. In addition, our Office
    of Career Services contacts employers to develop job leads. A strong relationship with employers
    exists as a result of our training students to meet the needs of industry for over fifty years. No school
    can, and NEIT does not, guarantee to its graduates employment or a specific starting salary.

12. Where will job opportunities exist?
    Graduates have obtained employment in the local area. However, one of the most exciting aspects of
    this technology is the ability to look nationally for employment opportunities.

13. What is the Feinstein "Enriching America" Program?
    New England Institute of Technology is the proud recipient of a grant from the Feinstein Foundation.
    To satisfy the terms of the grant, the College has developed a one-credit community enrichment course
    as a requirement for graduation. All entering associate degree students must take the course, which
    includes hands-on community enrichment projects. The course can be taken for a few hours per
    quarter, spread over several quarters. Students who are already engaged in community enrichment on
    their own may be able to count that service towards course credit.

14. What kind of jobs will I be qualified to look for?
    Generally jobs will exist in the entry-level positions in the computer industry. Data entry, computer
    operator, entry-level programmer, computer technician, database specialist or computer librarian are
    just some of the job choices available to a graduate with an associate degree. Upon completion of a
    bachelor's degree at NEIT, positions on the management level become attainable.




                                                       10
                           Computer Information Systems Technology
                                       Associate in Science Degree
                   (For students entering their technology October 2001 to June 2002.)
                                   Questions and Answers (All Tracks)

15. What is NEAP?
    NEIT is proud to be a NEAP, Novell Education Academic Partner. We are honored to be an approved
    training center for Novell. This agreement allows NEIT to offer authorized Novell training courses to
    our matriculating students.

16. What is Novell?
    Novell, Inc. is a company responsible for NetWare, the most popular networking software on the
    market today. Approximately 75% of the local area networks internationally are Novell networks.

    Networks allow computers to "talk" to one another. They become the "roads" of the Information
    Highway.

17. What is a CNA?
    Novell offers training courses to maintain and administer their local area networks. These courses are
    offered to NEIT Computer Information Systems Technology Associate Degree students. The objective
    of these courses is to acquire the mastery of DOS commands, the Windows environment to maintain
    the PC hardware and software (NetWare) required of the Novell network. A student completing these
    courses is eligible to take the required tests for Novell certification as a Certified NetWare
    Administrator (CNA).

18. Am I automatically a CNA when I complete the coursework at NEIT?
    No. Upon completion of the coursework, students are eligible to pursue certification as a CNA. Tests
    for certification are given locally. However, a student may apply for positions as a computer network
    administrator without the CNA certification.

19. What is a CNE?
    Novell offers courses to install, configure, service, and support Novell networks. These courses are
    offered to CIS Bachelor Degree students who have successfully NET132, Introduction to Novell LAN
    Administration I. The objective of these courses is to demonstrate the skills needed to install, maintain,
    and update a Novell network. A student completing these courses is eligible to take the required tests
    for Novell certification as a Certified NetWare Engineer (CNE).

20. Am I automatically a CNE when I complete the coursework at NEIT?
    No. Upon completion of the coursework, students are eligible to pursue certification as a CNE. Tests
    for certification are given locally. However, a student may apply for positions as a network engineer
    without the CNE certification.

21. What is AATP?
    NEIT is proud to be a Microsoft Authorized Academic Training Partner (AATP). This agreement
    allows NEIT to offer authorized Microsoft training courses to our matriculating students.

22. What is a MCP?
    Microsoft offers training courses to maintain and administer Microsoft local area networks. These
    courses are offered to NEIT Computer Information Systems Technology Associate Degree students.
    The objective of these courses is to acquire the mastery of DOS commands, the Windows environment
    to maintain the PC hardware and software (Microsoft) required of the Windows 2000 network. A
    student completing these courses is eligible to take the required tests for Microsoft certification as a
    Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP).

23. Am I automatically an MCP when I complete the coursework at NEIT?
    No. Upon completion of the coursework, students are eligible to pursue certification as an MCP. Tests
    for certification are given locally. However, a student may apply for positions as a computer network
    administrator without the MCP certification.




                                                      11
                           Computer Information Systems Technology
                                      Associate in Science Degree
                  (For students entering their technology October 2001 to June 2002.)
                                  Questions and Answers (All Tracks)

24. What is a MCSE?
    Microsoft offers courses to install, configure, service, and support Microsoft networks. These courses
    are offered to CIS Bachelor Degree students who have successfully completed NET233, Introduction
    to Workstation Software. The objective of these courses is to demonstrate the skills needed to install,
    maintain, and update a Microsoft Windows 2000 network. A student completing these courses is
    eligible to take the required tests for Microsoft certification as a Microsoft Certified System Engineer
    (MCSE).

25. Am I automatically an MCSE when I complete the coursework at NEIT?
    No. Upon completion of the coursework, students are eligible to pursue certification as an MCSE.
    Tests for certification are given locally. However, a student may apply for positions as a network
    engineer without the MCSE certification.

26. What is a Cisco Local Academy?
    NEIT is proud to be a Cisco Local Academy. This agreement allows NEIT to offer authorized Cisco
    training courses to our matriculating students.

27. What is a CCNA?
    Cisco offers training courses to maintain and administer their local area networks. These courses are
    offered to NEIT Computer Information Systems Technology Associate Degree students. The objective
    of these courses is to acquire the mastery of installing, configuring, and operating simple-routed LAN,
    routed WAN, and switched LAN networks. A student completing these courses is eligible to take the
    required tests for Microsoft certification as a Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA).

28. Am I automatically a CCNA when I complete the coursework at NEIT?
    No. Upon completion of the coursework, students are eligible to pursue certification as a CCNA. Tests
    for certification are given locally. However, a student may apply for positions as a computer network
    administrator without the CCNA certification.




                                                     12
                           Computer Information Systems Technology
                                      Associate in Science Degree
                  (For students entering their technology October 2001 to June 2002.)
                                          Technical Standards


These technical standards set forth by the CIS department establish the essential qualifications considered
necessary for students admitted to the program. The successful student must possess the following skills
and abilities or be able to demonstrate they can complete the requirements of the program with or without
reasonable accommodation, using some other combination of skills and abilities.

Cognitive Ability
§ Good reasoning and critical thinking skills.
§ Ability to learn, remember and recall detailed information and to use it for problem solving.
§ Ability to deal with materials and problems such as organizing or reorganizing information.
§ Ability to use abstractions in specific concrete situations.
§ Ability to separate complex information into its component parts.
§ Ability to perform tasks by observing demonstrations.
§ Ability to perform tasks by following written instructions.
§ Ability to perform tasks following verbal instructions.
§ Possession of basic keyboarding skills and knowledge of computer programs.

Communications Skills
§ Ability to speak in understandable English in a classroom situation on a one-on-one basis as well as
   before a group.
§ Ability to communicate effectively with faculty and other students.
§ Ability to demonstrate and use the knowledge acquired during the classroom training process.
§ Ability to verbally express technical concepts clearly and distinctly.
§ Ability to express thoughts clearly.

Adaptive Ability
§ Ability to remain calm in the face of computer lab equipment and/or software failure.
§ Ability to maintain emotional stability and the maturity necessary to interact with members of the
   faculty and students in a responsible manner.
§ Ability to tolerate the differences in all students, faculty, and administration.
§ Ability to follow instructions and complete tasks under stressful and demanding conditions.
§ Ability to adapt in a positive manner to new and changing situations with an open mind and flexibility.
§ Ability to think clearly and act quickly and appropriately in stressful situations.

Physical Ability
§ Ability to sit continuously at a personal computer for long periods of time in order to learn and become
   proficient in computer programming and networking.
§ Ability to perform learned skills independently, with accuracy and completeness within reasonable
   time frames in accordance with classroom and business procedures.

Manual Ability
§ Sufficient motor function and sensory abilities to participate effectively in the classroom laboratory.
§ Sufficient manual dexterity and motor coordination to coordinate hands, eyes and fingers in the
   operation of computers and business equipment.

Sensory Ability
Visual
§ Acute enough to see clearly and interpret the contents on the computer screen




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                           Computer Information Systems Technology
                                      Associate in Science Degree
                  (For students entering their technology October 2001 to June 2002.)
                      Student Acknowledgment of Receipt of Documents


Computer Information Systems Technology

I acknowledge that I have received copies of the following documents for the above technology:
        1) Program Description
        2) Curriculum
        3) Course Descriptions
        4) Q&A
        5) Technical Standards

I understand that it is my responsibility to read these documents. I have been advised that should I have any
questions related to the content of any of these documents, I may contact my admissions officer who will
review the material with me.

I further understand that NEIT reserves the right, in response to industry demands, to change the contents
of these documents without prior notice. Copies of the most recent versions of these documents may be
obtained in the Admissions Office.

Printed Name of Student: ________________________________________________

Signature: ________________________________ Date: _______________________




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