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Avon Intermediate School West

VIEWS: 10 PAGES: 25

									Avon Intermediate School West

  North Central Association
  School Improvement Plan


           2009-2010




     176 South State Road 267
        Avon, Indiana 46123
        Phone: 317-272-8700
         Fax: 317-272-8701
    http://www.avon-schools.org
                   Table of Contents
Mission Statement………………………………………………………...                  3

Unique Local Insights
      The History of Avon…………….…………………………………               4
      Hendricks County and Washington Township…………………….    4
      Avon Community School Corporations……………………………        5
      Avon Intermediate School West……………………………………          7

Survey of Stakeholders
      Data Collection Instruments………………………………………           8
      Analysis of Data……………………………………………………                 8

Existing Student Data
       Student Data………………………………………………………                  10
       Data Collection Instrument……………………………………….         11
       Analysis of Data……………………………………………….….              12
       6th Grade ISTEP+..………………………………………………..             12
       7th Grade ISTEP+…………………………………………………                13
       5th Grade NWEA……………………………………………..                  16
       6th Grade NWEA……………………………………………..                  16
       Disaggregated Data………………………………………………               17
       DIBELS Assessment……………………………………………..               19
       Instructional Survey………………………………………………             20

NCA Goal #1…………………………………………………………….                       21

NCA Goal #2…………………………………………………………….                       23

NCA Co-Chairs and Steering Committee…………………………….          25




                                2
               Avon Intermediate School West

                          Mission Statement

    Avon Intermediate School West, in partnership with parents and the
 community, will provide learning experiences that will develop the whole
   child intellectually, physically, socially and emotionally in a safe and
nurturing environment. As a result, students will become life-long learners
                     and responsible, productive citizens.


                                       Beliefs

  1. All students should learn in an environment that allows them to reach their
      greatest potential.
  2. All students should exhibit self-discipline and show respect for themselves,
      others, and property.
  3. Daily exploratory and physical activities are important in the overall development
      of the child.
  4. Each child should develop essential study skills in order to take full advantage of
      their learning experiences.
  5. All students should demonstrate effective written verbal communication skills.
  6. Students should develop a sense of discipline and responsibility through all
      procedures presented to them.
  7. Teaming provides students with the opportunity to learn and develop under the
      expertise of various instructors.
  8. Technology is a vital skill for life-long learning.
  9. Education is the shared responsibility of home, school and community.
  10. Students should become positive, self-directed and motivated learners.




                                          3
                               Unique Local Insights

The History of Avon
The Avon Community School Corporation, located in Washington Township in eastern
Hendricks County, is thirteen miles west of downtown Indianapolis. The community,
which developed around the intersection of a major U.S. highway (U.S. 36) and a major
Indiana roadway (S.R. 267), has been in existence since the 1800s. Avon has developed
from a predominantly agricultural based community into a blend of single-residential
homes, apartments, businesses, and service industries.

The first Washington Township School of record was located near the site of White Lick
Presbyterian Church. In 1878, (fifty-one years later) ten schools had been established in
Washington Township. Schools located within Six Points, Shiloh, and Avon joined to
form a consolidation within Washington Township. Even now, the schools located in
Avon continue to grow and expand. In 1958, there were 910 students enrolled in Avon
schools compared to today’s enrollment of approximately 8,300. The Avon schools
became a corporation on July 1, 1962 under the Acts of 1959, Chapter 202. The present
school corporation is composed of Washington Township, Hendricks County.

Hendricks County and Washington Township
Hendricks County has experienced a tremendous amount of growth over the past 25
years. The population in 2000 was 104,093. The population percent change for 2000-
2006 was 26 percent. By 2007, the population had grown to an estimated 134,558. By the
year 2025, the projected population will be 183,677, a population increase of 76.5% since
the year 2000. The 2000 census indicated in the 9 county region of central Indiana,
Hendricks County was the second fastest growing county with a 37.5% increase in
population (“Metro Area Has Grown More Suburban, Diverse,” Indianapolis Star, March
10, 2001). Hendricks County is the second fastest growing county in the state of Indiana.
(Wikipedia.org)

In 2006, nearly 25.3% of the county’s population was under 18 years of age, while
approximately 9.8% were 65 years or older. The average age of Hendricks County
residents was 35.1 years, compared to a statewide average of 36.3 years. In 2005, the
median household income was $59,720 which is about $15,669 over the state average.
Hendricks County also has 69,561 employed workers with an August 2008
unemployment rate of 4.6% compared to a statewide average of 6.3%.

Located in the center of Washington Township, incorporation of the town of Avon in
1997 has enhanced the township and attracted business and industry, resulting in an
evolving sense of community. In order to accommodate the increasing traffic patterns of
the community, two new roundabouts were added to the intersections of County Road
100 South and Dan Jones Road and County Road 100 North and Dan Jones Road. The
addition of sewage systems and other utilities have resulted in significant housing


                                            4
development in the town itself. A wide range of housing is available in the Avon area.
Most homes in Avon range from $100,000-$300,000. Projections based upon pending
building permits and approved subdivisions indicate that the Avon community will
continue to grow and experience substantial activity in commercial development related
to small business and service industries.

Avon’s proximity to Indianapolis provides easy access to the well-developed interstate
system, and Avon is just minutes from many places of interests. Examples include:

Colleges, Universities, and Trade Schools:          Cultural and Recreational Venues:
Butler University                                   Children’s Museum
DePauw University                                   Circle Center Mall
Franklin College                                    Clowes Hall
IUPUI                                               Conner Prairie
Indiana Vocational Technical College                Eagle Creek Reservoir and Park
Marian College                                      Eiteljorg Museum
Martin University                                   Indiana Historical Society
University of Indianapolis                          Indiana State Museum
                                                    Indianapolis Museum of Art
Sports Venues:                                      Indianapolis Zoo
Indianapolis Motor Speedway                         Indianapolis Botanical Gardens
Indianapolis Colts of the NFL                       Metropolis Shopping Center
Indianapolis Fever of the WNBA                White River State Park and IMAX Theater
Indianapolis Ice
Indianapolis Indians
Indiana Pacers of the NBA
Indianapolis Raceway Park
NCAA Hall of Champions and National Headquarters


Avon Community School Corporation
The Mission of Avon Community Schools is to provide an educational program and
learning environment for the intellectual, physical, social, and emotional development of
its students.

The Avon Community School Corporation serves over 8,300 students and is comprised
of Cedar Elementary, Hickory Elementary, Maple Elementary, Pine Tree Elementary,
Sycamore Elementary, White Oak Elementary, Avon Intermediate East, Avon
Intermediate West, Avon Middle School, and Avon High School. An additional middle
school is scheduled to open in the fall of 2009. Also, an addition to Avon High School
and a new Administration Center opened in the fall of 2007. Three elementary schools
house students in grades pre-kindergarten through fourth. The other three elementary
schools serve students in grades kindergarten through fourth. The intermediate schools
are made up of fifth and sixth grades, while the middle school contains the seventh and


                                             5
eighth grades. The high school includes ninth through twelfth grade students. The
corporation is in partnership with Brownsburg and MSD of Pike Township in providing
an alternative high school program, the Cooperative Achievement Program, which is
located outside the township. The Avon Community School Corporation is also a
member of both the West Central Joint Services Special Education Cooperative and Area
31, a vocational education cooperative.

Since the 1997-1998 school year, Avon Community School Corporation has averaged 7%
annual growth, which similarly reflects the growth of Washington Township.
Washington Township currently enjoys the distinction of being one of the fastest growing
townships in the state. This same growth rate will more than likely continue in the next
decade. The high rate of student transfers is affecting the population of Avon’s schools
in various ways. The growth has diversified our enrollment ethnically and socio-
economically, as well as impacting specialized educational programs. The enrollment
figures for each grade configuration for 2008-2009 are:

              Avon High School                      2,454
              Avon Middle School                    1,323
              Avon Intermediate East/West           1,347
              Elementary Schools                    3,269

The graph below represents the ethnic breakdown for ACSC.

       Display 1




Our diverse special needs program is a selling point for our school corporation. We offer
a broad continuum of services for students with disabilities. Our English Language
Learners program has expanded to include over 317 students for the 2008-2009 school
year.


                                            6
Extensive extracurricular and co-curricular opportunities are offered to Avon students.
Our academic, athletic, and fine arts programs have excelled at both the state and national
levels. Staff, parents, and community members take a very active role in our school
programs.

To maximize capacity and sustainability of newly embedded scientifically-based reading
methodology and practice, Avon Community School Corporation has embarked on a
literacy initiative. Literacy coaches were hired under the 2006-07 EPPIC grant to expand
professional development to meet the learning needs of all Avon K-12 faculty and
community preschool/daycare providers. The overarching goal of the Avon Literacy
Preparation System       (ALPS) project beginning in the 2006 school year was to
implement, evaluate, replicate, and disseminate systemic prevention and intervention
methodology and practice that will accelerate and sustain the early reading achievement
of students in grades K-2. The new goal of the 2008-2009 ALPS project is to improve
student achievement by:
     o Systematizing the English/Language Arts curriculum, instruction and assessment
        across all levels.
     o Providing professional development utilizing high yield strategies based upon
        scientifically-based reading research (SBRR)
     o Integrating and coordinating various programs and content areas into literacy
        development

All Avon schools’ goals and school improvement plans are designed to meet the
requirements of Indiana State Board of Education Strategic and Continuous School
Improvement and Achievement Plan. (IC 20-31-5 and 511 IAC 6.2) The North Central
Association of Commission on Accreditation and School Improvement model is used by
the schools to meet these legal requirements.

The Avon Community School Corporation is governed by a five member elected Board
of School Trustees, which has received state recognition as an Exemplary Board. All
schools are accredited by the North Central Association and the State of Indiana.

Avon Intermediate School West

The curriculum of Avon Intermediate School West (AIS West) strictly follows the
standards outlined by the Indiana Department of Education. Each teacher has a copy of
the locally developed curriculum and Indiana State Standards in their classroom. There
are also copies available in the main office, media center, and the Washington Township
Public Library.

Parent participation at AIS West is very strong. P.A.S.S. (Parent Assisting Student
Success) is a program in which parents volunteer to assist the school community in and
out of the classroom. Along with that, many parents volunteer on a weekly basis in their




                                            7
child’s classroom assisting the teacher where needed. Our parents support our 9 Week
Celebrations, Celebration of Cultures, Fun Run/Walk, and many other school activities.

Technology at AIS West is incorporated across the curriculum through a variety of
educational software programs and equipment. AIS West has language arts, math,
science and social studies software that enhances student learning. These programs can
be used to assess and document student progress. Students and teachers at AIS West
have access to three full functioning computer labs. Individual classrooms are also
equipped with four student computers and one teacher computer.

AIS West is a safe place for students. Our student handbook, which each student
receives, provides detailed guidelines for student behavior and discipline. Our
counseling department meets with students individually and as a group to address a
variety of issues relevant to 5th and 6th grade students. Classroom counseling and
convocation are held to reinforce issues such as bullying, drug awareness and tolerance
toward others. Life Skill Awards are given at the end of each 9-Week grading period to
those students who have best exhibited those specific skills. The award winners are
selected by peer voting.

Data Collection Instruments
We selected the following instruments to collect data:
       NSSE Teacher Opinion Inventory
       NSSE Parent Opinion Inventory
       NSSE Student Opinion Inventory

Analysis of Data
In the spring of 2006, teachers, parents, and students were asked to complete the NSSE
Opinion Inventory. A response of 5 indicated the respondent strongly agreed, while a
score of 1 meant the respondent strongly disagreed. Does not apply/Do not know was
also a response option. The survey was given to 53 staff members (48 responded), 210
students (195 responded), and 300 parents (126 responded). We opened the school two
evenings for those parents who did not have internet access. Computers were also
available during the school day and at our public library for parents to access the survey.

NSSE Teacher Opinion Inventory

The teacher survey grouped questions into four categories: Quality of Instructional
Programs, Support for Student Learning, School Climate/Environment, and School
Organization and Administration. There were also three school specific, open-ended
questions for teachers answer. The highest average scores came from Support for
Student Learning (4.36) and Quality of Instructional Programs (4.15). Each of the four




                                             8
categories had several questions that helped identify particular strengths and areas for
improvement for AIS West.

When examining the date, the specific areas for improvement were identified by looking
at the five lowest scored questions. Strengths were determined by examining the five
highest scored questions.

Using these criteria, the top five areas needing improvement were identified. Teachers
believe class size is the biggest area of concern (1.92). Students bullying one another
(2.63) is also a serious issue. Students’ motivation and respect for school and community
property were also an area needing improvement (3.81 and 3.69 respectively). Students
seeing a relationship between what they are learning and their everyday life was also a
concern (3.70).

Five areas of strength were also identified. Up-to-date technologies (4.71), our school
facilities (4.67), and the variety of resources available to students (4.65) top our list of
strengths. Teaching materials and supplies are current and in good condition (4.63)
support our strengths. The variety of assessments tools, such as projects, presentations,
and portfolios, support students with different learning styles (4.50).

NSSE Parent Opinion Inventory

The parent survey grouped questions into five categories: Quality of the Instructional
Program (3.84), Support for Student Learning (3.94), School Climate/Environment for
Learning (3.94), Parent/School Relationships (3.97), and Resource Management (4.15).
The Quality of the Instructional Program score was lowered significantly by two very
low scores in the following sub-categories: Our school is doing a good job of teaching
foreign language and our school is doing a good job of teaching career/vocational
courses. We do not offer either of these two courses of study.

Five areas needing improvement were identified. There are no problems with bullies at
our school (3.02) and teachers are willing to give students individual help outside of class
time (3.24) were the two biggest areas of concern from our parents. Class size (3.40),
parents feeling their opinion is considered (3.54), and preparing students to deal with
issues and problems they will face in the future (3.58) top the list of concerns parents feel
need addressed.

The five areas of strength our parents identifies include the clean and well maintained
grounds (4.48), our up-to-date technologies used by our students (4.40), our textbooks
and other materials are current and in good condition (4.39), the resources available to
our students that support their learning (4.34), and our school’s positive impact on our
community’s property values (4.27).




                                              9
NSSE Student Opinion Inventory

The randomly selected students who took this survey were very candid in their responses,
giving us quality and valid data to consider as we strive to improve. The student survey
also focused on four categories: Quality of Instructional Programs, Support for Student
Learning, School Climate/Environment, and Student/School Relationships. Students’
rated each of the four categories very closely. Quality of Instructional Programs, 4.09,
and Support for Student Learning, 4.06, were the two highest rated categories.
Student/School Relationships and School Climate/Environment were rated 4.06 and 4.04
respectively.

Problems with bullies at our school (3.06), and not looking forward to going to school
each day (3.39) are the top areas of concern for our students. Students seeing a
relationship between what they are learning and their everyday life (3.49), the grading
and evaluation of my school work is fair (3.53), and teachers are willing to give me
individual help outside of class time (3.61) round out the top five areas of concern.

Students indicated the following areas of strength: Cheating is strongly discouraged at
our school (4.57). In our school, students have access to a variety of resources to help
them succeed in their learning, such as technology, media centers, and libraries (4.50).
Up-to-date computers and other technologies are used in our school to help students learn
(4.45). Our school provides a safe and orderly environment for learning (4.44). My
teachers use a variety of teaching strategies and learning activities to help me learn
(4.39).

Parents, students and staff members were also asked to answer three open-ended
questions: What do you like best about our school, what do you like least about our
school, and what is one suggestion you would like to offer to improve our school. All
three groups of stakeholders were very candid and provided us with valuable feedback.

Follow up of Former Students

282 former students were surveyed. They were asked to “grade” AIS West on how well
we prepared them academically and socially. 93% of the students felt safe at school and
95% of them felt we did a great job of recognizing students for their achievements. Only
56% gave us an A preparing them in reading, while 52% gave us the same grade in math
preparation.

Aligning with our district literacy initiative, our questions focused on reading. 43% of
the students felt we did a great job motivating them to be readers. 31% gave us an A for
having a variety of reading activities. Only 15% shared that reading was their favorite
subject. The highest percentage of students felt reading was their least favorite subject.

The results of this survey have challenged us to look at our strategies for teaching
reading.


                                             10
Existing Student Data
AIS West has a population of 657 students, 330 female and 327 males, as of September,
2008. The diversity of our student population has changed substantially in the past five
years. In 2001, 93% of the students were classified as white. In September of 2008, 77%
are classified as white, 8% black, 5% Hispanic, 5% multiracial, and 5% Asian (Display
2). The percentage of students who receive free or reduced lunch has increased from
10% in 2001 to 23% in the Fall of 2008 (Display 3).

Display 2




Display 3




                                          11
Data Collection Instrument
We selected the following instruments to collect data regarding Student Data:

      ISTEP+ 6th Grade Language Arts and Math
      ISTEP+ 7th Grade Language Arts and Math
      NWEA 6th Grade
      NWEA 5th Grade
      Available School Data
          o DIBELS Assessment (Dynamic Indicator of Basic Early Literacy Skills)

Analysis of Data
ISTEP+ 6th Grade Language Arts and Math

When looking at ISTEP+ test results over the past year, the language arts and math scores
for 6th grade were above the state average. However, the scores did fall slightly below
the state’s top schools (Display 4). The 6th grade results indicate weaknesses in the
following areas: Reading Comprehension, Reading Vocabulary, and Literature Response
and Analysis (Display 5).

Students showed weaknesses in math in the following areas: Number Sense,
Computation, and Measurement. (Display 6)
Display 4




                                           12
Display 5




Display 6




            13
ISTEP+ 7th Grade Language Arts and Math

AIS West opened in the fall of 2005. The percentage of students who passed are a
combination of both AIS East and AIS West students. (Display 7)

When looking at ISTEP+ test results over the past year, the results indicate deficiencies
in Writing Applications. Strengths were displayed in Reading Vocabulary, Reading
Comprehension, Literature Response and Analysis, and Language Conventions.
(Display 8)

In mathematics, deficiencies were indicated in the following areas: Geometry,
Measurement, Computation, Data Analysis and Probability, and Problem Solving. Areas
of strength were Number Sense and Algebra and Function. (Display 9)

Display 7




                                            14
Display 8




Display 9




            15
NWEA 5th Grade Reading, Language Arts, and Math

NWEA, Northwest Evaluation Association, was fully implemented during the 2007-2008
school year. NWEA is a state-aligned computer adaptive test that accurately reflects the
instructional level of each student and measures growth over time. The display below
show the average RIT, a rasch unit, score per grade level for reading, language arts, and
math. Our administration set a building goal for growth for reading, 216, language arts,
218, and math, 225. Students met the reading goal. (Display 10)

Display 10




NWEA 6th Grade Reading, Language Arts, and Math

NWEA, Northwest Evaluation Association, was fully implemented during the 2007-2008
school year. NWEA is a state-aligned computer adaptive test that accurately reflects the
instructional level of each student and measures growth over time. The display below
show the average RIT, a rasch unit, score per grade level for reading, language arts, and
math. Our administration set a building goal for reading, 220, language arts, 221, and
math, 231. Reading and language arts goal were achieved. (Display 11)




                                           16
Display 11




Available School Data
Disaggregated Data

Analyzing ISTEP+ more closely, we disaggregated the data into three different
categories: Free/Reduced Lunch, Special Education, and Ethnicity. According to the
data, the Free/Reduced and Special Education population performed significantly lower
than the general education population.

In English/Language Arts, 63% of 6th graders in the Free/Reduced population passed the
ISTEP+ compared to 89% of the general education students. 47% of the special
education students passed compared to 88% of the general education students. (Display
14)

The ISTEP+ Math numbers proved to be very similar to the English/Language Arts test.
92% of the general education students passed the math portion compared to 77% of the
Free/Reduced students. 64% of the special education students passed while 92% of the
general education students passed. (Display 15)

Looking at the ethnicity of our students and analyzing the data based on ethnicity
revealed that noticeable improvements have been made by each population group in some
area. Those population groups include Black, White, Hispanic, Multiracial, and Asian.
(Display 16)




                                          17
Display 14




Display 15




             18
Display 16




D.I.B.E.L.S. Assessment

DIBELS, Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills, assessment is given to the
student three times per year. In April, 2009, 68% of 6th graders and 70% of 5th graders
were able to fluently read at the benchmark level. This is a “cold” read. Avon will raise
the benchmark requirements beginning in the fall of 2009. 5th grade’s Spring benchmark
is 124. 6th grade’s Spring benchmark is 125. Also, the probes that were used this school
year varied difficulty level. We are going to assess the probes to ensure consistency
throughout the various assessments. (Display 17)




                                           19
Display 17




Instructional Survey

An instructional survey was given to all teachers; related arts, special education, general
education. Three of the top four strategies included lecturing, reading aloud, and silent
reading. Hands-on activities are frequently used. Labs, interacting with technology, and
cooperative groups were well down the list. (Display 19)


Display 19

                                               Instructional Survey
                                                                      Lecture
                                 140                                  Hands-on
          Number of Occurances




                                 120                                  Read Aloud
                                 100                                  Silent Reading
                                  80                                  Cooperative Groups
                                  60
                                                                      Student Directed Inquiry
                                  40
                                                                      Technology (Teaching)
                                 20
                                                                      Games/Simulations
                                  0
                                                  1                   Technology (Student)
                                                                      Lab
                                       Instructional Strategies
                                                                      Other




                                                          20
                         SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT GOALS

Parents and staff rated the teaching of math and language arts as two of the poorest taught
subjects in our building. Test data supports that. After much consideration of the
previously mentioned data and reviewing the results of our survey of stakeholders, the
staff at AIS West have identified the following goals.

NCA Goal 1

All students will improve reading comprehension through vocabulary
development and increased fluency.
Strategies/Interventions
    Teachers will be encouraged and given the finances to purchase vocabulary
       workbooks and supplemental materials. (Fall 2007 – On-going – Teachers/
       Administration).
           o Words on a Vine
           o 1 Minute Fluency Builders
           o Word Ladder
           o Make it Real
           o Vocabulary Through Morphemes
           o Teaching Phonics and Word Study in the Intermediate School Grades
           o A-Z Reading
    Develop Context Clues skills (Fall 2007 – On-going – Reading/Language Arts
       teachers)
    Develop a vocabulary program to implement during our 30 minute flex time.
       (Fall 2007 – On-going – Reading Committee/Reading teachers)
    Create a grade-level vocabulary list for each content area. (Fall 2007 – On-Going
       – Subject area teachers)
    Display a school-wide word wall where classes take turns adding words to the
       wall (cross-curricular). (Fall 2007 – On-going – All teaching staff/Media Center
       Specialist)
    A cross-curricular vocabulary component will be added to our Brain Game
       competition. (Fall 2008 – On-going – Brain Game Coaches)
    Students will have increased opportunities to choral read, oral read, and listen to
       model reading across the curriculum. (Fall 2007 – On-going – Classroom
       Teachers)
    Students will have increased exposure to idioms, imagery, metaphors, and
       figurative language.     (Fall 2007 – On-going – Language Arts Teachers)
    Students and teachers will utilize Voyager for 30 to 60 minutes per day for those
       students who are below grade level in reading and language arts. (Fall 2007 – On-
       going – Special Education Teachers/General Education Teachers)




                                            21
    Students will complete and return the summer ISTEP+ Test Prep Packet to the
     Intermediate and Middle School homeroom teachers. (Fall 2008 – On-going –
     Test Prep committee and special education teachers)
    Work with our Instructional Coach to model, conference, and implement high-
     yield strategies to help students attain the goal. (Fall 2009 – On-going –
     Instructional Coach/Administration)

Technology Interventions (Fall 2007 – On-going)*
    Destination Success
    Word Munchers
    Create a website database for teachers to use as resources.
   *These programs will continually be assessed and new programs implemented as they
   become available.

Professional Development
    Teachers will hold regular meetings to share ideas.
    Work with a Literacy Coach to model, conference, and implement high-yield
       strategies to help students attain the goal.
    Maintain Literacy Educators as “experts” in the latest Best Practices.
    Teachers will be encouraged to attend appropriate workshops a share their
       findings.
    Utilize staff meetings, early release days, and team prep time to analyze data,
       share the results, and assess validity of strategies/interventions.
    One staff member will be responsible to coordinate all D.I.B.E.L.S. Benchmark
       and Progress Monitoring assessments and data entry.

Assessments
    Administer NWEA in the fall and spring to measure growth.
    Administer NWEA on a more frequent basis to assess progress of students who
      are not achieving at grade level and move-in students.
    Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Learning Skills, DIBELS, will assess reading
      fluency.
    Give an assessment for the stories read with questions that assess comprehension
      and the skills taught.
    ISTEP+ English/Language Arts Test
    Quick Phonics Screener (QPS)
    MAZE

Research/Best Practices
    Best Practices p. 30-35 and p. 55
    Indiana’s Academic Standards
      Reading: Word Recognition, Fluency, and Vocabulary Development
      Standard 1
             Students use their knowledge of word parts and word relationships, as well


                                          22
            as context clues, to determine the meaning of specialized vocabulary and
            to understand the precise meaning of grade-level-appropriate words.
     Reading: Reading Comprehension Standard 2
            Students read and understand grade-level-appropriate material. They
            describe and connect the essential ideas, arguments, and perspectives of
            the text by using their knowledge of text structure, organization, and
            purpose.
    Using Guided Reading, Literature Circles, Word Study and Other Strategies to
     Strengthen Your Students’ Comprehension (Grades 3-6) Resource Book by Tarry
     Lindquist (Bureau of Education and Research).
    Teaching Vocabulary: Early, Direct, and Suquential by Andrew Biemiller.


NCA Goal 2

All students will improve math computational and problem solving
skills.
Strategies/Interventions
    Provide Daily Math Review (DMR) that emphasizes computation, problem
       solving, and basic facts. (Fall 2007 – On-going – Math Teachers)
    Students will complete and return the summer ISTEP+ Test Prep Packet to the
       Intermediate and Middle School homeroom teachers. (Fall 2008 – On-going –
       Test Prep committee and special education teachers)
    Provide manipulatives to supplement instruction and learning. (Fall 2007 – On-
       going - Administration)
    Students will incorporate writing into math to explain mathematical steps and
       processes through the use of a math journal. (Fall 2007 – On-going – Language
       Arts Teachers/Math Teachers)
    Incorporate math computation and problem solving into related arts curriculum as
       appropriate. (Fall 2007 – On-going – Math Teachers/Related Arts Teachers)
    Students will keep a notebook consisting of math vocabulary, examples, and notes
       from class. (Fall 2007 – On-going – Math Teachers)
    Work with our Instructional Coach to model, conference, and implement high-
       yield strategies to help students attain the goal. (Fall 2009 – On-going –
       Instructional Coach/Administration)

Technology Interventions (Fall 2007 – On-going)*
    Reinforce math skills through the use of math software that is available at AIS
      West. (Destination Success, Accelerated Math, Harcourt Program)
    Integrate calculators into math instruction.
    Utilize the Internet to help develop lesson plans and for students to access
      different sites to improve math skills.



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    FASTT Math (Fluency and Automaticity through Systematic Teaching with
      Technology) – for those student who struggle with basic facts.
   *These programs will continually be assessed and new programs implemented as they
   become available.

Professional Development
    The Technology Integration Trainer and Computer Lab Assistant will in-service
       staff on the available math programs.
    All math teachers will attend monthly math meetings in order to share ideas and
       information.
    All math teachers will be encouraged to attend at least one workshop. They will
       then share any new ideas or strategies with other math teachers.
    Staff will share ideas and materials through a shared folder on the T:Drive.
    Utilize staff meetings, early release days, and team prep time to analyze data,
       share the results, and assess validity of strategies/interventions.
    The Instructional Coach will provide professional development.

Assessments
    Administer NWEA in the fall and spring to measure growth.
    Administer NWEA on a more frequent basis to assess progress of students who
      are not achieving at grade level and move-in students.
    Nightly assignments reinforcing skills taught that day, including mixed review.
    Immediate assessments of skills through direct teacher observation.
    Administer assessments after each unit of study.
    Give grade level assessments to provide baseline data to show improvement.
    Utilize a wide variety of assessment techniques – written, oral, and demonstration
      formats.
    ISTEP+ Math

Research/Best Practices
    Best Practices p. 88-94 and p. 105-106
    Indiana’s Academic Standards
      Mathematics: Computation Standard 2
             Students solve problems involving additions, subtraction, multiplication,
             and division of integers. They solve problems involving fractions,
             decimals, ratios, proportions, and percentages.
      Mathematics: Problems Solving Standard 7
             Students make decisions about how to approach problems and
             communicate their ideas.




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   Avon Intermediate School West
North Central Accreditation Committee

               Co-Chairs
    Mrs. Mendy Smith – 6th Grade/Parent
      Mr. Matthew Martin – 6th Grade

           Steering Committee
       Ms. Lori Morgan – 6th Grade
    Mrs. Kristin McFadden – 5th Grade
      Mrs. Stephanie Guzulaitis – Art
       Mrs. Krissi Miller – Counselor
 Mrs. Emily Schweitzer – Special Education




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