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					Implementing
Electronic
Government
Statement
July 2001
CONTENTS
Page
1. OVERVIEW & VISION 1
1.1 Vision for modern service delivery in 2005 1
1.1.1 The broader context 1
1.1.2 Customer service: our aims 1
1.1.3 Customer expectations 2
1.1.4 Our objectives 2
1.2 Role of Partnerships 3
1.3 Overview of costs, benefits and savings 4
1.4 The modernisation agenda 5
2. STRATEGY AND PROGRAMME 6
2.1 Strategic approach 6
2.2 Which Services by when? 6
2.3 Which channels by when? 7
2.3.1 Front-Line Service Points 7
2.3.2 Telephone access and Contact Centres 8
2.3.3 Public access ICT 10
2.3.4 Interactive digital TV 10
2.4 E-procurement 11
2.5 E-recruitment 11
2.6 Co-ordination with national projects 11
3. CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS 12
3.1 Web site and Intranet 13
3.2 Information management 13
3.3 Technology 14
3.3.1 ICT Strategy 14
3.3.2 Inter-operability 15
3.4 Community skills development 16
4. MANAGING TRANSITION 17
4.1 Project and risk management 17
4.2 Costs, benefits and savings (*) 17
4.3 Human resource issues 19
4.3.1 Skills development 19
4.3.2 Teleworking and mobile technology 20
4.4 Asset management 20
4.5 Integration with Service programmes 21
4.6 Monitoring, review and benchmarking 21
* Financial projections 22
5. SUMMARY TIMELINE AND MILESTONES 23
APPENDICES
1. Summary of Kirklees Vision & Strategy 25
2. Local customer research evidence 26
3. Service roll-out programme 27
4. Contact Centres 30
5. Strategic IT initiatives 33
6. Information, CSS and IT management framework 38
7. IT risk assessment 39
8. Overall IEG risk assessment 43
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KIRKLEES METROPOLITAN COUNCIL
IMPLEMENTING ELECTRONIC GOVERNMENT STATEMENT – JULY 2001
INTRODUCTION
This Statement has been developed from the Council‟s broader Information &
IT
Strategy in order to meet the specific requirement to prepare and submit an
Implementing Electronic Government Statement (IEGS). It is organised in the
following
sections:
1. Overview and vision
2. Strategy and programme
3. Critical success factors
4. Managing transition.
5. Summary timeline and milestones.
1. OVERVIEW AND VISION
1.1 Vision for modern service delivery in 2005
1.1.1 The broader context
The Council has developed a vision of the future of Kirklees, in partnership
with local
people, community organisations, other agencies and business
representatives. A
summary of the Vision, agreed in this form in 1999, is attached (Appendix 1).
By April
2002, the Kirklees Partnership will have reviewed and revised this as a
Community
Strategy, in accordance with the Local Government Act 2000, and used it as a
basis to
negotiate a local Public Service Agreement.
The Council has three broad roles in delivering the vision:
 seek to give best value in the delivery of services for which we are
  We
responsible.
 provide support to involve residents, organisations and enterprises in
  We
the
decisions that affect them.
 provide community leadership in securing the social, economic and
  We
environmental well-being of Kirklees, grounded in democratic accountability.
Despite the breadth of the Council‟s strategic and developmental roles, its
most
fundamental responsibility is in securing service delivery. This role is also the
focus of
this IEG Statement. However, links to the wider governance and
modernisation
agendas are also addressed, and the Council is already exploring with its
partners how
e-government issues can be taken forward collaboratively.
1.1.2 Customer service: our aims
The Council‟s Customer Services Strategy has as its fundamental aim:
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To enable every customer to have easy access to unified customer services,
at
their convenience, through a choice of access points and achieving equal
service outcomes.
To achieve this aim, the Council agreed, in July 1997, to transform its delivery
of
services, over the following 5-10 years, through:
 Flexible and convenient access
 Customer focus and customer care
 Cost-effective ICT
 „Seamless‟ equal access based on local community needs
 Generic working
 Co-location of existing services.
The Government‟s 2005 target for Electronic Service Delivery (ESD) falls
squarely
within this time horizon.
1.1.3 Customer expectations
National and our own local research has made it abundantly clear that
customers
expect:
 be able to contact the Council in the way which suits their circumstances
   To
–a
majority by phone, but also face-to-face and increasingly by electronic means.
 When using the phone, to have the call answered, and in all cases to obtain
the
information they need, quickly and accurately.
 complete a transaction without being passed from contact to contact.
   To
 to repeat the same information each time they contact us.
   Not
 be able to make payments by credit or debit cards.
   To
 be able to contact us outside „office hours‟ – particularly in the early
   To
evenings
and on Saturday mornings.
 That we can respond to „whole‟ issues (for example around „life episodes‟)
in a
unified way, irrespective of our departmental boundaries.
Local research evidence on these and related issues is attached at Appendix
2.
1.1.4 Our objectives
Our objectives for 2005 are therefore that:
Customers will have a real choice of channels to access services. These
will
include:
 Multi-service Contact Centres for telephone and e-mail contact, open at
least 64
hours per week. The diversity of services provided by a unitary Council means
we
must strike a careful balance between generic working and adequate
specialist
attention. At present we believe this will best be achieved by four thematic
groupings of transaction types, each with a dedicated contact number.
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 network of front-line service points offering face-to-face contact. Kirklees
  A
covers
160 square miles and embraces large and small towns and dispersed rural
settlements. This means offering a hierarchy of service, with trade-offs
between
distance travelled and complexity of service (just as people expect when
shopping
in the private sector). Our aim is to replace single-service facilities with
integrated
ones, where possible in partnership with other agencies such the Post Office
and
Primary Care Trusts.
 fully transactional web site for those who prefer to use electronic self-
  A
service. Our
approved Pathfinder project (with Tameside MBC and LB Waltham Forest) is
particularly focussed on developing this strand, whilst our successful ISB-3
bid will
explore the potential for access via digital TV.
There will be common standards of service whichever channel is used,
secured
by unified management of the above facilities. Building on Council standards
which
have been in place for a decade, these will cover basic customer care
behaviour; equal
access for all customers; timeliness and quality of delivery; availability and
accuracy of
information; choice of means of payment; and indeed all aspects of the
customer
transaction.
There will be integrated information management and ICT, to capture
customer
histories (subject to information security and data protection safeguards), and
to ensure
adequate links to „back-office‟ systems and readily available monitoring
information on
performance.
Most customer interactions will be handled through the ‘front office’
channels
outlined above. Our aim is for front-line staff to handle 80% of queries,
freeing „back
office‟ resources for more complex tasks. However, the Council will also
maintain
specialist channels, particularly in the social care and regulatory services, for
the
remaining 20% or fewer of transactions.
1.2 Role of Partnerships
The Council is a long-standing pioneer of a wide range of partnerships, but
these are
under-developed as yet in the e-government arena, and the Council
recognises that
further development of such partnerships will be essential.
The Kirklees Partnership – our Local Strategic Partnership – will develop its
Community
Strategy by April 2002. This will add to the themes of the existing Vision &
Strategy
(App. 1) a „seventh strand‟ focussed on community and citizen access to
information. A
Partnership seminar on this theme has already been held and partners have
begun to
discuss the potential for:
Shared information. Protocols are established between the Council and the
Police
in the Crime and Disorder arena, and there active discussions in hand with
the
Health Service.
Shared delivery channels. There is definite interest amongst Partners in a
Kirklees
portal, and in shared contact centre facilities. Opportunities for colocation will
be
pursued within the Front Line Service Points strategy (see below).
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Specific ‘joined-up’ services. As examples to date:
- The Kirklees Business Partnership, which brings together the Council, local
business intermediaries and all 13 statutory regulators, has a web site
(www.kbp.org.uk) with links to the KMC site and those of all other
regulators. This offers an electronic enquiry form through which business
can raise, and have answered, any regulatory issues.
- The West Yorkshire Connexions Partnership, to be established in April
2002, will be highly reliant on ICT to provide information to young people –
with a web site already in existence – and to communicate with them.
There will be free internet access from all schools and Careers Service
offices as well as from our libraries and Community Access to Lifelong
Learning centres.
- Under the Kirklees Community Advice and Legal Services Partnership the
advice sector, which includes Council and voluntary sector services, is
looking to develop extensive web-sites and technology to increase access
to legal information and advice.
Equally important are technology partnerships to develop the digital
infrastructure. The
Council‟s data and voice networks are provided by private sector managed
service
suppliers. The Council has also successfully obtained ISB-3 (Invest to Save)
funding,
in partnership with the Health Authority and a TV supplier, to pilot digital TV
access to
public services. These projects are detailed below.
West Yorkshire authorities have commissioned CDW Associates to carry out
work in August and September 2001 to identify cross-authority developments
that could be jointly worked on, and elements of a common approach to
partnership working with other public bodies
1.3 Overview of costs, benefits and savings
The Council believes there will be major benefits to our customers and
citizens from the
realisation of the objectives outlined above, based as they are on a strong
body of
evidence about public expectations. We will be able to track the impact of our
egovernment
initiatives through well-established mechanisms for gaining customer
feedback.
There are, however, very substantial costs in achieving these benefits. Some
of the
more obvious are:
 the capital side, investment in ICT and in new facilities such as contact
  On
centre
accommodation.
 the revenue side, the staffing costs of maintaining longer hours of public
  On
access
to services.
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Equally there are of course savings to be achieved, notably from:
The opportunity over a period to rationalise existing service channels.
Reduced transaction costs as customers are encouraged to switch to more
costeffective
channels.
But it Is certain that costs will precede savings, and up-front financial support
through
Government funding streams such as Local Government On-line (LGOL) and
Invest to
Save (ISB) is therefore essential to the achievement of the Government‟s
targets.
These issues are developed more fully, and so far as possible quantified, in
section 4.2
below.
1.4 The modernisation agenda
Although this Statement is focussed on electronic service delivery, the Council
fully
appreciates the links between e-government and the wider modernisation
agenda. For
example:
 Social inclusion. Much has been written about the 'digital divide', and there
are real
risks of social exclusion through lack of access to, or skills in using, the new
media.
Explicit strategies are developed below to address this. Equally, however,
electronic media can be a tool of inclusion, for example for citizens with
disabilities,
those on low incomes, and people from minority ethnic communities. An
integrated
strategy for community access to ICT, drawing on national and local funding
streams including UK Online and the Peoples Network, is currently being
implemented in community access points within the district (see 2.3.3). Web
pages
have recently been developed to support the Council‟s new Equality
Networks.
 Community engagement. The KMC web site already offers opportunities for
consultation and feedback. More broadly, the Council has embarked on a
programme of devolution and community engagement, including the
development
of devolved area committees, increased Member involvement, and community
action planning. This will provide opportunities for local people, through
personal
and community ICT access, to inform local decision-making on as a wide a
basis
as possible.
 Executive management. The Council is currently testing a range of models
for
decision-making and scrutiny, in advance of a Mayoral referendum in October
2001
and subsequent adoption of a constitution. Ready access by Members to
summarised information about decisions, and detailed background when
required,
will be crucial to the effectiveness and transparency of new arrangements. All
Members have e-mail addresses and Intranet access, and detailed proposals
for
content are currently being developed. The web site also enables improved
public
information about decision-making, which is the basis of transparency and
accountability.
The Government‟s agenda for modernising public services also includes
major
initiatives in IT infrastructure. The Council‟s plans to link to these are set out
below.
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2. STRATEGY AND PROGRAMME
Against the previous broad background, this section details the Council‟s
strategy and
programmes of work to meet the Government‟s ESD targets.
2.1 Strategic approach
The Council is committed to pursue the Government‟s target of 100%
electronic
capability in feasible services by 2005. As a Pathfinder, we are also
committed to a
target of 40% e-enablement by April 2002. Our partner, Tameside MBC, has
negotiated a „stretched target‟ of 100% by 2003 in its local Public Service
Agreement,
and we will consider an ESD target for our own PSA.
However, it is vital to see these targets as measures of effective customer
service, not
as an end in themselves, and to maintain a balanced approach. In particular:
 „Quick wins‟ can and will be gained by placing a whole range of customer-
facing
forms and Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on our web site, without initial
integration with back-office systems. However, there are risks of „double-entry‟
here, and alongside the quick wins in broadening the range of services
offered, we
will be researching the various technical routes to fuller integration so that the
offer
to customers can also be „deepened‟.
 Customer research to date has identified only a small minority whose
preferred
access route to the Council is through our web site. We recognise that this is
likely
to change rapidly, with 20 million of the national population over 16 now
having
Internet access at home or work, and 10 million homes now having access,
according to Oftel (June 2001). Oftel also report 59% of the population
anticipating
having Internet access by 2004, and 62% wanting to access at least one
transactional service. But face-to-face and telephone contact will remain
crucial for
many customers, and our IT systems will be designed for „dual use‟ – both for
customer self-service and for staff handling customer requests by telephone
or over
the counter.
2.2 Which Services by when?
In this context, the Council‟s programme is as follows:
1. Through our Pathfinder partnership, place a large array of forms and FAQs
on
our web site/Intranet by April 2002, to achieve the Pathfinder 40% target. To
achieve „quick wins‟ the initial focus is on:
Forms not requiring signatures, verifications or payments.
Transaction matching the roll-out programme for the Contact Centres (see
below).
Those not requiring complex processes across Service or agency
boundaries.
Pragmatically, those where Services can offer the enthusiasm and resource
to achieve early gains.
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Appendix 3 sets out those transactions already on our web site and those
planned by April 2002. We also comment there on BVPI 157, the proposed
measure of progress, which we believe needs improvement.
2. In parallel, and again through the Pathfinder, research the most effective
means
of back-office integration and begin to re-engineer back office processes. Our
aim is to complete this work by December 2001.
3. Define our „100%‟, and prioritise/programme the remaining 60%, against:
Government criteria as set out in the IEG Guidelines – volumes, statutory
change and efficiency gain.
Local evidence of customer concerns.
Scope for offering synergy across related services.
4. Negotiate with Partners, using similar criteria, to identify potential joint e-
enabled
services for future years.
There is a particular need to develop better payment facilities for customers.
The ability
to pay electronically „up front‟ will increase customer satisfaction, reduce
transaction
costs, and improve Council cash-flow and debt management. At present the
Council
offers direct debit/standing order facilities which are well-used, but offers very
limited
facilities for telephone or web payment by credit or debit card. A pilot is to
commence
shortly, jointly with Tameside, to process sundry debtor accounts by
telephone. This
will be reviewed in January 2002 and future strategy will be to:
Extend the facility to web payments and all FLSPs.
Extend from sundry debtors to other income streams, particularly Council
tax and
Housing rents.
Switch where possible from invoicing to advance payment – which may in
turn
require a review of pricing policies.
2.3 Which channels by when?
Key features of the Council‟s existing pattern of access to services are:
 extensive network of front-line service points, reflecting the dispersed
  An
nature of
the District and individual Service histories.
Telephone as the primary mode of access, accounting for some 70% of all
contacts,
but with substantial problems for customers in getting through and obtaining a
satisfactory response.
Limited development to date of the web site as an access channel.
2.3.1 Front-Line Service Points
Over the last two years, the Council has begun to rationalise its front-line
service points
(FLSPs) by establishing:
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 Two major Kirklees Information Points (KIPs) – one-stop shops for a
significant
range of services – in the major centres of Huddersfield and Dewsbury.
 Three of an eventual 5 or 6 smaller generic service points („township KIPs‟)
in
smaller centres, with a more restricted range of services available on demand,
but
with links to other facilities.
However, a wide range of Service-specific facilities also remain in operation.
The Council's 61 core FLSPs will be restructured over the next 3 years to
create a
network providing locations within 1 mile of 80% of the population and, for the
remainder, FLSPs in convenient district or local centres. Each FLSP will use
the
Intranet to provide a menu of services, referrals and electronic forms, at the
same time
as enabling staff to provide a wide range of real-time information services.
Each will
also have freephone links to the Council's Contact Centres. All FLSPs will
accept noncash
payments, and approximately 90 Post Offices will accept cash payments,
linked
via the Post Office Network to the Council.
Intranet access will be rolled out to trusted public sector partners (eg Primary
Care
Trusts) to permit their FLSPs to access appropriate Council information and to
make
referrals to and from Council services for their clients. Opportunities for joint or
colocated facilities with other agencies will be explored through the Kirklees
Partnership.
Free access internet terminals with bookmarked and hot-linked public service
sites are
being installed at a range of public FLSPs and community and education
venues (see
2.3.3 below), providing easy access to Council and other public sector
information via
the Web.
2.3.2 Telephone access and Contact Centres
The Council‟s telecomms. strategy over the last decade has been based on:
 Extensive promotion of direct-dial numbers for individual functions.
 central switchboard to handle residual calls and undertake diagnosis and
  A
signposting of customer requirements.
Specialist facilities including an automated reporting line for all highway-
related
matters (ROSS) and a front office call centre within the Revenues & Benefits
Service.
The latter in particular has been overwhelmed by the volume of calls from our
160,000
Council Tax payers and the Council is currently employing a private sector
call handling
service to manage this facility, which is providing valuable learning.
Although this architecture has strengths, its multitude of specialist lines is ill-
suited to
the needs of extended-hours access, when „back office‟ staff may simply be
unavailable. Nor does it lend itself to an integrated response to customers
who may
access the Council through different channels at different times. Accordingly
the
Council has committed itself to a major programme of Contact Centre
development.
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The Council‟s approach is to have four thematic contact centres:
- Home (Housing/Refuse Services/Switchboard)
- Finance (Council Tax/Benefits)
- Personal Services (Social/Education/Health)
- Street Care (Highways/Street Cleaning/Grounds Maintenance)
Whilst each contact centre will need to have a slightly different approach,
there will be
common areas such as:
Corporate standards of call handling.
Common hand-off processes and procedures.
Single CRM database and information.
Consistent standards and skills in the areas of customer care, IT and
specialised knowledge.
The development and roll out of the contact centres is across a broad front,
achieving
early improvements and their consolidation through investment in buildings,
technology
and staff development. Phasings of the above centre(s) are:
Home 10/2001 – 1/2002
Finance 6/2001 – 3/2002
(Co-location of these centres 6/2002)
Street Care 10/2001 – 10/2002
Personal 11/2001 – 2003
(Full integration of technology by 2005).
The Contact Centre project is detailed more fully in appendix 4.
As with the FLSPs, there may be opportunities for „joined up‟ call handling
with other
agencies, and this will be explored through the Kirklees Partnership. Further
work will
also be required to bring the more complex transactions of regulatory services
within
the above framework. Already, however, the Council provides a one-stop
helpline on
all regulatory enquiries (covering Council and non-Council Services). This was
part of
our successful Beacon application under the „competitiveness and enterprise‟
banner.
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2.3.3 Public access ICT
Although web access to the Council is an attractive and efficient option, not all
customers will have on-line access at home. Kirklees is developing a
partnership
approach to providing, planning and promoting public access to ICT. Already
960
terminals are in operation at a range of locations – libraries, FE colleges,
community
facilities and community schools.
Over the next 3 years the objectives are:
 agree a regularly updated hardware and software specification,
   to
 identify and fill gaps in provision (both in terms of geographical
   to
distribution and
targeted reduction in social exclusion) – to this end all facilities are recorded
on a
corporate GIS system as they are put in place;
 cross-promote the facilities to a range of priority groups, and
   to
 find solutions to the long term sustainability of the provision and the
   to
necessary
technical and learner/user support.
The strategy is founded on a set of agreed protocols and priorities which will
enable
development of integrated provision without distorting the service delivery
agendas of
the partners. Advantage will be taken of a range of funding streams, including
UK On-
Line, NGFL, HFECE, the People‟s Network and the New Opportunities Fund.
2.3.4 Interactive digital TV
Many commentators have argued that digital TV will be the route to mass
internet
access. To explore this potential, Kirklees Council and partners are
undertaking a 2-
year pilot project to assess how user-friendly and useful DTV could be as a
method of
accessing public sector services. Whilst the technological capacity exists we
know very
little about the public‟s attitude to electronic service delivery. This is
particularly the
case in disadvantaged communities where residents tend to use public
services more
than other sections of the population but have little or no access to the
electronic
means of doing so.
The project attempts to redress this imbalance and will test whether providing
information about health and local authority matters in this way is acceptable
and useful
to the communities identified within the scope of the project. The prime
objectives are
to:
Test customer views of digital TV as a medium to access public services.
Explore and evaluate the range of services suitable for inclusion in a project
of this nature.
Understand how the use of digital TV can add value to public services
Test the technology and its suitability for future use.
Identify what types of information may help provide future business
improvements for public services.
 local people in control, thereby challenging service provider
  Put
assumptions.
Improve customer relations
Test the ability of the public to cope with electronic access and to use the
interactive service.
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The Council‟s partners are Calderdale and Kirklees Health Authority, NHS
Direct, NTL
and local community arts group Artimedia.
The web/Intranet is a crucial underpinning technology for all the channels, and
our
web/Intranet strategy is set out below (section 3.1).
2.4 E-procurement
Although this Statement focuses on service delivery, the Council recognises
that the
Government has also set targets for e-procurement and that, as with
electronic
payments, there are substantial opportunities to reduce transaction costs.
Automatic payment by BACS is available to all suppliers of goods and
services, and
suppliers are regularly encouraged to use this method. Over 80% of invoices
are now
paid in this way (as are almost all payroll transactions and over 50% of
Housing Benefit
payments). However, the vision is to automate the whole purchasing cycle,
from
ordering through invoicing to payment, in order to reduce administrative costs
and
improve financial control through commitment accounting. This will be
achievable in
the first instance for purchases through the Yorkshire Purchasing
Organisation. Open
market purchases will take longer to automate but various options, including
those
offered nationally through IdeA‟s Marketplace project, are currently being
researched.
The Council, along with Preston Borough Council, has submitted an
expression of
interest in bidding for funds under ISB round 4, to set up an e-procurement
system for
use by local authorities in the North of England, with access to catalogues of
local and
national suppliers. One of the outcomes of this project would be a blueprint for
other
authorities planning to set up similar e-procurement systems.
2.5 E-recruitment
Job-seekers, like suppliers, are another less obvious „customer‟ group. In
preparing for
a Best Value Review of the Personnel function, targets have been set for the
delivery of
application forms and information packs for Council vacancies to applicants,
and the
receipt of applications, on line by the end of March 2002. This facility will
address
customer demand for internet-based communication in this area, although the
Council‟s
commitment to equal opportunities in recruitment means that we do not
foresee a time
when such facilities will fully replace hard copy.
This project also acknowledges the growth in internet recruitment advertising.
While all
Council jobs have been posted on our own web site since 1999, a pilot
scheme to work
in partnership with private sector partners is being developed. This will assess
the
impact on applications and advertising spend of placing adverts on a public
jobs web
site.
2.6 Co-ordination with national projects
The Council welcomes the fact that key elements of the e-government
infrastructure are
being provided nationally. The IDeA Marketplace initiative has been referred
to above.
Other key national projects are:
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National Land & Property Gazetteer. The draft LLPG for Kirklees was
produced in
time for the first cut of the NLPG in March 2001 and was one of 80 authorities‟
accepted for inclusion. A detailed project plan includes linkage with the
statutory
National Street Gazetteer; use to „cleanse‟ key Service systems; and
availability on
the Intranet. It is anticipated that the formal agreement with LGIH will be
signed in
August 2001 and the gazetteer completed by December 2001.
National Land Information Service. The Council is already receiving
searches over
the Internet, and work is in hand to establish a direct interface between our
Local
Land Charges system and the NLIS hub. The Council is working jointly with
the hub
providers to market the service to local solicitors. The partnership with NLIS
and
our software provider will also provide the capacity to respond to the Seller‟s
Pack
initiative once this legislation is revived.
Electoral Register. This project is at an early stage nationally. The Kirklees
registers are already available over our Wide Area Network and we therefore
anticipate no problem in linking to the national project at the appropriate time.
 On-Line Citizen Portal. This is linked to the Kirklees Council web site,
  UK
although
we acknowledge that the link can be improved. We are not clear about
Government
expectations beyond that, other than in terms of technical compatibility (see
below).
 National Grid for Learning. Now in its third year, this has provided internet
access
for all schools and has funded a range of other ICT developments including
some
networks. Also funded is the Regional Broadband project involving 12 of the
15
LEAs in Yorkshire & Humberside. This will provide fast connections between
schools, libraries and museums in the region, with a link to the Kirklees WAN.
Exploration is now under way to identify the opportunities for improved email/
internet links for schools and the LEA.
The Council‟s convergence with national technical standards is set out below.
3. CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS
Delivery of the ambitious public outcomes set out above is dependent on key
elements
of infrastructure. In particular there is a need for:
 robust web site/Intranet, supported by:
  A
Effective information management; and
 resilient technical infrastructure.
  A
Equally important is a widespread and inclusive ability in the community to
use the new
channels and – addressed in section 4 below – the change management
capability of
the Council itself.
G:\Admin\AdmHor\Report\IEG - Final.doc 13
3.1 Web site and Intranet
The Council‟s web site (www.kirkleesmc.gov.uk) and Intranet are the
crucial
platform for the delivery of e-government. This is because an integrated site
design
can provide a self-service channel for those customers who choose to use it,
whether
via PC or TV, and can also be used in the same way by staff handling face-to-
face or
telephone customer interactions.
The Council‟s Intranet was launched in October 1999 and has already
reached over
three-quarters of the Council‟s 4000 or so PC users; it is now part of the
standard
desktop, and roll-out to all technically practicable work stations will be
completed within
the next 12 months. Following an earlier pilot, the new web-site was launched
in April
2000, has won the RNIB award for content and accessibility and was short-
listed for
enhancing public service provision in the local government website awards
2000. It is
now attracting some 800,000 monthly hits to the site. The designs of the web
site and
Intranet have been aligned to maximise common information holdings and
ease of use
for staff. Key development projects now in hand, which support other
elements of this
strategy, include:
 On-line customer service forms.
 Database to capture generic customer details, as a building block towards
CRM.
 Pilot system for debtor payments.
 Web-based LLPG.
 Web-based Council decision information.
 Comprehensive „reference library‟ of Council policies and procedures.
A baseline external assessment of the site was commissioned as part of the
Pathfinder
project and issues arising from that will be integrated with the above action
plan.
Consideration will be given to multi-language facilities, where our partnership
with LB
Waltham Forest should assist.
The Council is already preparing for the impact of the Freedom of Information
Act and
sees the web site as a key platform for its publication scheme.
3.2 Information management
The web site/Intranet will only be as good as the information on which it relies.
The
Council has recognised the critical importance of effective information
management to
the e-government and wider modernisation agendas in several ways:
 formal corporate Information Management Policy has been agreed,
  A
setting out 20
quality standards for information management.
 Services are developing Information Management Action Plans which
  All
will identify
their information requirements and how they will address the corporate
standards.
 corporate Information Management team is being established to co-
  A
ordinate these
activities across the Council and to ensure continuing compliance with data
protection, freedom of information and other relevant legislation.
G:\Admin\AdmHor\Report\IEG - Final.doc 14
The assessment of which IM functions should be undertaken corporately and
which
devolved is a key issue for a large metropolitan council, as a fully corporate
solution is
impractical and a fully federal solution clearly inefficient. The LLPG is being
managed
centrally and the other key initiative at this stage is the development of
Customer
Relations Management (CRM).
As part of the Pathfinder Partnership, the Council is developing a browser-
based facility
to enable access by customer service staff to back office systems, which will
also
provide a database to support customer transactions. The database will work
across
the Council, holding base information including addresses and customer
details.
Transactions will be held on the database, enabling the Council both to
progress
requests and to respond to queries from customers on previous requests. To
maximise
the benefits in terms of unit costs and service levels, line of business systems
will be
integrated with the CRM database. This will ensure the capture of data from
Contact
Centres, FLSPs and the web without double entry.
This project, while in its early stages, has already highlighted the different
levels of
complexity in achieving integration, and different solutions are being
investigated with
software suppliers. As it develops it will expose the tension between „joined-
up‟
customer information and data protection, and the Council looks forward to
the
promised Cabinet Office guidance on this issue.
Beyond these initial commitments to LLPG and CRM, it will be a key task for
the
incoming Corporate Information Manager to advise on further corporate
initiatives.
3.3 Technology
3.3.1 ICT Strategy
As important as good information management is a resilient technical
infrastructure.
Key features of the Council‟s ICT strategy are the following:
Networks. The Council‟s voice and data networks are provided under
managed
service contracts, enabling flexibility in terms of capacity and facilities. The
contracts have been arranged so that both are due to be tendered for June
2005.
This will facilitate the work on voice and data convergence which is starting in
2001.
Key activities in the short term are, for the data network, a review of the
Server
Strategy, and for the voice network, support to Contact Centre developments.
The
medium term action is increased capacity to take account of e-services.
Platforms. These have been rationalised to provide an effective Unix facility,
with
migration from the mainframe (VME) to be completed by April 2002. The NT
environment is still comparatively unstable, although it is becoming the
preferred
option for some line of business system suppliers. In the short term the key
initiatives are the Server and Operations Best Value Review(s). In addition to
addressing procurement and support, these reviews will examine levels of
resilience, key to the delivery of services.
G:\Admin\AdmHor\Report\IEG - Final.doc 15
 Desktop. The Council has a standard desktop that meets both corporate
and
service needs in the short and medium term, with 88% of PC users now
attached to
the Wide Area Network. Following a completed Best Value Review, the key
activity
through the Service Improvement Plan is to provide the necessary resilience
and
support to ensure public service continuity. A replacement/rental strategy is in
place to enable PCs to be upgraded where this is required. The longer term
significant issue will be changes to the desktop with the convergence of voice
and
data.
 Business systems. The procurement of line of business applications
provides a
strong basis for Council Services to develop. These systems continue to be
enhanced, although the strategy brings with it a number of issues with regard
to
integration with the Customer Relations Management database, in that each
application presents unique problems requiring bespoke work.
Corporate systems. The Council has robust, secure and expandable
systems for
the provision of e-mail, Internet and Intranet. In the medium term these three
facilities will require additional resilience and support as they become central
to the
Council‟s extended customer services strategy.
A schedule of the Council‟s strategic ICT initiatives is attached at appendix 5
3.3.2 Inter-operability
The Government requirements for the electronic interchange of information
(e-GIF) are
based on XML standards and agreed data formats (XML schemas) to
facilitate the
electronic interchange of data with Government departments. At the moment
only a
limited number of formats have been published and many of these relate to
the
movement of data within central government. The schemas for interacting
with the
Government Portal are available and will be used to inform our development
of the
Kirklees web site. There is also a schema for submitting end of year PAYE
returns to
the Inland Revenue. KMC uses software from our payroll system supplier to
make this
return, currently on magnetic tape, and will expect them to comply with e-GIF
standards
prior to 2005. The Council is also aware of, and will track, proposals to
implement a
local/central government secure network (L-GSI), although these do not yet
appear to
be influencing practical discussions, for example between the DfEE and the
Education
Service.
Interoperability within KMC is being addressed both within the CRM initiative
described
above and in work being undertaken on data management. In order for CRM
and other
systems to communicate, there must be a means of translating the key fields
used for
accessing one system to the key fields needed to access the others. The
LLPG will
provide consistent address keys, but a wider data audit is being undertaken to
identify
all inter-system links and key fields. This will identify how data can be fed
between or
extracted from several systems to provide an integrated customer service,
and will also
offer efficiency gains by eliminating data inconsistency and duplication.
G:\Admin\AdmHor\Report\IEG - Final.doc 16
3.4 Community skills development
The Council recognises the importance of enabling all sections of the
community to
take advantage of the new electronic media. This involves more than creating
the
public access channels described above - there is also a need for active and
targeted
development of the necessary skills, in support of Lifelong learning, the
fulfillment of the
regional e-skills targets and the development of communities and individuals.
It is recognised that users and learners will have very different needs. For
example;
 Libraries and other public access ICT locations form soft entry points where
people
out of the habit of learning or training can begin to engage at their own pace.
 colleges' outstations provide places near to students' homes where they
   FE
can
study for courses and get remote tutor support.
 Specialist support is available to specific groups of adult learners and ICT
users:
Fe-email are based at the Media Centre and offer training to women in ICT
skills;
U3A rents Libraries' Holmfirth ICT training suite to teach groups of older
people ICT
skills.
However, the major specific initiatives is the UK Online ICT Learning Centres
initiative.
This will establish an integrated network of Centres, managed and staffed by
community organisations, in the 12 most disadvantaged wards in Kirklees.
The project,
managed by the Kirklees Learning Partnership, will receive £1.4m from UK
Online and
£0.5m from the New Opportunities Fund to equip Learning Centres with the
latest
technology to enable people to discover exactly how they can use it for
leisure, work, at
home or for their business.
The project will train hard-to-reach groups in ICT through a programme of
tasters and
courses in a wide range of ICT applications, working with local people to
create
activities that reflect local ideas, and to create partnerships between
individuals,
community organisations, colleges and others. The network will consist of
static
centres, mobile facilities using notebook computers for outreach, and micro-
facilities of
one or two computers. Centres will provide a combination of conventional
learning
materials and content that is designed to engage and inspire new users.
The will offer a welcoming environment with an emphasis on discovery and
enjoyment.
The staff at the Centres will help individuals to use the Internet and e-mail and
to
understand how to shop electronically, contact friends and family and to
obtain
information on sport, arts, jobs and local services.
Within the designated wards, the project is aimed at:
 People who need help with basic skills
 Lone parents
 People from ethnic minorities
 Unemployed people
 People with disabilities
 People who are over 60.
G:\Admin\AdmHor\Report\IEG - Final.doc 17
Skills development is also important to the Council's own workforce and is
addressed below.
4. MANAGING TRANSITION
The Council recognises that a major change process is needed to achieve the
strategy
and programmes outlined above.
4.1 Project and risk management
The Council‟s management arrangements for the work described in this
Statement
include the following:
Member of the Council‟s all-party Cabinet, Cllr Robert Light, as elected
Member eenvoy
– supported by an active (and again all-Party) Information & Customer
Services Panel chaired by Cllr Paul Battye.
Deputy Chief Executive (DCE) as officer e-envoy – Rob Vincent.
Corporate Information & IT Strategy Group, led by DCE and including other
appropriate Directors and Heads of Service (chief officers).
Action plans for each strand within the I & IT Strategy (e.g. customer
service, public
access, Web/Intranet, information management, technical infrastructure),
each led
by an appropriate chief officer.
Specific project plans within each action plan, with identified lead officers,
resource
requirement and timescales.
The chart at appendix 6 details these arrangements.
Risk management is inherent within the project management methodology.
For the
most pressing major project, the corporate contact centre, an explicit risk
register has
been developed and is actively managed. This discipline is now being
extended to
other major projects. Risk assessment of the IT infrastructure has also been
developed
with District Audit, and is attached at appendix 7.
Risks associated with this IEG strategy itself have also been carefully
considered and
an analysis appears at appendix 8.
4.2 Costs, benefits and savings
Council services are often contrasted unfavourably with on-line providers in
such areas
as insurance and banking, and customers‟ experience in those sectors has
clearly
influenced expectations of the public sector. However, a commercial
enterprise
investing in electronic service delivery has – in principle – some clear-cut
commercial
decisions to make. The key issue is the trade-off between the costs incurred
and the
business growth achieved through the number and profitability of customers
gained.
For most Council services, cost/benefit trade-offs are more complex than this,
for one
or more of these reasons:
Councils carry universal service obligations that preclude screening out
„unprofitable‟ customers (one objective of private sector CRM systems).
G:\Admin\AdmHor\Report\IEG - Final.doc 18
Councils are often monopoly providers of services with strong „public good‟
characteristics and little or no scope for growth.
Many services have no price which can be set against cost, but are rationed
on nonfinancial
criteria
Expenditure is limited by tax and borrowing constraints rather than by the
marginal
customer‟s willingness to pay.
Decisions about service provision are taken by elected Members
accountable to the
public, and not solely on „business‟ grounds.
These factors mean that an assessment of the „benefit‟ from ESD, whether in
meeting
more customer needs or achieving greater satisfaction, is likely to be
judgmental and
politicised rather than quantitative and hard-edged.
What is easier in principle – though far from easy in practice – is to assess the
balance
of financial costs and savings, once a particular course of action has been
judged
beneficial. Key elements of the balance sheet will include:
Costs Savings
One-off One-off
Investment in IT –especially systems
integration and resilience for high
transaction volumes
Adaptation and fitting-out of buildings (e.g.
contact centre)
Disposal of obsolete facilities
Staff retraining
Recurrent Recurrent
Maintenance of IT Lower transaction costs (e.g. from on-line
payments)
Longer opening hours – staff and IT costs Higher productivity
Flexible working/reduced office
accommodation?
Less need for paper and storage space?
The table illustrates that:
 Costs will precede savings – new facilities created before old ones can be
run down.
 Costs will be focused as new budget lines – savings will be diffused across
the
organisation, and harder to capture.
Funding strategies will have to reflect this profile. This means that:
 „Front-loaded‟ Government funding regimes, such as ISB and LGOL, are
essential
to rapid progress.
 These can be replicated internally – for example, our 2001/2 budget
includes
substantial „up front‟ funding for the contact centre.
 Investment by private partners can play a key role – for example our
managed
service provider‟s investment in the data network, amortised through annual
revenue budgets.
G:\Admin\AdmHor\Report\IEG - Final.doc 19
However, the Government needs to recognise that:
Major investment will be needed to achieve its 2005 targets.
National targets can distort proper VfM considerations – Members locally
must
retain discretion over the trade-off between spending and customer benefit.
Money can only be spent once – for example, efficiency savings can be
reinvested
for customer benefit or contribute to financial savings targets, but not both.
Government funding for one-off investments (e.g. UK On-Line and the
Peoples‟
Network) requires, for sustainability, funding to cover support staff, running
costs
and future replacement of hardware and software.
The pace of change will inevitably reflect the geographical and social
penetration,
and acceptability, of electronic media.
In this last respect, the Council recognises „hard choices‟ ahead, and
acknowledges
that it can influence customer preferences by promoting and incentivising
particular
channels. We are well aware, for example, that cheque payments cost some
20 times
as much as BACS payments and that, in the utilities sector, billing queries
over the web
can cost little more than 1% of the costs of handling a letter. Our Pathfinder
programme will include a drive to market electronic channels once a critical
mass of
transactions is available.
The Council has a well-integrated financial and service planning process – not
just in
our own view but in District Audit‟s too. The issues in this section have
received, and
will continue to receive, careful consideration in the revenue and capital
budget
processes. The table at the end of this section (p.22) offers a „snapshot‟
summary of
the current position.
4.3 Human resource issues
The Council recognises that major issues of human resource management
are implied
by this programme of work. Implications for staff include:
 New relationships between front and back office, and between the Council
and
partner organisations.
 More generic styles of working in the front office.
 Extended opening hours – which are also an opportunity to advance the
„family
friendly‟ agenda.
 Flexible working in the geographical sense – with more home-based
working and
use of mobile technology for appropriate staff groups.
 New skill requirements, with major impact on training and development
needs.
4.3.1 Skills development
The development of ICT skills in the wider community has been addressed
above.
Within the Council itself, we recognise the importance of all the areas of skills
development identified in the IEGS guidelines and we are currently revising
our ICT
training strategy. Commenting briefly on each area:
G:\Admin\AdmHor\Report\IEG - Final.doc 20
Leadership (Members and senior management) – our corporate training
plan
supports both management and Member development.
Business systems development – technical training by the IT Service is
complemented by management and business skills training from the generic
training
programme. All senior IT staff are to be trained in project management to
Prince 2
standard.
End-user skills – provided by the in-house Training & Development Team,
which
has ECDL accreditation, through short courses and an open learning centre.
Specialist user skills – usually provided jointly by suppliers and internal
trainers.
E-learning – a pilot has been undertaken in two Services and, following
evaluation,
the next stages are being planned.
Procurement – short courses have been provided but the need for further
skills
development is recognised.
 support - the IT Service provides a help desk facility through Service
  IT
Level
Agreements, and the Training Team provides some on-line software support;
discussions are in hand to rationalise these arrangements.
Information management – competencies are being defined within broader
current
work on management competencies.
4.3.2 Teleworking and mobile technology
The Council has been involved in a pilot EU-funded project, Target, to explore
new
working practices based on homeworking. The project has been developed in
partnership with Wakefield City Council, South and West Yorkshire Passenger
Transport Executives, Gothenburg and Bremen Councils. It set out to resolve
any
technological issues arising from remote working, to demonstrate travel
savings and to
identify successful means of remote management.
These aims have been achieved and work is under way to explore the
feasibility of
phase 2 of the scheme. This would extend the pilot to a larger group of staff,
provide
tele-cottaging facilities within Council community facilities and extend
provision of
equipment to the Council‟s mobile workforce to collect/receive information and
communicate remotely.
There are already over 1300 mobile phones by Council staff, and growing
numbers of personal digital assistants (PDAs), allowing remote use of email
and office
applications across all services. The majority of Councillors have laptops; six
are
piloting PDAs; and several Services are already using or planning to use
mobile
technology, including Social Services, Housing, Community Support and
Highways.
4.4 Asset management
There is a clear link, referred to in the national guidance on Asset
Management Plans,
between more flexible deployment of human resources and opportunities to
rationalise
the Council‟s property portfolio. Once again, however, the logic applies that
new
initiatives „up front‟ will not yield immediate savings opportunities, as typically
only small
pockets of space in larger buildings are vacated, or rented buildings are
vacated with
no capital benefit.
The Council plans to initiate a strategic review of its office accommodation
portfolio
within the next 12 months within which this will be an important strand.
G:\Admin\AdmHor\Report\IEG - Final.doc 21
4.5 Integration with Service programmes
E-government is a corporate issue and is being managed as such in Kirklees.
However, individual Services are in very distinct „businesses‟ and subject to
their own
statutory imperatives and central government planning processes. E-
government
initiatives, consistent with this IEGS, are reflected among others in the
Council‟s:
 Housing Strategy
 Social Services Information Strategy (required by Dept of Health by
September
2001).
 Local Cultural Strategy (due April 2002), which will draw on the existing
Library and
Peoples‟ Network Plans
 LEA Information Management Strategy (required by DfEE).
Conversely, this IEG Statement will now form part of the strategic context for
Servicespecific
strategies and the Best Value Performance Plan.
4.6 Monitoring, review and benchmarking
The project management arrangements set out above provide a robust
mechanism for
reviewing progress and revising plans in the light of experience. For example,
in
advance of the IEGS requirement, the Council‟s existing ICT Strategy
(published in May
2000) was already under review by the Information & IT Strategy Group. That
work,
when completed, will provide detailed action plans in support of this IEG
Statement.
The Council has also just launched a new performance management regime
which will
facilitate the transmission of targets from this and other corporate
programmes into the
BVPP, Service Performance Plans, budgets, sectional and personal
performance
targets – although the very substantial integrative work to achieve this degree
of „joining
up‟ must not be under-estimated.
The Council‟s work in this area as others will of course be subject to scrutiny.
The Council is a member of several relevant national benchmarking groups
and is
forming strong regional and sub-regional links on e-government and related
issues.
G:\Admin\AdmHor\Report\IEG - Final.doc 22
FINANCIAL PROJECTIONS (NOTE TO PARA. 4.2).
Set out below is the best available „snapshot‟ of financial commitments and
requirements specific to our e-government programme. There are of course
further
substamtial base budget commitments – corporately to the Web Development
Team
and Kirklees Information Points, and within individual Service budgets.
IMPLEMENTING ELECTRONIC GOVERNMENT
ESTIMATED PROJECT COSTS
ESTIMATED FUNDING
2001/.02 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 ON-GOING
£000 £000 £000 £000 £000
CUSTOMER SERVICES STRATEGY
CAPITAL INVESTMENT
KIPs Fully developed £1.4m invested in previous years* KMC
Frontline service points/ Township KIPs 30 300 300 150 KMC
Contact Centres 150 100 500 KMC/DTLR(?)
Web 220 KMC/DTLR(?)
Systems integration ----------------------- £2.6m** ------------------------------ Progress dependant upon
availability of resources
both locally and nationally
TOTAL (excluding systems integration) 180 620 800 150 0
Current approved resources 180 0 0 0 0
Proposals under consideration (excludes
systems integration) 0 620 800 150 0
CONTACT CENTRE***
Revenue 607 824 826 907 891
Current approved resources 607 270 270 270 270
Growth under consideration 0 554 556 637 621
PATHFINDER PARTNERSHIP 200 0 0 0 0 DTLR
DIGITAL TV (ISB 3) 436 611 £765K ISB(3)
£12K NTL
£270K KMC
* Additional revenue resources may be required
** Estimate provided by CRM consultant
*** Excludes existing budgets for Environmental Services, Switchboard, Highways, Revs & Bens
ESTIMATED COSTS

G:\Admin\AdmHor\Report\IEG - Final.doc 23
5. SUMMARY TIMELINE AND MILESTONES
The table below summarises target dates for the specific projects summarised
throughout the Statement. Behind each of these is a more detailed project
plan. It is
clearly the case, however, that the pace of progress will be dependent on the
Council‟s
ability to mobilise its own, national and partner resources and to balance the
demands
of e-government against the many other demands on public service
resources.
YEAR PUBLIC OUTCOMES ORGANISATIONAL SUPPORT
2001/2 10/01: New customer service
standards (linked to new Councilwide
core competencies
10/01: Contact Centre „Finance‟ &
„Streetcare‟ themes
10/01: E-payment pilot
11/01: Contact Centre „Home‟
theme
3/02: Council decision-making
information on web
3/02: E-recruitment on web
3/02: 1000
8/01: Web/Intranet convergence
10/01: detailed strategy for Front-Line
Service Points, ahead of budget round
10/01: Corporate IM Team in place
12/01: LLPG completed
12/01:100% of transactions defined,
customer analysis completed
12/01: CRM database and hand-off
technologies established and live
integration to „Home‟ systems
12/01:IT training strategy completed
3/02: Data audit completed
3/02: final migration of systems off
mainframe
2002/3 Q1: 40% of transactions on web
Q1: Colocation of Contact Centre
phases 1 and 2
Q4: 1500 public access terminals
available
Continuing rationalisation of
FLSPs
Continuing increase in % of eenabled
transactions (annual
targets to be defined by Pathfinder
process)
Q1: Kirklees Community Strategy
includes robust Access to Information
theme supported by agreed projects
Q2: Intranet roll-out completed
Q2: Complete strategic office
accommodation review
Q3: Complete roll-out of Intranet to PCs
Q3: Upgrade of Council financial system
to facilitate e-procurement.
Continuing integration of CRM/line of
business systems
G:\Admin\AdmHor\Report\IEG - Final.doc 24
2003/4 Digital TV project completed
Contact Centre phase 4 (Social
theme)
Continuing rationalisation of FLSPs
Continuing increase in % of eenabled
transactions (annual
targets to be defined by Pathfinder
process).
Continuing integration of CRM/line of
business systems
2004/5 Continuing rationalisation of FLSPs
Achieve 100% of e-enabled
transactions.
New voice/data contract
Continuing integration of CRM/line of
business systems
G:\Admin\AdmHor\Report\IEG - Final.doc 25
APPENDIX 1
summary
The Vision and Strategy in Summary
A community built on a strong economy
Wealth creation is the key to achieving many of the wider aspirations of the Vision
and
Strategy. We will:
Develop a more robust local economy linked to stronger regional and national
economies
Provide jobs with good prospects which support a good standard of living
A community and a future which engages everyone
We must provide opportunities for more local people to play a full part in the
life of the
community. We will:
Increase the involvement of local people and communities in shaping the future of
Kirklees
Tackle poverty and inequalities
 Ensure equal opportunities for all
Individuals who are encouraged and supported in personal development
We must ensure that local people are equipped with the education and skills they
need to
respond to the challenges ahead. We will:
Give young people opportunities for broad personal development
Allow them to influence decisions which affect their futures
Raise educational achievement and skill levels
Develop a culture in which learning continues throughout life
A community which is well housed, healthy and safe
We must create and sustain a secure and healthy living environment. We will:
Ensure local people have access to decent, affordable homes which meet their
needs
Work with local people and communities to improve health and independence and
reduce
inequalities
Work to reduce crime and the fear of crime
A community with a high quality environment and more sustainable way of life
We must ensure that local communities are sustainable not just for the present but
for
generations to come. We will:
Protect and enhance the environment and safeguard natural resources
Manage change in a way that allows us to achieve more sustainable communities
Develop a transport system which meets need and causes less damage to the
environment
G:\Admin\AdmHor\Report\IEG - Final.doc 26
A community with a good quality of life and communities with strong identities
We must make each community a good place to live and generate pride of place
among local
people. We will:
Provide a wide variety of leisure and cultural opportunities
Promote a positive image of the area and celebrate local successes
Nurture local community identities
APPENDIX 2 – LOCAL CUSTOMER RESEARCH EVIDENCE
The Council has undertaken research into local people‟s views. The main
method has
been the Council‟s Citizens Panel, „Kirklees Talkback‟. This is a panel of
approximately
1000 adults across the district who are broadly representative of the
population. Panel
members are surveyed through self-completion questionnaires which
regularly achieve
over 80% response rate.
Key findings from recent surveys
Use of the Internet
45% of panel members currently use the Internet, and a further 12% say they
are likely
to start using IT in the next 12 months.
Most people use the Internet at home, and it is mainly used for e-mails and to
find
information for personal use.
A third of panel members who use the internet have visited the Kirklees
Website,
mainly to find out information about Council services. This is an increase from
16%
who said they had visited the Kirklees Website in a similar question in October
2000.
Panel survey in May 2001. 877 responses, a response rate of 80%.
Council Opening Hours
Most panel members would like Council offices to be open over and above
the present
opening times. Saturday was the most popular day, followed by extended
weekdays.
Most people would like to be able to contact the Council outside normal office
hours by
telephone. Only a small proportion wanted to be able to contact the Council
face-toface
or by e-mail.
Over half of panel members wanted to be able to contact the Council between
5pm and
8pm. A further quarter would like to be able to contact the Council between
7am and
9am. Very few want to see Council offices open 24 hours a day or 7 days per
week.
Panel members would like to see the following services in the new contact
centre: dog
wardens, benefits advice, housing, street lighting, highways, and noise
complaints.
Panel survey in June 200. 831 responses, a response rate of 88%.
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APPENDIX 3 – SERVICE ROLL-OUT PROGRAMME
1. BVPI 157
In our view the current definition is incoherent and we urge that it be reviewed
for future
years. There are three issues here:
1. BVPI 157 is defined as the percentage of permissible “types of interactions”
that
are in fact e-enabled, and a non-exhaustive list of 10 “types” is provided.
Because this is non-exhaustive, and because each “type” will include many
different interactions, it cannot provide a meaningful denominator for a
quantitative PI – the denominator must in our view be the number of distinct
interactions, not the number of “types”.
2. „Electronic‟ is defined to include “delivery by telephone if the transaction
carried out
is electronically enabled, i.e. the officer receiving the call can access
electronic
information and/or update records on-line there and then.” It seems logical
that this
should also apply to „unintegrated‟ web transactions, and we will assume this
to be
the case in our measurement.
3. For comparative purposes, it will be helpful if there is a standard national
„menu‟ of
transactions from which each authority can define its „100%‟ and against
which it can
measure progress. Our understanding is that the CUPID transactions list to be
published by the IDeA will provide such a standard.
2. Interactions available now and by April 2002
2.1 Already available on the web
Forms
All forms can be completed and sent electronically, unless stated that the
document is in
PDF format where it should be printed out, completed and sent manually
Arts Funding
Arts in the Neighbourhood Application Form PDF
Community and voluntary groups can apply for help in setting up
neighbourhood
Arts and community projects..
Main Programme Application Form PDF
Grant to help set up and maintain programmes of arts and cultural projects. If
you
think you are eligible and wish to apply for the grant print out this PDF
document
Carers Gateway
ACE Information request
ACE (Action for Carers into Employment)
Enquiries Form
Make an enquiry, request a Newsletter.
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Carers Emergency Card
Peace of mind for Kirklees carers.
Facilities Booking Form
For the meeting and training room at the Carers Gateway
Training Event Booking Form
To book a place on one of the training events.
Child Care
Childminder Information Evenings
Book a place on a Childminder Information Evening.
Online Request for Child Care
Make an online request for childcare.
Environmental Waste
Bulky Household
To request collection and disposal of bulky household waste.
Garden Waste
To request collection and disposal of garden waste.
Replacement Bins
To request a new dustbin.
Events
Submit Event Information
To submit information regarding an event in Kirklees.
Health and Social Care
KIE Enquiry Form
Kirklees Information Exchange enquiry form, request for registration
form and Connexions, the KIE newsletter
Transport
Highways Service Request
Problems or enquiries can be reported here.
Your Council
Complaints, Comments & Compliments
Make a complaint, comment or compliment about a Council service.
Mayor Invitation Form
If you would like to invite the Mayor to your local event.
Scrutiny Referral Form
Refer matters which you think should come under scrutiny to the Council.
Postal Voting
To vote by post PDF
Voter Registration PDF
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FAQ‟s
Building
Some of the most common questions about building alterations.
Childcare
Childminding, how to open a Creche, Playgroup, Playscheme, Out of School
Club or
Nursery
Complaints, comments & compliments
How to complain about, comment on or compliment a council service.
Getting in touch with Kirklees Council/ your Councillor
Council contact details, and a link to Councillor information on the website.
Housing
Adaptations, repairs, buying your rented home, nuisance, private sector.
Reporting road, pavement & streetlighting problems
How to report problems.
Student Awards
How to apply for a student award and student loan. Link to the DfEE site.
Twin Towns
Common questions about Kirklees twin towns and twinning activities.
Useful Web Links
A range of useful web sites listed under various categories.
Using PDFs
How to use Adobe PDF files.
2.2 Prioritised for Pathfinder
100% of forms on line for completion or download by May 2002, initial
priorities
for Housing forms and Environmental forms to match „Home‟ Contact Centre
priorities.
Services will supply FAQ‟s using the Tameside model.
The web search will be improved to provide advanced search and automatic
update when new content is published
Links to external sites will be enhanced
Links across the site will be enhanced
Continuing improvement to the amount of content available for customers
Move to on-line payments following evaluation of the pilot in Strategic
Finance
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APPENDIX 4 – CONTACT CENTRES
Objectives
 deliver a range of front line services and deal directly with a high
  To
proportion of
customer requests (aiming for 80%). This will release specialist time by
shifting
straightforward transactions to officers in the contact centre.
 ensure a high quality of service and reliability in transactions for
  To
customers.
 improve customers‟ perception of the Council.
  To
 use IT/telecoms systems which manage the phone lines, distribute
  To
phone traffic and
bring up basic information – addresses and history of relevant past contacts.
 set standards for handling of the various contacts to the centre (e.g. time
  To
to answer
phone calls, e-mails, fax etc).
 use IT and training to give staff access to the expertise and information
  To
to allow
accurate and complete responses to be made.
 allow immediate booking of services where a visit or longer interview is
  To
required.
 make outbound calls where this is necessary to answer a customer
  To
query or gain
information.
 monitor the range and content of transactions, to enable the organisation
  To
to learn
from them.
 play an integral role in the achievement of the Council‟s Customer
  To
Services
Strategy, alongside Kirklees Information Points, Front Line Service Points and
Web
Transactions.
 adopt a culture of providing customer service by a multi-skilled officer.
  To
 establish and operate efficient communication with services to ensure
  To
the customer
receives an excellent service.
 operate over extended days (8am until 8pm) and Saturday mornings
  To
(8am until 12
noon) and provide an out of hours emergency service provision.
 have flexible staffing arrangements which operate in accordance with
  To
volume of
calls to the contact centre.
 be located in one building which is situated on the wide area network, is
  To
near to
local transport links and near to car parking facilities for staff.
Overall Approach
The grouping of transactions into themes that reflect the public‟s needs
relating to service
functions. These are:
G:\Admin\AdmHor\Report\IEG - Final.doc 31
Home – Housing/Refuse Collection Service(s)/Switchboard
This is a significant development whereby Housing repair processes are being
re-engineered to meet the above objectives with clear front and back office
activities.
The current refuse collection activities operate as a basic contact centre,
processes are
being re-engineered. A new location is being developed with the Contact
Centre
opening in November 2001. Recruitment and training of staff is from July –
October
2001. The Council‟s Switchboard will be integrated into this Contact Centre in
November 2001.
 Finance – Council Tax/Benefits
The Revenue and Benefits Service has undergone a major review and
re-engineering of the processes, including the replacement of all its system. A
part of
this work has been the development of a call centre. This has been facilitated
and
supported by using a private sector partner. This development work will be
concluded
by September 2001, in April 2002 the Contact Centre will be located with the
Home
Contact Centre recognising the synergy in terms of meeting the public‟s
needs.
 Personal Services – Social Services/Education/Health
This contact centre is in the early stages of development with the concept of a
virtual
centre being developed using technology to facilitate the activity. A wider look
is to be
taken at this theme, particularly in terms of NHS Direct.
 Street Care – Highways/Street Cleaning/Grounds Maintenance
There is an established Contact Centre dealing with pot holes and street
lighting which
has been operating for some years. The further development of this Contact
Centre is
to include street cleaning and verges, overhanging trees, etc. by October
2001.
Initially, this will be in the form of a virtual Contact Centre recognising the
integration of
the front and back office. Further work will then be undertaken to provide
greater
definition between the front and back office operations.
Activities
 Standards – corporate standards are being developed across all areas of
contact
centre activity. These include:
Customer care.
Hand-off procedures and processes.
Levels of emergency cover.
Hours of opening.
 Procedures – recognising the complexity of the Council procedures and
processes are
being developed and documented. Consistency is being achieved through the
use of
scripting, technology and service level agreements.
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Staffing – an induction and training programme is in place for new contact
centre staff,
with a rolling programme of training to be introduced for existing staff. A
continuous
training programme is to be implemented, very much in the same way as
private sector
call centres.
 Location – where the major contact centre is being developed, 100 + seats,
the
location is specifically designed for contact centre operations, e.g. training
rooms, rest
areas, air conditioning etc. Initially, this is the Home/Finance centre. Virtual
contact
centres have smaller groups of staff, up to 20. Whilst air conditioning and
bespoke
training facilities are not required a great deal of care is being taken with
regard to the
working environment.
  Technology – there are corporate standards in place across the Authority
for
telephoning, desktop, data networks, Intranet, Internet and e-mail. These
systems are
robust, have sufficient capacity and acceptable levels of resilience. Support is
being
put in place to cover the extended opening hours and the various systems.
The
integration of line of business systems is in hand for the early contact centre
development, with an extended programme to be implemented. An area of
concern is
the level of resilience required as this could be a major investment.
Milestones
Social Home Street
Care
Finance
 External consultancy to explore options - 9/2000 9/2000 9/2000
 Agree concept of themed contact centre 9/2000 9/2000 9/2000 9/2000
 up initial location - - - 12/2000
   Set
 Introduce new telephone technology 4/2001 4/2001 4/2001 4/2001
 Analyse customer profile - 6/2001 6/2001 6/2001
 Confirm corporate standards 7/2001 7/2001 7/2001 7/2001
 Recruit staff - 7/2001 Current
Staff
Current
Staff
 Staff induction and training - 9/2001 ! !
 Hand off processes & standards 9/2001 9/2001 9/2001 9/2001
 Review front/back office processes - 9/2001 9/2001 9/2001
 Location completed - 10/2001 - 10/2001
 Commence operation in new location - 10/2001
to
01/2002
- 4/2002
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APPENDIX 5
STRATEGIC IT INITIATIVES as at 21 MAY 2001
MANAGED DATA NETWORK
Objectives Actions Targets
Milestones
Resource/
Management
Implications
Target
Lead
Officer
Progress Summary
Upgrade LAN Confirm & plan
buildings to be
upgraded.
Determine strategy for
Hubs & Switches.
Confirm plan – April 2001.
Implement May 2001 –
September 2001.
Confirmed strategy – March
2001.
Estimate £40K in budget.
Initially £10K for Kirkgate.
EW/SP
EW/SP
In hand.
Ongoing
Enhance
server
performance
Improved controls for
server access.
Monitoring of storage
on servers.
Improved methods of
off line data storage.
4-weekly monitoring of
server capacity.
Review server
strategy.
 Agreed protocols and named
persons – March/April 2001.
 Agreed protocols, role and
links.
 Options being explored –
May 2001 EW.
– Standards and methodology
confirmed.
– Agree terms of
reference/process – April
2001.
-
1.0 FTE within Desktop.
-
-
Estimated £20K.
EW
EW/LR
EW
EW
EW/EA
Implemented
Ongoing
Incorporated within server
review
Completed/commence
forecasting
To report to MDN review
meeting mid April, delayed
scope to be agreed in May
2001
Future
Strategies
Develop combined
strategy for
desktop/voice/data.
Agree terms of reference
and group – June 2001.
External consultant required. EA To be undertaken in June
2001.
G:\Admin\AdmHor\Report\IEG - Final.doc 34
Develop framework for
informing the forecast
of MDN growth.
Confirm April 2001
Undertake exercise
May/June 2001.
- EW/SP SP to produce schedule
TELECOM
Objectives Actions Targets
Milestones
Resource/
Management
Implications
Target
Lead
Officer
Progress Summary
Contract
Implementation
Live date 28 April
2001.
Sign contract 1 April 2001.
Number exchange 18 April –
1 May 2001.
Included within 01-02
budget.
EA Completed 18 May
Automated
Billing
Purchase server and
undertake integration
System ready by mid-May
2001
Estimated as £6,000 TS/MP On track, finance involved
tariff to be determined
Review SIP Review targets
against the
implementation and
confirm/revise.
Review end May 2001.
Report end June 2001.
- EA/RW Commence 1 June
due to implementation
delay
F.Net migration
to 110
Confirm business
case and milestones
for change.
End May 2001 – revised mid
June 2001
- Ericsson Commence 1 May
Fixed/Mobile
Integration
Develop strategy. 
                   End June 2001 – revised
end July 2001.
- Ericsson Commence Mid June
Future
Strategies
Develop combined
strategy for
desktop/voice/data.
Develop framework for
informing the forecast of
growth/savings
Agree terms of reference
and group – June 2001.
Confirm April 2001.
Undertaken exercise
May/June 2001.
External consultant
required.
-
EA
EW (as per
MDN)
To be undertaken in June
2001.
In hand
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PLATFORMS/OPERATIONS/LINE OF BUSINESS SYSTEMS
Objectives Actions Targets
Milestones
Resource/
Management
Implications
Target Lead
Officer
Progress Summary
Migration
from
Mainframe
Remove systems
from and minimise
the use of the
mainframe.
ARCAST – April 2002.
HBIS – Oct 01 to April 02.
Estimated additional cost
£100K
EA/GL Dependent on associated
projects.
Unix Contracts being
signed to facilitate
SIP.

 Contracts aligned 2002/3. - EA/GL On track.
NT Service
Support
Model
Being developed
with Education
(Foundation).
Framework with SLA
confirmed – April 2001.
- EA/LR On track.
System
Availability
Completed review
of strategies.
Awaiting
confirmation from
contact centre
project board of
requirements.
Determine options
and resource
implications.
December 2000.
End of March 2001.
End of April 2001.
-
-
To be determined.
LR/GL
CT
LR/GL
Extended service
availability 08.00 to 20.00.
Being considered.
Awaiting requirements.
Platform
Resilience/
Business
Continuity
Evaluate
Authority‟s
requirements.
Prepare scope – Mid May
2001.
Determine requirements –
Early June 2001.
Develop options – Sept
2001.
Consultant may be required. EA/NT/GL Future work.
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Objectives Actions Targets
Milestones
Resource/
Management
Implications
Target Lead
Officer
Progress Summary
B.V Review Confirm scoping
document.
Present to InTech Steering
Group – 30 March 2001.
Corporate „sign off‟ – End
April 2001.
 produced – November
  SIP
2001.
-
To be determined.
EA/GL
EA/GL
On track.
-
Line of
Business
Systems
FIRST
SDMS
Live date – June 2001.
Evaluate options incl. ASP –
May 2001.
To be determined. LR
On track.
In hand.
DESKTOP
Objectives Actions Targets
Milestones
Resource/
Management
Implications
Target Lead
Officer
Progress Summary
Develop SIP Set up an SIP group 
                                 Agree framework of
processes.
Agree roles
Agree service support model
and targets.
H.o.S Chair – RW
Member Chair of I&CSP
ITUG representatives
Support Services
representatives
CRU representative
Report to
Cabinet/A&BMB
May 2001 - LR
SIP group formed
Change Manager role
approved
Rented PC Scheme approved   Commenced 1 April 2001 Greater rigour in asset
management
LR Approved by EMG 19
March 2001
Remote
Management/
Control
Evaluate options 
                  Determined approach to be
pursued, agreed that control
as opposed to management
provides the optimum VFM.
Evaluation exercise cost
some £50K
LR (MS) To be used within the work
of the SIP group.
Future
Strategies
Develop combined
strategy for
desktop/voice/data
Agree terms of reference
and group – June 2001
External consultant
required
EA To be undertaken in June
2001.
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CORPORATE SYSTEMS
Objectives Actions Targets
Milestones
Resource/
Management
Implications
Target
Lead
Officer
Progress Summary
CRM Strategy Confirm
corporate plan.
Confirm
middleware
solution.
Confirm strategy/
project plan.
Plan to Technical Reference
Group – April 2001.
Feasibility and test – April
2001, now 2001 due to
Pathfinder Partnership
Match plan and proposal to
resources – April 2001/Jan
2002
-
-
Resource determines
limitations.
AB
TH (No. 6
Group)
CS/Technical
Reference
Group
On track
Report – June 2001
Ongoing
Housing
Contact Centre
Confirm options.
Determine
progression path.
Deliver initial
CRM/Telephony model –
July 2001.
Develop plan – April 2001.
Remain within Housing and
Corporate budget.
-
MW (Monday
Group)
On track, Sept 01, system
only, Nov 01 front ended
Upgrade
GroupWise
Access to
GroupWise via
the Internet.
Complete testing – April
2001.
Roll out – June 2001.
Not material as only
Members and homeworkers.
LR/JH On track.
Implement
Delphi
Continue with
project.
 implementation – Feb
  Full
2002.
Link to Mainframe migration. EA/NT On track.
Implementation
of Asset
Management –
Desktop
Continue with
project.
 be clarified. EPM NT On track
 To
G:\Admin\AdmHor\Report\IEG - Final.doc 38
APPENDIX 6
INFORMATION, CSS AND IT MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK
Group Chair(s) Members
(1) Cllr Paul Battye 5 members plus Chairs of (3) (4) (6) & Head of InTech
(2) Cllr Robert Light Members Plus RV, R&B, InTech, CRU
(3) Rob Vincent Representative HoS
(4) Caroline Taylor Representative HoS, plus practitioners
(5) Rob Vincent Representative HoS
(6) David Griffiths Practitioners
(7) Dick Hewitson Practitioners
(8) Caroline Taylor Practitioners
(9) Dave Harris Practitioners
(10) Jonathan Drake Practitioners
NB: Directors/HoS attending one or more of these groups include:
Rob Vincent - Link to EMG
Gavin Tonkin
Caroline Taylor
Jonathan Drake
David Griffiths
Tony Hood
Cliff Stewart
Tony Gerrard
Dick Hewitson
Dave Harris
CABINET
(5) ICT Client
Group
InTech
(1) I&CSP
(Members)
(2) A & B
Core Team
(3) Information and
IT Strategy Group
(4) CSS/CRM/Call
Centre Group
(6) Information
Management (7) E-Finance
(8) Web Development
(9) Knowledge
(10) Public Access
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APPENDIX 7
KIRKLEES METROPOLITAN COUNCIL
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY – RISK ASSESSMENT
ACTIVITY RISK KMC ASSESSMENT
 Corporate Information and IT
Strategies with associated strategies
for Services
NB District Audit should consider this
area
H Corporate IT Standards in place with
framework agreements.
Corporate Information Policy approved.
Framework     in place, eg: I&~CSP, IS/IT
Strategy Group
Issues - require integrated information
and IT Strategy
- range of initiatives
- lack of Service strategies
- directives on Services from
Central Government
 Role of IT in joined up government.
- Cross agency working,
- Links to central Government
M Social Services – Health in part.
Revs & Bens – Benefits Agency (one).
Intranet available to all PCs.
Robust, resilient network.
DofEE/LEA/Schools strategy.
Highways/Social Services/LEA download
from Intranet – Government.
IS/IT Strategy – IS/IT Steering Group.
Part of GIS National Steering Group.
 Does InTech ask Users what they
want and isten?
L All system replacements and
developments are led by Services; eg Care
First (SS), FIRST (Revs & Bens), Asset
Management (Property Services).
IT User Group and IT Client Group plus
Information & Customer Services Panel
determine direction, policy and strategy.
Users involved in BV Reviews.
Service Liaison Officers facilitate and
support.
Regular sample feedback questionnaires
following help desk jobs, results reported to
ITUG and ITCG.
Formal complaints procedure and
complaints monitoring.
 Client control over InTech. Ability to
get requirements met.
M All development work is done against
quotations.
Often development is a 3 or 4 way
arrangement with 3rd party suppliers.
Services do not have the appropriate level
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ACTIVITY RISK KMC ASSESSMENT
of Project Management or Relationship/
Contract Management skills.
General corporate and support areas are
as per „Does InTech ask Users‟ above.
 Management arrangements of InTech
and within the Service.
L Head of Service arrangements confirmed
to April 2001. Corporate Senior Manager
review in hand – emphasis on business
management and service delivery.
Service Management structure is flexible
(generic JDC).
Corporate framework is A&BMB, I&CSP,
IS/IT Steering Group, IT Client Group, IT
User Group and Service BV Steering
Group.
NB These groups provide a balance for
what is the most „pervasive‟ service
within the Council.
 Impact on Information Management
and Customer Services Strategy.
M Effective development of Data Protection
and Security Policies with link officers.
Information Managers‟ role being created.
IS/IT Steering Group with an Information
Management and IT Strategy action plan.
CSS Strategy integrated into IM&IT Action
Plan.
Information, CSS and IT within a single
Member Group, I&CSP.
 CRM L The investment in the CRM workshop
enabled the Council to quantify the risk.
The strategy in Phase I means there is
minimal risk in terms of technology.
The learning from the workshop and what
will come from Phase I will inform an
outcome based spec when a major
investment is made.
 rd party relationships, contract
   3
management.
NB District Audit should consider this
area.
M
M
CGE&Y structured approach to contract
monitoring, review and involved in BV –
Client Officer in place.
Ericsson similar approach.
Other providers where there is a mix of
clients within the Authority this is patchy,
see “Client control over InTech” above.
 Internet, Members, Public Access,
inappropriate use.
L Security configuration on e-mail, firewalls
on network with protocols and ability to
monitor usage provides a sound technical
G:\Admin\AdmHor\Report\IEG - Final.doc 41
ACTIVITY RISK KMC ASSESSMENT
H
solution, along with WebSense which
blocks sites.
E-mail guidelines and the Security Police
provide a basis for non-IT Management.
Work is in hand to come forward with a
corporate approach.
 Technical
- IT Strategy delivering corporate
strategy.
H The IT Corporate framework outlined
above is now taking effect combined with
Services producing IS/IT strategies. An
incremental approach is taken to any
significant investments.
Choices of IT solutions are taken following
discussions with a range of partners, eg
Bull, CGE&Y. Then with evaluation and
tendering exercises. Remote
Management v Remote Control/Support
within the Desktop BV exercise.
- Architecture.
- Business Resilience, includes
disaster recovery, resilience from
damage/equipment failure and
virus.
M
L
M
M
MDN, MVN and MDS (Managed Desktop
Service) along with Unix, NT and Novell
provide this element. This supports the
Council‟s policy to buy in applications/
systems and packages as opposed to an
in-house facility.
A major review of converging Data, voice
and Desktop incorporating servers will
commence in 2001 for implementation by
2005.
MDN and MVN – built in resilience.
Servers, the nature of Corporate Servers
provides economy and operating efficiency
but requires improved management action
plan in hand. McAfee TVD installed on all
PCs and servers.
Platforms    – Unix whilst boxes are mirrored
the inherent capacity will only enable a
level of service continuity. The
development of the CSS, ie KIPs, Call
centres, extended hours and Web
Services, means this reduced capacity will
disrupt services to the public. Review in
2001.
G:\Admin\AdmHor\Report\IEG - Final.doc 42
ACTIVITY RISK KMC ASSESSMENT
- Change Management, purchases,
disposals, moves, locations and
amendments to hardware and
software.
- Asset Management.
Configuration Management, the
management of software,
applications and „policies‟.
Performance Management/ cost
comparison
M
M
M
H
M
H
H
M
Desktop – A revised approach including,
revised approach including remote control
and 4-hour service continuity standard will
improve current performance.
InTech only – a change management
system is being introduced linked to the
Service Desk System (Red Box).
InTech/Service shared activities – to be
considered by IT Framework Groups.
All aspects of the Council‟s IT – this
requires a corporate debate.
Hardware – plan has been agreed to
undertake an Audit to confirm the current
register. This will be following the
introduction of Change Management.
Audit will be undertaken every 12/18
months.
Software – the above audit and Change
Management will go some way to
managing the risk of litigation on licence
issues, misuse of equipment and
corruption of files. However, to achieve nil
risk will require Configuration
Management.
To achieve nil risk will require a series of
standards, lock down of PCs to these
standards with remote management as
opposed to remote control/support.
Requires a corporate debate, the
investment required is some £1m because
of the complexity of Services.
Some management of risk will be achieved
through Change and Asset Management.
InTech operates as a trading organisation.
Members have agreed Service Plan PIs
Work is being undertaken to benchmark
and be members of club(s)
G:\Admin\AdmHor\Report\IEG - Final.doc 43
APPENDIX 8 – OVERALL IEG RISK ASSESSMENT
RISK IMPACT PROBABILITY MITIGATION STRATEGIES
1. Failure to meet customer
expectations of improved service
High Low   Balanced approach across all channels.
Balance between breadth of transactions on offer and
depth of back-office integration.
Focus on customer service priorities rather than specific
PIs (eg BVPI157) per se.
Realistic resourcing and project management strategies
2. Failure to meet national PIs. Medium Medium    Give specific attention to
PIs but without losing sight of
balances outlined above.
3. Failure to develop effective
partnerships
Medium Low    Embed e-government within mainstream Local Strategic
Partnership and Community Strategy.
Develop specific partnership projects around life events,
e.g. with Health sector (but N.B. NHS restructuring).
Continue to research and, as appropriate, adopt private
sector opportunities.
4. Failure to achieve socially inclusive
access to services
High Medium    Maintain and develop range of channels (eg digital TV,
community access PC's)
Develop effective community strategies for ICT skills
development.
Explore broader customer service role of specialist staff
undertaking home visits, supported by mobile
technology.
5. Open new channels without
closing old ones, increasing cost
base.
High Low  Incentivise cheaper 'new' channels (eg e-payment)
Rationalise 'old' channels (eg FLSPs)
Share infrastructure with partners.
6. Inadequate resources to support
strategy.
High Low  Adequate attention within mainstream revenue and
capital budget processes.
Vigorous pursuit of additional funding opportunities (eg
ISB, Pathfinder)
G:\Admin\AdmHor\Report\IEG - Final.doc 44
Press for realistic Government approaches to phasing
and sustainability.
7. Inadequate technical
infrastructure.
High Low   Continued development of robust
partnerships/contracts, to balance internal and external
expertise.
Exploration of cross-boundary arrangements.
8. Incoherent management of
information.
Medium Low    Compliance with national and local corporate standards.
Adequate attention through corporate IM Team and
Service IM Link Officers.
9. Lack of consistent senior Member
and management attention.
High Low   Deputy Chief Executive and Cabinet Member as local
'e-champions'.
Dedicated Member Panel to address the issues.
Robust structure of strategy groups and project teams.
10. Inadequate management of
individual projects.
Medium Medium      Strengthen internal project management disciplines and
resourcing.
Recruit/buy-in external expertise as required.
11. Inadequate skills within the
workforce.
High Low   Robust corporate and Service training and development
strategies
Roll-out of new corporate performance management
framework.
12. Lack of appropriate change in
organisational culture.
High Medium    Embedding of new performance management
framework and core competences, including those
reflecting customer focus, continuous improvement and
improved teamwork.
Effective employee communications
Careful attention to conditions of employment and IR
issues.

				
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